The UofL Prostitution Scandal Rages On

There was a time, I now can admit, when I was really good at writing book reports on books I had not read. This is not the time for that. In evaluating the allegations soon to be brought forth in detail by a woman who says she was hired by former University of Louisville director of basketball operations Andre McGee to provide sexual services for men’s basketball recruits and players from 2010 to 2014, we can look at the smoke, we haven’t yet seen the fire. But it smells like something is burning. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday tightened the nation’s smog standard by nearly 7 percent, choosing a number that puts the Louisville area on the bubble for continued compliance. [C-J/AKN]

The Jeffersontown Police Chief spoke out Saturday and said gun violence in his town will not be tolerated. Sounds like Rick Sanders is back to pounding his chest? [WHAS11]

Dick Pitino may not read the new sexytime book but you know he’ll be listening to the audiobook! [H-L]

Things nearly turned deadly Thursday night in Jeffersontown as a father tried to buy a cellphone for his daughter. [WLKY]

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is stepping down in December after 7 years in the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Louisville has long been referred to as the River City, mainly due to its history as a flatboat and steamboat port carrying people and goods to and from the heartland from the city’s conception. But a big part of riverboat history that you may not know about lies right across the mighty Ohio River in Jeffersonville, Indiana. [WAVE3]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul said Saturday that his home state of Kentucky needs a governor willing to stand up to the federal government he aspires to lead from the White House. [ABC News]

Here’s hoping Greg Fischer doesn’t ruin Louisville’s chances at Google Fiber. Hopefully Google will rely on people like Ambassador Matthew Barzun and others. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer will join the city’s chief innovation officer, Ted Smith, on Monday to talk Google Fiber. [WFPL]

One Vatican official said there was “a sense of regret” that the pope had ever seen Kim Davis, a Kentucky county clerk who went to jail in September for refusing to honor a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and issue same-sex marriage licenses. [Reuters]

More than 360 local charities received donations Thursday as part of the Community Foundation of Louisville Inc.’s annual Give Local Louisville campaign. [Business First]

Several issues were brought to the stage, but Tuesday’s New Albany mayoral debate was bookended by who was missing from the discussion. [News & Tribune]

When Will JCPS Get A Non-Awful Supe?

Louisville Metro Council’s public safety committee tabled a motion on Wednesday to change the city’s public nuisance law. [WDRB]

Another battle is brewing between County Attorney Mike O’Connell and a district court judge over Drive Safe Louisville, O’Connell’s revenue-generating traffic school. [C-J/AKN]

New data released by the Kentucky Department of Education shows mixed results for JCPS scores. Donna Hargens and her PR firm friends you’re paying for can’t hype this up. [WHAS11]

Despite Kentucky’s socially conservative streak, more than half of the state’s voters think Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis should have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

Is TARC the devil? Probably. A bicyclist was injured Thursday morning in an accident involving a TARC bus. That comes on the heels of a TARC-school bus accident. [WLKY]

Thirteen people were killed and as many as 20 were wounded Thursday in a shooting at a small community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to multiple reports. Another day, another mass shooting. [HuffPo]

A recent murder has put Old Louisville in the spotlight as residents push for more police. Several complaints have already been made to police by people who live in the area. Those residents say they are frustrated over the lack of response. [WAVE3]

We might not be able to remember every stressful episode of our childhood. But the emotional upheaval we experience as kids — whether it’s the loss of a loved one, the chronic stress of economic insecurity, or social interactions that leave us tearful or anxious — may have a lifelong impact on our health. [NPR]

Kentuckians are continuing to default on federal student loans at one of the highest rates in the nation. [WFPL]

Congress is blocking legal marijuana in Washington, D.C. and maybe causing a spike in murders. [Mother Jones]

Let’s quit acting like Steve Beshear doesn’t already have someone picked to serve on UofL’s board of trustees. [Business First]

Floyd County has to submit a budget to the state by Oct. 28. And as of Monday night, it is still unknown how much will be set aside for the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter in 2016. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! JCPS Wants To Spend More $

