Attica Scott Really Is Spending Every Last Cent

Look, we love Brightside. Who doesn’t? This city owes the organization a lot.

What we don’t love is when people like Attica Scott hold poorly planned clean-up and beautification events and don’t announce then until a couple days beforehand:


Who on earth is able to get out there from 11:00 to 3:00 on a Friday?

What’s worse, sadly, comes from the press release:

“Once again, our goal is to bring beauty and nature back to our neighborhoods,” says Scott. “We have seen the effort to restore trees to many areas of the district, now we want to remind drivers and walkers that we can turn an ordinary spot into something of beauty that will help the environment.”

Brightside will coordinate the plantings which will take place from 12:00pm to 2:00pm. Volunteers should simply meet at the location.

Councilwoman Scott has funded $10,000 for the project and the median will get a new natural, greener look as volunteers plant the following: knockout roses, monkey grass, sedum, coneflowers, shrubs and perennials.

$10,000 for the project! For a traffic median!

In a district that’s filled with hungry kids, people who can’t find jobs, organizations that are suffering because Attica has refused to work with them.

On the bright side (pun intended), at least those $10,000 aren’t going to build another community garden on a site that’s potentially contaminated and unsuitable for growing food. And at least it’s not going to pay for movies at the amphitheater just because her buddy, Mike, runs the project for Metro Parks.


WDRB Spreading Race-Baiting Hype. Again.

A Northern Kentucky city sued the Kentucky Retirement Systems Monday over what it described as “illegal and imprudent investments” involving hundreds of millions of dollars in public pension money. In its lawsuit, filed in Kenton Circuit Court, the city of Fort Wright said KRS violates the law with risky investments in hedge funds, venture capital funds, private equity funds, leveraged buyout funds and other “alternative investments” that have produced small returns and excessive management fees, possibly in excess of $50 million over the last five years. [John Cheves]

John David Dyche loves race-baiting. And ignorant — because that’s what he is, purposefully ignorant — keeping schools racially integrated improving education. He apparently hasn’t read any of the big stories from the past several weeks on race, education and the south. At least he cares enough to try to talk about some of these things and that’s more than we can say for 99% of people. [WDRB]

The Louisville area is the 17th-deadliest metropolitan area for pedestrians, according to a new study from the National Complete Streets Coalition, a Washington D.C.-based organization that examined fatal wreck data in the country’s 51 largest metro areas. [C-J/AKN]

This is apparently the most important thing happening in Louisville. Have you heard about the social media phenomenon called hidden cash? [WHAS11]

Over the years, under both Republican and Democratic administrations, we’ve made progress in protecting our air and water from harmful mercury, arsenic, soot and other types of pollutants. Every time we’ve done it, people have claimed the economic costs weren’t worth the health and environmental benefits. They’ve been wrong every time because the higher standards sparked innovations in new technologies and ways of doing business that increased growth and created jobs. [Bill Clinton]

Five men have filed a lawsuit against the operators of Fourth Street Live, alleging they were denied entry because of their race. This Cordish nonsense needs to end. [WLKY]

Locals can definitely relate to this. Viewers aren’t the only ones disappointed with local news these days. [HuffPo]

Kentucky business groups said Monday that a federal proposal to reduce carbon emissions at power plants would lead to higher utility bills and scare companies from the state. But that’s only one slanted part of the story. [WAVE3]

Will these Louisville and Lexington leaders also bring back tips for corrupt administrations? Because Charlotte’s mayor is in a heap of legal trouble. [Business First]

Or maybe they’ll learn how to write and push bills to charge police officers and fire fighters for disclosing fracking checmicals. [Mother Jones]

Local arts organizations that receive funding through the Kentucky Arts Partnership grants could see significant cuts in support for the next fiscal year. [WFPL]

The University of Kentucky has received a $1.9 million grant to graduate more students in the STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. [H-L]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Jeffersonville attorney Brad Jacobs has entered the race for Clark County Circuit County No. 2 judge. [News & Tribune]

Attica Scott Got Publicly Schooled By The PSC

Another reason Attica Scott lost:


She almost never has any idea how the most basic parts of the government she’s a part of function. And the Public Service Commission had to publicly school her.

Why beat this dead horse? Because Scott and her legislative aid still refuse to work with people in her district, refuse to answer questions and are apparently just focusing on spending every last cent of her discretionary funds. As if wasting money building a community garden on a toxic site and taking money from her district for a free movie night in another district miles and miles away weren’t enough.

