If GLI Backs It, It’s Bad News Bears

More than 600 well-paying jobs could be coming to Louisville as an out-of-state company partners with a local non-profit to form a Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WDRB]

David Keith thought the fight to save his neighborhood was over. [C-J/AKN]

If GLI backs something, you know it’s the worst thing on earth. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt says that if Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget is approved by the General Assembly, the Department of Education will face $72 million in reductions over the next two years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville-based Passport Health Plan is partnering with Virginia-based Evolent Health to create the Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WLKY]

The FBI is joining a U.S. investigation into Flint, Michigan’s water contamination crisis, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

The Falls of the Ohio, a state park covered in fossils, is a perfect place to take pictures – expect for one thing. [WAVE3]

Legislation that would prohibit the General Assembly from diverting state lottery funds away from Kentucky’s need- and merit-based scholarship programs has cleared a House committee. [Press Release]

Jerome Perry doesn’t have many white neighbors. There are so few, in fact, that Perry can list the houses around him where white families live. Even the homes that are blocks away from his tidy yellow brick home on 45th Street in Louisville’s Westover neighborhood. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

Get ready to roll your eyes really hard at all the hype over this Omni hotel mess… [Business First]

After a little more than an hour of discussion Wednesday, the committee tasked with finding a possible compromise to the current weapons ban at the town’s municipal building came to some amicable starting points. [News & Tribune]

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It’s Morning In Our Possumbilly City

A major twist, Monday, in a lawsuit filed against the University of Louisville. The governor’s office has now switched sides. [WDRB]

PEE ALERT! In the wake of a public fight between its former chairman and vice chairman, the Metropolitan Sewer District board has proposed adding a loyalty provision to its ethics policy. Oh, and no tweeting during board meetings. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS have launched a bullying tipline which students, parents and others can use to report bulling at their school. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin spoke at a Republican presidential forum in New Hampshire Saturday afternoon, less than 24 hours after declaring a state of emergency and activating the Kentucky National Guard to help residents stranded by a massive snowstorm. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just a few years ago he was a local high school basketball star. Now his family wants to know why someone would take his life. [WLKY]

Flint was a failure of government — but it didn’t have to be so. And government wasn’t the root of the problem. It was about the people, and ideas they advocate, who have taken control of governments across the country. [HuffPo]

A former mayoral write-in candidate and bicycling advocate was back in court after being cited by police while riding on a city street. [WAVE3]

Mitch McConnell made a quiet move [last] week on a sweeping war authorization measure written by one of his most hawkish members — an effort to pressure the White House to craft a war proposal more to the GOP’s liking. [Politico]

The 16-year-old girl who died in a Kentucky juvenile-detention center last week was found unresponsive on a bed in a private room, according to the state Justice and Public Safety Cabinet. [WFPL]

Bourbon is a bigger deal than coal because it brings in gobs of tourism dollars. Tourists our pouring into Kentucky to visit distilleries on Kentucky Bourbon Trail and Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Tour. [Richmond Register]

A new collection of bank health ratings shows three Louisville-area financial institutions are in excellent financial shape, while three more might want to do some bank-cardio. [Business First]

The Indiana Supreme Court has established six commercial courts throughout the state, and one is in Floyd County. [News & Tribune]

Freak Out: Your Water’s Prolly Poison

Louisville Metro Animal Services remains the worst place on earth and no one seems keen on improving the situation. Even Kelly Downard turned cowardly and gave up. Louisville firefighters were called to Louisville Metro Animal Services just after 10:30 Friday night, early reports indicated no animals were harmed. [WDRB]

This is fascinating coming from the newspaper that asked its arts reporter to prove her position mattered. Arts leaders and advocates are hearing reports that the state budget Gov. Matt Bevin is planning to reveal on Tuesday would eliminate the Kentucky Arts Council, which has a budget of $3.3 million. [C-J/AKN]

Many schools have already scheduled make-up days to recover the days lost during this week’s snow closings. [WHAS11]

Is anyone surprised? A year after state officials created a nationally recognized public-private partnership to build America’s best statewide broadband network, opponents are trying to kill it. Some telecom and cable companies that now provide Internet service around the state, along with several right-wing advocacy groups, are pushing legislators and Gov. Matt Bevin to rethink the project, called KentuckyWired. [H-L]

