Getting Extra-Compassionate In Time For Derby

What’s new? Another day, another murder here in Compassionate City. [WDRB]

Holly Liter spends many weekends cleaning up vomit, picking up trash and explaining to her 11-year-old daughter what marijuana smells like. “It can be a nightmare,” she said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city is definitely experiencing deja vu with the jail again. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s public universities and colleges will be limited to tuition increases that range between 4.6 percent and 6.1 percent next school year for in-state undergraduate students, the Council on Postsecondary Education decided Tuesday. [H-L]

Residents in the Smoketown neighborhood have won a victory after the Metro Sewer District approved changes to a storm water storage basin after outcry from the community. [WLKY]

How the military is preparing for the possibility of a very different kind of Commander in Chief. [HuffPo]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made it official on Tuesday, throwing his support behind Hillary Clinton for president in advance of the May 17 Kentucky Democratic primary. [WAVE3]

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Sellus Wilder said he wants to run as a “progressive” candidate in a state where he believes Democrats run races like Republicans. [Ashland Independent]

Ann Morrison first noticed a change in her hearing three years ago. The 73-year-old who lives in Goshen, Ky., said she began missing parts of important conversations, turning up the television volume and growing increasingly frustrated. [WFPL]

Ten months ago, three teenaged boys who had escaped from a group home in Brooklyn were arrested for the violent assault and rape of a woman in Manhattan. The boys had been placed in the home as part of a program run by New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, which had been seeking alternatives to formal detention facilities for troubled youngsters caught up in the juvenile justice system. [ProPublica]

The Young Professionals Association of Louisville has announced its new board of directors and officers for 2016-17. [Business First]

Heidi Cruz, wife of Republican presidential candidate and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped in Jeffersonville to talk to the local GOP at Kye’s II on Friday afternoon. [News & Tribune]

All The News Is About Shootings & Such

Located about a mile from each other, Roosevelt-Perry and Byck elementary schools have long served the children of the Russell neighborhood – the majority of whom come from low-income families. [WDRB]

Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has filed a federal suit alleging the state’s Judicial Conduct Commission, which is considering possible disciplinary action against the judge, has violated his First Amendment rights. [C-J/AKN]

If you live in Louisville, you’re going to get shot dead or run over by a car. Or maybe hit by a train or school bus. Right? That’s the sense one gets by watching local news. [WHAS11]

Windstream announced Monday that it is launching one-gigabit Internet service in Lexington, as Windstream and Time Warner continue to battle for area customers. In a news release, Windstream said it was the first provider to bring the service to residential and small business customers in Fayette County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man is dead following a shooting at the intersection of 32nd and Kentucky streets. [WLKY]

But Matt Bevin, your half-wit governor, would have! Republican presidential candidate John Kasich said Sunday that he wouldn’t have signed a North Carolina law that banned cities in the state from passing anti-discrimination measures and mandated that transgender people use the public bathrooms for the gender they were assigned at birth. [HuffPo]

Another day, another shooting on Compassionate City. This time involving a juvenile. [WAVE3]

Here’s more of the University of Kentucky just TRYING to make you hate it. Moonshine packs a punch in this corner of Appalachia, where making hooch is steeped in local lore. But when Colin Fultz, the grandson of a bootlegger, opened a gourmet distillery here last fall, he ran afoul of a spirit even more potent than white lightning: University of Kentucky basketball. [NY Times]

Louisville’s planning commission is calling a public hearing to get input on proposed zoning regulations for short-term rentals. [WFPL]

It is only April, but some on Wall Street are already predicting a rotten 2016 for U.S. banks. [Reuters]

Kevin Cogan, who is battling to build a high-rise condominium in Cherokee Triangle, said the ease with which people can appeal rulings could start sinking big projects. [Business First]

Angela Renfro promised herself that if she ever escaped her life in prostitution and human trafficking, she would help every woman and child she could. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City Loves It Some Gun Violence

