Louisville Streets Have Always Been Pothole City

After an abrupt change in leadership for Jeffersonville Police, the new chief appointed is making history and says he is ready to take charge. [WDRB]

Jeffersonville Police Chief Chris Grimm was ousted from the position Monday by Mayor Mike Moore, who attributed the demotion only to a “new direction in the police department,” according to a news release. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky State Auditor Adam Edelen has described the financial practices of the city of West Buechel as “astounding and highly irregular. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has ruled in favor of a newspaper seeking police records. [H-L]

A JCPS teacher accused of sex crimes with a child wants his trial delayed. [WLKY]

The tide has turned for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender couples seeking to be married in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A). [HuffPo]

Metro government has gotten more than 1,000 reports of potholes in the past three days as winter quickly gave way to warmer weather. [WAVE3]

But none of the top candidates in this field gets within 10 points of Hillary Clinton in a series of hypothetical general election matchups. Rand Paul comes closest, with 43% saying they’d be more likely to back him while 54% choose Clinton. [CNN]

A week after announcing the receipt of $6.3 million from the foundations of businessmen “Papa” John Schnatter and Charles Koch, the University of Louisville has released the underlying seven-year agreements. Rebecca Peek, a U of L senior and member of the Student Labor Action Project, said she was ashamed of the school’s agreement. [WFPL]

The U.S. government is preparing to roll back a widely criticized approach to public health, in which the “lost pleasure” people might suffer if they quit smoking or chose to eat healthier foods was used to reduce the projected benefits of new regulations, government officials told Reuters. [Reuters]

This time next year, the new Speed Art Museum will be open for business. [Business First]

Former Jeffersonville City Councilman John Perkins’ name is back on the ballot for the May primary election, following a circuit court’s decision. [News & Tribune]

How Many Will Be Shot Dead This Week?

LMPD responded to the scene of a shooting at 26th and Chestnut Streets in the Russell neighborhood. Police Chief Steve Conrad says a male in his 20s was shot by an LMPD officer during a narcotics investigation. [WDRB]

A half-dozen faculty members speaking before the University of Louisville Faculty Senate on Wednesday denounced large deferred compensation packages that have been given to the university’s top executives. Several speakers said that while the packages for President James Ramsey, Provost Shirley Willihnganz and Chief of Staff Kathleen Smith might be legal, they are not ethical, given tuition hikes and low pay for faculty. [C-J/AKN]

Protesters were out in force in Louisville Saturday night, echoing a common cry across the country: Black lives matter. [WHAS11]

About 45 minutes before Comer’s remarks began, the latest Bluegrass Poll was released showing the state commissioner of agriculture trailing former Louisville councilman Hal Heiner by 8 points and tied with Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, who lost a primary challenge to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell last spring. Hours before that, Comer’s campaign faced a minor embarrassment when the PageOneKentucky blog revealed that the parents and brother of Holly Harris Von Luehrte, Comer’s former campaign manager, were hosting a fundraiser for Heiner. [H-L]

Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when the car they were riding in was struck by a train in the West Buechel area. [WLKY]

The share of unemployed Americans who receive unemployment insurance benefits has dwindled to its lowest point in decades, thanks in part to benefit cuts in Republican-led states. Just 23.1 percent of unemployed workers received state unemployment benefits at the end of 2014. [HuffPo]

“I heard the shot,” Pamela Vethel recalled. She saw when police pulled up at an apartment building on the corner of 26th Street and Chestnut. She didn’t expect what would happen next, just as two officers entered the stairwell. [WAVE3]

Johnathan Masters admits he’s not exactly the ideal running mate – he’s got a string of charges on his record, and pending court appearances on the calendar — but he is absolutely puzzled by his latest arrest in Kenton County, Kentucky. Apparently, he was told by police on Wednesday he failed to return a library book from 11 years ago. [Umm]

