We Were First! Kentucky Hated The Gays Before Indiana

Just in case you needed another instance of Greg Fischer having no idea what he’s talking about. He’s to be applauded on the needle exchange front but we all know he didn’t “misspeak” — he just had no idea what was going on. [WDRB]

Oh, now David Jones wants a closer look at the JCPS budget? How convenient. He thinks he can sit on his hands for ages and only wake up after tension boils over the top. [C-J/AKN]

A man found dead after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood in West Louisville has now been identified. [WHAS11]

For the first time in the history of this tobacco state, the House voted on — and passed — a bill to ban indoor smoking statewide in workplaces and other public spaces, such as bars and restaurants. And then the Senate assigned House Bill 145 to its Committee on Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection, where it saw no further action. [H-L]

Way to go, Louisville, now your old people are shooting each other. [WLKY]

The National Collegiate Athletic Association expressed concern Thursday with a new “religious freedom” law in Indiana that could open the door to legalized discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. [HuffPo]

Watching this AirBnB slap fight between Greg Fischer and the Metro Council is tons of fun. [WAVE3]

There is significant evidence that cop cams cut down on most civilian complaints. But a close examination of violent encounters with the police caught on tape suggests that even with seemingly incontrovertible video evidence, questions will often linger. The kind of sea change that police reform activists desire will still likely escape them. [HuffPo]

African American leaders in Louisville are speaking out against Kentucky’s U.S. senators and their efforts to block the confirmation of Loretta Lynch as U.S. attorney general. [WFPL]

Remember when Kentucky enacted this legislation in 2013 and no one batted an eyelash? Thousands of people marched in Indiana’s largest city on Saturday to protest a state law that supporters contend promotes religious freedom but detractors see as a covert move to support discrimination against gay people. [Reuters]

If you can’t find the right people for these jobs you aren’t even trying to look for them. Period. [Business First]

Jeffersonville’s embarrassingly bad mayor has shown himself once more? [News & Tribune]

Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]

You A Pedestrian? Your Days Are Numbered

Walsh Construction won’t be cited after three workers were thrown into the Ohio River as they sought to retrieve a boat that had broken free from the downtown bridge construction site. [WDRB]

A year after two members of Congress asked for an investigation into the appraisal price of the planned Brownsboro Road VA Medical Center site, there has been no response and opponents are launching an 11th-hour appeal to persuade Veterans Affairs officials to pick another site. [C-J/AKN]

Three pedestrians in the Kentuckiana area were struck in three separate accidents within two hours Friday night. Nothing to see here, move along, Possibility City, compassion, transparency. [WHAS11]

The state Senate voted Friday to limit Kentucky’s debt, and the Senate president later said the chamber will search for another way to strengthen the state’s teacher pension system instead of the House-approved plan to borrow $3.3 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A local reporter was indicted for leaving the scene of a deadly crash. Police said Jeff Woods, a WHAS sports reporter, was driving a station vehicle when he hit a woman in downtown Louisville in January. [WLKY]

There’s good news and bad news for both parties, in a Pew Research poll out Thursday: Republicans are seen as extreme and intolerant but more trusted to handle international issues, while Democrats’ position as the party of the middle class doesn’t translate into an edge on the economy. [HuffPo]

Remember Debbie Fox? She’s the woman who half-assed everything so badly at Metro Animal Services that everyone threatened to resign unless Fischer moved her ASAP. Now she’s making mega bucks handling an agency that’s far more important. [WAVE3]

Indiana could be the first US state to introduce baby boxes – anonymous drop-off points designed to prevent the deaths of abandoned infants. [BBC]

Young people living in Louisville’s westernmost neighborhoods have less opportunities for physical, social and cognitive development than in other parts of the metropolitan area, according to findings of a recent study by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. [WFPL]

More jails are replacing face-to-face visits with video, passing the costs on to inmates. [Mother Jones]

Hillerich & Bradsby Co., maker of Louisville Slugger baseball bats, may be up for sale. [Business First]

The New Albany-Floyd County Public Library is looking for a new director. [News & Tribune]

Jones Shenanigans Will Plague The School Board

Ruh ro. It’s a rare morning roundup from Jake and not some college kid trying to score some intern credits.

