David Tandy-Dan Johnson Slap Fight!

Police body cameras, smoother roads with more bike lanes and affordable housing. Those are just some of the big ticket items Louisville’s mayor is asking Metro Council to approve. [WDRB]

SLAP FIGHT! Louisville Metro Councilman Dan Johnson claims Council President David Tandy physically threatened him in a private telephone conversation this week and that he may file a criminal complaint. [C-J/AKN]

Boarded up homes and vacant and abandoned properties are problem in many Louisville neighborhoods. [WHAS11]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

The school year is almost over, but some elementary students are already getting help preparing for next year. What the hell kind of opener is that? [WLKY]

The U.S. Department of Education has formally cleared Navient Corp., the student loan giant formerly part of Sallie Mae, of wrongdoing after an investigation into whether the company cheated troops on their federal student loans. The findings contradict earlier conclusions reached by the Justice Department, which sued the company in May 2014 after determining that Navient systematically overcharged troops and denied them key rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Federal prosecutors said the company’s actions were “intentional, willful, and taken in disregard for the rights of servicemembers.” [HuffPo]

As victims recover from a devastating apartment fire in southern Indiana, there are new problems. Time Warner Cable tried to collect lost equipment fees from at least two of its customers who lost everything when the Bridgepoint Apartments caught fire in April. [WAVE3]

Looks like some folks discovered the UPS hub again. [Gizmodo]

The Obama administration announced new clean water rules today that it says will protect sources of drinking water for 117 million Americans, rules welcomed by environmental groups, but bitterly opposed by congressional Republicans and farm state democrats. [WFPL]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

KFC Corp.’s rebranding and revival of Kentucky Fried Chicken founder Col. Harland Sanders has garnered mixed reviews. [Business First]

A former New Albany Police officer was formally terminated Thursday evening by the department’s Merit Commission on four of five charges of improper conduct. Laura Schook — who made claims in 2008 and 2010 to the merit commission of some officers filing inaccurate time sheets, corruption within the department and by not receiving proper backup on calls — was terminated by a 4-1 vote of the commission. [News & Tribune]

Gen Con Should Just Move To Louisville

It’s just another day for UPS driver Mark Casey. He has 60 miles to drive, and 125 deliveries to make. [WDRB]

One deal to restore Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home appears dead, but a Philadelphia attorney says he wants to buy the site and convert it to a museum honoring the three-time Louisville heavyweight boxing champion and humanitarian. [C-J/AKN]

Way to go, JCPS, you’ve done it again. There is new information about the 5-year-old girl left alone on a JCPS school bus for hours on March 11. [WHAS11]

Told ya Jamie Comer is in one of the biggest CYA moves in the history of gubernatorial primary politics in Kentucky. HUGE MEGA PEE ALERT! Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer’s claim that Kentucky had lost 50,000 jobs had disappeared from his campaign website. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Three weeks after he was shot in a West Louisville neighborhood, 13-year-old Tay Reed returned to school. [WLKY]

The number of uninsured U.S. residents fell by more than 11 million since President Barack Obama signed the health care overhaul five years ago, according to a pair of reports Tuesday from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

A(sic) inmate who had been placed into the Home Incarceration Program is charged with escape after he walked out of the Hall of Justice and tried to leave. [WAVE3]

Thirty-one stats(sic) have water supplies dipping below normal. Droughts have formally been declared in 22 of them. How we use water has never been more important, especially in the American Southwest, where drought conditions are the most severe in a generation — and could last another 1,000 years. [ProPublica]

Louisville’s shrinking tree canopy has finally been quantified. Jefferson County is losing trees at a rate of about 54,000 a year, according to a comprehensive assessment of the county’s trees scheduled to be released later this morning. [WFPL]

A major gaming convention, Gen Con, threatened on Tuesday to move its annual event out of Indiana if Gov. Mike Pence signs into law a controversial bill that would allow private businesses to deny service to homosexuals on religious grounds. [Reuters]

The First Link Supermarket at 431 E. Liberty St. in downtown Louisville has been for sale for awhile now, but the agent representing the store’s owner said he would prefer to lease the space after the death of his father and business partner last month. [Business First]

Another step in approving the new radio and television stations at Greater Clark County Schools’ high schools was approved at this week’s board meeting. [News & Tribune]

Here’s A Good Morning You-Know-What Sandwich

An LG&E natural gas pipeline that ruptured in Oldham County in September caused $1.3 million in property damage and other costs, according to the utility’s report to federal safety regulators. [WDRB]

Attorney General Jack Conway appointed another special prosecutor to handle the ongoing dispute over whether Louisville Metro Councilman David James is serving in two incompatible public positions. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. Louisville Metro Police are working a fatal shooting on 2100 block of Ratcliffe Avenue just west Dixie Highway. [WHAS11]

