Can We Just All Focus On The West End? Just For Once? Please?

Oldham County voters may soon decide whether to expand alcohol sales. The Oldham County Chamber of Commerce says it now has enough signatures to ask for a special election. [WDRB]

Members of Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, have scheduled a series of meetings with Jefferson County legislators in early September to discuss business-related issues as well as legislation expected to come up during the 2016 General Assembly convening in January. [C-J/AKN]

On a stage set to celebrate the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 52nd annual Country Ham Breakfast & Auction concluded Thursday morning, Aug. 27, with a show-stealing $400,000 bid for the Kentucky State Fair’s Grand Champion Ham. [WHAS11]

Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Arrests were made Thursday morning at the annual ham breakfast at the Kentucky State Fair. [WLKY]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

The goal to bring 43 new homes to the Russell neighborhood started a decade ago, and Thursday, Mayor Greg Fischer announced a plan to make good on that promise. [WAVE3]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

Jim Wathen has been selling military merchandise at the Kentucky State Fair for nearly a decade. By noon on a recent weekday, he had already restocked a rack of Confederate flags. He said the 3-by-3-inch Confederate flag, his top seller, is a piece of military history. [WFPL]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

A study released Wednesday shows that congested roads are costing the typical Louisville metro area driver more than 40 hours in delays annually and almost $1,050 in lost time and burned fuel. [Business First]

Former New Albany Police Department Officer Laura Schook is proceeding with a federal case against the city as well as an appeal of the decision to fire her in May, and she’s doing so without an attorney. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun(?) Educational Roundup Things

Eastern High School staff physically and verbally harassed a football player over accusations of smoking marijuana, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday. [WDRB]

Amid growing protests claiming the building of a methane plant in western Louisville continues a legacy of environmental racism, Mayor Greg Fischer says the Fort Wayne, Ind.-based company behind the project will spend the next two months listening to community concerns before seeking construction approval. [C-J/AKN]

The Highlands Neighborhood Association is encouraging Councilmen David Tandy and Tom Owen to permanently revoke the license of Cahoots which is located on Bardstown Road. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Board of Education voted Tuesday to move five candidates forward in the search for the next state education commissioner. The candidates, who have not been named, are in-state and out-of-state educators. However, the board did not preclude adding finalists when it meets Friday in Lexington, before the start of second-round interviews. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Crews are quickly restoring Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home, with big plans for it to attract visitors from around the world. [WLKY]

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a dire report about the state of the planet: July 2015 was the earth’s warmest month on record, dating back to 1880. [HuffPo]

With its largest-ever incoming class starting school Monday, Spalding University celebrated the growth by rebranding and renaming its new Kentucky College of Art and Design. [WAVE3]

Applications for U.S. home mortgages edged up last week as interest rates declined, an industry group said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

A neighborhood group is hoping concerns about public health and the environment will factor into a city board’s decision to grant a conditional use permit to pork producer JBS Swift. [WFPL]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

Students at Mount Tabor Elementary in New Albany can now use a finger scanning system from Horizon Software to pay for school meals, but some parents are worried about the new technology. [Business First]

Community Montessori High School senior Nick Vaughn narrowly lost in the May New Albany City Council District 6 Republican Party primary. He had a plan to start a work program to benefit disadvantaged residents, and though it won’t be implemented yet in a governmental platform, Vaughn has launched a nonprofit aimed at ushering low-income families out of poverty. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Just Flipping Give Cahoots The Boot

Wednesday is the first day of school for approximately 4,000 early childhood education students in JCPS — but 1,100 have not turned in the required immunization forms and will not be allowed to attend class. [WDRB]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

The Civilian New Albany Traffic Supervisor has resigned amid an investigation into the supervisor’s implementation and execution of duties, according to New Albany Police Chief Todd Bailey. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

An effort to revitalize west Louisville is gearing up. Many people consider Broadway and Ninth Street the dividing line between downtown and west Louisville. [WLKY]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

We brought you the video after a large fight broke out recently in the busy bar area of Bardstown Road. Business owners said after the closings of Jim Porters, Phoenix Hill and several bars downtown, much more traffic headed to the Highlands. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Foiled in state court, a Jefferson County Public Schools teacher filed a federal court suit Monday claiming the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System illegally raised teachers’ share of pension contributions to shore up a retirement plan that is only half-funded. They sure have shopped this story around an awful lot. [WFPL]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

