UofL Had Another Horrible News Week

Hillerich & Bradsby Co. is asking a judge to resolve a dispute over the value of more than 2,000 shares that were returned by stockholders who opposed the sale of the Louisville Slugger brand. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville Foundation voted Thursday to decline booster J.D. Nichols’ offer to use part of his $10 million gift pledged to the school to pay off past bonuses for President James Ramsey and other top administrators. [C-J/AKN]

The West Louisville Minister’s Coalition is demanding an answer from Attorney General Jack Conway about whether or not Governor Steve Beshear acted legally when he did not appoint an African American to the University of Louisville board. [WHAS11]

In his address to Congress, Pope Francis praised the American Thomas Merton as “a source of spiritual inspiration and a guide for many people.” [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Louisville is partnering with a popular app to help drivers avoid traffic. [WLKY]

Americans like to think of our country as a nation of immigrants and a nation of religions, but repeatedly we have failed to live up to our ideals, banishing fellow citizens from the American family because of their ethnicities or religious commitments. [HuffPo]

You dial those three numbers, 311, to report problems to Louisville Metro Government. But how often is the city picking up the phone? Records show thousands of calls for service go unanswered every month. [WAVE3]

When Kentucky Republicans last agreed to conduct a caucus to choose their presidential preference some said it would draw more candidates than just favorite son, Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. [Ronnie Ellis]

Josh White doesn’t like the look of Louisville these days. “It looks gritty,” he said. “I don’t want it to look gritty.” [WFPL]

Growth in the U.S. manufacturing sector showed no month-over-month change during September, staying at August’s sluggish pace which was the weakest in almost two years, according to an industry report released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital in St. Matthews has opened a new pediatric emergency department. [Business First]

With full bellies, Jeffersonville residents got a taste for their city candidates’ views Tuesday night during the Jeffersonville Fraternal Order of Police No. 100’s Meet the Candidates Steak Dinner. [News & Tribune]

UofL’s Leadership Is Still The Worst

Everyone pray to the Flying Spaghetti Monster that someone with no ties to Greg Fischer runs this program so it stays on track and comes to fruition. Google Fiber announced it was considering bringing its high speed internet service to Louisville earlier this month and now the company is hiring managers for the project. [WDRB]

It looks like Louisville may go another year without a monitoring program for airborne toxic chemicals, as city and state officials keep looking at each other as the future funding source. [C-J/AKN]

Family members of five people who died when a boat capsized on the Ohio River say in federal court documents that the placement and condition of a construction barge caused the tragedy. [WHAS11]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

She’s old enough for that? Jennifer Lawrence is the latest Louisville native to be honored by the Greater Louisville Pride Foundation’s Louisville Hometown Heroes series. [WLKY]

Daniel Suddeath has been hired as editor of the Glasgow Daily Times, effective Tuesday, Sept. 29. Suddeath, a staff writer for the News and Tribune in Southern Indiana for the past seven years, also served as editor for Southern Indiana Business Source magazine during that time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Neighbors who say there has been an increase in crime in their area are frustrated and now they are taking action by starting a neighborhood watch. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called homelessness an “emergency” in the city and proposed spending $100 million to provide permanent housing and shelters for the city’s 26,000 indigent. [Reuters]

State Auditor Adam Edelen says he’s looking into the financial management of the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the university’s $1.1 billion endowment, and the university’s board of trustees as part of an ongoing investigation. [WFPL]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

It looks like another expansion is on the way at Ford Motor Co.’s Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The city’s mayoral candidates did not hold back during Thursday night’s League of Women Voters debate, answering moderated questions and sending accusations the other’s way. [News & Tribune]


And we don’t mean the teevee newsreaders constantly hyping up Will Russell’s sad state…

A fire in Old Louisville that left three people dead has now been ruled arson. The fire happened on South Second Street in early July. [WDRB]

You should definitely go to this! The Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center in Clarksville will reopen in January with a completely revamped exhibit space including state of the art interactive exhibits. [C-J/AKN]

Wasn’t this flipping great? Around 9 p.m. Sept 21 Johnson and Cornelius escaped from the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections Community Corrections Center on East Chestnut Street. The inmates used bed sheets to facilitate an escape. [WHAS11]

Fees will be waived at several recreation areas in the Daniel Boone National Forest this weekend to celebrate National Public Lands Day. [H-L]

Some Jefferson County Public School pre-kindergarten students are using drama to learn math and other subjects. [WLKY]

