Another Day, Another Compassionate Murder In Fischer’s Transparent City

MetroSafe dispatchers have confirmed that homicide detectives are investigating after a man’s body was found on the ground in the west end. [WDRB]

Activists said Sunday that the police shooting of a black man in Old Louisville a day earlier illustrates their claim that officers too often use excessive force to subdue people of color, and they said they hope it leads to police measures to increase transparency. [C-J/AKN]

Owning a home doesn’t come cheap and costs of maintenance and repairs to both inside as well as outside can add up. For the elderly and disabled, paying for the costs isn’t always easy. [WHAS11]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [H-L]

A Kentucky company that’s a top maker of whiskey and other spirits is buying a southern Indiana lumber mill that will turn out wooden segments for its bourbon barrels. Louisville, Kentucky-based Brown-Forman Corp. will spend $12 million to buy and expand that Owen County mill. [WLKY]

Any city struggling to house its residents should look no further than Houston for a few pointers. [HuffPo]

While facts began to surface about Saturday’s officer-involved shooting, local activists came together Sunday to discuss the fatal event. Their main concern is that they say the officer used unnecessary force. [WAVE3]

A group led by anti-gay pastor Rick Scarborough is vowing to defy any ruling by the Supreme Court that recognizes same-sex marriage. Louisville’s Six Flags Over Jesus is part of the group. [ThinkProgress]

A dramatic decline in Kentuckians earning GED diplomas over the last two years has led some lawmakers to question the current version of the test, which rolled out in January of 2014. [WFPL]

Workers are putting the finishing touches on rows of barracks in a 50-acre camp here, the largest immigration detention center in the country. It houses thousands of women and their children who were caught crossing the border illegally and are seeking asylum in the United States. [NY Times]

Nature’s Methane, an Indiana-based biofuel company, has plans to build not one but two biofuel facilities in west Louisville. [Business First]

The Louisville Metro Corrections officer who was charged with driving drunk along Spring Street and almost striking a patrol car before crashing through the Jeffersonville Overlook last year was sentenced to one year probation with a hefty price tag. [News & Tribune]

It’s Positive UofL Spin Time Again

Another day, another horrific death in Possibility City. Don’t worry, everything is fine, we have bike lanes in white neighborhoods. (What? We’re still not supposed to talk about the racial divide in this city?) [WDRB]

American Pharoah blew into racing immortality Saturday, his 51/2-length victory over Frosted in the Belmont Stakes making him racing’s first Triple Crown winner since 1978 and only the 12th ever to sweep the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer can give away tens of millions of dollars to Cordish for literally doing nothing. He can cut WIC programs in half, which are pocket change by comparison. But he can still afford to sink $7.4 million into non-essentials — including a $300,000 swimming pool filter. [WHAS11]

Dr. David Jones is still impressed by the sight of it: A smiling fast-food worker taking the time to feed a disabled woman her favorite meal, a steak burrito. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! We sadly hear this isn’t the only Trinity teacher up to no good. The school has allegedly shipped teachers off to other parts of the state when catching them up to no good in the past, as well. [WLKY]

American Pharoah has cemented his misspelled name among horse racing royalty, claiming the Triple Crown with his win at the Belmont Stakes on Saturday, a feat not done since 1978. [HuffPo]

A southern Indiana county is facing a sharp increase in hepatitis C cases, but officials say it’s too soon to seek state permission for a needle-exchange program. [WAVE3]

According to data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the leading causes of cancer death are generally the same across the country. [Click the Clicky]

Researchers at Louisville’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center have found a new way to treat advanced melanoma using the herpes simplex 1 virus. [WFPL]

Thousands gathered in St. Paul, Minnesota Saturday afternoon to march in protest of the growing network of tar sands pipelines in America, singling out one pipeline — the Alberta Clipper — in particular. [ThinkProgress]

UofL is mired in controversy so it’s time for some PR spin. The University of Louisville has found its leader for the recently announced UL Additive Manufacturing Competency Center, a partnership with UL LLC, a global safety science company. [Business First]

Health officials are still searching for “patient zero” seven months after detecting HIV among drug users in the small, rural town of Austin. [News & Tribune]

Happy Greg Fischer Rainbow Funtimes

Bank Street in Portland could become the new E. Market Street in Nulu. A new soccer stadium for the Louisville City Football Club could be built in West Louisville. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police have opened an in-custody death review after a man who police handcuffed late Saturday became unresponsive and died soon after. [C-J/AKN]

A salary review is underway for six top UofL officials, including president James Ramsey. [WHAS11]