Two hour-long dramas about the world of Kentucky bourbon may be coming to TV soon. [Business First]

Twelve added employee positions — mostly in the public safety sector — are major components of Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore’s proposed 2016 budget. [News & Tribune]

People Still Freaking Out About FoodPort

The maker of Fireball Cinnamon Whisky is putting the heat on a North Carolina brewer over packaging that allegedly too closely resembles its red-capped liquor bottles adorned with a fire-breathing creature. [WDRB]

One of the candidates calls it the “basement level of the practice of law,” but 22 lawyers are vying to take up residence there. [C-J/AKN]

The former president of the local Teamsters Union, James Vincent Jr. pleaded guilty to embezzlement. [WHAS11]

Someday in the not-too-distant future, fans of great Thoroughbreds might look out on a Bluegrass pasture and think they are seeing double. And they might be. [H-L]

GE showed off its new top-loading washing machine and manufacturing line on Tuesday morning. [WLKY]

Two Pennsylvania-based nonprofits that have funded everything from a super PAC supporting Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) to education privatization efforts across the country are likely connected to the operators of the global investment firm Susquehanna International Group. [HuffPo]

In an effort to set the record straight, Louisville Metro Councilwoman Cheri Bryant Hamilton made the West Louisville FoodPort, the topic of her community meeting Monday night. [WAVE3]

Attorney General Jack Conway announces a joint effort to bring state-level voices to a national debate on how best to help students victimized by Corinthian Colleges and other predatory for-profit schools. [Yesterday], 11 state attorneys general called on the U.S. Department of Education to cancel federal student loans in cases where schools have broken state law and provide clear processes for students seeking relief. Attorney General Conway joined the multistate effort making several recommendations to the U.S. Department of Education on the structure of its newly-formed debt relief program. [Press Release]

George Palmer pays a lawn service company to fertilize his grass. He keeps his shrubs neatly trimmed. And sitting on his front porch last week, he could rattle off the names of his neighbors. [WFPL]

A few times a year, Anna Lucio leaves her office and heads back to her roots. “Everybody’s got their own way of seeing it,” she said. Lucio grew up on a piece of land in Kentucky that welcomed the shade needed for Ginseng. “The first time we went in the woods- It’s that excitement that you can be able to find it, and even if you’ve seen a million, you’d be like, ‘Oh! I found one!'” [WKYT]

Home sales in the Louisville area remained strong in July, according to a report from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors. [Business First]

The Indiana State Department of Health has identified West Nile Virus in a sample of mosquitoes from Clark County. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Some People Shouldn’t Have Children

What the hell is wrong with people? How are they able to walk without falling down? How are they able to tie their shoes while breathing? [WDRB]

Humana’s board of directors began weighing how the company might survive the rapidly changing landscape of the managed care industry and ultimately decided maintaining a stand-alone company wasn’t the best option. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, amongst others, was on hand to dedicate a new memorial garden to the late Metro Council President. Located near the Sullivan University Bakery on Bardstown Rd., the garden will serve as a memory not just to King as a city leader, but as a family man as well. [WHAS11]

This summer, Zachary Schwarzkopf spent five weeks at Morehead State University in the prestigious Governor’s Scholars Program. In addition to enrichment classes in civics, economics and leadership, the program provides a huge perk: a $40,000 Presidential Scholarship to the University of Kentucky, provided you have a 28 ACT score and a grade-point average of 3.3. [H-L]

The West Louisville FoodPort project will move forward in the Russell neighborhood without plans for a methane plant previously planned for the site. [WLKY]

Less than eight months into 2015, humans have already consumed a year’s worth of the Earth’s resources. [HuffPo]

Metro Council members are frustrated by eight-foot-tall grass growing in the medians of some state roads in Louisville, yet city officials were divided about how to tackle the problem. [WAVE3]

The stupid is still thick with Kim Davis. She employs Nathan Davis just like her mother employed her — nepotism runs in the family. A Kentucky clerk’s office turned away a gay couple seeking a marriage license on Thursday, defying a federal judge’s order that dismissed her argument involving religious freedom. [AP]

The Liberty Tire recycling center in Southwest Jefferson County was the site of a massive tire fire in November that prompted a 36-hour shelter-in-place for those who live within a mile of the building on Bohannon Avenue. Now, the recycling facility in Southwest Louisville is vacant. [WFPL]

