About Having Compassion For The Homeless…

The Jefferson County Board of Education is being asked by its teachers union to hold off extending the contract of Superintendent Donna Hargens to allow time for “stakeholder involvement.” [WDRB]

The animal-rights group PETA is continuing its push for federal regulators to take action against Tim Stark, a Charlestown man who has run the nonprofit organization Wildlife in Need on his property since 1999. [C-J/AKN]

Cracked and dripping ceilings – buckets litter every room. This is how Patrick Christner and Megan Tate have been spending their week post President’s Day snowstorm. [WHAS11]

Last fall, Pike County school board chairman Charles Johnson made a motion for the district to set what’s known as a “compensating” tax rate, which means property taxes would be adjusted to produce the same revenue as the year before. [H-L]

The parents of a toddler who was accidentally killed hope to build a community park in his honor. [WLKY]

The World Food Program is confronting its worst challenge since World War II in trying to tackle five top-level humanitarian crises at the same time, the head of the U.N. agency said Friday. [HuffPo]

A group of firefighters is hoping to spark a movement and inspire warm acts of kindness in the recent cold temperatures. [WAVE3]

When the season’s first cold snap hit in November, Kenneth Winfield arrived at Louisville’s St. John Center for Homeless Men — his hands icy cold after sleeping outdoors. [USA Today]

All eyes are on Kentucky’s state senators to see if they’ll move on the House’s proposed statewide smoking ban. [WFPL]

It was a short week for the Kentucky General Assembly, which canceled three days of meetings because of a severe winter storm. But while the House decided to forgo its scheduled Thursday and Friday meetings, the Senate was in session those two days. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Kentucky Retail Federation, Kentucky Restaurant Association and Louisville-based company Packaging Unlimited have filed a lawsuit that seeks to prevent Louisville from hiking its minimum wage. [Business First]

After weeks of debate and discussion, the Floyd County Election Board got exactly what it wanted. [News & Tribune]

Please Have Patience…

We’re moving to a new server this weekend.

If you have difficulty accessing the site, that’s why.

Please have patience while our nerd people do all the good nerd things. You’ll be rewarded. (For real. We’re giving away a couple cool books this week.)

A Fun Blind Item For Your Snow Blind Friday

GUESS WHO:

  • She allows her cabinet to spread rumors about the sexual orientation of her employees
  • She’s hired three (3!) hot messes/communications directors in less than four years
  • She told her employees their pay was being frozen on a Friday at 4:00 P.M.
  • She puts things on meeting agendas and then tries to remove them after facing heat
  • She promised her employees that a monster of an audit wasn’t about salaries… but it obviously was
  • She has her ombudsman handle HR matters so there are zero checks and balances when it comes to who she hires
  • She’s knee-deep in the collusion game with a wealthy board member
  • She’s being rewarded with four more years

Do you know who she is?

Because the EPSB certainly does.

Cough.

Suck At Your Job? Get Rewarded At JCPS

The Jefferson County Board of Education is looking to extend Superintendent Donna Hargens’ contract by four years. Louisville’s wealthy electeds always reward those who bumble along. [WDRB]

A jury has awarded nearly $5 million to a courier for a Louisville law firm who suffered a traumatic brain injury when he was hit by a TARC bus. [C-J/AKN]

There was no woe on Louisville’s amazing Walnut Street in the 1950’s and early 60’s. [WHAS11]

Ann Parrish remembers trying to wrangle and bundle her two toddlers during last winter’s cold snap so they could get on a bus to find another place to stay. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian hit by a vehicle in Possibility City. [WLKY]

James Risen reiterated on Tuesday a warning about the White House that he delivered nearly one year ago. [HuffPo]

From digging out driveways to checking on area seniors Good Samaritans have been out and about performing good deeds despite the cold. [WAVE3]

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week, offering fresh evidence that the labor market was gathering steam. [Reuters]

It was about noon on Wednesday and Kenneth Williams hadn’t eaten breakfast. In fact, he hasn’t eaten since Tuesday afternoon–a peanut butter sandwich. [WFPL]

