Frankfort Harassment Scandal Still Front & Center

A mobile application concept developed by a team of eighth graders at Meyzeek Middle School has won the school $20,000, the students brand new tablets and now they’ll work with an expert to make their concept a reality. [WDRB]

At the Metropolitan Sewer District, board members and the executive director routinely use private accounts or personal smartphones to do agency business, sending emails or text messages to each other, the former chairman asserts. This is how Greg Fischer conducts business these days. He’s crapping his pants. [C-J/AKN]

We now know the theme of this year’s Thunder Over Louisville. The big reveal took place Tuesday morning with the help of six sponsors for the big day: A Boom with a View. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate said Monday he will rule this week whether the Legislative Research Commission must turn over all sexual harassment complaints involving lawmakers and staffers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Local first responders are facing a major life-and-death situation, and they’re not sure how to stop it from getting worse. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama wants to create a new government agency dedicated to keeping the nation’s food safe. [HuffPo]

A woman being booked into Louisville Metro Corrections was found to be carrying a possible explosive device. [WAVE3]

What can be proven beyond a doubt is that, even if underlying economic trends have increased inequality, Obama’s economic policies have reduced it sharply. [NY Magazine]

The plan to develop a Wal-Mart on Broadway and Dixie Highway is now heading to the Board of Zoning Adjustments—bringing the project just a couple steps away from construction. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is bringing in an all-star team led by Hill-veteran Antonia Ferrier. [Politico]

Following an uptick in office activity in 2014, the industrial vacancy rate in the Louisville area continued to fall in 2014 as absorption soared above 5.6 million square feet of warehouse inventory, according to a report by Louisville commercial real estate firm Commercial Kentucky Inc. [Business First]

The outlook for the May primary, and in some regards, the November general election, became clearer this week as several candidates filed in major New Albany races. [News & Tribune]

Will Walmart Ever Get Built In The West End?

Kentucky farmers have filed more than 20 federal lawsuits alleging a Swiss company distributed genetically-modified corn before gaining approval to sell it to China, harming exports to a leading buyer of U.S. corn. Sen. Paul Hornback, who chairs the state Senate’s agriculture committee, is among those who has sued Syngenta Corp. and its affiliates since Jan. 1 in U.S. District Court in Kentucky. Two lawsuits have been filed in Indiana and at least 300 nationwide against Syngenta already this year. [WDRB]

A Ford Motor Co. executive on Friday carefully skirted high-stakes questions about how the resurging automaker will handle labor contract negotiations this year with its hourly workers. [C-J/AKN]

Dozens gathered for a prayer vigil Wednesday afternoon hoping nothing will stand in the way of a proposed Walmart headed for west Louisville. [WHAS11]

State officials say highway fatalities in Kentucky increased last year after a record low in 2013. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another damn murder in Possibility City. [WLKY]

Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch attempted on Wednesday to tread a fine line on immigration, telling senators she believes President Barack Obama acted within his powers on deportation relief, but that she would respect the courts if they find his actions unconstitutional. [HuffPo]

A student from Breckinridge Metropolitan High School was severely injured on Tuesday after she fell out of a moving school bus, according to Ben Jackey, a spokesman for Jefferson County Public Schools. [WAVE3]

An attorney representing Democratic House Whip Johnny Bell of Glasgow says a motion sought in Franklin Circuit Court seeking to include Bell in a sexual harassment suit and accusing him of improperly dismissing a legislative staffer and illegal drug activity has “no basis whatsoever.” [Glasgow Daily Times]

More people than ever will help with an annual count of homeless in Louisville this week. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, the Republican Louisville investment manager who unsuccessfully challenged U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell in last year’s Republican primary, is making another run at statewide office, this time for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

GE Appliances CEO Chip Blankenship helped announce the formation of a new work-force development program called KY FAME at an event Wednesday at Jefferson Community and Technical College. [Business First]

The first hearing between the city of Jeffersonville and MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. regarding MAC’s asphalt plant has been pushed back. [News & Tribune]

Woah, Robert Felner’s Lackeys Just Won’t Quit

Extremists in Southern Indiana are losing their marbles over fluoride in the water. [WDRB]

Wal-Mart officials have not yet budged on making further changes in the layout of a West Broadway store long sought by city and Russell neighborhood leaders. And if they don’t redesign it, it would cast uncertainty on the status of the store in which the city has pledged millions of dollars in incentives. [C-J/AKN]

A 22nd birthday is supposed to be fun and laughter: cake, dinner, and dancing with friends. That’s what Caroline Fouts had planned for her special day on December 27th. [WHAS11]