We told you ages ago this was happening! There’s more where this came from, particularly on the communications front. Just watch. A close associate of Jefferson County Board of Education Chairman David Jones Jr. was one of four people who vetted and interviewed candidates for a high-level Jefferson County Public Schools job last year — despite a state law that prohibits school board members from playing any role in the hiring of district personnel. [Toni Konz]

The sides are lining up for what may be the last battle over the design of a planned Wal-Mart superstore at Broadway and Dixie Highway. [C-J/AKN]

LG&E said there was an explosion and fire at the Cane Run sub-station in PRP, just after 1 a.m. on Sunday. [WHAS11]

A quarter of a century ago, “inadequate” was a kind description for many schools in Kentucky. School districts relied heavily on local property taxes for funding, which meant children in poor counties with small property-tax bases sometimes sold candy or magazines to help keep the lights on at school. [H-L]

Guess there are no crazy ass murders to solve or anything. Two women were arrested on prostitution charges following an undercover LMPD operation. [WLKY]

One of the few bipartisan goals that President Barack Obama and Republicans agree on is comprehensive reform of the tax system, but Democrats cried foul Friday as GOP leaders in the House began passing permanent tax cuts that opponents believe would make that reform harder. [HuffPo]

Some of those putting up with the tunnel blasting and traffic stoppages for the construction of the new east end bridge may need to be reminded why the project is going underground before going across the river. [WAVE3]

A married same-sex couple on Friday asked a federal court to force Indiana state and county officials to name both of the women as parents on their newborn son’s birth certificate. [Reuters]

The passing rate for Kentuckians taking the GED has improved since the national high school equivalency exam underwent changes in 2014, according to Kentucky Adult Education officials. [WFPL]

It was a wildly busy week in the Kentucky General Assembly as the Democratic-controlled House sprang into overdrive, passing a bevy of bills after the Senate had done the same in the session’s first week. [Ronnie Ellis]

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated, the nation’s largest independent Coca-Cola bottler, plans to cut the ribbon on a new sales and distribution center in Louisville on Monday. [Business First]

The Floyd County Election Board has been working on improving the voting process since the day after the November election, when some voters stood in line more than two hours to cast a ballot. [News & Tribune]

What On Earth Is Wrong With JCPS These Days?

Everything people want to know about the Ohio River Bridges Project can now be learned in one hour. [WDRB]

An attorney for Louisville Water Co. chief executive Jim Brammell wants a judge to throw out the results from a breathalyzer that was used following his August arrest and determined Brammell’s breath alcohol level was more than twice the legal limit allowed to drive in Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

The bleachers were filled at Stopher Elementary School with Lauren Eason’s students. 130 are in her class this year but almost all will pass through her inventive classroom before they go to middle school. She wants no students left out. [WHAS11]

The bourbon was flowing and, at least in one Washington ballroom, a spirit of bipartisanship broke out Tuesday night, courtesy of Kentucky’s distillers. [H-L]

Jefferson County Public Schools officials are responding to what police say is surveillance video showing a school resource officer twice assaulting students. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama’s budget for fiscal year 2016 includes a major change for legally married same-sex couples, making them eligible to receive Social Security spousal benefits regardless of where they live. Currently, these couples are unable to get such benefits if they live in a state that does not recognize their marriage. [HuffPo]

What the heck is wrong in Clark County? A woman was trusted with the care of hundreds of inmates, until she became one of them. [WAVE3]

A group of Republican and Democratic lawmakers will begin their second attempt on Wednesday to introduce a bill that would reform the Renewable Fuel Standards (RFS) program in the United States, targeting an end to ethanol fuel-blending mandates. [Reuters]

Rose Mollyhorn, 52, has spent most of her life within a 12-block area of Louisville’s Portland neighborhood, and she’s seen drastic change over those years. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says Common Core contains anti-American history… but it doesn’t have history requirements. [Think Progress]

Some Ford Motor Co. employees in Louisville will be kicked into a higher pay bracket because of the automaker’s plans to hire workers elsewhere in the U.S. The raise will amount to an approximately $9 per hour increase. [Business First]

