No, Voting Machines Are Not To Blame

Can you imagine if there were accountability like this for Jim Ramsey and the University of Louisville? Of course you can’t, don’t even try. [WDRB]

Surely no one is surprised that Greg Fischer and his crew tried to pull the wool over the eyes of everyone in the West End. [C-J/AKN]

Indiana’s first statewide program that pays for addiction and mental health treatment for convicted felons sent to community corrections instead of jail or prison is now underway. [WHAS11]

In case you thought the Republican Party of Kentucky was going to actually accomplish something? It no longer has a full-time chairman. A wealthy figurehead does not a functioning party make. Mac Brown is the next chairman of the Republican Party of Kentucky. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police say a 16-year-old boy stabbed his father in the chest Monday morning at a home on Saint Claire Drive. [WLKY]

When it comes to accreditors, the private organizations paid by colleges to help them maintain access to nearly $150 billion annually in federal student aid, the U.S. Department of Education seems to think sunlight is the best disinfectant. [HuffPo]

Of course John Boel is back to fearmongering. Leave it to him to try to crap all over needle exchanges. [WAVE3]

From last week but more relevant today. Just a reminder – the people screaming about alleged voting machine rigging have no clue what they’re talking about. They’re the folks who get everything they know about politics from MSNBC and have no concept of what goes on in Kentucky. [Page One]

Kentucky’s next state auditor, Danville Republican Rep. Mike Harmon, said he’s not sure if he’ll continue the investigation of the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees and its relationship with the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the school’s $1.1 billion endowment. [WFPL]

Three major companies, citing the under-representation of minorities in science and technology fields, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold affirmative action in university admissions in a closely watched case to be argued next month. [Reuters]

Almost Family Inc. has acquired Home Care by Black Stone, a Kenwood, Ohio-based nursing services provider, for $40 million. [Business First]

Community members are invited to help shape the future of their town by attending the “Envision South Clarksville” workshop for the South Clarksville Redevelopment Plan starting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10, at Ohio Falls United Methodist Church, 917 S. Virginia Ave., Clarksville. [News & Tribune]

West End Methane Plant Fun Continues

On Tuesday, voters in Clark County voted in resounding fashion to quash a move to bring in millions of extra tax dollars to improve school buildings. [WDRB]

Nature’s Methane is offering a coalition of western Louisville leaders and organizations around $5 million in gifts and investments as it tries to move forward with its plan to build a controversial methane plant fueled by food waste in the California neighborhood, according to several sources familiar with the negotiations. [C-J/AKN]

Pat Mulvihill has been elected to the job of 10th district councilman. He’s ready to help his constituents, but unlike his predecessor, the embattled Economy Inn won’t be his top priority. [WHAS11]

The latest report on coal production and employment in Kentucky reinforces how far and fast the industry has fallen. [H-L]

The date has been set for the public celebration on the Downtown Bridge. [WLKY]

The long-awaited text of a landmark U.S.-backed Pacific trade deal was released on Thursday, revealing the details of a pact aimed at freeing up commerce in 40 percent of the world’s economy but criticized for its opacity. [HuffPo]

Patrick Mulvihill may be serving the shortest term of any local political elected Tuesday, but he says he plans to make the most of it. [WAVE3]

ProPublica and Frontline reopen the investigation into a death squad run by former South Vietnamese military men that killed journalists, torched businesses and intimidated those who challenged its dream of re-starting the Vietnam War — all on American soil. [ProPublica]

AT&T has filed a protest against a Kentucky state government project to expand broadband fiber throughout the state. The telecommunications giant claims KentuckyWired has an unfair advantage in the bidding process. In its protest, AT&T states KentuckyWired “almost certainly has confidential, inside information that no other bidder could have.” AT&T said KentuckyWired Executive Director Steve Rucker was deputy secretary of the state’s Finance and Administration Cabinet when the agency started developing its request for proposal. [WFPL]