The mail-processing center on Nandino Boulevard in Lexington will begin closing in June, according to a U.S. Postal Service schedule. [H-L]

Here’s a literal pee alert. What you’re drinking could actually be pee. And we’re not talking about Angel’s Envy. [WLKY]

The number of Americans struggling to pay medical bills fell last year for the first time in nearly a decade — the latest sign that Obamacare is making health care more affordable. [HuffPo]

Donna Hargens was pretty pissed that this was such a big deal. [WAVE3]

Here’s another good look at University of Louisville-Robert Felner lackey, John Deasy, getting caught by the U.S. Department of Education in the iPad scandal. Turns out the FBI focused on his relationship with Apple executives. Imagine that. [Click the Clicky]

As the U.S. Senate begins debating the Keystone XL pipeline bill, activists across the country are planning protests. [WFPL]

Oh, wait for it, here’s the sweet new gig John Deasy scored. He’s going to be training school superintendents. What a disaster. [LA Times]

New Albany residents and business owners will have three chances to speak their piece about a recently released street study. [Business First]

The four judges that oversee the Clark County Circuit Court named a new chief probation officer. [News & Tribune]

Enjoy The Holiday Break Cause 2015 Will Suck

Spoiler Alert: A gymnasium isn’t going to solve the problem. In the last 10 years, Wayne Blakey Sr. has seen a lot of violence near his home on River Park Drive in West Louisville. [WDRB]

Launched in September in four high-crime areas, Zones of Hope is a city initiative trying to tackle issues of education, unemployment and violence by focusing on young black males. [C-J/AKN]

It was a joyous welcome for Santa and his elves at the Wayside Christian Mission on Christmas Eve. With the help of the Louisville community, Santa brought presents for all the Mission’s residents, spending their holiday at the shelter. [WHAS11]

The University of Louisville has been awarded a $155,000 grant to map disease genes in horses. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! For one family, Christmas Eve isn’t just a holiday, but the anniversary of a devastating loss. [WLKY]

This is not the kind of bourbon that will get you excited. Researchers have identified the cause of a Kansas farmer’s mysterious death this summer as Bourbon virus. [HuffPo]

The rally at Jefferson Square in downtown Louisville was organized by the local group Man Up, and came just hours after another person was shot dead by police near St. Louis. Maybe in the future, they could hold a rally without one of the city’s most notorious bigots screaming into the microphone? [WAVE3]

The 2014 midterm elections saw a wave of Republican candidates elected and re-elected to federal office, many of whom are now rearing to make the environment their first casualty of the 114th Congress. As it turns out, the fossil fuel industry may have had something to do with that. [Think Progress]

Steve Beshear is heading into his final regularly scheduled legislative session next month, but he said he doesn’t believe that will hamper his ability to help get legislation passed in the 2015 General Assembly. [WFPL]

Here’s a fun read about Ambassador Matthew Barzun’s musical tastes. Just read between the lines. [BuzzFeed]

Churchill Downs Racetrack has named its latest track announcer. For some reason, a ton of folks wrote in asking for this link. Here you go. [Business First]

Amid public outcry over a new fee being assessed, the Clark County Commissioners declined to vote on an ordinance that would have facilitated the collection of the fee. [News & Tribune]

Housing Continues To Be An Afterthought Here

In November 2013, Mayor Greg Fischer formally declared Louisville’s interest in getting the same type of blazing-fast Internet connections that Google is bringing to a few select cities. More than a year later, two companies have expressed interest in bringing a fiber “gigabit” network to Louisville, but no work has begun. [WDRB]

Jefferson County has less public housing assistance than a year ago, long waiting lists and public housing remains heavily concentrated in west Louisville, according to the 2014 State of Metropolitan Housing Report released Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

The WHAS Crusade for Children is able to continue its noble mission of raising money for agencies, schools and hospitals to better the lives of special needs children, thanks to generous donations to the Crusade for Children Endowment fund. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Equine Education Project announced Friday that on Tuesday the board voted unanimously on a resolution stating that for the 2015 session it will not support casino legislation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Hundreds gathered at the Highland Baptist Church to remember the dozens killed this year here in Louisville. [WLKY]

An outgoing Senate Democrat wants to take federal money from low-income college students to pay student loan contractors, whose tactics toward borrowers have been criticized by consumer advocates, federal regulators and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. [HuffPo]

One week after a teenage girl was killed in Louisville’s West End, a new group is calling for residents to stop the violence and take back their communities. [WAVE3]

Ferguson, Mo., has captured the nation’s attention for the better part of the past four months. But in just a few short days in the national news, Eric Garner has become the political rallying point that Ferguson never has. A new poll shows considerably more unhappiness with the lack of an indictment in Garner’s case than in the one in Ferguson. And, perhaps most important as far as its impact goes, that unhappiness is significantly less connected to a person’s race. [WaPo]

