Local State Legislator Turns Republican

It’s a multi-million dollar plan to give Dixie Highway a new look and make the area safer and the city plans to use federal dollars to help make it happen. [WDRB]

Louisville Fraternal Order of Police members re-elected President Dave Mutchler late Tuesday evening, reaffirming the controversial union leader’s defense of police officers this summer by more than a two-thirds vote. [C-J/AKN]

Sam Padilla and his fiancée Megan stopped by their newest JP’s Napa Auto Care location in Fairdale. It is not even open yet to the public yet, but they were making sure Wednesday’s rain wasn’t damaging anything. [WHAS11]

It’s always the rich white guys who fight minimum wage increases. Lexington Mayor Jim Gray declined to say Wednesday if he would sign an ordinance raising the minimum wage in Fayette County to $10.10 an hour over the next three years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! You can’t even go to Walmart these days without being injured. [WLKY]

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed tougher new limits on Tuesday on smokestack emissions from nearly two dozen states that burden downwind areas with air pollution from power plants they can’t control. [HuffPo]

Who could have predicted! A lawsuit filed against Louisville Metro Animal Services points out an issue that could cost the city millions of dollars. [WAVE3]

Kentucky Democrats just didn’t want to listen. Now all good old boy hell is breaking loose. [House Republicans]

A Lexington-based nonprofit is using its share of a $2.6 million grant from JPMorgan Chase as leverage to garner millions more in new investments in Louisville’s Russell neighborhood. [WFPL]

There’s a scientific consensus that by 2050, the United States can expect to see an increase in flooding, heat waves, droughts and wildfires due to climate change. Now, scientists at Climate Central and ICF International have produced the first Preparedness Report Card for the United States, highlighting how states are preparing for the projected disasters. Spoiler alert: Kentucky is ill-prepared. [Vocativ]

You’ll have a bigger water bill in 2016 but at least you won’t have a LWC CEO DUIing all over the place. [Business First]

A Floyd County-based court program that serves veterans going through the criminal justice system is widening its reach thanks to partnerships with neighboring counties. [News & Tribune]

UofL Continues Series Of Hot Garbage Fires

In the span of less than two hours Wednesday afternoon, the University of Louisville announced that its Board of Trustees executive committee would have a closed-door meeting Thursday morning — then said the committee would not meet after all. [WDRB]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering why your neighbor is snowed into hype about compassion? It’s because media outlets run crap like this, unchecked, as if it’s gospel. Mayor Greg Fischer is celebrating Louisville’s status as a compassionate city. [WHAS11]

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Maybe Louisville should try the same thing? The Lexington Parking Authority is giving people the opportunity to pay off parking tickets with food. [WLKY]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

The name of a man who was shot and killed Tuesday night in a Dixie Highway Taco Bell parking lot during dinner time has been released. [WAVE3]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Matthew Barzun, the American ambassador to the Court of St. James’s, stood before a buzzing, boisterous audience of several hundred teenagers in a poor borough on the southern edge of greater London and asked them what frustrated or concerned them the most about the United States. [NY Times]

Just wait til we start talking about affairs and sex scandals at LWC… Louisville Water Co. president and CEO Jim Brammell announced Wednesday that he will retire from the position, effective Jan. 1. [Business First]

While tentative tolling rates for the Ohio River Bridges Project have been set for almost two years, some details have yet to be finalized. For some, those details could make all the difference. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

Water Company Is Maybe A Giant Sewer

Told ya there was more coming on the Water Company. This story has been shopped to me for AT LEAST a year with lurid stories of affairs and all kinds of shenanigans and legal maneuvers. The Water Company folks are just plain old corrupt. [WDRB]

This isn’t the only big legal problem facing folks from the Water Company. James Brammell, president and chief executive of the Louisville Water Co., pleaded guilty Wednesday to charges of speeding and aggravated driving under the influence. [C-J/AKN]

An explosion has been reported at LG&E’s Mill Creek plant, located at 14660 Dixie Highway. It is now being reported that two contractors were injured in a contained fire while welding. [WHAS11]

Ultimately, less than half of Kentucky’s voters are satisfied with their choices for governor this year, but that number is slightly worse for Bevin than it is for Conway. [H-L]

Halloween is a couple of days away, but there was a different type of spirit at the Frazier History Museum. [WLKY]