America is undergoing a religious polarization. With more adults shedding their religious affiliations, as evidenced in the latest from the Pew Research Center, the country is becoming more secular. In the past seven years, using the new Pew data, Americans who identify with a religion declined six points. Overall, belief in God, praying daily and religious service attendance have all dropped since 2007. [WaPo]

Shares of Louisville-based Papa John’s International Inc. plunged Wednesday, following the company’s third-quarter earnings report yesterday. By the end of the trading day, shares were down $8.22 per share, or 12.08 percent, to $59.83. [Business First]

Clark County election results were left open-ended into early morning Wednesday as close to 1,000 absentee ballots were in question countywide because a voting machine couldn’t read them. [News & Tribune]

More Puppies & Rainbows For Metro Govt

Another day, another pedestrian hit in Possibility Compassionate City. [WDRB]

Western Louisville residents will have an opportunity to question the Metropolitan Sewer District about building a massive storage basin beneath Shawnee Park at a public meeting next Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

On Election Day people in southern Indiana decided they liked the direction their cities are going. Both New Albany and Jeffersonville decided to re-elect their current mayors for another term. [WHAS11]

There was no shortage of story lines in the Fasig-Tipton sales pavilion Sunday evening, from the bittersweet parting a couple of years in the making to the family who, once again, wasn’t that upset to leave some money on the table and take one of its favorite girls back home. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In Jeffersonville, Mike Moore will serve another term as mayor. [WLKY]

Law enforcement officers accused of sexual misconduct have jumped from job to job — and at times faced fresh allegations that include raping women — because of a tattered network of laws and lax screening that allowed them to stay on the beat. [HuffPo]

Residents are concerned Germantown is becoming too populated with bars and restaurants that will disrupt the neighborhood. [WAVE3]

President Obama on Monday mocked Republican presidential candidates as thin-skinned for lashing out at CNBC over the network’s handling of last week’s primary debate. [The Hill]

Economy Inn, the troubled motel on Bardstown Road, has passed its latest inspection by the Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, a Republican political novice, wealthy Louisville businessman and Tea Party favorite, was elected Kentucky’s next governor on Tuesday, a victory that could herald a new era in a state where Democrats have held the governor’s mansion for all but four of the last 44 years. The Associated Press declared Mr. Bevin the winner shortly after 8 p.m. [NY Times]

This is in an alternate universe, right? Louisville Metro Government has earned the rank of the second best digital city in the U.S., according to a new survey released by e.Republic’s Center for Digital Government. [Business First]

Comments collected at five public workshops are coming together to provide a vision for Clarksville’s future. [News & Tribune]

Death & Destruction In The “Compassionate City”

A Rowan County man has been arrested in connection with a body that was found inside a wooden box in Louisville. [WKYT]

Giving up on the West End is the last thing the West End needs right now. A well-known West Louisville pastor — who has spent the last 10 plus years trying to help reduce the crime and violence — is leaving the neighborhood. [WDRB]

The former principal of Louisville Male High School, fired last year amid investigations finding standardized testing improprieties, has filed a lawsuit against Jefferson County Public Schools claiming he was wrongfully fired and defamed. [C-J/AKN]

“Fifty feet from my front door, I saw a corpse.” And that shocking scene prompted dozens of people to pack into a small room in the Salvation Army on Beecher Street. [WHAS11]

In their last debate before voters go to the polls next Tuesday, Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway continued to trade jabs, but in the end, one candidate did manage to compliment the other. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Jeffersonville has seen a lot of growth over the past few years, and the two candidates for mayor said they’re the best choice for continued growth. [WLKY]

The White House on Monday slammed FBI Director James Comey’s notion that pervasive cellphone footage featuring police actions has led to an uptick in violent crime. [HuffPo]

Monday evening the Jefferson County Public School board voted to hire two search firms. You can thank Donna Hargens for this unnecessary spending. [WAVE3]

A new report reveals multiple errors and hundreds of cases missing from federal data on fatal police shootings. [Mother Jones]

