Felner’s Thankful For UofL Sex Scandal

Here is a new thing for old ladies sitting at home to freak out about. [WDRB]

The misery continues for many Louisville Water Co. customers trying to navigate a transition to a new $29 million computerized billing system, eight months after it went live. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, sure, let’s prosecute the victims here and not the rich as hell sports folks. [WHAS11]

Escort Katina Powell broke her silence on Tuesday, saying she has no proof that Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino knew that a former Cardinals staffer hired her and other dancers to strip and have sex with former recruits and players. [H-L]

The woman at the center of a recruiting scandal in the University of Louisville basketball program is speaking out publicly for the first time. [WLKY]

Vice President Joe Biden said he will not run for president in 2016. Biden announced his decision in a statement given from the White House on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Wait, wait, wait — rich white guys complaining about folks attempting to hold police accountable for admitted profiling? Surely not! [WAVE3]

We can’t afford to be cynical about the news that the most lucrative college hoops program in the country uses women as a form of currency. On revelations that the University of Louisville basketball program may have paid a self-described “Louisville Madam” to supply recruits with strippers and sex, the reactions have congregated into two camps: moralizers and cynics. [The Nation]

A zoning hearing on the future use of JBS Swift’s lot on Cabel Street in Butchertown has been delayed yet again. [WFPL]

Clinton said she has “serious concerns” with the proposed mergers between Anthem and Cigna and between Aetna and Humana that are currently underway. The deals will be under review by the Department of Justice for the next year or so, likely running into the next president’s tenure. [The Hill]

The University of Louisville School of Medicine’s probationary status with an accrediting body has been lifted after more than a year. [Business First]

The RDA, for now, is dead in Clark County. The Clark County Council signed an ordinance rescinding a previous vote and absolving any current membership the county would have with the Regional Development Authority. [News & Tribune]

Woah, This Is Clarksville’s First Black Cop?!

Community leaders and parents are saying enough is enough with all the recent violence in Louisville. [WDRB]

Four Louisville Metro Council members are pooling their resources to hire former Democratic Caucus Director Elizabeth Hoffman for an unspecified role in City Hall less than a month after she was fired. [C-J/AKN]

Seriously? Not even a mention of failing a polygraph being essentially meaningless? And we’re supposed to trust the teevee folks. [WHAS11]

ESPN reported Tuesday that five former University of Louisville basketball players and recruits told their “Outside the Lines” reporters that they attended parties at a campus dorm from 2010-14 that included strippers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Months after Crystal Rogers, 35, a mother of five disappears, new details are emerging about the case. [WLKY]

A key House Democrat suggested Monday that Vice President Joe Biden can’t win the Democratic nomination on his own and should not enter the contest. [HuffPo]

Thanks to a $250,000 grant, the Clarksville Police Department has hired three new officers, including the first African American to serve on the force. [WAVE3]

The two women who want to be Kentucky’s next lieutenant governor offered sharply contrasting views on education and economic policies in a televised debate on Kentucky Education Television Monday evening. [Ronnie Ellis]

Nearly 1,000 local leaders and neighborhood revitalization advocates from across the nation are in Louisville this week for the annual NeighborWorks America Community Leadership Institute. [WFPL]

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has granted Kentucky a one-year extension for meeting requirements of the stringent new identification security law known as REAL ID – meaning a Kentucky driver’s license is still sufficient for gaining access to the vast majority of federal installations. [Press Release]

The Courier-Journal’s horse racing reporter, Jennie Rees, who’s been with the paper for 34 years, will leave after accepting a buyout offer from the paper’s parent company. [Business First]

After three city department heads decried the measure, New Albany City Councilman Kevin Zurschmiede pulled his ordinance to adopt the International Property Maintenance Code on Thursday night. [News & Tribune]

Latest UofL Dumpster Fire Rages On

Louisville Metro Fire needs your help identifying someone it calls a person of interest in a fire that killed three people. [WDRB]

The veteran journalist who co-authored a book filled with explosive allegations against the University of Louisville men’s basketball program said Monday that the escort he wrote with is “pretty damn credible.” [C-J/AKN]

University of Louisville announced on Tuesday, Oct. 6, it is reviewing allegations regarding the men’s basketball program. [WHAS11]

Eleven employees in the Jefferson County public school district have filed a lawsuit saying they shouldn’t be forced to pay union fees if they don’t want to be part of the union. [H-L]