The Louisville Metro Planning Commission has stopped reviewing “conservation subdivisions” in Jefferson County while it looks into whether regulations approved in 2008 achieve a goal of saving green space. [WDRB]

Responding to public concerns about lead in public drinking water supplies, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has created a work group to review existing government regulations or practices and potentially make recommendations for changes. But the agency that created the work group, which includes a variety of public officials, intends to exclude the general public – potentially violating the state open meetings law. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police confirm that one woman has died and two men are injured after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey Calvin Borel, a three-time winner of the Kentucky Derby, has informed his agent, Larry Melancon, that he is retiring effective immediately. [H-L]

A bill giving death benefits to families of EMS workers killed in the line of duty has been signed into law by the governor. [WLKY]

The biggest question of the political season is whether Donald Trump will get enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination before the convention. Prediction markets, which allow people to bet on future events using real money, estimate an average 61 precent chance of a contested Republican convention with two or more votes required. The chance Trump will fail to get to the required 1,237 delegates before the convention, they estimate, is 69 percent. [HuffPo]

A man was shot in front of a Louisville clothing store on Saturday over a pair of new athletic shoes, Louisville Metro Police said. [WAVE3]

From late Friday Afternoon… “The governor’s unilateral action in cutting the appropriated funding of colleges, universities and community colleges was outside of his authority. The law on budget reductions is straightforward. It requires a declared shortfall that does not exist. If it did, the last budget bill that was passed and signed into law dictates the steps that must be taken. We are therefore requesting the governor withdrawal his order. We are confident he will comply.” [Attorney General Andy Beshear]

This could be one of the dumbest moves from JCPS yet and Allison Martin isn’t helping matters. Jefferson County Public School officials are declining to discuss gang activity in local schools with a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from the United States has proved popular from the beginning. When he first articulated it following the Paris terrorist attacks in November, he surged in the polls and hasn’t slumped since. And while progressives might want to believe the appeal of Trump’s divisive idea is limited to a small subset of conservatives, a new poll indicates Islamophobia actually runs deep across the spectrum of the American electorate. [ThinkProgress]

A legal dispute between the four daughters of late Louisville real estate developer Al J. Schneider focuses on a belief by two of those daughters that the trustees for the estate want to quickly liquidate the company’s millions in real estate assets — to a point that beneficiaries would not receive the fair value for those properties. [Business First]

While Clarksville continues to focus on revitalizing the community through extensive development and redevelopment efforts, the town is making plans to ensure proper infrastructure is in place to improve conditions and handle growth. [News & Tribune]

Still Loving The Christy Brown Shade

The federal government is throwing new resources at the growing heroin problem in Kentucky and throughout the nation. [WDRB]

Louisville planners recommended Thursday morning that short-term rentals be allowed in most zoning districts but that a special permit should be necessary if the unit is not a host’s primary residence. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The best part of this whole Speed Museum coverage? All the photos of Christy Brown throwing shade at Matt Bevin. May we all grow up to be as skilled as her. [WHAS11]

Lexington is apparently trying to imitate Louisville again. Second overnight shooting in a week. [H-L]

Valley Station may be one of the few areas of the city where Rand Paul would be welcomed with open arms. [WLKY]

Another Donald Trump supporter was caught on video evoking Nazis as he yelled at protesters following a rally in Cleveland on Saturday. “Go to Auschwitz,” the man said to the protesters after raising his arm in an apparent Nazi salute. “Go to fucking Auschwitz.” [HuffPo]

Really, all that shade Christy Brown threw was terrific. Somebody please give her an award. [WAVE3]

Apollo Global Management says it’s buying specialty grocery store chain Fresh Market Inc., for $1.36 billion, in a deal that adds a premium of more than 20 percent to Fresh Market’s closing stock price last week. [NPR]

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced federal funding for several Kentucky health care centers to help fight the state’s opioid epidemic. [WFPL]