Health insurance costs will probably jump by 10 percent or more next year for many Kentuckians buying coverage through Kynect, the state-run insurance exchange created under the federal Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

An activist and a University of Louisville doctor are shining light on gun violence in the city. [WLKY]

A majority of Democratic members in the House and Senate have now signed on to letters rebuking the Obama administration for expanding the practice of detaining immigrant women and children. [HuffPo]

Oh, look, people are finally realizing that Greg Fischer is an entitled d-bag. Kind of like the Brown Family found out after it was too late. [WAVE3]

American Pharoah drew the favorable post number five for the 147th running of the Belmont Stakes on Saturday when the colt looks to become the first Triple Crown winner in nearly four decades. [Reuters]

Is this the “essence and spirit” of Louisville or of every other modern building in every other generic city on earth? It’s not ugly but it’s certainly not got anything Louisville about it. [WFPL]

College admissions take a crucial factor into account that could be creating enormous racial bias, but it’s not grades or extracurricular activities or even SAT scores. It’s a student’s disciplinary record. [ThinkProgress]

The LG&E Center, the downtown office tower at 220 W. Main St., has a new owner. [Business First]

Citing more time for review, the Jeffersonville Board of Public Works has twice tabled city paving bids wherein the lowest bidder sued the city last year. [News & Tribune]

Council Holding Fischer Accountable

A bipartisan group of Louisville Metro Council members wants more information about how Mayor Greg Fischer nominates people to scores of city boards and commissions. But not David Yates — he cowardly removed his name as a sponsor. [WDRB]

How do people even have kids knowing this crap can happen? Too terrifying to think about. [C-J/AKN]

For the first time the public is seeing a second incident where a school resource officer appears to punch a middle school student. [WHAS11]

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is calling for a 140-mile extension of the Mountain Parkway from Prestonsburg to Beckley, W.Va., at a cost of $8 billion to $10 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood that left one man hospitalized. [WLKY]

College graduates, brace yourselves for some disappointing news. Wages for university grads are 2.5 percent lower than what they were 15 years ago, according to the latest edition of the Economic Policy Institute’s annual report on the labor market prospects of new workers. [HuffPo]

A New Albany councilman referred to a colleague as a “lying piece of (expletive)” during a debate over public prayer on Monday. Councilman Dan Coffey made the comment into an open microphone, yet denied using the curse word during a brief, tense interview after the meeting. [WAVE3]

On Wednesday, when President Barack Obama spoke at the US Coast Guard Academy’s commencement ceremony, he called climate change “an immediate risk to our national security.” In recent months, the Obama administration has repeatedly highlighted the international threats posed by global warming and has emphasized the need for the country’s national security agencies to study and confront the issue. [Mother Jones]

The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced more than $54 million in grant funds to clean up contaminated brownfields sites around the country, and one of the projects getting funding is in Louisville. [WFPL]

The lawyer for the man who alleges that Ahmed Zayat has not paid a $2 million gambling debt filed a $10 million libel suit on Monday against Zayat, the owner of American Pharoah. [NY Times]

Cecilia Henderson, the 71-year-old widow of Angel’s Envy bourbon creator Lincoln Henderson, is suing her son, saying that Wesley Henderson has “effectively stolen” her share of proceeds from a recent sale to Bacardi Ltd. [Business First]

A community that successfully addresses homelessness is a united one, according to Michael Stoops, the director of community organizing at the National Coalition for the Homeless. [News & Tribune]

Hope Henderson Doesn’t Copy Secrecy

A family is trying to figure out why their dad was stabbed at a Louisville gas station. [WDRB]

A backup power generator at a pumping station could have prevented April’s massive flooding and a big sewage spill at Louisville’s Morris Forman Water Quality Treatment Center, state officials have concluded. [C-J/AKN]

The Phoenix Hill Tavern (PHT) and Jim Porter’s Good Time Emporium closed permanently on Monday, June 1. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics has wrapped up a 10-year, $2.5 million donation from BB&T that will result in a new program on capitalism and funding toward the college’s $65 million renovation. But Gatton officials stepped back from the more controversial aspects of the original 2004 agreement, including a requirement for an Ayn Rand reading room, named for the novelist and free market philosopher. [H-L]

A Louisville park is hosting a night of camping in June as part of a national celebration. [WLKY]

U.S. police have shot and killed 385 people during the first five months of this year, a rate of more than two a day, the Washington Post reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

A minister has a new plan to try to curb crime in West Louisville. [WAVE3]

It’s almost like these folks in Henderson didn’t bother talking to anyone living in the real world in Louisville. [Henderson Gleaner]