You should probably go to this pumpkin thing. The third annual Jack-O-Lantern Spectacular will be held Oct. 8 through Nov. 1 at Iroquois Park. [WLKY]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took a shot this week at President Barack Obama’s immigration strategy from his first years in office, saying it wouldn’t work with today’s GOP. [HuffPo]

Changes could be coming to the Original Highlands. The Board of Zoning adjustments gave the green light for Edwards Communities Development Company to build 194 apartments on the site where Mercy Academy sits empty on East Broadway. [WAVE3]

Girls, many of whom have suffered a range of trauma at home, make up a growing share of children arrested and detained across the country. [ProPublica]

An academic conference on the environmental history of the Ohio River Valley kicks off in Louisville later this week. [WFPL]

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. [WaPo]

American Commercial Lines Inc., which is based in Jeffersonville, announced Thursday that it has agreed to acquire AEP River Operations LLC from American Electric Power Co. Inc. AEP River Operations is a commercial inland barge company that delivers about 45 million tons of products each year. The company is based in Chesterfield, Mo., and has operations in Paducah, Ky., and Convent, Algiers and Belle Chasse, La., the News and Tribune reports. [Business First]

Victims of domestic violence in need of immediate legal protection in Floyd County now have a place to turn to after regular business hours. [News & Tribune]

UofL Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves. In Other Words? Told Ya So Years Ago, Nothing Has Changed

Who could have known, over the past eight years, that there’s a morale problem with faculty and staff at the University of Louisville??? Vicious and disrespectful: that’s how some faculty and staff describe the work environment at the University of Louisville. [WDRB]

African Americans living in Kentucky saw their average yearly incomes drop by more than 11 percent in one year, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released this week. The poverty rate also rose for black Kentuckians at a rate four times more than the rest of the state from 2013 to 2014. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 has learned, through MetroSafe, there is a shooting in the 3800 block of Vermont Avenue, in the Shawnee area. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Metro police said a 66-year-old man found dead last week was slain. Police said Michael Davis was killed sometime last Monday. [WLKY]

Seventy-three law enforcement agencies across the country will receive $20 million in federal grants to help them purchase and implement the use of body cameras, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance announced Monday. [HuffPo]

Crowds rallied together Sunday near the corner of 17th and Broadway with concerns of a new biodigester planned for the West Louisville neighborhood that would deal with methane gas. [WAVE3]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan touted two Louisville educational institutions Thursday during a stop in the city. [WFPL]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services is updating and expanding its surgical facilities in a $2.4 million project. [Business First]

Shane Corbin said his role as Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning director has been an exciting one. [News & Tribune]

Is There A Murder Every Other Day?

City leaders in Jeffersonville have released an ambitious new plan to help fight homelessness in the city. [WDRB]

The makeup of the membership of the metro panel that decides some key zoning-related cases is facing a legal challenge. State law requires the membership of the seven-member Metro Board of Zoning Adjustment to be diverse and reflect the demographics of Metro Louisville. But the newly filed lawsuit notes that the board has only one African-American and two women among its membership. [C-J/AKN]

The ongoing discussions about the relationship between the police and the community continue with a ‘monthly race summit’ that is set to start Thursday evening. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul of Kentucky, running for president on a platform of keeping the government out of people’s business, took a deep breath when asked at a recent stop in Philadelphia whether he’d make addressing abortion a part of his campaign. Pander to bigots = you’re a bigot. [H-L]

The coroner has identified the man shot and killed at a downtown restaurant. Compassionate City. It’s Possible here. [WLKY]

American gun owners are far more likely to injure themselves or someone else with their firearm than to stop a criminal, according to a new study from a group calling for tighter gun control. [HuffPo]

There’s a lot that we can learn from our past so we can move forward in the future. In light of what we’re going through in our country with outrage in cities like Ferguson, Baltimore, even here in Louisville, there is a demand for change when it comes to encounters between police, city leaders and minorities. [WAVE3]

This is not a time for peace and quiet. Only scared white people want peace and quiet. [NY Times]

Independent candidate for governor Drew Curtis needs to get 5,000 signatures by Aug. 11 in order to appear on the ballot in November’s general election. [WFPL]