Sales of spirits are accelerating into the festive season, according to Brown-Forman. The Louisville-based parent of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey and Woodford Reserve reported that sales for the second quarter were up 5 percent to nearly $1.14 billion. For the first half of the financial year net sales are up 4 percent, the company said. [H-L]

We’re blown away that wingnuts aren’t screaming satanism or whatever. Good Morning Dragons is a yoga program at South Oldham Middle School that has kids bending and twisting into yoga poses before the first bell. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali on Saturday posted a selfie on his Instagram to cheer on Louisville against Kentucky in college football. “#Louisville Game Day! Go Cards!” the caption read. [HuffPo]

This is why Clark County can’t have nice things. She makes decisions that affect thousands of students, but several months ago she made a decision that landed her in jail. Despite admitting to felony theft, Teresa Perkins took her seat on the Greater Clark County School Board Tuesday night and she says she’s not resigning. [WAVE3]

Did UPS discriminate against a pregnant worker by letting her go? Women’s reproductive rights are once again before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Only this time, pregnancy discrimination is the issue and pro-life and pro-choice groups are on the same side, opposed by business groups. [NPR]

James McGaugh is the recipient of the Grawemeyer Award for psychology, the University of Louisville announced Tuesday evening. [WFPL]

A growing number of cable companies are implementing data caps (sorry — “data thresholds”), which put limits on how much data a subscriber could use before facing penalties ranging from warning messages to throttled speeds to overage fees. A new report from the federal Government Accountability Office says that lack of competition in the broadband market could result in these caps being implemented with no one benefiting other than cable companies’ bottom lines. [Consumerist]

Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) recently began cranking out its new aluminum body F-150 trucks. Since then, there’s been plenty of speculation about whether the new body would be carried over to other vehicles, including the F-Series Super Duty Trucks made in Louisville. [Business First]

Another fun scandal is brewing at the University of Louisville. The VP of Human Resources was canned and escorted away by cops. [The ‘Ville Voice]

The legal bills of a Jeffersonville resident who sued MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. and the city of Jeffersonville over a neighboring asphalt plant have been paid by a laborers’ union. [News & Tribune]

Let’s Take Racism More Seriously, Louisville

Officials with Jefferson County Public Schools unveiled a plan to the school board Monday on where to place two new innovative schools that will open in time for the 2015-16 school year. [WDRB]

The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday the crew of a UPS jet that crashed last year in Birmingham, Ala., made mistakes during the critical pre-dawn approach to the runway, adding that the fatigue of the pilot and co-pilot were factors in the accident. [C-J/AKN]

With the appliance sale of General Electric to Electrolux, many employees are wondering what it will mean for them in the future. [WHAS11]

Republican Agriculture Commissioner James Comer formally entered the 2015 race for governor on Tuesday in front of hundreds of hometown supporters in an ambitious campaign rollout more than a year before the election. [WKYT]

Will this Josh Young saga never end with local media??? [WLKY]

Atmospheric volumes of greenhouse gas hit a record in 2013 as carbon dioxide concentrations grew at the fastest rate since reliable global records began, the World Meteorological Organization said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Six decades ago a family’s home was attacked in a neighborhood ripped apart by racism. Now, researchers at the University of Louisville are retelling the story about two families and their fight for desegregation and need the public’s help. [WAVE3]

The Louisville ECHO program (Louisville is Engaging Children Outdoors), Louisville Metro Parks and Recreation’s signature environmental education initiative for fourth-grade students, has received significant support this year with $41,295 in grant funding from the U.S. Forest Service, and $7,500 Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky, Inc. [Press Release]

Starting this week, members of the Jefferson County Board of Education are hosting community conversations across the district. [WFPL]

WDRB in Louisville, Kentucky has hired six journalists from print publications to contribute to its website during the last two years, said Barry Fulmer, the station’s news director. [Poynter]

A University of Louisville cancer researcher, Dr. Anthony Dragun, is trying to make treatment easier for breast cancer patients. [Business First]

An outside firm will investigate New Albany’s police department for possible workplace violations after a state police investigation cleared two officers accused of working on private jobs on taxpayer time. [News & Tribune]

Clarksville Law Enforcement Sounds Kinda Crazy

Protestors lined the sidewalk across the street from the WDRB News building Tuesday morning to protest a recent “Point of View” editorial by WDRB President and General Manager Bill Lamb. WDRB gave Scott an opportunity to sit down for an interview, but she declined. [WDRB]

For the first time in 15 years, there is no monitoring for a variety of toxic chemicals in Louisville’s air — even though Jefferson County accounts for nearly 20 percent of all industrial emissions of those types of pollutants in Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office has given the thumbs up to Metro Council to increase the city’s minimum wage. [WHAS11]