The amount of money the world has pledged to divest from fossil fuels now exceeds $2.6 trillion, a group of policymakers, philanthropists and activists announced Tuesday. The figure is 50 times higher than the $52 billion that had been divested exactly one year ago. [HuffPo]

OH GOD WE’RE ALL GONNA GET THE SUPER LICE! The treatment-resistant form of lice scientists are calling ‘super lice’ has been found in 25 states including Kentucky and Indiana. [WAVE3]

If we’re handcuffing autistic children at the elbows or throwing them in jail overnight, then we’re failing them. If we’re hitting kids with felony weapons charges for bringing fishing tackle to school, then we’re failing them. And if we’re using suspensions (which absolutely do not work) against students who build clocks, or twirl pencils, or write about pot, or chew their Pop-Tarts into the shape of a gun, then we’re failing them. [Click this Clicky]

More than 60 percent of Louisville’s occupied housing structures are detached, single-family buildings, according to a Washington Post analysis of U.S. Census data. [WFPL]

Remember LMPD Chief White? He’s still up to the same old crap. [Click this Clicky]

My Morning Jacket drummer Patrick Hallahan, attorney Jon Salomon and chef Bobby Benjamin will open a new restaurant called Butchertown Grocery this November in Louisville. [Business First]

The conversation has only just begun. That’s the goal of Facing Homelessness: A Community Conversation, a public forum hosted by the News and Tribune and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]

UofL Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves. In Other Words? Told Ya So Years Ago, Nothing Has Changed

Who could have known, over the past eight years, that there’s a morale problem with faculty and staff at the University of Louisville??? Vicious and disrespectful: that’s how some faculty and staff describe the work environment at the University of Louisville. [WDRB]

African Americans living in Kentucky saw their average yearly incomes drop by more than 11 percent in one year, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released this week. The poverty rate also rose for black Kentuckians at a rate four times more than the rest of the state from 2013 to 2014. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 has learned, through MetroSafe, there is a shooting in the 3800 block of Vermont Avenue, in the Shawnee area. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Metro police said a 66-year-old man found dead last week was slain. Police said Michael Davis was killed sometime last Monday. [WLKY]

Seventy-three law enforcement agencies across the country will receive $20 million in federal grants to help them purchase and implement the use of body cameras, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance announced Monday. [HuffPo]

Crowds rallied together Sunday near the corner of 17th and Broadway with concerns of a new biodigester planned for the West Louisville neighborhood that would deal with methane gas. [WAVE3]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan touted two Louisville educational institutions Thursday during a stop in the city. [WFPL]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services is updating and expanding its surgical facilities in a $2.4 million project. [Business First]

Shane Corbin said his role as Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning director has been an exciting one. [News & Tribune]

You Already Know What JCPS Has Done

Jack Conway’s office says JCPS broke the law with too many redactions. But here’s the deal: Helene Kramer was allegedly trash-talking re: that high-level employee’s sexual orientation and Donna Hargens allowed it to occur. She didn’t stop it. She’s never taken it seriously and refuses to admit that real harm was done. Everyone wants to piss and moan and bicker over whether or not those details should be revealed. I’m not gonna identify the individual until they decide to come forward but let’s get real here. That’s what happened. Several of us in the local media world have had the allegations in our possession for months and months and everyone’s just been sitting on it while trying to find a way to get JCPS to cough up the specifics. And all the mainstream media outlets have been afraid to reveal what the victim claims off-the-record occurred. [WDRB]

The Administration for Children and Families has given Jefferson County Public Schools the all-clear after the agency last year found a deficiency in the school district’s Head Start program. [C-J/AKN]

Where’s the media outrage over this murder? The victim’s life is no less valuable than that of anyone else. [WHAS11]

Under most circumstances, global stock market volatility would be enough to unnerve those in a commercial arena preparing for its bellwether exercise. But both the strength of key indictors and a wave of industry momentum heading into the Keeneland September Yearling Sale make for a positive forecast for the 12-day auction when it begins Monday. [H-L]

Muhammad and Lonnie Ali have made a donation to the University of Louisville Athletics. [WLKY]

More than half of the tax cuts proposed in former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s (R) tax plan would flow to America’s wealthiest citizens, according to a report released by the nonpartisan group Citizens for Tax Justice, which advocates for “requiring the wealthy to pay their fair share.” [HuffPo]

All the WAVE gays freaked out over Cher. Like lost their minds freaked out. It was kind of a big gay deal. [WAVE3]

The Obama administration has said it will allow 10,000 Syrian refugees to resettle in the US over the next year. Is this enough? And are there any risks? [BBC]