Attorney General Jack Conway’s office has ruled that Gov. Steve Beshear’s office violated the state law that requires racial balance on the University of Louisville’s board of trustees when he removed its only African American. [C-J/AKN]

Shepherdsville’s mayor, accused in a sex scandal, is refusing to take a plea deal. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is hoping to push through a new contract to make greater use of the public relations firm that has been handling the district’s media issues. [More C-J/AKN]

A homeless woman who spent her nights in Central Park is now getting a permanent home. Metro Councilman David James met the woman earlier this year and said she left a powerful impact on his life. [WHAS11]

Freedom of religion isn’t reason enough to deny any American their constitutional rights, President Barack Obama said Sunday as he addressed members of the LGBT community, one of his major sources of political and financial support. [H-L]

Five schools in Louisville are being honored by the U.S. Department of Education. St. Gabriel, St. Mary Academy, St. Albert, St. Margaret Mary and Christian Academy were the Louisville schools honored Tuesday. [WLKY]

The U.S. plans to increase the number of refugees it takes from 70,000 to 100,000 over the next two years. New York, Los Angeles and 16 other cities have urged President Barack Obama to accept even more refugees from Syria. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Government has reached an agreement to settle the final pending claim related to the June 1, 2009 train accident at the Louisville Zoo, according to a news released issued by the office of Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell. [WAVE3]

Just in case you were wondering why Hillview has gone bankrupt? Andy Beshear was involved, apparently. [CN|Toot]

Mary Campbell steps over a pile of old bricks and squeezes into a hallway heaped with the remnants of a long life — burnt out lamps, discarded boxes, busted chairs. [WFPL]

The nation’s largest mortgage lenders are violating the terms of a punitive 2012 settlement that was meant to prevent unfair and unnecessary foreclosures that destroyed communities and pushed working families from their homes. [Politico]

Looking for the next American Pharoah? The place to be is at the annual Keeneland September Yearling Sale in Lexington, Kentucky, which ended this weekend. More than 2,700 yearlings were sold at this year’s Thoroughbred yearling auction, which is a cornerstone of the $39 billion horse industry. [Business First]

The empty Rose Hill Elementary School in downtown Jeffersonville will be torn down soon, and in its place will rise a 93-room upper-mid scale hotel. [News & Tribune]

UofL Had Another Horrible News Week

Hillerich & Bradsby Co. is asking a judge to resolve a dispute over the value of more than 2,000 shares that were returned by stockholders who opposed the sale of the Louisville Slugger brand. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville Foundation voted Thursday to decline booster J.D. Nichols’ offer to use part of his $10 million gift pledged to the school to pay off past bonuses for President James Ramsey and other top administrators. [C-J/AKN]

The West Louisville Minister’s Coalition is demanding an answer from Attorney General Jack Conway about whether or not Governor Steve Beshear acted legally when he did not appoint an African American to the University of Louisville board. [WHAS11]

In his address to Congress, Pope Francis praised the American Thomas Merton as “a source of spiritual inspiration and a guide for many people.” [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Louisville is partnering with a popular app to help drivers avoid traffic. [WLKY]

Americans like to think of our country as a nation of immigrants and a nation of religions, but repeatedly we have failed to live up to our ideals, banishing fellow citizens from the American family because of their ethnicities or religious commitments. [HuffPo]

You dial those three numbers, 311, to report problems to Louisville Metro Government. But how often is the city picking up the phone? Records show thousands of calls for service go unanswered every month. [WAVE3]

When Kentucky Republicans last agreed to conduct a caucus to choose their presidential preference some said it would draw more candidates than just favorite son, Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. [Ronnie Ellis]

Josh White doesn’t like the look of Louisville these days. “It looks gritty,” he said. “I don’t want it to look gritty.” [WFPL]

Growth in the U.S. manufacturing sector showed no month-over-month change during September, staying at August’s sluggish pace which was the weakest in almost two years, according to an industry report released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital in St. Matthews has opened a new pediatric emergency department. [Business First]

