A Weekend Without Tons Of Murder?

Louisville Metro Police are investigating after a male victim was shot at the White Castle in the 4100 block of Outer Loop. [WDRB]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer called for state legislation that would allow local governments to pass gun control measures in an effort to deal with rising murder rates in places like Louisville and other urban areas. [C-J/AKN]

Shots fired into a bar in the Highlands area, but thankfully, nobody was hurt. [WHAS11]

This is terrible news for Matt Bevin. For Kentucky workers who have health insurance through their employers, the number enrolled in high-deductible plans has risen sharply over the last eight years. [H-L]

Black lives Matter demonstrators marched Saturday evening through the downtown area. [WLKY]

Preston Gilstrap, 64, was a Dallas police officer for over 41 years before he retired in 2013. Earlier this week, he saw the two brutal videos of police officers killing black men ― Philando Castile in St. Paul, Minnesota, and Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana ― that shook the nation. [HuffPo]

There may often be a wall between law enforcement officers and those who may be using illegal drugs. [WAVE3]

Buzz is building on Capitol Hill for Indiana Gov. Mike Pence to be Donald Trump’s running mate. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s political leaders responded to Thursday’s shootings in Dallas, Texas with grief, sympathy and a hint of the debates to come on gun control and police-involved violence. [WFPL]

Protests against the shootings of two black men by police officers shut down main arteries in a number of U.S. cities on Saturday, leading to numerous arrests, scuffles and injuries in confrontations between police and demonstrators. [Reuters]

Forecastle is sort of like Derby — except it’s hipsters instead of horses and everyone is a slightly sweatier. [Business First]

Amid public outcry and a lawsuit, Clark County is reversing an earlier zoning decision involving a cement plant’s hopes to burn hazardous waste fuel. [News & Tribune]

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The City’s Losing Yet Another Convention

Louisville sure is Compassionate City. According to LMPD spokesperson Dwight Mitchell, three people were found dead in a home on the 1600 block of Louis Coleman Jr. Drive after police responded to a report of shots fired in the neighborhood Saturday afternoon. [WDRB]

Thanks, religious extremists, for ruining hospitals everywhere when you buy them up! The state is investigating whether patient care is unsafe at University of Louisville Hospital because of staff cuts made by KentuckyOne Health. [C-J/AKN]

WARING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As violence continues to spike around the city, one neighborhood is continuing to combat crime by promoting a festival of non-violence. [WHAS11]

Meanwhile, the people who do all the actual work at UK are paid dirt in comparison. University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto received a 48 percent increase in his base pay and a three-year contract extension Friday. [H-L]

If it’s not a gun death, it’s a stabbing, so that’s fun. Police are investigating a stabbing in southern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell (R-Cowardly Grandmother) is supporting Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump for president — but he isn’t saying, at least for now, whether he thinks the business mogul is actually up to the job. [HuffPo]

A big convention in Louisville will finish out its contract, and then it will be off to another city. SkillsUSA Executive Director Timothy Lawrence said hotels and transportation are the two biggest factors why the organization will be switching locations in 2021. [WAVE3]

A tax break that benefits only about 2,000 people adds up to billions in savings for them — and billions lost for the US economy. Leo Hindery Jr. remembers the call he got the night before he was to testify before Congress, in September of 2007, to close a tax loophole enjoyed by private-equity investors. It was from Stephen Schwarzman, co-founder of the Blackstone Group, the largest private-equity management firm in the US. [Bill Moyers]

Residents wishing to rent their homes through online portals like Airbnb must soon adhere to a set of local regulations. [WFPL]

Republicans STILL DON’T have an actual health care alternative and they never will. The House GOP’s health-care proposal would expand savings accounts, provide tax credits for buying insurance, and allow people to purchase coverage across state lines. Just don’t ask how much it costs. [The Atlantic]

Aetna Inc. and Humana Inc. are giving themselves a little more time to shore everything up before merging. [Business First]

The last vote is just three days away, but some the details regarding Floyd Memorial Hospital’s sale to Baptist Health have raised concerns among local officials. [News & Tribune]

JCPS: Still The Most-Hated Local Devil

The Jefferson County Board of Education met for more than three hours in executive session following its regular meeting Tuesday night to discuss the performance and evaluation of Superintendent Donna Hargens. [WDRB]

Tucked against an Ohio River levee in Rubbertown sits a plain brick building that on many rainy days is all that stands between nature’s fury and deadly flooding that could impact tens of thousands of residents. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Support from Mayor Mike Moore to ease traffic congestion on a busy road means hundreds of thousands of dollars getting pulled from an airport expansion agreement. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin spoke this past weekend at a Utah retreat organized by Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee who has been one of the most outspoken critics of Donald Trump. [H-L]

