Council Holding Fischer Accountable

A bipartisan group of Louisville Metro Council members wants more information about how Mayor Greg Fischer nominates people to scores of city boards and commissions. But not David Yates — he cowardly removed his name as a sponsor. [WDRB]

How do people even have kids knowing this crap can happen? Too terrifying to think about. [C-J/AKN]

For the first time the public is seeing a second incident where a school resource officer appears to punch a middle school student. [WHAS11]

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is calling for a 140-mile extension of the Mountain Parkway from Prestonsburg to Beckley, W.Va., at a cost of $8 billion to $10 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood that left one man hospitalized. [WLKY]

College graduates, brace yourselves for some disappointing news. Wages for university grads are 2.5 percent lower than what they were 15 years ago, according to the latest edition of the Economic Policy Institute’s annual report on the labor market prospects of new workers. [HuffPo]

A New Albany councilman referred to a colleague as a “lying piece of (expletive)” during a debate over public prayer on Monday. Councilman Dan Coffey made the comment into an open microphone, yet denied using the curse word during a brief, tense interview after the meeting. [WAVE3]

On Wednesday, when President Barack Obama spoke at the US Coast Guard Academy’s commencement ceremony, he called climate change “an immediate risk to our national security.” In recent months, the Obama administration has repeatedly highlighted the international threats posed by global warming and has emphasized the need for the country’s national security agencies to study and confront the issue. [Mother Jones]

The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced more than $54 million in grant funds to clean up contaminated brownfields sites around the country, and one of the projects getting funding is in Louisville. [WFPL]

The lawyer for the man who alleges that Ahmed Zayat has not paid a $2 million gambling debt filed a $10 million libel suit on Monday against Zayat, the owner of American Pharoah. [NY Times]

Cecilia Henderson, the 71-year-old widow of Angel’s Envy bourbon creator Lincoln Henderson, is suing her son, saying that Wesley Henderson has “effectively stolen” her share of proceeds from a recent sale to Bacardi Ltd. [Business First]

A community that successfully addresses homelessness is a united one, according to Michael Stoops, the director of community organizing at the National Coalition for the Homeless. [News & Tribune]

Hope Henderson Doesn’t Copy Secrecy

A family is trying to figure out why their dad was stabbed at a Louisville gas station. [WDRB]

A backup power generator at a pumping station could have prevented April’s massive flooding and a big sewage spill at Louisville’s Morris Forman Water Quality Treatment Center, state officials have concluded. [C-J/AKN]

The Phoenix Hill Tavern (PHT) and Jim Porter’s Good Time Emporium closed permanently on Monday, June 1. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics has wrapped up a 10-year, $2.5 million donation from BB&T that will result in a new program on capitalism and funding toward the college’s $65 million renovation. But Gatton officials stepped back from the more controversial aspects of the original 2004 agreement, including a requirement for an Ayn Rand reading room, named for the novelist and free market philosopher. [H-L]

A Louisville park is hosting a night of camping in June as part of a national celebration. [WLKY]

U.S. police have shot and killed 385 people during the first five months of this year, a rate of more than two a day, the Washington Post reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

A minister has a new plan to try to curb crime in West Louisville. [WAVE3]

It’s almost like these folks in Henderson didn’t bother talking to anyone living in the real world in Louisville. [Henderson Gleaner]

A resident must work full-time and earn at least $14.17 an hour to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment in Louisville, according to a recent study from the National Low Income Housing Coalition. [WFPL]

Among African American adults with low education and income levels, the increase in risk of heart disease or stroke associated with living in poverty is largest for women and people under age 50, according to a large new study. [Reuters]

Ford Motor Co. CEO Mark Fields said aluminum-body F-Series Super Duty Trucks will be launched next year and that the design will “wow people.” [Business First]

Parts of South Clarksville could be the next Newport, Ky., or at least a bustling addendum to the Louisville metropolitan area. [News & Tribune]