Cordish Nightmare Continues With More Discrimination, No Consequences From Metro Government, No Leadership, No Nothing

Five black men have filed a lawsuit against the Cordish Company, which owns and operates 4th Street Live, claiming they were denied entrance to the premises because of their race. This is the millionth incidence of racial profiling at 4th St but the city continues to give hundreds of millions of dollars to Cordish. That shows what people like Jerry Abramson and Greg Fischer really think about Louisvillians. [WDRB]

Jeffersonville police say they’ve been “stretched thin” trying to provide around-the-clock coverage in the 34-square-mile city since thousands of walkers, runners and cyclists have crossed the Big Four ramp into downtown since it opened. [C-J/AKN

Horrible Jeffersonville mayor Mike Moore says he wants to hire more police officers. [WHAS11]

Heroin was once the scourge of the urban poor, but today the typical user is a young, white suburbanite, a study finds. And the path to addiction usually starts with prescription painkillers. [NPR]

The city of Jeffersonville is getting a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to help clean up some old industrial sites. [WLKY]

Most people could be more bored to tears about the latest EPA regulation announcement. Because they’re comfortable paying a few extra bucks a month in order to not die. [CN|2]

A family came together on Saturday to remember a loved one 10 years after her murder. Angela Nelson-Carroll’s body was found off the Gene Snyder Freeway near Dixie Highway in 2004. The 17-year-old died of blunt force trauma to the head. [WAVE3]

Just in case you missed the latest on Democratic sex scandals in Frankfort? You’ll want to check our latest videos out. [Page One Here & Here]

Jefferson County Public Schools’ budget is its largest ever, and some school board members argue that the process for reaching future spending plans must be improved. [WFPL]

Pay for fast-food workers is a hot topic nowadays, particularly in the battle over the minimum wage limit. Here’s John Schnatter defending Papa John’s pay practices. [Business First]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

A $400,000 federal grant from the Environmental Protection Agency will allow Jeffersonville to make some of its otherwise unusable properties attractive to developers and businesses. [News & Tribune]

Even New Albany Takes Unwanted Pets Seriously

New Albany Police Chief Todd Bailey has asked the Indiana State Police to investigate the New Albany Police Department. [WDRB]

A Metro Council committee last Tuesday tabled an effort to stop allowing new transitional housing and halfway shelters in certain west Louisville neighborhoods while members decide how to address neighborhood concerns about a proliferation of single-family homes with several unrelated residents. [C-J/AKN]

We’ve been reluctant to mention Chris Thieneman’s latest arrest because he’s such a hot mess. But it really puts the icing on the cake. [WHAS11]

Steve Beshear has chosen a former Louisville assistant police chief to lead the state’s troubled Emergency Management division. Michael Dossett will take over the state’s disaster response planning on Monday. [H-L]

The U.S. is in the midst of what Housing Secretary Shaun Donovan calls the “worst rental affordability crisis” ever. Poor families are being hit the hardest: an overwhelming majority spend more than half of their incomes on rent. [NPR]

Sign up and show up — one mayor’s new volunteer program is as simple as that. On Saturday about a dozen volunteers with the City Services Network were on hand in New Albany helping to spruce up a new building donated to the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter. [WLKY]

Ford Motor Co (F.N) said on Thursday it is recalling a total of 1.39 million SUVs and sedans in North America, most for the possible loss of power steering. [Reuters]

While the new Highlands-Old Louisville corridor is the talk of the town among area bikers, some worried drivers had yet to take note. From turning into them, to simply driving down them, throughout Louisville many new bike lanes are getting unwanted traffic. [WAVE3]

The world’s largest no-kill cat sanctuary has saved more than 20,000 feline friends. Unlike No-Kill Louisville, which has saved next to no animals. [HuffPo]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s 2014-15 budget proposal has $63.7 million slated for capital spending, a 60 percent increase compared to last year. But some Metro Council members are crying foul over the lack of funding for needed projects in the city’s East End, which has experienced the greatest population growth in recent years. [WFPL]

A national organization is contemplating including Louisville in research that could help developers, building preservation leaders and metro government figure out the best places to invest economic development dollars. [Business First]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Several entities partnered to fund the construction of a heavy haul corridor from the River Ridge Commerce Center to the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville, but now the city of Jeffersonville’s involvement is in doubt. [News & Tribune]