Really, WDRB? It Just Turned Racial?

Just outta the blue? Some scary black people made it all scary and racial and OH GOD THE RACE CARD?

What the actual fuck?

It’s always been about race:


Really. It’s always been about race. It’s always been about wealthy white people pushing something onto the West End. And if you live in the West End? It appears to be happening because wealthy white people are behaving as if they know what’s best for the West End. Hipsters are getting up in arms, claiming the West End is shooting itself in the foot. The same upper middle class white people who tried to stall construction of a Walmart store because of a parking lot (or, really, because they hate Walmart.) A store they’ll never, ever visit, of course. Not just because it’s Walmart but because it’s beyond Ninth Street.

Let’s quit acting as if this comes as a surprise. Let’s quit acting as if there’s no racial divide in Louisville. Let’s quit acting like dumb headlines like this aren’t both a provocation and an example of white privilege in action. Particularly when the story references race once, loosely, with the term “African Americans”, insinuating that people of color are making this about something it’s not.

Wondering how it might be possible to cover something like the biodigester without ridiculous headlines? Maybe without encouraging the white flight bigots?


There you go.

Lest anyone think what WDRB has done isn’t inciting bigots? Just a taste of the more tame comments they’re receiving:

The same sort of thing happened with the station’s most recent hype over JCPS.

Possumbilly City.

Some Journo Ethics Would Be Great For Louisville

Folks wonder why everyday people are distrustful of media?

Check this out from a WDRB reporter:


Her job is to objectively cover things like LMPD.

We all make mistakes, sure. Every day. But she snapped when asked if she’d be reimbursing the police to avoid any perception of ethics issues. Rather than seize the moment to say, “Ooh, good call, right on top of that.” Straight to defense and snapping. In addition to previous scuffles over police coverage in the past (like the time she raised red flags while covering a murder near Phoenix Hill Tavern), this is… Not that great.

WDRB should at the very least offer to reimburse LMPD to fix this. If they can’t afford to or don’t want to, surely the local journo community will chip in to help avoid the appearance of impropriety.

Everyone from Joe Gerth to the folks at my hometown newspaper in Eastern Kentucky refuse even the appearance of an ethical dilemma. I’ve seen Gerth turn down water from people he’s covering — despite water being pretty much acceptable on all journalistic fronts. Chuck Olmstead often paid for bottles of water. Francene wouldn’t even let another journalist (which she barely was) buy her coffee.

Good grief. No wonder people have given up on trust. Something that’s sorely needed today.

WDRB trolls will start attacking in 3, 2, 1 instead of doing the right thing…

But kudos to the cops for being great in this situation. Even though they wouldn’t do this for just any random person on the street unless they’re elderly or in dire straits.

Why jump on WDRB? Because WDRB sure loves attacking people like Phillip Bailey for daring to say and do what no one else in this town will. And this isn’t the first time something like this has occurred with the station’s reporters.

They spent the better part of two days attacking Bailey for daring stand up to the asshats he worked for at WFPL — going so far as to insinuate he was unethical, biased, blah blah blah.

Every week it seems like there’s someone else in Louisville media these folks want to jump. When it comes to them? We’re not allowed to ask questions or raise concerns because we get personally attacked. Even Eric Flack is better than that (he, too, turns things like this down).

Let’s Take Racism More Seriously, Louisville

Officials with Jefferson County Public Schools unveiled a plan to the school board Monday on where to place two new innovative schools that will open in time for the 2015-16 school year. [WDRB]

The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday the crew of a UPS jet that crashed last year in Birmingham, Ala., made mistakes during the critical pre-dawn approach to the runway, adding that the fatigue of the pilot and co-pilot were factors in the accident. [C-J/AKN]

With the appliance sale of General Electric to Electrolux, many employees are wondering what it will mean for them in the future. [WHAS11]

Republican Agriculture Commissioner James Comer formally entered the 2015 race for governor on Tuesday in front of hundreds of hometown supporters in an ambitious campaign rollout more than a year before the election. [WKYT]

Will this Josh Young saga never end with local media??? [WLKY]

Atmospheric volumes of greenhouse gas hit a record in 2013 as carbon dioxide concentrations grew at the fastest rate since reliable global records began, the World Meteorological Organization said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Six decades ago a family’s home was attacked in a neighborhood ripped apart by racism. Now, researchers at the University of Louisville are retelling the story about two families and their fight for desegregation and need the public’s help. [WAVE3]

The Louisville ECHO program (Louisville is Engaging Children Outdoors), Louisville Metro Parks and Recreation’s signature environmental education initiative for fourth-grade students, has received significant support this year with $41,295 in grant funding from the U.S. Forest Service, and $7,500 Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky, Inc. [Press Release]