Even though LMAS is a disaster, you should still pitch in to help. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) really doesn’t like idea that President Barack Obama could use executive power to make more corporations disclose campaign spending. [HuffPo]

This is important news you can use. Mr. Peabody will ride almost anything. He loves to ride a bike. And on Thursday, he rode a sled in Louisville’s Seneca Park. [WAVE3]

Water authorities across the US are systematically distorting water tests to downplay the amount of lead in samples, risking a dangerous spread of the toxic water crisis that has gripped Flint, documents seen by the Guardian show. [The Guardian]

Isn’t it fun how Jim Ramsey continues to make excuses for all of his scandals? He’s still defending Robert Felner when he thinks there aren’t reporters around. [WFPL]

A ProPublica analysis of political fundraising shows conservative House Republicans have less and less in common with their party’s leaders, whose donors sometimes more closely resemble those of Democrats. [ProPublica]

How much do you pay for your Medicare Advantage premium? That number could go up for seniors enrolled on a plan from Louisville-based insurer Humana Inc. or Connecticut’s Aetna Inc., if the merger of those two companies goes through. [Business First]

Before he became judge, Brad Jacobs thought he knew the prevalence of Clark County’s substance abuse problem as one of the county’s busiest criminal attorneys. [News & Tribune]

Another Week of Messy UofL Scandals

As a cold snap reaches Kentuckiana this weekend one group is doing its best to keep the area’s homeless warm. [WDRB]

It’s almost like Jim Ramsey is being purposefully more terrible than usual in order to set Jerry Abramson up to take over. Ramsey is making Abramson look less terrible. [C-J/AKN]

According to Chief Rick Sanders, police found a 35-year-old man unconscious and unresponsive at the Red Carpet Inn on Hurstbourne Parkway. Jeffersontown officers who had received and been trained on how to use Naloxone were able to inject the man and get him to the hospital, saving his life. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s chief justice has denied a motion to remove a judge from all criminal cases but referred the case to a state disciplinary commission. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It has been a year and a half since a mother found her son killed and no one has been held accountable. [WLKY]

While the vast majority of Americans now have access to the Internet and mobile devices, regional and economic disparities persist for wired broadband access in the largest 100 American cities. [HuffPo]

The Center for Women and Families, a local non-profit organization that helps victims of domestic violence and abuse, needs help for the holidays with its Holiday Gift Card Drive. [WAVE3]

ICYMI: Matt Bevin took false equivalency to new levels this weekend when he used the sad situation in Johnson County to try to justify his special brand of Islamophobia. Unity and respect? Not so much. Empty words. [Page One]

The new head of the state’s Energy and Environment Cabinet, Charles Snavely, has been on the job for a little more than a week. It’s also been about that long since he served as an official on the state’s coal association governing board. [WFPL]

New calculations show that our already sizeable water footprint is 18% bigger than we thought. [BBC]

The University of Louisville and Norton Healthcare Inc. have reached a settlement agreement in their dispute surrounding Kosair Children’s Hospital. [Business First]

If the opening of the Big Four Bridge in Jeffersonville proved one thing, it’s that people want to get outdoors and exercise. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Local State Legislator Turns Republican

It’s a multi-million dollar plan to give Dixie Highway a new look and make the area safer and the city plans to use federal dollars to help make it happen. [WDRB]

Louisville Fraternal Order of Police members re-elected President Dave Mutchler late Tuesday evening, reaffirming the controversial union leader’s defense of police officers this summer by more than a two-thirds vote. [C-J/AKN]

Sam Padilla and his fiancée Megan stopped by their newest JP’s Napa Auto Care location in Fairdale. It is not even open yet to the public yet, but they were making sure Wednesday’s rain wasn’t damaging anything. [WHAS11]

It’s always the rich white guys who fight minimum wage increases. Lexington Mayor Jim Gray declined to say Wednesday if he would sign an ordinance raising the minimum wage in Fayette County to $10.10 an hour over the next three years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! You can’t even go to Walmart these days without being injured. [WLKY]

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed tougher new limits on Tuesday on smokestack emissions from nearly two dozen states that burden downwind areas with air pollution from power plants they can’t control. [HuffPo]

Who could have predicted! A lawsuit filed against Louisville Metro Animal Services points out an issue that could cost the city millions of dollars. [WAVE3]