At Least It Moved To Cordish Central

Remember the Louisville “purge” nonsense? Now it’s a thing in Baltimore — where Cordish is headquartered. [Baltimore Sun]

They are family homes, but they’re being used like extended stay hotels in neighborhoods where that was never the plan. Now, new rules regulating boarding houses in Louisville are aiming to put a stop to it. [WDRB]

Meanwhile, we give away MILLIONS to Cordish for doing nothing. The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is eliminating half of its clinics serving residents in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program because of a projected $800,000 budget shortfall this year. [C-J/AKN]

When Tess Graham, 64, looks in the mirror these days she sees the female she’s also felt she was inside. “I waited 55 years to see me. That is a long time,” Graham said. [WHAS11]

Trying to pry information out of professional chauffeur T.J. Doyle is harder than wrestling a winning trifecta ticket out of a poor man’s hand. [H-L]

A Louisville elementary school got some big-name recognition when Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear visited to celebrate the school reaching an environmental milestone. [WLKY]

This highly entertaining pothole move is hilarious. It’s a shame it hasn’t happened in Louisville. [HuffPo]

All the pageantry and tradition of Derby week really boils down to one thing: the incredible athletic talent of 20 horses that reach the starting gate on the first Saturday in May. Kentucky loves its horses, and the Derby horses are some of the best treated around. But the Bluegrass is also home to many people who are working to better the lives of other horses that don’t have it anywhere near as good. [WAVE3]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission was scheduled to hold a hearing on Tuesday on Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities’ proposed rate increase. [WFPL]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

Louisville-based Baptist Healthcare System Inc., operator of Baptist Health Louisville and several other hospitals across the state, plans to expand its corporate headquarters on Eastpoint Parkway in Louisville in the coming years. [Business First]

The space the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center’s museum exhibits once occupied now is a labyrinth of metal frames and stacks of drywall. A cacophony of clanging metal on metal and shrieking power tools overwhelms the senses there now, but it won’t be too long before a different sound fills the air. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Greg Fischer Is Now A Fancy Engineer

Really, Preservation Louisville? A petition? Please. Fascinating that Greg Fischer now thinks he’s an engineer, though. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens informed employees Wednesday of a significant shake-up that includes outsourcing the legal department, creating a new top-tier district job and replacing the district’s human resources director. [C-J/AKN]

Shelbyville really wants to get in on Louisville’s murder spree. [WHAS11]

Wondering just how stupid the Republican candidates for governor will get before it’s all over? All four of Kentucky’s Republican candidates for governor said Tuesday night they do not agree that global warming is manmade, disputing the science that insists it is and declaring that protecting coal jobs is the higher priority. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA LIMITS! This was all the hype yesterday. [WLKY]

New rules limiting smog may be “controversial,” but they are among the administration’s top priorities, according to Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy. [HuffPo]

Residents of Louisville’s West End who pushed Metro Council to create rules for boarding houses are now waiting for Mayor Greg Fischer’s administration to follow through. [WAVE3]

Privately run Medicare plans, fresh off a lobbying victory that reversed proposed budget cuts, face new scrutiny from government investigators and whistleblowers who allege that plans have overcharged the government for years. [NPR]

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail would officially begin in downtown Louisville under a planned $1.4-million expansion of the Frazier History Museum, the museum and the Kentucky Distillers’ Association announced Thursday. [WFPL]

After Edward Snowden, the government said its controversial surveillance programs had stopped a terrorist – David Coleman Headley. In “American Terrorist,” ProPublica and PBS “Frontline” show why the claim is largely untrue. [ProPublica]

Looking to attend something that won’t matter? Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, will host a discussion next month that will explore the future of Jefferson County Public Schools a year after a state audit report was released. [Business First]

Incumbent Charlestown At-Large City Councilman Dan James is facing opposition from fellow Democrat and Clark County Sheriff’s Office deputy Scott Johns in the May primary election. [News & Tribune]