Both the Democratic and Republican National Committees have agreed to give their blessing to a presidential town hall set up by activists in the Black Lives Matter movement. But organizers within the network have said that gesture isn’t enough. They want the parties to devote one of their official — and more high-profile — debates to racial justice issues. [HuffPo]

You should read the lawsuit because it’s pretty damning. A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of a woman who claims she was sexually assaulted by a former Louisville Metro Department of Corrections officer. [WAVE3]

Their lips are moving. They’re lying: Ben Carson, Rand Paul and the right-wing’s truthiness problem. When Rand Paul, Ben Carson and Ted Cruz start citing history and “facts,” best double-check them right away. [Salon]

Few pieces of legislation drew as much attention this year as the bill addressing Kentucky’s recent surge in heroin abuse and overdose-related deaths. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Granny) is now viewed negatively by a majority of Republicans, a new poll says. [The Hill]

United Parcel Service Inc. will triple the size of its Louisville ground package-sorting facility, known as Centennial Hub. [Business First]

Name recognition won’t be a problem for voters when choosing three New Albany City Council At-large candidates next month. [News & Tribune]

UofL Loves Flushing Cash Down The Drain

Here’s a lesson in stupid lawsuits that draw even more attention to a scandal you wish would go away. [WDRB]

With Halloween approaching, the mansion for the University of Louisville president in the Cherokee Triangle is once again decorated for the holiday, and President James Ramsey and his wife, Jane, may hand out treats to trick-or-treaters on Halloween night Saturday as they have in the past. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 and the Center for Women and Families are teaming up for a new challenge. [WHAS11]

Lexington could be poised to become the second city in Kentucky to increase the minimum wage. [H-L]

The attorney for the woman at the center of Louisville basketball’s recruitment sex scandal answered questions on local radio. [WLKY]

Tuberculosis has joined HIV/AIDS as the top infectious disease killer on the planet, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The downtown bridge project is one step closer to being completed. The bridge is officially connected from river bank to river bank across the Ohio. [WAVE3]

A group of nearly 40 representatives, from the Congressional Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses, wrote to Attorney General Loretta Lynch Wednesday morning, requesting that the Department of Justice do more to address gun violence in minority communities across the country. [Mother Jones]

The Louisville Water Company has finished the phase-out of two hazardous chemicals that were stored at both of the company’s water treatment plants. [WFPL]

A panel of medical experts said on Friday the prices of prescription medicines in the United States need to be brought in line with the value they bring to patients instead of continuing to let drugmakers set any price they choose. [Reuters]

The U.S. Department of Justice says AB Electrolux is stonewalling it in its fight over the GE Appliances merger, according to a report by legal site Law360. [Business First]

Construction on the renovated Jeffersonville marina — now called Fisherman’s Wharf — is complete, according to an announcement. [News & Tribune]

Felner’s Thankful For UofL Sex Scandal

Here is a new thing for old ladies sitting at home to freak out about. [WDRB]

The misery continues for many Louisville Water Co. customers trying to navigate a transition to a new $29 million computerized billing system, eight months after it went live. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, sure, let’s prosecute the victims here and not the rich as hell sports folks. [WHAS11]

Escort Katina Powell broke her silence on Tuesday, saying she has no proof that Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino knew that a former Cardinals staffer hired her and other dancers to strip and have sex with former recruits and players. [H-L]

The woman at the center of a recruiting scandal in the University of Louisville basketball program is speaking out publicly for the first time. [WLKY]

Vice President Joe Biden said he will not run for president in 2016. Biden announced his decision in a statement given from the White House on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Wait, wait, wait — rich white guys complaining about folks attempting to hold police accountable for admitted profiling? Surely not! [WAVE3]

We can’t afford to be cynical about the news that the most lucrative college hoops program in the country uses women as a form of currency. On revelations that the University of Louisville basketball program may have paid a self-described “Louisville Madam” to supply recruits with strippers and sex, the reactions have congregated into two camps: moralizers and cynics. [The Nation]

A zoning hearing on the future use of JBS Swift’s lot on Cabel Street in Butchertown has been delayed yet again. [WFPL]

Clinton said she has “serious concerns” with the proposed mergers between Anthem and Cigna and between Aetna and Humana that are currently underway. The deals will be under review by the Department of Justice for the next year or so, likely running into the next president’s tenure. [The Hill]

