Gun Nuts Visited Murder City This Weekend

Louisville Metro Police are investigating a double homicide in the 4000 block of River Park Drive, near South 40th Street. [WDRB]

It’s a prime example of infill – using land in already developed areas for new homes. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! And not far away from the Expo Center, dozens gathered to pray for victims of gun violence. [WHAS11]

Donald Trump brought his brand of feel-good fascism back to Louisville to receive an endorsement from National Rifle Association leaders and to speak to its national convention. [Tom Eblen]

Police were called to the scene of a shooting near Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

Exaggerator took advantage of sloppy conditions and a “dream trip” to win the 141st running of the Preakness Stakes by 3-1/2 lengths in Baltimore on Saturday, ending Kentucky Derby winner Nyquist’s bid for the Triple Crown. And two horses died because of course they did. [HuffPo]

Many people gathered around the city Saturday at different events promoting unity and safety. [WAVE3]

A new study by the Pew Research Center spurred a rash of headlines last week about “the dying middle class.” But the word “dying” might be more appropriate if we were watching the regrettable-but-inevitable effects of natural forces at work. We’re not. We’re seeing the fruits of deliberate action – and sometimes of deliberate inaction – at the highest levels of power. The great American middle was never large enough, even at its height. It always excluded too many people – sometimes, shamefully, merely for their skin color. And now, instead of growing and becoming more inclusive, it’s fading away instead. [Bill Moyers]

Exaggerator has taken home the second gem in horse racing’s triple crown. The colt won a mud-filled Preakness Stakes on Saturday, handing rival Nyquist the first loss of his career and effectively ending his shot at a triple crown. [WFPL]

A powerful array of the Republican Party’s largest financial backers remains deeply resistant to Donald J. Trump’s presidential candidacy, forming a wall of opposition that could make it exceedingly difficult for him to meet his goal of raising $1 billion before the November election. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville is expanding its Enterprise CarShare program to downtown, offering the service for the public at its Health Sciences center. [Business First]

The Floyd County Commissioners voted 3-0 to fund LifeSpring Health System and Rauch, Inc. from the tax levy instead of the general fund. But minutes after taking that vote Tuesday, they reversed it, voting 2-1 to keep the two out of the levy. [News & Tribune]

Let’s Lock All The Youth Up Or Something

If you missed it earlier this week, kids these days are horrible. [WDRB]

A judge has upheld Gov. Matt Bevin’s right to cut higher education in the current budget year, ruling that under Kentucky law the governor has the authority to reduce spending within state government. Wingate’s order rejects arguments in the high-profile lawsuit filed April 11 by Attorney General Andy Beshear. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Are y’all goin over to the shootin festival? [WHAS11]

Only about 20 percent of Kentucky’s 3.2. million registered voters made it to the polls for Tuesday’s primary election. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Guess what most gay people don’t give a flip about, Fairness Campaign: hate-filled, backward religious organizations. Maybe you should keep your money – donated mostly by gay people – out of church nonsense. [WLKY]

The House passed a massive National Defense Authorization Act late Wednesday, and tucked inside of it, a provision that would allow federal contractors to fire employees for being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. [HuffPo]

Wednesday marked 10 years since Earon Harper was murder and 10 years since her daughter 2-year-old Erica Hughes was shot multiple times in the head and rushed to the hospital. [WAVE3]

The overdose death toll from opioids, both prescription drugs and heroin, has almost quadrupled since 1999. In 2014 alone, 28,000 people died of opioid overdoses, more than half from prescription drugs. [ProPublica]

This sort of thing is a big deal for food deserts. [WFPL]

On Friday afternoon, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a new rule regarding the implementation of nondiscrimination protections under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It guarantees that transgender people cannot be denied health care by professionals that receive federal funding, and also that it is discriminatory to refuse them access to transition-related services. [ThinkProgress]

The lowest-paid employee at 21st Century Parks Inc. earns just $1 per year. But “he may double his wage after this,” CEO Dan Jones said at the Louisville nonprofit’s fundraiser kickoff luncheon Monday, benefiting The Parklands of Floyds Fork. [Business First]

Indiana Department of Transportation officials met with contractor representatives and New Albany city engineer Larry Summers at Seymour District offices last week to launch a $811,000 Local Public Agency (LPA) project that will make improvements at the Spring Street/Silver Street intersection this summer. [News & Tribune]

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At Least There’s Good Bourbon News

Check out the spin/excuses from Jack Conway’s former spokesperson. A meeting held Wednesday was supposed to address the JCPS code of conduct. However, JCPS and the Metro Public Safety Committee saw the clock run out on a conversation many are waiting to have. [WDRB]

Louisville’s Coalition for the Homeless announced Monday that the overall number of homeless people in the city has dropped for the third year in a row — but those numbers don’t change local agencies’ disappointment in the federal government’s decision to cut their funds by 11 percent this year. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky bourbon production hit a nearly 50-year high last year. [WHAS11]

The Republican leader in the Senate says most candidates for president have released their tax documents as presumptive GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump insists he’ll wait until after an IRS audit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Ten years ago a 2-year-old Louisville girl was shot multiple times and her mother was killed. [WLKY]