Residents of Louisville Metro Council District 10 — which includes parts of the Highlands, Germantown, Camp Taylor and Buechel — will elect a new council member next week. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, the Republican running for governor who’s been called a “pathological liar” in ads by his opponent, Democrat Jack Conway, told Conway to “stop lying to people” during a contentious debate Sunday evening at Eastern Kentucky University. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville’s Power Creative advertising agency is preparing to spin off a new business, which will be led by Power Creative CEO David Power, and it could be open for business as early as Dec. 1. [Business First]

Eight local manufacturers, service companies and trucking companies have filed suit against the city of New Albany, New Albany Mayor Jeff Gahan, the Floyd County Commissioners, Indiana Department of Transportation and other government agencies alleging that a recent redesign of East Main Street has negatively affected their right to safely access the street. [News & Tribune]

Powell’s The Devil & Not Athletics Honchos?

A Missouri company has dropped plans to buy land near Louisville International Airport viewed as a potential site for one of the city’s largest industrial buildings. [WDRB]

Facing a gauntlet of questions from western Louisville residents, the head of the Metropolitan Sewer District said his agency favors putting a proposed 20 million gallon underground waste basin in Shawnee Park’s Great Lawn rather than a more intrusive maintenance site closer to neighbors’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Katina Powell said she has no problems admitting to her involvement in the alleged strip shows and sex acts she said happened at UofL Minardi’s Hall from 2010-2014. [WHAS11]

The owner of KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell plans to spin off its China business into a separate, publicly traded company. [H-L]

With U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell urging a boycott of a federal rule to cut carbon emissions from power plants, a Kentucky citizen’s group is coming up with its own plan. And it’ll get absolutely nowhere because this is Kentucky, not the real world. [WLKY]

After a recent federal report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration called for an end to conversion therapy for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth, survivors of the practice joined HuffPost Live last week to discuss their traumatic experiences. [HuffPo]

What? WAVE slut-shaming someone for revealing what goes on at the University of Louisville? SURELY NOT! [WAVE3]

Civil rights lawyers are using a new strategy to change a common court practice that they have long argued unfairly targets the poor. At issue is the way courts across the country sometimes issue arrest warrants for indigent people when they fall behind on paying court fees and fines owed for minor offenses like traffic tickets. [NPR]

Jefferson County is vying for part of a huge pot of federal money meant to make communities more resilient during natural disasters. [WFPL]

The myth of welfare’s corrupting influence on the poor. Does welfare corrupt the poor? Few ideas are so deeply ingrained in the American popular imagination as the belief that government aid for poor people will just encourage bad behavior. [NY Times]

Industrial Terrorplex, a haunted house attraction at 835 Spring St. in Jeffersonville, will close its doors after Halloween wraps up at the end of this month, and construction could start on the next phase for the property by January. The owners of Industrial Terrorplex, Todd Moore and Terry Campbell, agreed to sell the property last year to Jeffersonville-based New Hope Services Inc., which planned to renovate the building into a senior housing facility. [Business First]

Stemming from two outstanding payments from the County Council, the option of suspending services to parts of the county will come to the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter at the Animal Control Authority meeting next month. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun Humana Things Happening…

Wait, 448 square feet is tiny? In May, WDRB took you to Louisville’s very first permanent tiny house, which had just broken ground. Five months later, we take you inside now that the house is finished. [WDRB]

In her first comments to a reporter since the publication of her book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” Katina Powell said in a brief interview Friday that her daughters support the book in which she claims she provided them as escorts for University of Louisville players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

After months of community meetings discussing the site for the proposed West Louisville FoodPort, organizers held an event to celebrate the season as well share more information about the project Saturday. [WHAS11]

Democrat Andy Beshear and Republican Whitney Westerfield are the men publicly running to be Kentucky’s next attorney general. But behind the scenes, scores of corporations, wealthy businessmen, lawyers, lobbyists and labor unions have given several million dollars to two independent groups loosely affiliated with the Democratic and Republican parties, which are spending that money on a barrage of attack ads meant to influence voters. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A triple shooting in Louisville’s Portland neighborhood leaves two dead and one injured. [WLKY]

