Rep. John Yarmuth On The CIA Torture Report

While Mitch McConnell faps to torture, here’s what John Yarmuth had to say:

“There is not much in the Senate Intelligence Committee report that people didn’t already know or suspect, but it is important that we send a message to the world that we will hold ourselves to the highest possible standards of conduct, particularly to international legal standards that we worked to establish in the first place. The bottom line is that CIA officers and contractors went way too far in the interrogations, these torture methods resulted in little, if any, useful intelligence, and the people in charge intentionally misled the White House, Congress, and the American people about both. We are better than this – America doesn’t condone torture or hide from the truth.”

Maybe the only Kentuckian in Warshington with sense at the moment.

Maybe The CWF Could’ve Informed Everybody

The Center for Women and Families is falling well short of its goal to collect $30,000 in gift cards for the holiday season, according to a news release. [WDRB]

Is this the beginning of Zipcar taking over Louisville? Cross your fingers. [C-J/AKN]

Ready to be terrified? Hundreds of elves flooded the Galt House Tuesday morning–trying to break a world record. [WHAS11]

One of the arguments often made against government involvement in health care is that it impedes the action of the marketplace which, if left unfettered, could solve all our problems. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. [WLKY]

The United Nations children’s agency UNICEF declared 2014 a devastating year for children on Monday with as many as 15 million caught in conflicts in Central African Republic, Iraq, South Sudan, Syria, Ukraine and the Palestinian territories. [HuffPo]

Charlestown Mayor Bob Hall’s controversial proposal to tear down hundreds of homes in favor of a large development failed to win city council approval Monday. [WAVE3]

The GOP is refocusing its attention on the courts as it searches for any way to weaken President Obama’s signature healthcare law while he continues to wield a veto pen. [The Hill]

Indiana state Sen. Michael Crider wants federal investigators to provide the public with an update on its investigation of a troubled exotic animal refuge in Charlestown, Ind. [WFPL]

Last week we got an actually good employment report — arguably the first truly good report in a long time. The U.S. economy added well over 300,000 jobs; wages, which have been stagnant for far too long, picked up a bit. [NY Times]

Rain and cooler weather over the summer has led to a bountiful, healthy crop of Christmas trees in Indiana, and that has the state’s tree farmers celebrating. [Business First]

For the second time in just more than two years, the city has taken legal action against a New Albany dump truck business. [News & Tribune]

Housing Continues To Be An Afterthought Here

In November 2013, Mayor Greg Fischer formally declared Louisville’s interest in getting the same type of blazing-fast Internet connections that Google is bringing to a few select cities. More than a year later, two companies have expressed interest in bringing a fiber “gigabit” network to Louisville, but no work has begun. [WDRB]

Jefferson County has less public housing assistance than a year ago, long waiting lists and public housing remains heavily concentrated in west Louisville, according to the 2014 State of Metropolitan Housing Report released Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

The WHAS Crusade for Children is able to continue its noble mission of raising money for agencies, schools and hospitals to better the lives of special needs children, thanks to generous donations to the Crusade for Children Endowment fund. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Equine Education Project announced Friday that on Tuesday the board voted unanimously on a resolution stating that for the 2015 session it will not support casino legislation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Hundreds gathered at the Highland Baptist Church to remember the dozens killed this year here in Louisville. [WLKY]

An outgoing Senate Democrat wants to take federal money from low-income college students to pay student loan contractors, whose tactics toward borrowers have been criticized by consumer advocates, federal regulators and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. [HuffPo]

One week after a teenage girl was killed in Louisville’s West End, a new group is calling for residents to stop the violence and take back their communities. [WAVE3]

Ferguson, Mo., has captured the nation’s attention for the better part of the past four months. But in just a few short days in the national news, Eric Garner has become the political rallying point that Ferguson never has. A new poll shows considerably more unhappiness with the lack of an indictment in Garner’s case than in the one in Ferguson. And, perhaps most important as far as its impact goes, that unhappiness is significantly less connected to a person’s race. [WaPo]

Did anyone expect something less from one of the highest paid people in education? Please. Save the feigned outrage. As Michael McCall winds down his 16-year career as president of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, he will leave behind an operation that ran a budget deficit in his final three years. [WFPL]

Kentuckians have long known that Rand Paul’s outreach in the black community only started because he wants to run for the presidency. [Politico]

More than six months after construction started, Feast BBQ’s second location finally has an opening date. [Business First]

he Clark County Commissioners didn’t take any action on an ordinance that would add a $40 drainage fee to some residents’ property tax bills Thursday, but they heard about how unhappy some residents were about the new fee anyway. [News & Tribune]

Will The Zoo Hold Secret Interviews Again?

You bet your ass it will. And probably at Debbie King’s office — just like last time.

The Zoo is yet again looking for a Development Director.

Since it’s allegedly about half way to its $10 million project goal, all the low-hanging fruit has been picked. Which means it’ll take someone with serious skill and likely a family background (you know that’s how it works in Louisville) in money to finish.

We hear Walczak has already set his sights on an insider — the current coordinator already making bank and isn’t liked too well by the board.

And a certain Frazier is in the running?

So you know what that means. Fun, secret meetings.

We’ll get calls asking us to keep things hush-hush in 3, 2…

White Flighters Panicked Over Peaceful Protest

FFS, it’s not bourbon if it’s made in Indiana. [WDRB]

In responding to his most recent performance review, Metropolitan Sewer District executive director Greg Heitzman objected to the middle rating that his board gave him, an evaluation that was colored by a bitter union dispute. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police are helping make the holidays brighter for senior citizens in the community. [WHAS11]

Seems like only yesterday Steve Beshear and Jack Conway were pushing this as the second-coming. Like most economic developments Beshear touts, here’s yet another failure. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s a look at panicked white flighters freaking out about a peaceful protest. If only more people had the guts Amy Rock has. [WLKY]

Isn’t it fascinating to see a bunch of fat white people freaking out about a scary black guy protesting? Because it’s obviously the best thing to do — to prosecute a protestor instead of bothering to do anything about the slaughter of poor brown people at the hands of wealthy white communities. Almost as fascinating to watch the Louisville Metro Police threaten to arrest peaceful protestors this weekend in a super-white neighborhood because some sheltered kids were scared. [HuffPo]

Six Fern Creek Traditional High School students were taken to the hospital after drinking water tainted with prescription medication. [WAVE3]

Adam Edelen is still in a pissing contest with Bobbie Coleslaw for her shady spending. [External PDF Link]

Amid national attention to police tactics across the U.S., Louisville officials are making an attempt to open up a dialogue between local police and the community. [WFPL]

Charter schools are often promoted as a tool to address educational inequities, but a potential precedent-setting legal case launched this week says the opposite. In filings with the U.S. Department of Education, two Delaware nonprofit groups allege that some of the state’s publicly funded, privately managed schools are actively resegregating the education system — and in a way that violates federal civil rights law. [David Sirota]

For nearly a decade, Maria Hampton has been the face of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in Louisville [Business First]

The lawsuit that Jeffersonville residents filed against MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. has been dropped, but a judge’s ruling Thursday and a new lawsuit against the city mean the fight is far from over. [News & Tribune]