The University of Louisville School of Medicine’s probationary status with an accrediting body has been lifted after more than a year. [Business First]

The RDA, for now, is dead in Clark County. The Clark County Council signed an ordinance rescinding a previous vote and absolving any current membership the county would have with the Regional Development Authority. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Cities Don’t Kill Like This

200 trees? Try 200,000. Then we can start talking about the tree canopy here in Possibility City. [WDRB]

A bipartisan pair of Louisville council members want to restrict Mayor Greg Fischer’s office from making any changes to the city’s portion of the Neighborhood Place partnership without Metro Council approval. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating the murder of a man found at the intersection of 20th and Chestnut streets. [WHAS11]

More than 100 former Jefferson County Public Schools students who dropped out are now re-enrolled in classes. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway after two people were found dead Monday afternoon inside a home in southeastern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Will body cameras be a tool for police reform? Only if bad policy doesn’t get in the way. [HuffPo]

Eight people have been wounded by gunfire in the Greater Louisville area since Friday afternoon. Four of them died. It is in this background that Louisville Councilwoman Mary C. Woolridge will introduce the new Commander of the Louisville Metro Police Department Second Division to the community.

The Shell Farms & Greenhouses is an expansive 1,000-acre property in Garrard County, 37 miles south of Lexington, Kentucky. The five-generation family farm is operated by 31-year-old Giles Shell and his 60-year-old father, Gary. The two are whizzes at making ornamental flowers flourish, and like most farmers in the area, the family has grown tobacco for years. [Newsweek]

The author of the bestselling book on people’s relationship with water will be among the speakers Monday during the IdeaFestival Water event. [WFPL]

On the evening of April 29th last year, in the southern Minnesota town of Waseca, a woman was doing the dishes when she looked out her kitchen window and saw a young man walking through her back yard. [New Yorker]

Sarah Davasher-Wisdom has been promoted to senior vice president of public affairs and strategy at Greater Louisville Inc. [Business First]

Throughout all three debates this election season, Jeffersonville mayoral candidates Mike Moore and Dennis Julius challenged the accuracy of some of each others’ statements, asking audience members to look it up for themselves. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Still Loves Shooting People

Saturday was a big day for Louisville’s gay community. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police have recorded 77 suicides this year, a 30 percent jump compared to this time a year ago and one more than the city totaled all of last year. The suicide total also far exceeds the city’s homicide total this year, which stood at 53 as of Sept. 17. Officials at the state and city level, however, admit Louisville’s suicide count could be higher given that the police do not investigate all deaths that turn out to be ruled suicides. [C-J/AKN]

One of the three teens accused of violently beating a Louisville homeless man in June says they did it as a game. [WHAS11]

One year ago, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway met with a group of out-of-state trial lawyers who urged him to pursue litigation against the oil industry over a now-disused gasoline additive — methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE — found to contaminate groundwater. [John Cheves]

Louisville police are investigating after a man was shot early Saturday morning. [WLKY]

Nearly 1,000 people showed up at the Islamic Center of Louisville, Kentucky, on Friday to paint over anti-Muslim graffiti that appeared Wednesday night, according to a center director. [HuffPo]

Bleachers were packed at Western High School’s home football game Friday evening, hours after an anonymous active shooter threat. [WAVE3]

Republican candidate for governor Matt Bevin is up on the air with his first television ad of the general election following weeks of ads by his Democratic opponent Jack Conway and those on his behalf by the Republican Governor’s Association. Don’t look for any surprises. The ad relies on trusted Republican strategy of tying any Democratic opponent to President Barack Obama, who is deeply unpopular in Kentucky. [Ronnie Ellis]

Somi Babar huddled Thursday morning with a group of mothers, peering at the white exterior walls of the Louisville Islamic Center. [WFPL]

Federal Reserve policymakers appeared deeply divided on Saturday over how seriously problems in the world economy will effect the U.S., a fracture that may be difficult for Fed Chair Janet Yellen to mend as she guides the central bank’s debate over whether to hike interest rates. [Reuters]

Oh, that won’t be terrible at all. A new television show that connects Louisville-area entrepreneurs with local financial backers has named initial members of its panel. [Business First]

A company that operates dozens of nursing homes across Indiana — including three in Clark County — fired its top executive Friday, three days after federal agents searched his home and the company’s headquarters. [News & Tribune]