PharMerica Corp., the nation’s second-largest operator of institutional pharmacies, has agreed to settle two federal healthcare fraud lawsuits, one of which accuses the Louisville-based company of taking kickbacks to help expand the misuse of an anti-seizure drug in nursing homes during an 11-year period. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell says there’ll be no vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general until Republicans and Democrats resolve a dispute over a human trafficking bill. [Politico]

Wait for it, wait for it… Claudia Coffey, executive director of the Louisville Apartment Association, said the city’s rental boom is infused by job growth. Couldn’t possibly have anything to do with no one being able to afford to buy. [Business First]

J.P. can see the end of the road to his journey out of homelessness. The 42-year-old Jeffersonville resident lives in a shipping container near some railroad tracks. [News & Tribune]

How Much Time Has He Spent Raising Taxes?

Another day, another JCPS bus accident. They’re almost as plentiful as shootings or pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Can you imagine how much better off Louisville would be if Greg Fischer spent the amount of time he’s spent trying to raise your taxes on holding people like Sadiqa Reynolds accountable? With hours left for the local option sales tax to advance in the state Senate, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made a push Tuesday to rally support for the bill. [C-J/AKN]

A single vote upheld the decision to prevent James Helinger from returning to his post as a Buechel Police Lieutenant. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission will discuss the decline of important natural pollinators like bees and butterflies. The meeting Thursday in Frankfort will be open to the public. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City! One person was rushed to the hospital after an early morning shooting in Okolona. Was apparently a teen who was found shot in the groin. [WLKY]

This man helps American cities hide their homeless populations. His tactics are being put to use in Louisville by Greg Fischer. But no one wants to talk about it because how dare anyone question puppies and rainbows. [HuffPo]

Parents within West Clark Community Schools are voicing concerns over school conditions and overcrowding at Silver Creek High School in Clark County. [WAVE3]

Louisville businessman Hal Heiner leads the crowded race for the Republican party’s nominee for Kentucky’s next governor who would then likely take on Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [WKYT]

John Schnatter’s long-running, multi-generational ties to the University of Louisville just grew $4.64 million deeper. [WFPL]

A new study has found that when transgender young people are allowed to fully identify with their gender and take steps toward transition, it significantly improves their depression and anxiety. [Think Progress]

When Lily DeRosia read about the mandatory overtime and long shifts forced on workers at the Louisville company that makes Girl Scout cookies, she was inspired to try to do something about it. [Business First]

Floyd County is in the process of hiring a public works director. [News & Tribune]

Are You Excited For Not Diana To Visit?

Everybody is freaking out about Prince Charles and that lady who is not Diana coming to Louisville. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer on Monday nominated Sujata Barai Chugh, a public policy and nonprofit grant writing consultant, to fill one of two open seats on the Metropolitan Sewer District board. [C-J/AKN]

An underground service explosion caused a disruption to power to some customers in the areas of 4th, Liberty, Fifth and Jefferson streets, according to LG&E spokesperson Natasha Collins. [WHAS11]

Raising the minimum wage is a top issue for Kentucky voters, contrary to the nonsense Greg Fischer has spewed. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville police are investigating human remains found on a construction site in Lake Louisvilla in eastern Jefferson County, on Monday. [WLKY]

When he published Diana: Her True Story in 1992, Andrew Morton faced a “cataclysm” from the British establishment, who wished to “deny the message and denigrate the messenger” behind the explosive biography. [HuffPo]

Now we’re leaving shootings (okay, not really) and are getting back to good old fashioned stabbings. [WAVE3]

Hypocrisy. Disappointment. Frustration. That’s how Democrats described their feelings about Republicans as they listened to President Barack Obama call for a renewal of the Voting Rights Act in front of the Edmund Pettus Bridge on the anniversary of the march that helped get the law passed 50 years ago. [Politico]

Louisville Metro Government will pay $1.5 million to settle a legal suit filed by a group of young men wrongfully arrested in summer 2014. [WFPL]

No new research projects will begin at the U.S. government’s key livestock study center until animal welfare is improved through stronger oversight and better training of standards, U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said on Monday. [Reuters]