The Jefferson County Public Schools Board of Education met Tuesday night. Board members voted to approve a $165,603 contract with Bellarmine University and Dr. Theresa Magpuri-Lavell, an employee of Bellarmine University, for the third year of the JCPS-Bellarmine Literacy Project. [WLKY]

What we do know — what I’ve known my entire life — is that the sight of two men kissing is a stunning, terrifying thing. A dangerous thing. A thing that inspires fury and fear and violence and, yes, murder. [HuffPo]

Another tree fell in a storm, so Louisville media lost its mind for an entire day. [WAVE3]

Muhammad Ali grew up in a poor neighbourhood in segregated Louisville, Kentucky, in the 1950s. Sixty years later, segregation has yet to lose its grip on the city. [BBC]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is looking to ban nearly all apartments and condominiums from use as short-term rental units. [WFPL]

Last weekend, US TV show host John Oliver bought and forgave $15m (£10.3m) worth of medical debt, delighting hundreds of people who had defaulted on the sky-high expenses from life-threatening illnesses. It only cost him $60,000 plus a $50 set-up fee. So is it that simple? [BBC]

PNC Bank has agreed to pay millions of dollars to the University of Kentucky’s marketing partner to be the school’s “official” bank, with the school getting 70 percent of the proceeds. [Business First]

The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA) announced last week that New Hope Services has been approved for funding an expansion and rehabilitation of its Highland Glen housing community in Scottsburg. [News & Tribune]

Shootings, Shootings & More Shootings!

Greater Louisville Inc. is calling on employees of Louisville businesses to line the procession route for boxing legend Muhammad Ali on Friday. [WDRB]

Gov. Matt Bevin on Friday appointed three new members to the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD is investigating a shooting that may have injured a child. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey and three-time Kentucky Derby winner Kent Desormeaux issued a brief statement Saturday through his agent, J.R. Pegram, stating that Desormeaux will return to riding in New York on June 9 following a brief stay in an alcohol rehabilitation program at Cirque Lodge in Sundance, Utah. [H-L]

There are several events going on around Louisville this week to honor Muhammad Ali. [WLKY]

Throughout U.S. history, white Americans have toned down the life stories of radical people of color so that they can celebrate them as they want them to be, not as they were. [HuffPo]

Another day, another bunch of shootings in Compassionate City. It’s really compassionate. [WAVE3]

On the morning of May 29, 2014, an overcast Thursday in Washington, DC, the general counsel of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Robert Litt, wrote an email to high-level officials at the National Security Agency and the White House. [VICE]

Regulations governing Louisville’s short-term rental industry won’t take effect until later this summer. [WFPL]

Arising from the shadows of the American repressed, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump have been sending chills through the corridors of establishment power. Who would have thunk it? [Bill Moyers]

No more Red7e? The Kentucky Science Center has named PriceWeber Marketing Communications Inc. as its agency of record. [Business First]

The heart of Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana work is in Dawn Klemm’s sunny living room, decorated with the coastal blues inspired by Charleston, South Carolina and aided by the company of her pug. [News & Tribune]

Getting Extra-Compassionate In Time For Derby

What’s new? Another day, another murder here in Compassionate City. [WDRB]

Holly Liter spends many weekends cleaning up vomit, picking up trash and explaining to her 11-year-old daughter what marijuana smells like. “It can be a nightmare,” she said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city is definitely experiencing deja vu with the jail again. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s public universities and colleges will be limited to tuition increases that range between 4.6 percent and 6.1 percent next school year for in-state undergraduate students, the Council on Postsecondary Education decided Tuesday. [H-L]

Residents in the Smoketown neighborhood have won a victory after the Metro Sewer District approved changes to a storm water storage basin after outcry from the community. [WLKY]

How the military is preparing for the possibility of a very different kind of Commander in Chief. [HuffPo]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made it official on Tuesday, throwing his support behind Hillary Clinton for president in advance of the May 17 Kentucky Democratic primary. [WAVE3]

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Sellus Wilder said he wants to run as a “progressive” candidate in a state where he believes Democrats run races like Republicans. [Ashland Independent]

Ann Morrison first noticed a change in her hearing three years ago. The 73-year-old who lives in Goshen, Ky., said she began missing parts of important conversations, turning up the television volume and growing increasingly frustrated. [WFPL]

Ten months ago, three teenaged boys who had escaped from a group home in Brooklyn were arrested for the violent assault and rape of a woman in Manhattan. The boys had been placed in the home as part of a program run by New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, which had been seeking alternatives to formal detention facilities for troubled youngsters caught up in the juvenile justice system. [ProPublica]

The Young Professionals Association of Louisville has announced its new board of directors and officers for 2016-17. [Business First]