The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services released a comprehensive plan to reduce health disparities earlier this week, and efforts are already under way in Louisville that address some of the findings. [WFPL]

Every day in America, mortgage companies attempt to foreclose on homeowners using false documents. It’s a byproduct of the mortgage securitization craze during the housing bubble, when loans were sliced and diced so haphazardly that the actual ownership was confused. [The Incercept]

Earlier this week, I took a tour of Norton Commons, the self-contained urbanist community in northeastern Jefferson County that eventually will extend into Oldham County as it is completed in the next 10 to 15 years. [Business First]

The New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter has launched a unique fundraising effort to benefit local animals. [News & Tribune]

Fighting Over Grass As Folks Go Hungry

Some say growing grass on abandoned properties in Louisville is a growing problem. [WDRB]

Jack Conway went to western Louisville on Saturday and promised that he would appoint African Americans to the University of Louisville’s board of trustees if he were elected governor. [C-J/AKN]

The oil bust has been largely a supply-driven phenomenon. Unlike the last time that oil prices were this low — during the 2008-2009 financial crisis — this past year’s price collapse has not been because of destruction in demand, but due to too much supply. [WHAS11]

While standardbreds took to the track outside during Red Mile’s regular meet Saturday night, fans of casino gaming took their seats inside for the historic track’s first night of slots-style wagering. [H-L]

Who knew this was a thing? A crowd favorite returned to the Ohio River along Waterfront Park Saturday. A team from Waggener High School was one of 30 teams competing in the Annual Dragon Boat Festival. [WLKY]

Kamilah Brock says the New York City police sent her to a mental hospital for a hellish eight days, where she was forcefully injected with powerful drugs, essentially because they couldn’t believe a black woman owned a BMW. [HuffPo]

With the stroke of a paintbrush, a west Louisville man is transforming shoes. Dinero Andretti creates custom artwork for any shoe and any customer. Some customers have requested specific designs for causes. [WAVE3]

Hidden in the haze of the petrochemical plants and beyond the seemingly endless traffic jams, a Texas city has grown so large that it is poised to pass Chicago as the third biggest in the United States in the next decade. [Reuters]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is looking into concerns that deliberate and systemic bias pollute the process of allocating funds associated with the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, as more than $300,000 allocated for the program this year went unused. [WFPL]

Governor Steve Beshear announced today that U.S. Deputy Secretary of Transportation Victor Mendez, a champion for the nation’s vital transportation infrastructure, will visit Louisville next week to speak to an automotive conference and to view progress on the downtown Ohio River bridge project. [Press Release]

Louisvillians are practically salivating for a major-league sports team to support. [Business First]

Most employee positions or big purchases, with an exception for public safety, will not yet be approved for next year’s budget, but the Jeffersonville City Council is still discussing what’s to come during its annual budget workshops. [News & Tribune]

Let’s All Freak Out Over Google Fiber!

Officials at U of L say they are going to make medical care for transgendered persons a priority. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools wants to extend its contract to keep its $190/hour spokeswoman. Way to go, Louisville, for screwing things up again. [C-J/AKN]

Bardstown Police issued a short release Thursday morning saying that one of their officers has been suspended. [WHAS11]

Boy, is this guy in for a real treat. David A. Byerman, who has served two terms as Nevada’s Senate secretary, is the choice of a search committee to be director of the Kentucky Legislative Research Commission. [H-L]

This kind of fluff is why people apparently still turn to this website for Louisville Metro Animal Services news and not the teevee folks. [WLKY]

The 16 NFL stadiums that will host NFL games this weekend have cost taxpayers nearly $3 billion, a new analysis found. [HuffPo]

Family members are desperately searching for answers after a driver hit and killed their loved one and severely injured another woman in Valley Station over Labor Day weekend. [WAVE3]

Maybe this means Louisville is going to get some sweet, sweet GOOGLE FIBER sometime soon. [Click the Clicky]

Mary Cooksey had a tough time getting a pizza delivered to Kingston Park apartments. “They said they won’t come in Kingston,” she said. [WFPL]

Federal immigration officials are issuing far fewer detainer requests, also known as immigration holds, to state and local law enforcement agencies seeking immigrants who are in this country illegally. At the same time, the requests that are issued don’t appear to be targeting serious, or convicted, criminals. [NPR]

If you have driven down Third or Fourth streets south of Broadway lately, you might have noticed a pile of concrete and dirt on Spalding University’s campus. [Business First]

The New Albany police union won portions of its arbitration case against the city, but both sides labeled the decision as essentially a split. [News & Tribune]