With full bellies, Jeffersonville residents got a taste for their city candidates’ views Tuesday night during the Jeffersonville Fraternal Order of Police No. 100’s Meet the Candidates Steak Dinner. [News & Tribune]

UofL’s Leadership Is Still The Worst

Everyone pray to the Flying Spaghetti Monster that someone with no ties to Greg Fischer runs this program so it stays on track and comes to fruition. Google Fiber announced it was considering bringing its high speed internet service to Louisville earlier this month and now the company is hiring managers for the project. [WDRB]

It looks like Louisville may go another year without a monitoring program for airborne toxic chemicals, as city and state officials keep looking at each other as the future funding source. [C-J/AKN]

Family members of five people who died when a boat capsized on the Ohio River say in federal court documents that the placement and condition of a construction barge caused the tragedy. [WHAS11]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

She’s old enough for that? Jennifer Lawrence is the latest Louisville native to be honored by the Greater Louisville Pride Foundation’s Louisville Hometown Heroes series. [WLKY]

Daniel Suddeath has been hired as editor of the Glasgow Daily Times, effective Tuesday, Sept. 29. Suddeath, a staff writer for the News and Tribune in Southern Indiana for the past seven years, also served as editor for Southern Indiana Business Source magazine during that time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Neighbors who say there has been an increase in crime in their area are frustrated and now they are taking action by starting a neighborhood watch. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called homelessness an “emergency” in the city and proposed spending $100 million to provide permanent housing and shelters for the city’s 26,000 indigent. [Reuters]

State Auditor Adam Edelen says he’s looking into the financial management of the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the university’s $1.1 billion endowment, and the university’s board of trustees as part of an ongoing investigation. [WFPL]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

It looks like another expansion is on the way at Ford Motor Co.’s Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The city’s mayoral candidates did not hold back during Thursday night’s League of Women Voters debate, answering moderated questions and sending accusations the other’s way. [News & Tribune]


And we don’t mean the teevee newsreaders constantly hyping up Will Russell’s sad state…

A fire in Old Louisville that left three people dead has now been ruled arson. The fire happened on South Second Street in early July. [WDRB]

You should definitely go to this! The Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center in Clarksville will reopen in January with a completely revamped exhibit space including state of the art interactive exhibits. [C-J/AKN]

Wasn’t this flipping great? Around 9 p.m. Sept 21 Johnson and Cornelius escaped from the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections Community Corrections Center on East Chestnut Street. The inmates used bed sheets to facilitate an escape. [WHAS11]

Fees will be waived at several recreation areas in the Daniel Boone National Forest this weekend to celebrate National Public Lands Day. [H-L]

Some Jefferson County Public School pre-kindergarten students are using drama to learn math and other subjects. [WLKY]

The amount of money the world has pledged to divest from fossil fuels now exceeds $2.6 trillion, a group of policymakers, philanthropists and activists announced Tuesday. The figure is 50 times higher than the $52 billion that had been divested exactly one year ago. [HuffPo]

OH GOD WE’RE ALL GONNA GET THE SUPER LICE! The treatment-resistant form of lice scientists are calling ‘super lice’ has been found in 25 states including Kentucky and Indiana. [WAVE3]

If we’re handcuffing autistic children at the elbows or throwing them in jail overnight, then we’re failing them. If we’re hitting kids with felony weapons charges for bringing fishing tackle to school, then we’re failing them. And if we’re using suspensions (which absolutely do not work) against students who build clocks, or twirl pencils, or write about pot, or chew their Pop-Tarts into the shape of a gun, then we’re failing them. [Click this Clicky]

More than 60 percent of Louisville’s occupied housing structures are detached, single-family buildings, according to a Washington Post analysis of U.S. Census data. [WFPL]

Remember LMPD Chief White? He’s still up to the same old crap. [Click this Clicky]

My Morning Jacket drummer Patrick Hallahan, attorney Jon Salomon and chef Bobby Benjamin will open a new restaurant called Butchertown Grocery this November in Louisville. [Business First]

The conversation has only just begun. That’s the goal of Facing Homelessness: A Community Conversation, a public forum hosted by the News and Tribune and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]