Kentucky Democrats just didn’t want to listen. Now all good old boy hell is breaking loose. [House Republicans]

A Lexington-based nonprofit is using its share of a $2.6 million grant from JPMorgan Chase as leverage to garner millions more in new investments in Louisville’s Russell neighborhood. [WFPL]

There’s a scientific consensus that by 2050, the United States can expect to see an increase in flooding, heat waves, droughts and wildfires due to climate change. Now, scientists at Climate Central and ICF International have produced the first Preparedness Report Card for the United States, highlighting how states are preparing for the projected disasters. Spoiler alert: Kentucky is ill-prepared. [Vocativ]

You’ll have a bigger water bill in 2016 but at least you won’t have a LWC CEO DUIing all over the place. [Business First]

A Floyd County-based court program that serves veterans going through the criminal justice system is widening its reach thanks to partnerships with neighboring counties. [News & Tribune]

UofL Continues Series Of Hot Garbage Fires

In the span of less than two hours Wednesday afternoon, the University of Louisville announced that its Board of Trustees executive committee would have a closed-door meeting Thursday morning — then said the committee would not meet after all. [WDRB]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering why your neighbor is snowed into hype about compassion? It’s because media outlets run crap like this, unchecked, as if it’s gospel. Mayor Greg Fischer is celebrating Louisville’s status as a compassionate city. [WHAS11]

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Maybe Louisville should try the same thing? The Lexington Parking Authority is giving people the opportunity to pay off parking tickets with food. [WLKY]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

The name of a man who was shot and killed Tuesday night in a Dixie Highway Taco Bell parking lot during dinner time has been released. [WAVE3]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Matthew Barzun, the American ambassador to the Court of St. James’s, stood before a buzzing, boisterous audience of several hundred teenagers in a poor borough on the southern edge of greater London and asked them what frustrated or concerned them the most about the United States. [NY Times]

Just wait til we start talking about affairs and sex scandals at LWC… Louisville Water Co. president and CEO Jim Brammell announced Wednesday that he will retire from the position, effective Jan. 1. [Business First]

While tentative tolling rates for the Ohio River Bridges Project have been set for almost two years, some details have yet to be finalized. For some, those details could make all the difference. [News & Tribune]

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Water Company Is Maybe A Giant Sewer

Told ya there was more coming on the Water Company. This story has been shopped to me for AT LEAST a year with lurid stories of affairs and all kinds of shenanigans and legal maneuvers. The Water Company folks are just plain old corrupt. [WDRB]

This isn’t the only big legal problem facing folks from the Water Company. James Brammell, president and chief executive of the Louisville Water Co., pleaded guilty Wednesday to charges of speeding and aggravated driving under the influence. [C-J/AKN]

An explosion has been reported at LG&E’s Mill Creek plant, located at 14660 Dixie Highway. It is now being reported that two contractors were injured in a contained fire while welding. [WHAS11]

Ultimately, less than half of Kentucky’s voters are satisfied with their choices for governor this year, but that number is slightly worse for Bevin than it is for Conway. [H-L]

Halloween is a couple of days away, but there was a different type of spirit at the Frazier History Museum. [WLKY]

Both the Democratic and Republican National Committees have agreed to give their blessing to a presidential town hall set up by activists in the Black Lives Matter movement. But organizers within the network have said that gesture isn’t enough. They want the parties to devote one of their official — and more high-profile — debates to racial justice issues. [HuffPo]

You should read the lawsuit because it’s pretty damning. A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of a woman who claims she was sexually assaulted by a former Louisville Metro Department of Corrections officer. [WAVE3]

Their lips are moving. They’re lying: Ben Carson, Rand Paul and the right-wing’s truthiness problem. When Rand Paul, Ben Carson and Ted Cruz start citing history and “facts,” best double-check them right away. [Salon]

Few pieces of legislation drew as much attention this year as the bill addressing Kentucky’s recent surge in heroin abuse and overdose-related deaths. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Granny) is now viewed negatively by a majority of Republicans, a new poll says. [The Hill]

United Parcel Service Inc. will triple the size of its Louisville ground package-sorting facility, known as Centennial Hub. [Business First]

Name recognition won’t be a problem for voters when choosing three New Albany City Council At-large candidates next month. [News & Tribune]