Fischer Could Stop Family Dollar In One Call

Only Greg Fischer’s corrupt zoning folks (Bill Bardenwerper) think this is a good idea. Nulu leaders say a Family Dollar discount store isn’t a good fit for the rapidly gentrifying neighborhood centered along E. Market Street. [WDRB]

Kentucky’s horse racing regulators voted Wednesday to change medication rules, bringing the state closer to becoming the 11th racing jurisdiction to adopt a proposed uniform rule that supporters hope will be followed nationwide. [C-J/AKN]

A trial date has been set for a former Oldham County police officer accused of sending inappropriate messages to an underage girl. [WHAS11]

Pope Francis said in the first peace message of his pontificate that huge salaries and bonuses are symptoms of an economy based on greed and inequality and called again for nations to narrow the wealth gap. [HuffPo]

Time is running out for dozens of animals seized from a Harrison County couple convicted of animal abuse. [WLKY]

Marie Zhang, chief food innovation officer for Long John Silver’s, shared the company’s message recently at the Chief Innovation Summit in New York City. [Business First]

Police are asking for the communities help to identify two men who witnesses said left the home of an assault victim who later died. [WAVE3]

Michter’s Distillery, which is building two multimillion-dollar distilleries in Louisville, announced Thursday that it has joined the Kentucky Distillers’ Association, the industry’s 133-year-old trade and lobbying organization. [H-L]

What do outsiders think of Louisville? Click this clicky to find out. [USA Today]

An accused child molester across the river in Jeffersonville has committed suicide. [News & Tribune]

The data is preliminary, but overall crime has declined slightly (about .5 percent) in Louisville Metro Police’s jurisdiction this year through November, compared to the same time period last year, Chief Steve Conrad said. [WFPL]

Louisville has received a $25,000 grant to increase access to healthy foods and support 13 community gardens over the next year. [C-J/AKN]

If only Frankfort had the guts to do something like this. The Ohio House has passed a bipartisan bill increasing penalties for animal abuse. In most cases, the Goddard Bill, named for Dick Goddard, makes abusing a dog or cat a low level felony, punishable by up to a year in jail. [WKSU]

Printing House For The Blind’s A Local Treasure

Here’s a reason not to hate Greg Fischer. Mayor Greg Fischer is looking for a vendor to build a gigabit Internet network in Louisville using city-owned rights of way if necessary. [WDRB]

You should definitely go to this thing! The American Printing House for the Blind, 1839 Frankfort Ave., will have an open house from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 30, that is free and open to the public. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. Police are investigating after a man was shot while walking down the street. [WHAS11]

Seriously, Lexington is trying to become the new Louisville. Now pedestrians are being killed left and right. [H-L]

You can’t go anywhere these days without just cold getting stabbed. [WLKY]

A Littleton, Colo.-based real estate investment firm that has snapped up several local apartment complexes in recent years has a contract to buy Louisville’s Starks Building. [Business First]

Cool temperatures won’t keep Churchill Downs from heating up this weekend. [WAVE3]

U.S. railroads on Thursday called on regulators to improve safety standards for tank cars carrying flammable liquids following a boom in transporting oil by rail and a spate of accidents and spills. [Reuters]

A federal judge in Louisville has ruled that the founder of the food charity USA Harvest is competent to face charges that he used money from the organization for personal expenses. [WFPL]

The 10-day Keeneland November breeding stock sale, which ended Thursday, started with high expectations and proceeded to exceed them. [More H-L]

Looking the other way is always possible in Possibility City. Especially if someone is wealthy, well-connected and making the right campaign contributions. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Boat owners docked along Jeffersonville’s riverfront won’t be allowed to stay along the city’s shoreline beyond Nov. 30. [News & Tribune]

Looking The Other Way: It’s All Possible Here

A long time ago (the 1980s, which no one can remember, thankfully) Masonic Homes sold some land in the Crescent Hill area for development of what became the Mockingbird Gardens subdivision. It’s what you now know as that, well, oasis of homes for the wealthy just off Brownsboro Road. Along with fancy landscaping, horse fences and all kinds of stuff to hide the middle class and lower income apartments at the rear of the development. It houses the people who fought the Brownsboro Road Diet and blind neighborhood sidewalk project. Because they want to speed through the area that houses people who can’t afford Range Rovers.