Clark County Commissioner Rick Stephenson appeared in Jeffersonville City Court on Friday for a hearing following his drunken-driving arrest on Christmas Eve. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Harassment Scandal Still Front & Center

A mobile application concept developed by a team of eighth graders at Meyzeek Middle School has won the school $20,000, the students brand new tablets and now they’ll work with an expert to make their concept a reality. [WDRB]

At the Metropolitan Sewer District, board members and the executive director routinely use private accounts or personal smartphones to do agency business, sending emails or text messages to each other, the former chairman asserts. This is how Greg Fischer conducts business these days. He’s crapping his pants. [C-J/AKN]

We now know the theme of this year’s Thunder Over Louisville. The big reveal took place Tuesday morning with the help of six sponsors for the big day: A Boom with a View. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate said Monday he will rule this week whether the Legislative Research Commission must turn over all sexual harassment complaints involving lawmakers and staffers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Local first responders are facing a major life-and-death situation, and they’re not sure how to stop it from getting worse. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama wants to create a new government agency dedicated to keeping the nation’s food safe. [HuffPo]

A woman being booked into Louisville Metro Corrections was found to be carrying a possible explosive device. [WAVE3]

What can be proven beyond a doubt is that, even if underlying economic trends have increased inequality, Obama’s economic policies have reduced it sharply. [NY Magazine]

The plan to develop a Wal-Mart on Broadway and Dixie Highway is now heading to the Board of Zoning Adjustments—bringing the project just a couple steps away from construction. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is bringing in an all-star team led by Hill-veteran Antonia Ferrier. [Politico]

Following an uptick in office activity in 2014, the industrial vacancy rate in the Louisville area continued to fall in 2014 as absorption soared above 5.6 million square feet of warehouse inventory, according to a report by Louisville commercial real estate firm Commercial Kentucky Inc. [Business First]

The outlook for the May primary, and in some regards, the November general election, became clearer this week as several candidates filed in major New Albany races. [News & Tribune]

Will Walmart Ever Get Built In The West End?

Kentucky farmers have filed more than 20 federal lawsuits alleging a Swiss company distributed genetically-modified corn before gaining approval to sell it to China, harming exports to a leading buyer of U.S. corn. Sen. Paul Hornback, who chairs the state Senate’s agriculture committee, is among those who has sued Syngenta Corp. and its affiliates since Jan. 1 in U.S. District Court in Kentucky. Two lawsuits have been filed in Indiana and at least 300 nationwide against Syngenta already this year. [WDRB]

A Ford Motor Co. executive on Friday carefully skirted high-stakes questions about how the resurging automaker will handle labor contract negotiations this year with its hourly workers. [C-J/AKN]

Dozens gathered for a prayer vigil Wednesday afternoon hoping nothing will stand in the way of a proposed Walmart headed for west Louisville. [WHAS11]

State officials say highway fatalities in Kentucky increased last year after a record low in 2013. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another damn murder in Possibility City. [WLKY]

Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch attempted on Wednesday to tread a fine line on immigration, telling senators she believes President Barack Obama acted within his powers on deportation relief, but that she would respect the courts if they find his actions unconstitutional. [HuffPo]

A student from Breckinridge Metropolitan High School was severely injured on Tuesday after she fell out of a moving school bus, according to Ben Jackey, a spokesman for Jefferson County Public Schools. [WAVE3]

An attorney representing Democratic House Whip Johnny Bell of Glasgow says a motion sought in Franklin Circuit Court seeking to include Bell in a sexual harassment suit and accusing him of improperly dismissing a legislative staffer and illegal drug activity has “no basis whatsoever.” [Glasgow Daily Times]

More people than ever will help with an annual count of homeless in Louisville this week. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, the Republican Louisville investment manager who unsuccessfully challenged U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell in last year’s Republican primary, is making another run at statewide office, this time for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

GE Appliances CEO Chip Blankenship helped announce the formation of a new work-force development program called KY FAME at an event Wednesday at Jefferson Community and Technical College. [Business First]

The first hearing between the city of Jeffersonville and MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. regarding MAC’s asphalt plant has been pushed back. [News & Tribune]