Billionaire Donald Trump is firing back against Sen. Rand Paul (R-Hopeless), saying Paul “has no chance” of winning the White House in 2016 in the latest salvo between the GOP presidential candidates. [The Hill]

Hundreds were in attendance for the Leadership Louisville Center’s annual luncheon Tuesday afternoon, where Nashville Mayor Karl Dean was the keynote speaker. We ate our vegetables, but we also had dessert — both literally and figuratively. [Business First]

So far, 31 counties in Indiana have said “yes” to joining a Regional Development Authority. Floyd County is not one of those counties. [News & Tribune]

No Puppies & Rainbows This Morning

The Clark County Sheriff suspended the county jail’s work program after investigators uncovered a plan to deliver drugs and cell phones to inmates involved. [WDRB]

Upset over plans to build methane plants in residential neighborhoods, the Coalition for Sustainable West Louisville announced Tuesday that it is calling for a boycott of suppliers of the planned food hub on 30th Street. [C-J/AKN]

This is worth reviewing again. The Century Foundation released a report that puts Louisville as the tenth worst city in the US for concentrated black poverty. [WHAS11]

Let’s all just bite our tongues and allow our eyes to roll back in our heads. Democratic state Treasurer Todd Hollenbach was the odd man out of statewide elections this year, unable to seek re-election because of term limits while some of the biggest names in Kentucky politics are campaigning for governor and attorney general. But the 55-year-old hopes to stay in public office as he filed Tuesday to run for district judge in the 30th judicial district of Jefferson County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WLKY]

An ambitious pilot program to help former chronically homeless people in Utah has proven to be successful despite some legal challenges. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. Maybe Emperor Fischer can appoint someone just as incompetent as Sadiqa Reynolds to figure this out. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, whose campaign is struggling with deep fundraising and organizational problems, has fixated on throwing grenades at GOP frontrunner Donald Trump, hardly the strategy of a thriving campaign. [Politico]

A new, more rigorous version of the GED test has led to a dramatic drop in the number of Kentuckians receiving a high school equivalency diploma. Final numbers from the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education show there were 1,663 GED diplomas awarded in the 2015 fiscal year. That’s down from 7,083 — a 77 percent decline — in 2014, and a drop of 81 percent in 2013, the last full year the old version of the test was used. [WFPL]

Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin and the state House GOP caucus are calling for de-funding of Planned Parenthood in Kentucky. But Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear and his health secretary say the Republicans don’t understand how federally funded family planning and women’s health services work. [Richmond Register]

A new Securities and Exchange Commission filing shows that Humana Inc. started pursuing a partner in October, and Aetna Inc. wasn’t the first to be involved. [Business First]

While some city leaders touted the health of New Albany’s tax-increment financing districts Tuesday, State Rep. Ed Clere warned spending TIF dollars on projects such as an aquatic center could leave taxpayers “swimming in debt.” [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

West End Methane Plant Meeting Tomorrow

Publishing an entire press release is no fun.

But.

The West End usually gets the shaft.

Here’s this from Councilwoman Mary Woolridge:

Councilwoman Mary C. Woolridge (D-3) will host a meeting on Thursday, August 6th to organize opposition to two proposed methane gas plants to be located in West Louisville.

“I want to encourage anyone who has a concern about these two projects to come and join us as we plan to make our voices heard,” says Woolridge. “I strongly believe that while economic development is very important for the West Louisville area, we do not need to have something that could be potentially dangerous located so close to our neighborhoods.”

The meeting is set for Thursday, August 6th at the Louisville Urban League, 1535 West Broadway from 6:00pm to 8:00pm.

The two proposed projects are located at 821 South 17th Street and 30th and Muhammad Ali Blvd. The meeting will update the next steps in asking the Board of Zoning Adjustment to deny approval for the West Louisville Anaerobic Digester and Methane Gas Facilities.

Representatives from Seed Capital KY have been invited to make a presentation and to answer questions.

Councilwoman Woolridge is being joined in this effort by the Justice Resource Center and the Kentucky Alliance Against Racism.

“It is time we let everyone know that West Louisville does not want these types of businesses located near our homes,” says Woolridge.

For more information about the meeting, contact Councilwoman Woolridge’s office at 574-1103.

Have at it.