Is Anyone Even Working This Week?

Shore Runner was nearing the final furlong, charging down the stretch of Keeneland’s muddy track on a Saturday afternoon last October. Then he took a step that ended his life. [WDRB]

Despite months of customer frustrations that it produced, a new billing system at Louisville Water Co. was recognized for a top “implementation” award at an industry gathering in Phoenix this week. [C-J/AKN]

Join Bernie Sanders for a campaign rally in Louisville, Ky. The event happens on Tuesday May, 3 at the Big Four Lawn at 4 p.m. [WHAS11]

In a story April 30 about the upcoming removal of a Confederate monument, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the monument was capped with a statue of Jefferson Davis. The statue is of a Confederate soldier. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Spring Meet at Churchill Downs began with night racing. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama brought the laughs at his last White House Correspondents’ Dinner. [HuffPo]

Stories of murders and shootings have almost become routine in Louisville. In 2015, the Metro area had 84 murders and more than 350 shootings, an average of nearly one per day, tearing lives and communities apart. [WAVE3]

Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton has a 4-point lead over rival Bernie Sanders days ahead of Indiana’s primary, within a new poll’s margin of error. [The Hill]

Mayor Greg Fischer and University of Louisville President James Ramsey announced Friday the Confederate statue on U of L’s Belknap campus will be removed. [WFPL]

With Charter Communications set to receive approval for its acquisition of Time Warner Cable (TWC), regulators plan to impose a series of conditions designed to stop anti-competitive and anti-consumer policies pursued by TWC. Conditions proposed by the Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission would prohibit the combined company from imposing data caps and overage fees on Internet customers, charging large online content providers for network interconnection, and stifling growth of online video by demanding restrictive clauses in contracts with programmers. [Ars Technica]

In a week in which Churchill Downs Inc. debuted renovations at its namesake Louisville racetrack, announced the return of the Breeders’ Cup to the track in 2018 and unveiled plans for a $25 million hotel and expansion at its Oxford, Maine, casino, the company focused on something else in a conference call with investors today. [Business First]

Drivers on 10th Street may soon notice more activity along either sides of the busy road. [News & Tribune]

Counting The Days Til Derby 2016 Is Over

Police have arrested the owner of a day care after a child under her care died after being left in a hot van. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is paying its employees “a premium” compared to similar school districts around the country, and those higher salaries mean Kentucky’s largest school district is paying out $105 million or more extra each year in salaries, according to a comprehensive salary review the district unveiled Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! Another day, another murder in Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz talks about the future of coal during a meeting with the Herald-Leader editorial board on Thursday, April 21, 2016. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are on the scene of a shooting at Floyd and Woodbine streets. [WLKY]

If a cop kills an unarmed black person, and that person’s family then sues the police, how much can the city expect to pay? Six million dollars, give or take. [HuffPo]

So now all you have to do in order to be a Derby celebrity is steal a bunch of stuff, get arrested and appear on “reality” television? Seems to go well with all the fun and murder here in Compassionate City. [WAVE3]

Donald Trump is bristling at efforts to implement a more conventional presidential campaign strategy, and has expressed misgivings about the political guru behind them, Paul Manafort, for overstepping his bounds. [Politico]

Louisville legislators may soon get their first chance to craft policy around the findings of an acclaimed study on the city’s urban heat island. [WFPL]

The United States is on the verge of a national crisis that could mean the end of clean, cheap water. [The Hill]

The Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft will reopen June 4 after being closed nine months for a multimillion-dollar renovation. [Business First]

When Clifford Owens walked into the Clark County Voter Registration office to request an absentee ballot for himself and his wife, Janet, he was surprised to find out they could both vote right away. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Loves It Some Gun Violence

The Louisville Metro Planning Commission has stopped reviewing “conservation subdivisions” in Jefferson County while it looks into whether regulations approved in 2008 achieve a goal of saving green space. [WDRB]

Responding to public concerns about lead in public drinking water supplies, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has created a work group to review existing government regulations or practices and potentially make recommendations for changes. But the agency that created the work group, which includes a variety of public officials, intends to exclude the general public – potentially violating the state open meetings law. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police confirm that one woman has died and two men are injured after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey Calvin Borel, a three-time winner of the Kentucky Derby, has informed his agent, Larry Melancon, that he is retiring effective immediately. [H-L]

A bill giving death benefits to families of EMS workers killed in the line of duty has been signed into law by the governor. [WLKY]

The biggest question of the political season is whether Donald Trump will get enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination before the convention. Prediction markets, which allow people to bet on future events using real money, estimate an average 61 precent chance of a contested Republican convention with two or more votes required. The chance Trump will fail to get to the required 1,237 delegates before the convention, they estimate, is 69 percent. [HuffPo]