At the time, middle class (translation: everyone but the Rick Pitino kinda folks) residents of Crescent Hill in the Reservoir Park neighborhood were opposed to having construction equipment and garbage trucks use their streets (Fenley Avenue – for instance) as alleyways. So they complained to their alderwoman, Melissa Mershon, and stopped it from happening.


MOCKINGBIRD GARDENS – “THE ESTATES”

Years later, the rich folks were restless and decided to get greedy, taking matters into their own hands. Gates were installed at the rear of some properties in order to illegally access Fenley. Violations were repeatedly reported but the city refused to enforce code. Surprising, we know. Louisville ignoring something that wealthy campaign donors are doing.

Some time after that (specific timing doesn’t matter because this is Louisville and we all know what’s going to happen in the end), CSX decided to close one of three street accesses to Reservoir Park, leaving residents with only one emergency access point (through the aquatic center parking lot) to get out in the event of a train catastrophe. Naturally, residents demanded the city provide another way out. Instead of using existing city easements from unmade roads and alleys, a new (surprise!) plan was devised. A wealthy guy with an illegal access drive to Fenley Avenue would allow Reservoir Park folks to cross through his property during emergencies. With a catch. Deed restrictions would have to be lifted. Because of course they would.

That wealthy guy has contributed to a number of political campaigns, as you can imagine, so the decision makers believe he’s now owed a favor.

Today at 1:00 P.M. a public meeting will be held to begin the rubber stamp process. All under the auspices of helping those poor Reservoir Park residents out.

Possibility City!

Louisville Still Rolls Its Eyes At Rand Paul

The question is one facing the state’s largest school district: Are there enough seats in the classrooms to accommodate every student? [WDRB]

A new procedure put in place by the Louisville Metro Division of Planning and Design Services is intended to speed up the planning, zoning and development plan process. [C-J/AKN]

Have you noticed how obsessed one station is with running stories based on H&M press releases the past several months? [WHAS11]

About 60 state workers gathered in front of the Capitol early Saturday morning to try to “wake up the governor and legislators” about their financial plights. [H-L]

A Louisville police detective indicted for shooting an unarmed man is no longer on the force. [WLKY]

One of the two people found dead inside a Jeffersonville home Saturday also set the house on fire, according to Jeffersonville police. One of the victims was the son of a Jeffersonville city council member and mayoral candidate. [C-J/AKN]

Firefighters found a woman dead after an apartment building went up in smoke during the early hours of the morning Tuesday. [WAVE3]

Of course Steve Beshear is spending your tax dollars to go to a country that still jails women for reporting rape. Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear will lead a Kentucky Chamber of Commerce trade mission to Dubai later this week in the hopes of strengthening ties to the Middle Eastern country. [Business First]

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens will announce details of a competition to create a new JCPS school Tuesday. [WFPL]

Just keeps getting worse and worse for the Miniature Texan. Another section of Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul’s 2012 book Government Bullies appears to be plagiarized from an article by a think tank scholar, as well as a section of a speech copied from a conservative chain email. [BuzzFeed]

While Kentuckians need to give the Affordable Care Act a chance to work, Kentucky health officials shouldn’t be nearly as patient with the rate of those who are signing up for health insurance through the health exchange, a key lawmaker said. [Ryan Alessi]

Does Downtown Need Even More Shelters?

Allegations of four police officers breaking the law with a 15-year-old girl come from counties west and south of Louisville. [WDRB]

It seems counterintuitive — shrink the size of your tax district so you can increase revenue. But that’s what the Louisville Arena Authority is proposing to help reduce the KFC Yum! Center’s annual revenue shortfalls. [C-J/AKN]

How to know the Wayside expansion is a hot mess that stinks to high heaven: Nina Moseley’s attorney in the expansion situation is Bill Bardenwerper. [WHAS11]

Two women who filed sexual harassment complaints against a Western Kentucky lawmaker say more needs to be done to protect legislative staff from sexual harassment. [H-L]

Jurors found a Louisville man guilty of murder. Now they must decide whether he should pay with his life. [WLKY]

Isn’t it funny watching outsiders act as if they’re breaking news when they run stories revealing that Mitch McConnell and David Jones are friends? Folks in Kentucky have known that for ages and ages. [Politico]

Smart phones will be allowed in several Jefferson County Public Schools. [WAVE3]

A 23-acre former landfill is expected to be declared surplus by the Louisville Metro Council when it meets Thursday, clearing the way for the site’s development as the Waterfront Botanical Gardens. [C-J/AKN]

Horseshoe Southern Indiana, the closest riverboat casino to Louisville, reported 186,284 admissions in August, a 2 percent increase over the 183,350 reported in August 2012, according to figures newly released from the Indiana Gaming Commission. [Business First]

For the second time in as many months, Unified Circuit Court Presiding Judge Vicki Carmichael appeared before the Clark County Council to request the creation of two positions for home incarceration in the county’s probation department. [News & Tribune]

Businesses and individuals challenged to join Jefferson County Public Schools reading program. [WFPL]

Really, They Were Shocked Over Tree Removal?