Starting this week, members of the Jefferson County Board of Education are hosting community conversations across the district. [WFPL]

WDRB in Louisville, Kentucky has hired six journalists from print publications to contribute to its website during the last two years, said Barry Fulmer, the station’s news director. [Poynter]

A University of Louisville cancer researcher, Dr. Anthony Dragun, is trying to make treatment easier for breast cancer patients. [Business First]

An outside firm will investigate New Albany’s police department for possible workplace violations after a state police investigation cleared two officers accused of working on private jobs on taxpayer time. [News & Tribune]

Be Smart: Just Say No To Crappy Hipster Bourbon

What they’re not telling you is that their site was compromised and many pages were redirecting to sites that Google said were malware. We got dozens of emails about it and had to disable links for quite a while. [WDRB]

The new school year will bring a lunch price increase as well as an expanded free lunch program to Jefferson County Public Schools intended to help struggling families. [JCPS]

There is less than a week left of summer before the first day of school for Jefferson County Public Schools and the hotline for important bus questions will be open starting Sunday. [WHAS11]

Possible links between health problems and mountaintop mining in Eastern Kentucky emerged as a key concern of people attending sessions aimed at coming up with ideas to improve the economy and quality of life in the region, according to the dentist who chaired the sessions. [H-L]

This guy sounds like a real winner. A southern Indiana man is facing charges after police say he rammed a mobile home with his vehicle and then assaulted three people. [WLKY]

Aiming to sidestep a logjam in Congress, the Obama administration is looking for steps it could take on its own to prevent American companies from reincorporating overseas to shirk U.S. taxes. [HuffPo]

If they can win one more game, a dream is about to be realized for a group of New Albany kids. [WAVE3]

The racist lady who advised Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes (until this weekend) is slowly trying to erase her existence from the internet. [Page One]

If there’s a war on coal (there’s not), it started long before President Barack Obama. [WFPL]

In Cleveland, a public hospital may be succeeding at the seemingly impossible: saving money while making patients healthier. It’s doing so by giving patients personalized attention. [NPR]

You don’t have to worry about this if you’re not drinking crappy bourbon. Period. [Business First]

Tuesday night, the Floyd County Commissioners unanimously approved the request to hire a director of public works — a first for the county. [News & Tribune]

Karen Sypher Is Poking Her Head Up Again

Louisville Male High School Principal David Mike and two other school staffers could face disciplinary actions at the hands of the Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board following the results of an investigation into allegations of cheating on a standardized test. [WDRB]

A Wayside Christian Mission emergency shelter has begun an $11.8 million renovation that will provide space for more beds, a multipurpose building and a new kitchen. [C-J/AKN]

A local organization is hoping safe drinking water will soon be a reality in parts of Tanzania. It’d be awesome to see this sort of effort in our, you know, own backyard in rural Kentucky. Not with water but developing life. [WHAS11]

Long story short: The Democrats are shitting their pants this year. [Sam Youngman]

How you gonna sell fake zoo passes in the parking lot of the flipping zoo?! [WLKY]

With Toni Konz bailing on the Courier-Journal and her sweet USA Today spot to go to WDRB, there must be more trouble afoot. They’ve been trying to recruit her for more than six months. [Press Release]

PEE ALERT! U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn in Louisville, Kentucky, alerted the warden at SCI Benner Township in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, that 37-year-old Jonathan Lee Riches may have used two false names to file an appeal on behalf of 54-year-old Karen Sypher without her consent. [WAVE3]

The HSUS can’t stem the trend toward no-kill, so it’s help shelters mollify critics. [Nathan Winograd]

A greater percentage of foreign-born Kentucky residents hold a college degree than Kentuckians born in the U.S.—but immigrants to Kentucky are also likelier to have not finished high school, according to a study by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [WFPL]

First ladies typically avoid getting into public scraps, but Michelle Obama has jumped into perhaps her biggest battle yet. She’s fighting a House Republican effort to soften a central part of her prized anti-childhood obesity campaign and she says she’s ready “to fight until the bitter end.” [HuffPo]

Dr. Cindy Stowe, the new dean of Sullivan University’s College of Pharmacy, got started in the job last week. [Business First]

While Election Day is still four months away, some races in Floyd County have already been decided. [News & Tribune]

Fischer To Poor People: Fuck You Poor People

Just when you thought Bill Lamb couldn’t get more disconnected from reality… Taxing cyclists because he’s not man enough to control himself or his emotional reactions. What’ll get his manties in a twist next? This city should be paying cyclists because it gets cars off our already crumbling streets. The environmental benefit is just an added bonus. [WDRB]