Google is warning that the government’s quiet plan to expand the FBI’s authority to remotely access computer files amounts to a “monumental” constitutional concern. [National Journal]

A Missouri real-estate developer is planning to build one of the largest industrial buildings in Jefferson County on land that it’s buying near Louisville International Airport. [Business First]

More students at Greater Clark County Schools are starting to take advantage of the state’s 21st Century Scholars program, and administrators hope to get more seventh- and eighth-graders to sign up early. [News & Tribune]

Transparency Is Not A Thing In Possibility City

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found with a gunshot wound inside the Hampton Inn on Jefferson Street in downtown Louisville just before 11 o’clock Monday night. [WDRB]

Because there’s no such thing as transparency in Louisville! The question of whether the Metropolitan Sewer District was violating the state’s open records rules from its board members’ use of private email accounts won’t be answered by Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway. [C-J/AKN]

People are still freaking out about the murder on Ewing Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Fayette County Public Schools have cancelled classes for the rest of the week, according to the district’s website. [H-L]

There was an open conversation between African-American veterans and Congress Wednesday morning in Louisville. [WLKY]

A federal judge’s ruling halting the president’s executive actions on immigration did little to persuade either party in Congress to publicly back down from a budget standoff. [HuffPo]

Electrolux, the Swedish company buying General Electric’s appliance division, will make Louisville’s Appliance Park a key part of future plans, the company’s leader said Tuesday. [WAVE3]

Louisville is the 11th-poorest city in the United States. But it’s still all puppies and rainbows and whatever else Greg Fischer’s spokesgays can come up with on any given day. [CBS News]

Jefferson County Public Schools is asking parents whether an A letter grade should be based on a 90-100 point scale instead of the 93-100 scale currently used. [WFPL]

Scott Welk, who brought forward the lawsuit on Tuesday in California federal court, accused the Jim Beam Brands of violating California’s False Advertising Law with its handmade claims thus forcing him to pay a premium price for Jim Beam’s white label Bourbon. [The Spirit Business]

The elephant in the room: forcing everyone at the dying newspaper to re-apply for their jobs despite saying that wouldn’t happen. And laying Jim Carroll off because Kentucky doesn’t need to know anything about Washington, D.C., obviously. [Business First]

Two challenges have been filed against Clarksville Town Council candidates — Rick Schafer running for District 2 and Dave Disponett running for District 4. [News & Tribune]

The Snow Has Ruined Everything Forever & Ever

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, along with other city leaders, provided residents in Metro Louisville with an update at a Tuesday afternoon press conference, regarding the city’s plans for snow removal — and he also addressed criticisms that some streets had not yet been cleared. [WDRB]

A 19-year-old inmate charged with multiple crimes including kidnapping and robbery committed suicide Monday morning, according to Corrections Major Endora Davis. [C-J/AKN]

What happens when a bunch of whitewater boaters throw a party and a film festival breaks out? [WHAS11]

Steve Beshear issued two executive orders Tuesday: to protect consumers from price gouging and to make sure Kentuckians have access to needed prescription orders during winter’s onslaught. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two people and a dog were pulled from an icy pond in Lyndon on Tuesday afternoon. [WLKY]

Attorney General Eric Holder called Tuesday for a moratorium on the death penalty pending a Supreme Court decision on the use of lethal injection drugs in Oklahoma. [HuffPo]

As road crews continued to clear routes throughout the city Tuesday, many businesses spent the day getting back up and running. [WAVE3]

Many children pretend to be astronauts or dream of exploring space, but eight Rowan County students have dedicated time to learning about space science. [The Morehead News]

Jefferson County Public Schools will stay closed on Wednesday because of the winter weather, school district officials announced Tuesday during a news conference with city officials. [WFPL]

Just in case you missed it, here’s a deeper look at the behind-the-scenes of Greg Fischer’s minimum wage nonsense. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Ford says pricing pressures and excess capacity are among the problems for the U.S. auto industry. [Business First]

Though two members hadn’t cast a vote on the matter as of Friday, the Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County board isn’t expected to seat New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair. [News & Tribune]