Failed presidential candidate and the creator of Obamacare — Mittens Romney — is coming to Kentucky to campaign for Mitch McConnell. [Sam Youngman]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Clark County Chief Deputy John Kahafer has died. [WLKY]

After months of campaigning and with primary season nearly at a close, the midterm elections landscape remains decidedly decidedly game-unchanged. [HuffPo]

An Indiana woman says she was shot in the stomach through a window in her apartment. [WAVE3]

Man, it would be sweet to have one of those Public Works jobs in Louisville. You can take naps whenever you want. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Ford Motor Company says the addition of a new vehicle line at the Louisville Assembly Plant has created hundreds of new jobs. [WFPL]

White pupils in state schools in the United States are set to be a minority for the first time when schools return for the new term. [BBC]

The National Transportation Safety Board has removed United Parcel Service and its pilot union from the investigation of a plane crash that killed two people. [Business First]

The Clark County Council needs to decide whether or not programs like the home incarceration program and community service should be administered by a locally funded program or a state-funded one. [News & Tribune]

Legislators Outside Louisville Are Enviro-Ignorant

Just before 2 a.m. Saturday, emergency officials received a call about a shooting on Routt Road in Jeffersontown. [WDRB]

The Transit Authority of River City is making what the transit officials call relatively minor service adjustments, with most of the changes to be in place by Monday. [C-J/AKN]

It was a scary first day of school for parents of a local kindergartner. The Salls family says their 5-year-old son Damien was brought to the wrong school on his first day, but they say they only found out when he did not get off the bus that evening. [WHAS11]

In a business where patience is part of the process, Kentucky bourbon makers are making a big bet by stashing away their largest stockpiles in more than a generation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A Louisville man is literally changing the facades of Louisville, one building at a time, and he’s doing it with one hand. [WLKY]

A portion of an organ donation from a deceased gay Iowa teen has been rejected due to his sexual orientation. [HuffPo]

The husband of a Tennessee pilot killed when a UPS cargo jet crashed in Alabama is suing the company that makes equipment used in the aircraft. [WAVE3]

The frustration of eastern Kentucky lawmakers was obvious Friday as they listened to a report on looming federal regulations designed to limit carbon and “greenhouse gas” emissions. [Ronnie Ellis]

A study commissioned by Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad to examine whether racial profiling is a factor when officers make traffic stops is weeks away from being completed, said a department spokesman. [WFPL]

Mental health issues like depression, anxiety and substance abuse often start in adolescence, then peak in young adulthood. But for young people who don’t have steady jobs or stable paychecks, getting help can be tough. [NPR]

Another month of Louisville home sales figures have been reported by the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors, and the trend that has been apparent throughout 2014 persists. [Business First]

With a little more than four months remaining in 2014, the Floyd County Council is out of money. [News & Tribune]

Tina Ward-Pugh Snaps Back At Greg Fischer

Pictures of alleged animal abuse in Spencer County are making the rounds on the internet. But county officials are standing by their decision not to charge the owner. [WDRB]

Dozens of employees at the Louisville Metro Air Pollution Control District must reapply for their jobs after audits criticized the agency. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky general assembly is considering a new bill that would allow school districts more flexibility when dealing with school closings or delays during inclement weather while ensuring instructional time stays the same. [WHAS11]

In a unanimous opinion, the Kentucky Supreme Court sent racetracks’ efforts to expand Instant Racing back to square one. The court ruled Thursday that the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has the legal authority to regulate wagers on previously run horse races presented on electronic gambling machines — but the legality of the wagers themselves has yet to be established. [H-L]

A cockpit voice recorder transcript shows the pilots of a UPS cargo jet that crashed last August complained of tiring work schedules that don’t allow enough time for sleep at the start of the fatal flight. [WLKY]

Want to see what arrogance looks like in the Kentucky State Senate? Get a load of Damon Thayer. He’s directly responsible for stalling the restoration of voting rights. [Page One]

We wish this would have better luck than promised and failed reforms at Metro Animal Services. Cutting down on salt and requiring a body mass index test for students in kindergarten through 6th grade were two of the recommendations listed in a 6-year comprehensive plan unveiled by city leaders Wednesday. [WAVE3]

Joining a chorus of Democratic candidates, retiring Louisville Metro Councilwoman Tina Ward-Pugh says she disagrees with Mayor Greg Fischer’s decision to endorse in the District 9 primary race. [WFPL]

Louisville and Jefferson County trail U.S. averages in income, most educational attainment measures and employment. [Business First]

Members of the public are invited to take walking tours of the construction progress on the downtown crossing of the Ohio River Bridges Project, according to a ORBP press release. [News & Tribune]

The bluegrass state is not only the third-largest car manufacturer in America; thanks to its central location (see map), it has become a huge logistics hub and now also ranks third among American states in air-cargo shipments. [The Economist]