When Audrey Haynes sat down before the legislature’s Medicaid Oversight and Advisory Committee Wednesday, she expected the data she brought would persuade lawmakers that Kentucky’s expansion of Medicaid has been good for the state. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville Foundation is moving ahead on the second phase of building out the ShelbyHurst Office and Research Park, which would include a conference hotel and numerous commercial developments on the University of Louisville’s Shelby Campus. [Business First]

The police presence was strong at Clarksville’s most recent town council meeting. Not only were four reserve officers stationed at the door, manning the new metal detectors, but they appeared on the council’s agenda as well. [News & Tribune]

At Least It Moved To Cordish Central

Remember the Louisville “purge” nonsense? Now it’s a thing in Baltimore — where Cordish is headquartered. [Baltimore Sun]

They are family homes, but they’re being used like extended stay hotels in neighborhoods where that was never the plan. Now, new rules regulating boarding houses in Louisville are aiming to put a stop to it. [WDRB]

Meanwhile, we give away MILLIONS to Cordish for doing nothing. The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is eliminating half of its clinics serving residents in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program because of a projected $800,000 budget shortfall this year. [C-J/AKN]

When Tess Graham, 64, looks in the mirror these days she sees the female she’s also felt she was inside. “I waited 55 years to see me. That is a long time,” Graham said. [WHAS11]

Trying to pry information out of professional chauffeur T.J. Doyle is harder than wrestling a winning trifecta ticket out of a poor man’s hand. [H-L]

A Louisville elementary school got some big-name recognition when Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear visited to celebrate the school reaching an environmental milestone. [WLKY]

This highly entertaining pothole move is hilarious. It’s a shame it hasn’t happened in Louisville. [HuffPo]

All the pageantry and tradition of Derby week really boils down to one thing: the incredible athletic talent of 20 horses that reach the starting gate on the first Saturday in May. Kentucky loves its horses, and the Derby horses are some of the best treated around. But the Bluegrass is also home to many people who are working to better the lives of other horses that don’t have it anywhere near as good. [WAVE3]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission was scheduled to hold a hearing on Tuesday on Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities’ proposed rate increase. [WFPL]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

Louisville-based Baptist Healthcare System Inc., operator of Baptist Health Louisville and several other hospitals across the state, plans to expand its corporate headquarters on Eastpoint Parkway in Louisville in the coming years. [Business First]

The space the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center’s museum exhibits once occupied now is a labyrinth of metal frames and stacks of drywall. A cacophony of clanging metal on metal and shrieking power tools overwhelms the senses there now, but it won’t be too long before a different sound fills the air. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Sadly, Education In Kentucky Continues To Suffer

Elderly and low income neighbors in Jeffersonville are caught in the middle of a zoning fight that could force them out of their home. [WDRB]

Your dying local newspaper got at least a few school board endorsements right, it seems. Not endorsing people like Horne was a wise move. [C-J/AKN]

Prosecutors said they plan to ask for the death penalty in the case of a Louisville man charged with killing his neighbor while her three children were sleeping in the home. [WHAS11]

Janice Duncan, a fifth-grade teacher at Lexington’s Southern Elementary, shares the opinion of other educators who are concerned about the lack of specifics in the proposed new Kentucky Core Academic Social Studies Standards. [H-L]

Jeffersonville leaders disagree on a major project that has already hit residents in the pocketbook. [WLKY]

You can thank Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes and Mitch McConnell for the national embarrassment. [HuffPo]

Just what Louisville needs! Another downtown hotel. [WAVE3]

Global climate models have underestimated the amount of CO2 being absorbed by plants, according to new research. [BBC]

Louisville Metro has reached an agreement with the J.B. Swift plant in Butchertown over some administrative violations, but the plant’s issues with alleged odor violations remain unresolved. [WFPL]

Kentucky ranks 11th worst in the country in depth of cuts to school funding since the start of the recession, according to a new report released by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a non-partisan policy research organization based in Washington, D.C. Kentucky has cut per-student investment in K-12 schools by 11.4 percent between 2008 and 2015 once inflation is taken into account. [KYCEP & CBPP]

The Ohio River Bridges Project is showcased in a Bloomberg report about the nation’s infrastructure. [Business First]

The Jeffersonville Sanitary Sewer Board and members of the city council were updated on the city’s ability to pay for an EPA-mandated project — and were told one of the last things they wanted to hear. [News & Tribune]