More than 7 million previously uninsured Americans gained health coverage in 2015, the second full year of the Obamacare coverage expansion, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

While JCPS tries to provide social and emotional support for students in the form of Student Response Teams, Positive Behavior Coaches and other resources, Metro Council members voiced their concern that it is not enough. [WAVE3]

Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump said it would take another 9/11 to wake up border security — and predicted refugees would plan the next attack. [The Hill]

Faculty and staff within the Jefferson County Public Schools system continue to call out district administration for potential changes to teacher salary structure and the student code of conduct. [WFPL]

Interviews with dozens of women who have worked for Donald Trump or interacted with him socially reveal a pattern of often unsettling personal behavior by the Republican presidential candidate, The New York Times reported on Saturday. [Reuters]

Kroger isn’t just in the beginning stages of grocery delivery, it’s been testing refining things in Lexington and other markets so it can be rolled out ASAP. [Business First]

Anesthesiologist Jaime Guerrero, who had a practice in Jeffersonville, was sentenced to 100 months in prison Thursday by United States District Judge Greg N. Stevens, and according to the terms of a prior plea agreement, agreed to forfeit his license to practice medicine and real property owned by Guerrero Real Estate Investments, LLC. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Drama Must Just Be Never-Ending

Approximately $1.7 million is being cut by Jefferson County Public Schools by eliminating 25 central office positions, according to new information obtained through an open records request. [WDRB]

Former Metro Council President David Tandy has been hired by one of Louisville’s oldest and largest law firms as an attorney and lobbyist who will be tasked with finding opportunities for emerging minority and women-owned companies. [C-J/AKN]

From Safari and TeensConnect camps at the Louisville Zoo, to Summer Reading and the annual Cultural Pass, Louisville is offering dozens of programs designed to keep students’ minds and bodies active during the summer break, Mayor Greg Fischer announced. [WHAS11]

The drugmaker Purdue Pharma launched OxyContin two decades ago with a bold marketing claim: One dose relieves pain for 12 hours, more than twice as long as generic medications. [H-L]

Another day, another shooting or two. Police are investigating two shootings blocks apart in the Parkland neighborhood. [WLKY]

Two Boston brothers accused of urinating on and beating a homeless Mexican man and telling police “Donald Trump was right: All these illegals need to be deported,” were sentenced to prison on Monday, prosecutors said. [HuffPo]

A same-sex couple is accusing the Archdiocese of Louisville of discriminating against them after Catholic Cemeteries denied the design for their joint tombstone. [WAVE3]

Data released Friday by the Major Cities Chiefs Police Association, based on reports from more than 60 cities, showed notable increases in murders in about two dozen cities in the first three months of the year compared to last year and a 9 percent increase nationwide. [NY Times]

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin says the commonwealth has a lot in its favor when it comes to attracting manufacturers. [WFPL]

From the time we began reporting on the archive provided to us in Hong Kong by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, we sought to fulfill his two principal requests for how the materials should be handled: that they be released in conjunction with careful reporting that puts the documents in context and makes them digestible to the public, and that the welfare and reputations of innocent people be safeguarded. As time has gone on, The Intercept has sought out new ways to get documents from the archive into the hands of the public, consistent with the public interest as originally conceived. [The Intercept]

They’re people with advanced degrees who hail from all over the world, and they are relocating to Louisville. [Business First]

Floyd County finances improved by $878,000 Tuesday night. But what happens to that money was the main topic of discussion at the monthly Floyd County Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Everything Is Getting Shot Or Burned Lately

Surprise! Another shooting in Compassionate City. Police are investigating after one person was shot to death in the Portland neighborhood Monday afternoon. [WDRB]

It symbolizes how cavalier we were in 20th century America – a hole dug next to a drinking water source where businesses sent hazardous waste to be buried out of sight and out of mind. [C-J/AKN]

If you take a look at just about any local media site, it’s a gross mess of blood, gore, fire and love of police. [WHAS11]

Central Kentucky is being scouted for locations for a movie based on the true story of FBI agent Mark Putnam, who confessed to killing a pregnant informant with whom he had been having an affair. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s like Portland is turning into an absolute wasteland lately. [WLKY]

This is one of the most disgusting things you’re going to read this week. Or any week. There’s likely no way you’ve missed the story, but just in case you did… [HuffPo]

See? It’s a wasteland of gunshots and fires. At least, that’s how local media portrays the neighborhood. [WAVE3]

A U.S. Senate committee has approved legislation that would require American women to register for the military draft, setting the stage for a fight in Congress over the historic shift in policy later this year. [Reuters]

This is super-boring but it’s important and you should probably pay attention. [WFPL]

A group of researchers at Harvard Medical School has found that medical industry payments to physicians in Massachusetts are associated with higher rates of prescribing brand-name drugs that treat high cholesterol. [ProPublica]

Are peanuts worth the trouble for Louisville-based steakhouse chain Texas Roadhouse Inc.? [Business First]

Cone Zone? Don’t think that means what they think it means. [News & Tribune]

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