Nucleus, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, plans to keep its deadline intact for the construction of a six-story parking garage at 220 S. Preston St. in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

The Indiana Senate’s top budget writer said Thursday he wants to consider ways of possibly easing proposed school funding shifts that could lead to cuts for many urban and rural districts with shrinking enrollments. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Email Blast About Interim VP/Provost

Seems you folks love reading the UofL email blasts, so here’s one from Ramsey:

From: Cmoffice,Service Account
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2015 11:00 AM
Subject: Message from the President re: Interim provost

Colleagues,

I’m pleased to announce that Dr. Neville Pinto, dean of the J.B. Speed School of Engineering, has agreed to serve as Interim Executive Vice President and University Provost at UofL. Dean Pinto will succeed Dr. Shirley Willihnganz, who announced she is stepping down following this academic year.

Dean Pinto brings vision and energy to this position. Since coming to UofL as dean in 2011, he has built a significant list of accomplishments including spearheading development of the Belknap Engineering and Applied Sciences Research Park and significantly strengthening the university’s relationship with GE. The GE partnership has led to significant educational and career opportunities for our students and encouraged the company to bring its FirstBuild microfactory to our campus.

He also brings experience in academic leadership, having served in a number of administrative roles, including most recently as vice provost and dean of the Graduate School at the University of Cincinnati, before coming to UofL.

Dean Pinto has the strong support of Dr. Willihnganz, who will have completed 13 years of outstanding service as provost when she steps down on June 30. Dr. Willihnganz has worked hard on behalf of all faculty, staff and students at UofL, and she is responsible for many great things that have occurred during her tenure.

I hope you will join me in wishing Dr. Willihnganz well as she enters the next stage of her career and in congratulating Dr. Pinto on his new role as interim provost.

Jim Ramsey
President

Good? Bad? Meh?

More Possibility In Chattanooga Than Louisville?

The words don’t always come easy. For Perry Clemons, they sometimes vanish. Clemons is 58-years-old and lives in Clarkson, Kentucky. [WDRB]

As Mayor Greg Fischer joins Metro Council member Angela Lee in calling for a fuller environmental study of the Brownsboro Road site purchased for a new Veterans Affairs Medical Center, plans are in the works to turn about half of the second choice site into a subdivision. [C-J/AKN]

What? Another shooting? Surely not. Not in Possibility City where everything is Compassionate and Transparent. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul takes the first step toward running for president when he asks state party leaders to endorse his idea to create a 2016 presidential caucus in Kentucky. [H-L]Singed by their defeat in the battle over Homeland Security funding, Republicans aren’t about to renew their fight against President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration anytime soon. [Politico]

They’ll run stories like this about animal shelters hundreds of miles away. But couldn’t be bothered to dig in at Metro Animal Services at any point over the past decade. [WLKY]

Louisville doesn’t have the guts to do something like this. Fischer and council will always bend over backwards for lobbyists. [HuffPo]

Lexington has started to shoot its kids just like Louisville! Copycat. We were first. Lexington police told media outlets a 9-year-old boy was taken to UK Hospital after being shot while riding in his parents’ car. [WAVE3]

A factory in Louisville, Kentucky, made chewing tobacco for over a century before folding in 2009. Now the abandoned site is a symbol of how the city is changing: The 24-acre brownfield will soon become one of the largest hubs for local food in the U.S. [Fast Company]

Louisville Metro Police is on track to putting body cameras on some officers this summer. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s proposal to consolidate more than a dozen regulatory offices into an agency that would oversee food safety is drawing the intrigue and ire of some food safety advocates, producers, and experts — some of whom question the feasibility of a move that’s decades in the making. [ThinkProgress]

A U.S. Supreme Court decision about whether patients who get insurance through federally administered exchanges should have their costs subsidized is not expected to have an impact on Kynect, Kentucky’s insurance exchange. [Business First]

At first it looks like some kind of marketing ploy. Six picnic tables, surrounded by a garbage can on a concrete slab in the middle of Same Peden Community Park in New Albany. [News & Tribune]