Migrants streaming across the Balkans reached Slovenia on Saturday, diverted overnight by the closure of Hungary’s border with Croatia in the latest demonstration of Europe’s disjointed response to the flow of people reaching its borders. [HuffPo]

Of all the things that are hard to understand, shots fired at a visitation are near the top of the list. Especially, when it was gun fire that claimed the life of the 22-year-old in the casket. [WAVE3]

Maybe we’ll take homelessness this seriously in Louisville some day. Hawaii’s governor has signed an emergency proclamation to deal with the problem of homelessness, saying the state faces the country’s highest per capita rate of homelessness and more needs to be done to house the indigent. [Reuters]

West Louisville residents are organizing against a proposed biodigester plant, where organic waste would be converted into methane gas. The efforts come as Louisville Metro officials — including Mayor Greg Fischer — and the energy company behind the proposal work to educate the community about the technology. [WFPL]

It used to be a given: When your kids reached school age, they’d strap on their backpacks and head for the neighborhood elementary school. Or, you’d pay a hefty tuition to send them to private school. In the last two decades, a third option has emerged. Today, there are more than 6,000 charter schools in the country. And lately, they’ve been the subject of passionate and often acrimonious debate about the right way to fix public education in America. [NPR]

The guests have arrived, the band is playing and bride and groom are meeting at the altar. Then the chaplain asks, “does anyone object?” That’s the question Monday for insurers Humana Inc. and Aetna Inc., as shareholders of both companies vote on whether to approve a merger that would combine Humana’s growing Medicare business with Aetna’s portfolio to create the second-largest managed-care company in the United States. [Business First]

Legislation, its effects on funding public schools and the advent of major changes in public education are the discussion table for a meeting of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education on Wednesday, Oct. 21. [News & Tribune]

Now The KSB Is On A PR Spin Push

The Kentucky School for the Blind brings visually impaired kids together with a day of fun outside on the track. [WDRB]

Louisville isn’t green yet, another study concludes. As green as city officials like to call Louisville, studies continue to show we rank poorly in a number of environmental indicators — the latest coming from a personal finance website, WalletHub. [C-J/AKN]

If you have any concerns about the proposed methane plant in West Louisville, then mark your calendars for a chance to weigh in. [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ordered Kentucky’s Democratic governor to weigh in on whether altered marriage licenses issued by Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis’ office are valid. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The investigation continues into a body that was found Tuesday in a box in the Fairdale area. [WLKY]

Just like the Islamic State, radical domestic hate groups can use social media to spread messages and inspire attacks in the United States, a top counterterrorism official said Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The search continues for two men accused of beating up a man on his bicycle who says he was just minding his own business. It happened last month along Dixie Highway. A restaurant server witnessed the attack and was able to stop it. According to the police report, they just started punching him and kicking him for no apparent reason. [WAVE3]

From his first days as commander in chief, the drone has been President Barack Obama’s weapon of choice, used by the military and the CIA to hunt down and kill the people his administration has deemed — through secretive processes, without indictment or trial — worthy of execution. There has been intense focus on the technology of remote killing, but that often serves as a surrogate for what should be a broader examination of the state’s power over life and death. [The Intercept]

David Jones knew there was extensive unrest. Stephanie Horne knew there was extensive unrest. But Jones is being pretty honest while Horne is feigning surprise. A real shame the community doesn’t get better representation on the board. [WFPL]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto has a small army of recruiters who blanket the state to persuade high school students to attend the state’s flagship university. [Ashland Independent]

Kroger Co. is the nation’s largest supermarket chain, and now it’s claiming another title, Forbes reports. The Cincinnati-based grocer will begin offering transgender workers full health benefits on Jan. 1, including surgery and drug therapy for gender reassignment. The move makes Kroger, the nation’s fifth-largest employer, the largest retail chain to offer such benefits to its employees. [Business First]

Floyd County is not immune to the heroin problem in Southern Indiana. And with the drug use comes another issue — discarded syringes and needles being thrown in streets and yards. [News & Tribune]