Did anyone expect something less from one of the highest paid people in education? Please. Save the feigned outrage. As Michael McCall winds down his 16-year career as president of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, he will leave behind an operation that ran a budget deficit in his final three years. [WFPL]

Kentuckians have long known that Rand Paul’s outreach in the black community only started because he wants to run for the presidency. [Politico]

More than six months after construction started, Feast BBQ’s second location finally has an opening date. [Business First]

he Clark County Commissioners didn’t take any action on an ordinance that would add a $40 drainage fee to some residents’ property tax bills Thursday, but they heard about how unhappy some residents were about the new fee anyway. [News & Tribune]

Homeless Kids? What Homeless Kids? Surely Not

Here’s your annual Greg Fischer Pee Alert: Citing his progress in making Louisville a globally-regarded city for caring and compassion, a coalition of international organizations has honored Mayor Greg Fischer with a City Leadership award for compassion. [Lane Report PR Regurgitation]

Nakiya Crawford hasn’t seen her father in more than a year. Crawford Confessed, “I don’t talk about it much.” [WDRB]

On a bus trip with 18 western Louisville residents to see how sustainable power plants turn waste into energy, Keith S. Hackett, assistant director of the Metro Department of Public Works, wondered aloud how much tax money could be saved. [C-J/AKN]

For one east Louisville family, early mornings are about getting in the yard and enjoying quiet time. Recently, the family experienced a big scare during their morning routine. [WHAS11]

A Superintendent Screening Committee will be formed to help the Fayette County school board select a new leader for the district. Under state law, the committee must include one parent, who will be elected by the presidents of the PTA or parent organization at all of the district schools. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Once again all eyes are on Ferguson as the nation waits for the grand jury’s decision on whether to indict Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson for firing the shots that killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. [WLKY]

The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation’s high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence. [HuffPo]

The possibility of a labor strike looms after tempers rose during a Metropolitan Sewer District Board meeting. [WAVE3]

In Mitch McConnell’s world, it doesn’t matter who works in his Hill office, who left for K Street or who runs his campaign, almost everyone calls the Kentucky Republican “Boss.” [Politico]

Kentucky’s community college system offers little accountability in its presidential search. [WFPL]

After saying “no” last April, the Kentucky Court of Appeals said Friday that it now will hear oral arguments on two lawsuits that threaten the financial stability of most of the state’s public libraries, including Rowan. [The Morehead News]

The KFC Yum! Center will be at the heart of March Madness in 2016. [Business First]

A national watchdog organization for issues pertaining to church and state separation sent a letter to New Albany regarding Saturday’s 46th Annual Mayor’s Community Prayer Breakfast. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Needs A New Frankfort Leader Now

A state audit released in May found that JCPS is spending too much on high-dollar administrators, and not enough on students. Six months later, the district gets a new progress report with a grade school leaders did not see coming. [WDRB]

Walmart has filed a development plan with the city for its much-anticipated western Louisville store just southwest of Broadway and 18th Street. [C-J/AKN]

In a state that leads the nation in lung cancer cases, Kentucky is turning its attention to small but growing group: lung cancer survivors. [WHAS11]

In a surprise announcement Wednesday, House Speaker Pro Tem Larry Clark said he will not seek re-election to the chamber’s No. 2 post he has held since 1993. [H-L]

A Louisville man who admitted to killing a woman while driving drunk wants to get out of prison early but prosecutors say he needs to spend more time behind bars. [WLKY]

In some American cities, up to 40 percent of households don’t have an Internet connection, according to a new analysis based on census data. [HuffPo]

Abramson said he would advise local politicians across the country that their work shouldn’t be about big developments. “If you can’t pick up the garbage, if you can’t get recycling picked up, if you can’t fill the potholes, then no community’s going to give you the opportunity and support when, as an example, I decided to expand the airport, relocate 4,000 people and 180 businesses and 11 churches,” Abramson said. “That was a monumental decision.” [WAVE3]

More than two dozen advisers to Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul converged inside a boutique Washington hotel Wednesday to begin to form the skeleton of a 2016 presidential campaign. [U.S. News]

The group behind a project to build a botanical garden on Louisville’s waterfront will unveil its master plan. [WFPL]

Some spectacular jumps in generic drug prices have been exposed in an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. [CBS News]

Ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft are banned from picking up customers at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. [Business First]

The city of Jeffersonville revoked the zoning permit from MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. last week that allowed it to operate an asphalt plant at the Hanson-Atkins Quarry. [News & Tribune]