A man was shot in front of a Louisville clothing store on Saturday over a pair of new athletic shoes, Louisville Metro Police said. [WAVE3]

From late Friday Afternoon… “The governor’s unilateral action in cutting the appropriated funding of colleges, universities and community colleges was outside of his authority. The law on budget reductions is straightforward. It requires a declared shortfall that does not exist. If it did, the last budget bill that was passed and signed into law dictates the steps that must be taken. We are therefore requesting the governor withdrawal his order. We are confident he will comply.” [Attorney General Andy Beshear]

This could be one of the dumbest moves from JCPS yet and Allison Martin isn’t helping matters. Jefferson County Public School officials are declining to discuss gang activity in local schools with a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from the United States has proved popular from the beginning. When he first articulated it following the Paris terrorist attacks in November, he surged in the polls and hasn’t slumped since. And while progressives might want to believe the appeal of Trump’s divisive idea is limited to a small subset of conservatives, a new poll indicates Islamophobia actually runs deep across the spectrum of the American electorate. [ThinkProgress]

A legal dispute between the four daughters of late Louisville real estate developer Al J. Schneider focuses on a belief by two of those daughters that the trustees for the estate want to quickly liquidate the company’s millions in real estate assets — to a point that beneficiaries would not receive the fair value for those properties. [Business First]

While Clarksville continues to focus on revitalizing the community through extensive development and redevelopment efforts, the town is making plans to ensure proper infrastructure is in place to improve conditions and handle growth. [News & Tribune]

Let’s All Freak Out About Lead Pipes

How is JCPS addressing the learning gap between white and African-American students? That was just one of many topics at a meeting between Louisville’s NAACP and district leaders Monday night. [WDRB]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Every morning in every Louisville public school, custodians run the water fountains for up to a minute before children arrive for the day. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city of New Albany is set to break ground on a new dog park on the site of the Cannon Acres Sports Complex, but a group of residents say that doing so would desecrate a historic Native American site. [WHAS11]

When the state’s oldest and largest art museum closes for three years for a $50 million makeover, expectations are high. But the transformation of the Speed Art Museum, which attracted 17,000 people to a 30-hour marathon reopening last weekend, blew me away. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Scott County hired a fifth prosecutor who will assist with the fight against drugs, which goes hand in hand with the efforts to curb the HIV outbreak in the area. [WLKY]

Burning coal doesn’t just pollute the environment and harm people’s health — it’s a huge drain on the world’s increasingly strained supply of freshwater. [HuffPo]

Concerns over children’s safety and control have prompted cancellations of protests planned for this year’s Kentucky Derby Festival Pegasus Parade on May 5 and a demonstration scheduled outside KDF’s downtown offices Monday evening, organizers said. [WAVE3]

An Indiana man was sentenced to life in prison on Friday for his part in causing a 2012 home explosion that killed two neighbors, injured dozens of people and damaged scores of homes in an Indianapolis neighborhood, a court official said. [Reuters]

The crumbling house next door to George Palmer’s 41st Street home hasn’t changed much over the years. Phone books are piled on the porch. Boards, cracked and curled after years of baking in the sun, cover the windows and front door. [WFPL]

More than 10,000 Kentuckians have registered to vote or updated their registration using GoVoteKY.com, the Commonwealth’s new online voter registration system. “GoVoteKY.com publicly launched last week and is already a huge success,” said Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes. “Over 10,000 people have used the site to register to vote or update their information. And anyone can use it – we’ve seen users from the age of 18 to 98!” [Press Release]

The number of craft spirits distillers across the United States have grown by a rate of 16 percent annually between 2007 and 2015, according to a preliminary report from the American Craft Spirits Association, the International Wine and Spirits Research and industry firm Park Street. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council approved an ordinance Thursday night which requires the registration of any property in the city that will be rented to tenants. [News & Tribune]

Can We Quit Pretending We’re Compassionate?