Heidi Cruz, wife of Republican presidential candidate and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped in Jeffersonville to talk to the local GOP at Kye’s II on Friday afternoon. [News & Tribune]

All The News Is About Shootings & Such

Located about a mile from each other, Roosevelt-Perry and Byck elementary schools have long served the children of the Russell neighborhood – the majority of whom come from low-income families. [WDRB]

Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has filed a federal suit alleging the state’s Judicial Conduct Commission, which is considering possible disciplinary action against the judge, has violated his First Amendment rights. [C-J/AKN]

If you live in Louisville, you’re going to get shot dead or run over by a car. Or maybe hit by a train or school bus. Right? That’s the sense one gets by watching local news. [WHAS11]

Windstream announced Monday that it is launching one-gigabit Internet service in Lexington, as Windstream and Time Warner continue to battle for area customers. In a news release, Windstream said it was the first provider to bring the service to residential and small business customers in Fayette County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man is dead following a shooting at the intersection of 32nd and Kentucky streets. [WLKY]

But Matt Bevin, your half-wit governor, would have! Republican presidential candidate John Kasich said Sunday that he wouldn’t have signed a North Carolina law that banned cities in the state from passing anti-discrimination measures and mandated that transgender people use the public bathrooms for the gender they were assigned at birth. [HuffPo]

Another day, another shooting on Compassionate City. This time involving a juvenile. [WAVE3]

Here’s more of the University of Kentucky just TRYING to make you hate it. Moonshine packs a punch in this corner of Appalachia, where making hooch is steeped in local lore. But when Colin Fultz, the grandson of a bootlegger, opened a gourmet distillery here last fall, he ran afoul of a spirit even more potent than white lightning: University of Kentucky basketball. [NY Times]

Louisville’s planning commission is calling a public hearing to get input on proposed zoning regulations for short-term rentals. [WFPL]

It is only April, but some on Wall Street are already predicting a rotten 2016 for U.S. banks. [Reuters]

Kevin Cogan, who is battling to build a high-rise condominium in Cherokee Triangle, said the ease with which people can appeal rulings could start sinking big projects. [Business First]

Angela Renfro promised herself that if she ever escaped her life in prostitution and human trafficking, she would help every woman and child she could. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City Loves It Some Gun Violence

The Louisville Metro Planning Commission has stopped reviewing “conservation subdivisions” in Jefferson County while it looks into whether regulations approved in 2008 achieve a goal of saving green space. [WDRB]

Responding to public concerns about lead in public drinking water supplies, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has created a work group to review existing government regulations or practices and potentially make recommendations for changes. But the agency that created the work group, which includes a variety of public officials, intends to exclude the general public – potentially violating the state open meetings law. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police confirm that one woman has died and two men are injured after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey Calvin Borel, a three-time winner of the Kentucky Derby, has informed his agent, Larry Melancon, that he is retiring effective immediately. [H-L]

A bill giving death benefits to families of EMS workers killed in the line of duty has been signed into law by the governor. [WLKY]

The biggest question of the political season is whether Donald Trump will get enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination before the convention. Prediction markets, which allow people to bet on future events using real money, estimate an average 61 precent chance of a contested Republican convention with two or more votes required. The chance Trump will fail to get to the required 1,237 delegates before the convention, they estimate, is 69 percent. [HuffPo]

A man was shot in front of a Louisville clothing store on Saturday over a pair of new athletic shoes, Louisville Metro Police said. [WAVE3]

From late Friday Afternoon… “The governor’s unilateral action in cutting the appropriated funding of colleges, universities and community colleges was outside of his authority. The law on budget reductions is straightforward. It requires a declared shortfall that does not exist. If it did, the last budget bill that was passed and signed into law dictates the steps that must be taken. We are therefore requesting the governor withdrawal his order. We are confident he will comply.” [Attorney General Andy Beshear]

This could be one of the dumbest moves from JCPS yet and Allison Martin isn’t helping matters. Jefferson County Public School officials are declining to discuss gang activity in local schools with a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from the United States has proved popular from the beginning. When he first articulated it following the Paris terrorist attacks in November, he surged in the polls and hasn’t slumped since. And while progressives might want to believe the appeal of Trump’s divisive idea is limited to a small subset of conservatives, a new poll indicates Islamophobia actually runs deep across the spectrum of the American electorate. [ThinkProgress]

A legal dispute between the four daughters of late Louisville real estate developer Al J. Schneider focuses on a belief by two of those daughters that the trustees for the estate want to quickly liquidate the company’s millions in real estate assets — to a point that beneficiaries would not receive the fair value for those properties. [Business First]

While Clarksville continues to focus on revitalizing the community through extensive development and redevelopment efforts, the town is making plans to ensure proper infrastructure is in place to improve conditions and handle growth. [News & Tribune]