We Were First! Kentucky Hated The Gays Before Indiana

Just in case you needed another instance of Greg Fischer having no idea what he’s talking about. He’s to be applauded on the needle exchange front but we all know he didn’t “misspeak” — he just had no idea what was going on. [WDRB]

Oh, now David Jones wants a closer look at the JCPS budget? How convenient. He thinks he can sit on his hands for ages and only wake up after tension boils over the top. [C-J/AKN]

A man found dead after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood in West Louisville has now been identified. [WHAS11]

For the first time in the history of this tobacco state, the House voted on — and passed — a bill to ban indoor smoking statewide in workplaces and other public spaces, such as bars and restaurants. And then the Senate assigned House Bill 145 to its Committee on Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection, where it saw no further action. [H-L]

Way to go, Louisville, now your old people are shooting each other. [WLKY]

The National Collegiate Athletic Association expressed concern Thursday with a new “religious freedom” law in Indiana that could open the door to legalized discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. [HuffPo]

Watching this AirBnB slap fight between Greg Fischer and the Metro Council is tons of fun. [WAVE3]

There is significant evidence that cop cams cut down on most civilian complaints. But a close examination of violent encounters with the police caught on tape suggests that even with seemingly incontrovertible video evidence, questions will often linger. The kind of sea change that police reform activists desire will still likely escape them. [HuffPo]

African American leaders in Louisville are speaking out against Kentucky’s U.S. senators and their efforts to block the confirmation of Loretta Lynch as U.S. attorney general. [WFPL]

Remember when Kentucky enacted this legislation in 2013 and no one batted an eyelash? Thousands of people marched in Indiana’s largest city on Saturday to protest a state law that supporters contend promotes religious freedom but detractors see as a covert move to support discrimination against gay people. [Reuters]

If you can’t find the right people for these jobs you aren’t even trying to look for them. Period. [Business First]

Jeffersonville’s embarrassingly bad mayor has shown himself once more? [News & Tribune]

Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]

You A Pedestrian? Your Days Are Numbered

Walsh Construction won’t be cited after three workers were thrown into the Ohio River as they sought to retrieve a boat that had broken free from the downtown bridge construction site. [WDRB]

A year after two members of Congress asked for an investigation into the appraisal price of the planned Brownsboro Road VA Medical Center site, there has been no response and opponents are launching an 11th-hour appeal to persuade Veterans Affairs officials to pick another site. [C-J/AKN]

Three pedestrians in the Kentuckiana area were struck in three separate accidents within two hours Friday night. Nothing to see here, move along, Possibility City, compassion, transparency. [WHAS11]

The state Senate voted Friday to limit Kentucky’s debt, and the Senate president later said the chamber will search for another way to strengthen the state’s teacher pension system instead of the House-approved plan to borrow $3.3 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A local reporter was indicted for leaving the scene of a deadly crash. Police said Jeff Woods, a WHAS sports reporter, was driving a station vehicle when he hit a woman in downtown Louisville in January. [WLKY]

There’s good news and bad news for both parties, in a Pew Research poll out Thursday: Republicans are seen as extreme and intolerant but more trusted to handle international issues, while Democrats’ position as the party of the middle class doesn’t translate into an edge on the economy. [HuffPo]

Remember Debbie Fox? She’s the woman who half-assed everything so badly at Metro Animal Services that everyone threatened to resign unless Fischer moved her ASAP. Now she’s making mega bucks handling an agency that’s far more important. [WAVE3]

Indiana could be the first US state to introduce baby boxes – anonymous drop-off points designed to prevent the deaths of abandoned infants. [BBC]

Young people living in Louisville’s westernmost neighborhoods have less opportunities for physical, social and cognitive development than in other parts of the metropolitan area, according to findings of a recent study by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. [WFPL]

More jails are replacing face-to-face visits with video, passing the costs on to inmates. [Mother Jones]

Hillerich & Bradsby Co., maker of Louisville Slugger baseball bats, may be up for sale. [Business First]

The New Albany-Floyd County Public Library is looking for a new director. [News & Tribune]