A resident must work full-time and earn at least $14.17 an hour to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment in Louisville, according to a recent study from the National Low Income Housing Coalition. [WFPL]

Among African American adults with low education and income levels, the increase in risk of heart disease or stroke associated with living in poverty is largest for women and people under age 50, according to a large new study. [Reuters]

Ford Motor Co. CEO Mark Fields said aluminum-body F-Series Super Duty Trucks will be launched next year and that the design will “wow people.” [Business First]

Parts of South Clarksville could be the next Newport, Ky., or at least a bustling addendum to the Louisville metropolitan area. [News & Tribune]

At Least It Moved To Cordish Central

Remember the Louisville “purge” nonsense? Now it’s a thing in Baltimore — where Cordish is headquartered. [Baltimore Sun]

They are family homes, but they’re being used like extended stay hotels in neighborhoods where that was never the plan. Now, new rules regulating boarding houses in Louisville are aiming to put a stop to it. [WDRB]

Meanwhile, we give away MILLIONS to Cordish for doing nothing. The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is eliminating half of its clinics serving residents in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program because of a projected $800,000 budget shortfall this year. [C-J/AKN]

When Tess Graham, 64, looks in the mirror these days she sees the female she’s also felt she was inside. “I waited 55 years to see me. That is a long time,” Graham said. [WHAS11]

Trying to pry information out of professional chauffeur T.J. Doyle is harder than wrestling a winning trifecta ticket out of a poor man’s hand. [H-L]

A Louisville elementary school got some big-name recognition when Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear visited to celebrate the school reaching an environmental milestone. [WLKY]

This highly entertaining pothole move is hilarious. It’s a shame it hasn’t happened in Louisville. [HuffPo]

All the pageantry and tradition of Derby week really boils down to one thing: the incredible athletic talent of 20 horses that reach the starting gate on the first Saturday in May. Kentucky loves its horses, and the Derby horses are some of the best treated around. But the Bluegrass is also home to many people who are working to better the lives of other horses that don’t have it anywhere near as good. [WAVE3]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission was scheduled to hold a hearing on Tuesday on Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities’ proposed rate increase. [WFPL]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

Louisville-based Baptist Healthcare System Inc., operator of Baptist Health Louisville and several other hospitals across the state, plans to expand its corporate headquarters on Eastpoint Parkway in Louisville in the coming years. [Business First]

The space the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center’s museum exhibits once occupied now is a labyrinth of metal frames and stacks of drywall. A cacophony of clanging metal on metal and shrieking power tools overwhelms the senses there now, but it won’t be too long before a different sound fills the air. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Greg Fischer Is Now A Fancy Engineer

Really, Preservation Louisville? A petition? Please. Fascinating that Greg Fischer now thinks he’s an engineer, though. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens informed employees Wednesday of a significant shake-up that includes outsourcing the legal department, creating a new top-tier district job and replacing the district’s human resources director. [C-J/AKN]

Shelbyville really wants to get in on Louisville’s murder spree. [WHAS11]

Wondering just how stupid the Republican candidates for governor will get before it’s all over? All four of Kentucky’s Republican candidates for governor said Tuesday night they do not agree that global warming is manmade, disputing the science that insists it is and declaring that protecting coal jobs is the higher priority. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA LIMITS! This was all the hype yesterday. [WLKY]

New rules limiting smog may be “controversial,” but they are among the administration’s top priorities, according to Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy. [HuffPo]

Residents of Louisville’s West End who pushed Metro Council to create rules for boarding houses are now waiting for Mayor Greg Fischer’s administration to follow through. [WAVE3]

Privately run Medicare plans, fresh off a lobbying victory that reversed proposed budget cuts, face new scrutiny from government investigators and whistleblowers who allege that plans have overcharged the government for years. [NPR]

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail would officially begin in downtown Louisville under a planned $1.4-million expansion of the Frazier History Museum, the museum and the Kentucky Distillers’ Association announced Thursday. [WFPL]

After Edward Snowden, the government said its controversial surveillance programs had stopped a terrorist – David Coleman Headley. In “American Terrorist,” ProPublica and PBS “Frontline” show why the claim is largely untrue. [ProPublica]

Looking to attend something that won’t matter? Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, will host a discussion next month that will explore the future of Jefferson County Public Schools a year after a state audit report was released. [Business First]

Incumbent Charlestown At-Large City Councilman Dan James is facing opposition from fellow Democrat and Clark County Sheriff’s Office deputy Scott Johns in the May primary election. [News & Tribune]