How hot was it last month globally? It was so hot that the famed Iditarod sled race in Alaska brought in extra snow from hundreds of miles away by train. [ThinkProgress]

Two-thirds of state economic development spending benefits big businesses, according to a sample of three states analyzed by Good Jobs First. [Business First]

One of the last things left before Gateway Park opens in Clarksville is to wait for the grass to fill in. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]

Sanctuary? More Like Torture Farm

A Jefferson County Board of Education is speaking out against a district proposal that would increase class sizes and potentially eliminate assistant principals from some elementary schools. [WDRB]

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said it will be “looking into” a recent barn fire at a Charlestown, Ind., wildlife refuge that killed 41 animals. [C-J/AKN]

Jefferson County Public Schools is trying to distance itself from a fake Twitter account that was getting a lot of attention on Tuesday. [WHAS11]

Prompted by new federal regulations, the state’s two largest utility companies are closing several storage ponds that collect the coal ash burned by power plants. [H-L]

Fire broke out Tuesday at a popular but controversial animal sanctuary that is home to lions and tigers. [WLKY]

“As frustration grows, there will be voices urging us to fall back into tribes, to scapegoat fellow citizens who don’t look like us, or pray like us, or vote like we do, or share the same background.” [HuffPo]

The Clark County Sheriff’s Office is hosting several firearms training session to provide information beneficial to anyone owning and carrying a gun. [WAVE3]

General Electric will announce [today] that it has selected Boston for global headquarters, according to an official familiar with the process. [Boston Globe]

Pork processor JBS Swift now has official permission to use a Butchertown parking lot for staging refrigeration trucks, despite the objections of its neighbors. [WFPL]

As winter sets in around the country, thousands of the nation’s poor are struggling to keep the heat on thanks to intentional underfunding of a key federal progam(sic). [ThinkProgress]

Thorntons Inc., a Louisville-based gas station and food store chain, broke ground on its new $27.8 million headquarters on Friday. [Business First]

Advocates are praising Congress’ recent softening of a longtime ban on federal dollars going to needle exchanges amid growing intravenous drug abuse that’s spreading hepatitis and HIV in many states. [News & Tribune]

NYE Dept Of Awful Update Stuff

Louisville International Airport is filling four out of five available airplane seats, the highest rate since at least 2007. [WDRB]

We can’t keep track of all the UofL scandals these days! Two former University of Louisville biosafety employees who lost their jobs last year following federal investigations of biological safety practices have filed a federal lawsuit against the university, claiming repeated violations of health and safety regulations and an attempted cover-up by university officials. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Get a grip, Julie Raque Adams, and quit it with the fear mongering. It’s like you want to lose your state senate seat. [WHAS11]

Kentucky child welfare officials place too many children with mental health problems in institutions for too long when they could be better served by relatives or foster families, according to a leading child advocacy group. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The family of a teenager charged with murder in the death of another teen said they want the truth to come out. [WLKY]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Leave it to Louisville teevee folks to continue the Mall St. Matthews freak out. [WAVE3]

When officers take the lives of those they are sworn to protect and serve, they undermine their own legitimacy. [The Atlantic]

A prominent member of Louisville’s Board of Zoning Adjustment and Planning Commission has resigned his positions. [WFPL]

Open data has contributed to dramatic improvements in a wide array of fields over the past few decades, affecting how we look at astronomy, genetics, climate change, sports and more. But until recently, crime has gone without the open analysis prevalent in other fields because crime data has been closely held by law enforcement agencies and has usually only been released in bulk at monthly, quarterly or annual intervals. [FiveThirtyEight]

When most of the assets of the Sam Swope Auto Group were sold to a Florida company earlier this year, the purchase price was not disclosed. But now we at least know the price of the bulk of the real estate involved. [Business First]

Counties in Southern Indiana are working on securing a grant that would help strengthen partnerships between local manufacturing industries and their workforces. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]