Strengths and weaknesses of each Jefferson County Public Schools facility, a redesign proposal that would impact three middle schools and the Class of 2016 graduation schedule will all be up for discussion on Tuesday. [WDRB]

Some 7,700 Louisville Water Co. service lines are made of lead – and now for the first time, customers can quickly check to see whether those old pipes are made of lead. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s new State Police Commissioner was announced Monday and they’re from right here in the Louisville area. [WHAS11]

A judge has denied a request by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration to temporarily close a Lexington abortion clinic that the state claims is operating illegally. [H-L]

A man shot and killed his wife and children before setting their house on fire and killing himself in Saratoga Springs on Sunday, Louisville Metro Police said. [WLKY]

After nearly a decade of generally lukewarm concern over what’s been called the “greatest threat“ of our time, Americans are finally taking climate change seriously. [HuffPo]

It wouldn’t be a day in Compassionate City without a school bus accident. mergency crews responded to a multi-vehicle crash involving a school bus. [WAVE3]

It’s 2016, but the Eastern Kentucky Correctional Complex didn’t get the memo. The minimum and medium security prison in West Liberty, Kentucky has a mail policy that prohibits prisoners from receiving books and magazines that “promote homosexuality” — whatever the prison thinks that means. In just a four-month period in 2015, EKCC used the policy 13 different times to confiscate mail including letters, cards, “pages out of book,” and magazines like Out and The Advocate. [ACLU]

It’s obvious just from looking at it that the Black Leaf site in West Louisville is in an extreme state of disrepair. [WFPL]

Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid (Nev.) on Thursday called on Republican leaders in Congress to renounce Donald Trump because of his controversial views, saying their “moral cowardice” led to the GOP presidential front-runner’s rise. [The Hill]

Don’t expect another big purchase from Kindred Healthcare Inc. anytime soon — at least, not in the world of home health care. [Business First]

Floyd County Democratic Party Chairman Adam Dickey has announced the declared candidates for a special vacancy caucus for the position of party vice chair. The caucus was called following the resignation of Stacy Deck last month. [News & Tribune]

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If GLI Backs It, It’s Bad News Bears

More than 600 well-paying jobs could be coming to Louisville as an out-of-state company partners with a local non-profit to form a Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WDRB]

David Keith thought the fight to save his neighborhood was over. [C-J/AKN]

If GLI backs something, you know it’s the worst thing on earth. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt says that if Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget is approved by the General Assembly, the Department of Education will face $72 million in reductions over the next two years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville-based Passport Health Plan is partnering with Virginia-based Evolent Health to create the Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WLKY]

The FBI is joining a U.S. investigation into Flint, Michigan’s water contamination crisis, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

The Falls of the Ohio, a state park covered in fossils, is a perfect place to take pictures – expect for one thing. [WAVE3]

Legislation that would prohibit the General Assembly from diverting state lottery funds away from Kentucky’s need- and merit-based scholarship programs has cleared a House committee. [Press Release]

Jerome Perry doesn’t have many white neighbors. There are so few, in fact, that Perry can list the houses around him where white families live. Even the homes that are blocks away from his tidy yellow brick home on 45th Street in Louisville’s Westover neighborhood. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

Get ready to roll your eyes really hard at all the hype over this Omni hotel mess… [Business First]

After a little more than an hour of discussion Wednesday, the committee tasked with finding a possible compromise to the current weapons ban at the town’s municipal building came to some amicable starting points. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

It’s Morning In Our Possumbilly City

A major twist, Monday, in a lawsuit filed against the University of Louisville. The governor’s office has now switched sides. [WDRB]

PEE ALERT! In the wake of a public fight between its former chairman and vice chairman, the Metropolitan Sewer District board has proposed adding a loyalty provision to its ethics policy. Oh, and no tweeting during board meetings. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS have launched a bullying tipline which students, parents and others can use to report bulling at their school. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin spoke at a Republican presidential forum in New Hampshire Saturday afternoon, less than 24 hours after declaring a state of emergency and activating the Kentucky National Guard to help residents stranded by a massive snowstorm. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just a few years ago he was a local high school basketball star. Now his family wants to know why someone would take his life. [WLKY]

Flint was a failure of government — but it didn’t have to be so. And government wasn’t the root of the problem. It was about the people, and ideas they advocate, who have taken control of governments across the country. [HuffPo]

A former mayoral write-in candidate and bicycling advocate was back in court after being cited by police while riding on a city street. [WAVE3]

Mitch McConnell made a quiet move [last] week on a sweeping war authorization measure written by one of his most hawkish members — an effort to pressure the White House to craft a war proposal more to the GOP’s liking. [Politico]

The 16-year-old girl who died in a Kentucky juvenile-detention center last week was found unresponsive on a bed in a private room, according to the state Justice and Public Safety Cabinet. [WFPL]

Bourbon is a bigger deal than coal because it brings in gobs of tourism dollars. Tourists our pouring into Kentucky to visit distilleries on Kentucky Bourbon Trail and Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Tour. [Richmond Register]

A new collection of bank health ratings shows three Louisville-area financial institutions are in excellent financial shape, while three more might want to do some bank-cardio. [Business First]

The Indiana Supreme Court has established six commercial courts throughout the state, and one is in Floyd County. [News & Tribune]