Metro Council woman Barbara Shanklin is fighting to clear her name. Monday afternoon her attorney filed an appeal to the ethic complaint against her. [WDRB]

New details about one of Mississippi’s most infamous murders are coming to light — more than a half-century later. The death of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black boy who allegedly whistled at a white woman, helped spark the civil rights movement. [NPR]

Almost two months after the Big Four Bridge opened, officials say they are still having issues with people not picking up after their pets. [WHAS11]

What planet is Steve Beshear on right now when it comes to Frankfort and pension “reform”? [Page One]

Two men who Louisville Metro Police say fired shots at an apartment complex could face charges. [WAVE3]

Doesn’t this hot mess of a judge remind you of a local judicial disaster? Family Court Judge William Watkins III has got a pretty bad temper. He’s been known to yell at litigants in his courtroom, as well as on one occasion, calling a woman seeking a protective order “stupid.” [Gawker]

The University of Kentucky violated the state Open Records Act by refusing to release documents about surgeries at Kentucky Children’s Hospital, the state attorney general’s office has ruled. [John Cheves]

More information is expected this week about the human skeletal remains found near a Jeffersonville church. [WLKY]

Under a new proposal, Louisville Metro Government would bill neighborhood groups approximately $3,000 to hold zoning hearings in their affected communities. [WFPL]

Louisville-based Blue Equity LLC has entered a management agreement with Louisville-based Industrial Services of America Inc. [Business First]

The Court of Appeals of Indiana has affirmed a trial court’s judgment against the Clark County Board of Aviation Commissioners — and by extension, the county — in a case stemming from a 2009 eminent domain action for the expansion of Clark County Regional Airport. [News & Tribune]

After decades of endeavoring to protect the forested Wolf Pen Branch Road area near U.S. 42 and Prospect, the Wolf Pen Preservation Association was shocked when hundreds of trees were taken out recently for the start of preliminary work on the new eastern bridge across the Ohio River. [C-J/AKN]

Barbara Shanklin’s Probably A Little Mad This Week

Just what Louisville needs: another road rage incident involving a gun. A Louisville man has been arrested after police say he pulled a gun in an act of road rage. [WDRB]

While a pointless way to “protest” in Kentucky, the prosecution’s push to prevent the reality that a gay marriage fight is the reason it happened in the first place is absurd. Mike O’Connell knows better than to try hiding the truth from the court and is silly to try to keep it out of proceedings. [C-J/AKN]

A local landmark will be demolished but the historic elements on the building will be relocated. Way to go, Louisville! Possibility City! [WHAS11]

Louisville Metro Council members are forming a charging committee to hold a removal trial against Councilwoman Barbara Shanklin. [WFPL]

Several Louisville day care licenses have been revoked after a yearlong investigation by the state. This story is likely to dominate the news for a while. [WLKY]

Gun violence costs the U.S. health care system and taxpayers billions of dollars each year. [HuffPo]

Imagine burying your loved one and the cemetery isn’t what it used to look like. For anyone who visits Eastern Cemetery off Baxter Avenue, it can be pretty heartbreaking. [WAVE3]

What the heck is going on in Lexington these days? Two reports of heavily armed juveniles fighting and shooting guns in the street prompted police to take four teenagers to headquarters for questioning Wednesday night. [H-L]

That new “pension” reform bit? Not exactly what you think it means. It will prove a hardship for the non-governmental entities, such as Louisville-based Seven Counties Services Inc. and Jefferson Community and Technical College, which also pay into the fund. [Business First]

The Indiana Department of Transportation will have to find somewhere else to place a home being moved to make way for the Ohio River Bridges Project. [News & Tribune]

The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services — citing alleged fraud — ordered 18 Louisville child care centers to close Wednesday. Here’s more on the story. [C-J/AKN]