A Jefferson County grand jury Tuesday declined to indict the defendants dubbed the “Misidentified Four” who claimed they were the victims of shoddy identification procedures when arrested on the night of the mob violence in Louisville. What, bad police work in Louisville? Surely not! A rush to pin the blame on someone no matter what? Not in Possibility City! [C-J/AKN]

Wondering what your police chief had to say about the four people his officers wrongly accused? [WHAS11]

All the sudden Adam Edelen can make demands in this case but can’t in Montgomery County? Proof Edelen truly loves to talk out of both sides of his mouth and feed excuses through his spokesperson. Thank goodness he’s not trying to take his selective outrage to the governor’s mansion because he’s afraid of the man who lost to Rand Paul. [H-L]

A witness in a murder case says she feared for her life when the suspect confronted her. Raymon Murrell is charged with murder in the April 11 beating death of 63-year-old Philip “Wayne” Schulz. [WLKY]

The governor of the state that hosts the first leg of horse racing’s Triple Crown says he doesn’t want to see any changes to the system, despite protests from the latest near-winner. [HuffPo]

The opening of the Big Four Bridge has been a boom for businesses on both sides of the Ohio River. [WAVE3]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Greg Fischer’s office and the Louisville Metro Housing Authority plan to apply for a $500,000 federal grant to demolish the largest remaining public housing complex in the city. Because fuck poor people. Fuck them. Foul language? Yes. Because it’s always about fucking poor people to make wealthy folks feel safe when they drive in from the interstate. [WFPL]

A local (in E-town) medical practice agreed Tuesday to pay nearly $3.8 million in U.S. District Court to settle claims owners engaged in improper conduct by extending chemotherapy treatment times to maximize reimbursements and inappropriately billing office visits for infusion therapies. [News-Enterprise]

Former President Clinton will come to Louisville on Wednesday, Aug. 6, to accept the PGA’s Distinguished Service Award. [Business First]

The Jeffersonville Parks Authority didn’t initially have Colston Park on its meeting agenda Monday, but it ordered two appraisals of the property anyway. [News & Tribune]

WDRB Spreading Race-Baiting Hype. Again.

A Northern Kentucky city sued the Kentucky Retirement Systems Monday over what it described as “illegal and imprudent investments” involving hundreds of millions of dollars in public pension money. In its lawsuit, filed in Kenton Circuit Court, the city of Fort Wright said KRS violates the law with risky investments in hedge funds, venture capital funds, private equity funds, leveraged buyout funds and other “alternative investments” that have produced small returns and excessive management fees, possibly in excess of $50 million over the last five years. [John Cheves]

John David Dyche loves race-baiting. And ignorant — because that’s what he is, purposefully ignorant — keeping schools racially integrated improving education. He apparently hasn’t read any of the big stories from the past several weeks on race, education and the south. At least he cares enough to try to talk about some of these things and that’s more than we can say for 99% of people. [WDRB]

The Louisville area is the 17th-deadliest metropolitan area for pedestrians, according to a new study from the National Complete Streets Coalition, a Washington D.C.-based organization that examined fatal wreck data in the country’s 51 largest metro areas. [C-J/AKN]

This is apparently the most important thing happening in Louisville. Have you heard about the social media phenomenon called hidden cash? [WHAS11]

Over the years, under both Republican and Democratic administrations, we’ve made progress in protecting our air and water from harmful mercury, arsenic, soot and other types of pollutants. Every time we’ve done it, people have claimed the economic costs weren’t worth the health and environmental benefits. They’ve been wrong every time because the higher standards sparked innovations in new technologies and ways of doing business that increased growth and created jobs. [Bill Clinton]

Five men have filed a lawsuit against the operators of Fourth Street Live, alleging they were denied entry because of their race. This Cordish nonsense needs to end. [WLKY]

Locals can definitely relate to this. Viewers aren’t the only ones disappointed with local news these days. [HuffPo]

Kentucky business groups said Monday that a federal proposal to reduce carbon emissions at power plants would lead to higher utility bills and scare companies from the state. But that’s only one slanted part of the story. [WAVE3]

Will these Louisville and Lexington leaders also bring back tips for corrupt administrations? Because Charlotte’s mayor is in a heap of legal trouble. [Business First]

Or maybe they’ll learn how to write and push bills to charge police officers and fire fighters for disclosing fracking checmicals. [Mother Jones]

Local arts organizations that receive funding through the Kentucky Arts Partnership grants could see significant cuts in support for the next fiscal year. [WFPL]

The University of Kentucky has received a $1.9 million grant to graduate more students in the STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. [H-L]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Jeffersonville attorney Brad Jacobs has entered the race for Clark County Circuit County No. 2 judge. [News & Tribune]