JCPS Needs About A Billion Dollars

The long-awaited opening of a new elementary school this summer will come at the same time Jefferson County Public Schools is expected to unveil a plan to deal with a growing problem – more than $880 million in facility needs scattered across the district. [WDRB]

Conversations about alleged drug activity on the nextdoor.com social network site for Crescent Hill are increasing, and residents were urged to report such incidents to the police at a recent gathering. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It will apparently take a second resignation from the UofL Board of Trustees before Governor Matt Bevin can act to replace Paul Diaz. [WHAS11]

More than a dozen states have strengthened laws over the past two years to keep firearms out of the hands of domestic abusers, a rare area of consensus in the nation’s highly polarized debate over guns. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another pedestrian accident. [WLKY]

U.S. employment gains slowed more than expected in January as the boost to hiring from unseasonably mild weather faded, but surging wages and an unemployment rate at an eight-year low suggested the labor market recovery remains firm. [HuffPo]

Hundreds turned out to say goodbye to local civil rights pioneer, Benjamin Shobe, Sunday at his visitation. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder if you haven’t yet read this. How do you stop states and cities from forcing more disclosure of so-called dark money in politics? Get the debate to focus on an “average Joe,” not a wealthy person. Find examples of “inconsequential donation amounts.” Point out that naming donors would be a threat to “innocents,” including their children, families and co-workers. And never call it dark money. “Private giving” sounds better. [ProPublica]

On the corner of Breckenridge and Logan streets, at the edge of Smoketown, there’s a giant hole in the ground. It’s an active construction site, with trucks and heavy machinery working behind a barbed-wire fence. [WFPL]

There are some subtle indications Republicans may be rethinking the wisdom of trying to make right-to work-an issue in this year’s legislative elections. [Ronnie Ellis]

The International Boat Builders’ Exhibition & Conference (known as IBEX) is leaving Louisville for Florida. [Business First]

In the May primary election, two familiar faces will vie for a judge’s seat on opposite sides of the aisle. [News & Tribune]

Another Gag-Worthy Week For UofL

A job listing just posted online for Louisville Metro Police Department has some wondering if the city’s police force is short on officers. [WDRB]

It’s hilarious that Rick Pitino is defending Jim Ramsey, as if they’re both victims of things they can’t help. Both of these men are the worst of the worst in higher education. Pitino, with sex scandal after sex scandal. Ramsey, with financial corruption mess after financial corruption mess. Both should be relieved of their duties instead of allowing a bunch of kids to take the blame for crap that those two are ultimately supposed to take responsibility. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees member has resigned following months of questions surrounding its racial imbalance. [WHAS11]

Just eight years ago, most of the domestic violence deaths in Louisville were from strangulation. Today, more than 71 percent are from guns. [H-L]

How excited are you that the shootings are spreading to Southern Indiana? [WLKY]

Health care got some attention in Saturday night’s GOP presidential debate. And when it was Texas Sen. Turd Cruz’s turn to speak, he started by cataloging the alleged evils of “socialized medicine.” [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City! [WAVE3]

Noting their excitement about “the energy that exists across campus,” Maribeth and Louis Berman, of Louisville, have pledged $1 million to Eastern Kentucky University to support a combination of academic and student-focused initiatives. [Richmond Register]

The Louisville Metro Council will soon consider measures to streamline the process for bringing ultra-fast Internet access, including a plan to condense the franchise-granting authority of Jefferson County’s suburban cities for communication services into one entity. [WFPL]

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’ campaign has reportedly raised $3 million since Monday night’s Iowa caucuses. [The Hill]

A new study shows that Kentucky and Arkansas had the sharpest decline in the percentage of adult residents without health insurance from 2013 to 2015. [Business First]

Voters on both sides of the aisle will have options for the Clark County Council race, as 10 people signed up to run for the three At-large seats up for election in each party in May’s primary. [News & Tribune]

Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls

The principal of Stuart Middle School has been reassigned and transferred to Central High School as an assistant principal. [WDRB]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The University of Louisville announced Thursday that it’s kicking off a capital fundraising campaign for its previously announced plans to expand Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [C-J/AKN]

Labor leaders at Brown-Forman have filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board accusing the spirits maker of unfair labor practices. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto has formed a task force to advise him on what to do about a controversial mural in Memorial Hall. [H-L]

Another day, yet another JCPS bus crash. Everyone is numb to news like this. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama has said that a college degree “has never been more valuable.” But if you borrow to finance your degree, the immediate returns are the lowest they’ve been in at least a generation, new data show. [HuffPo]

In just a few short months, tolls across WAVE Country will be a reality. The price will range from $1 to $4 per way for everyday drivers, but getting that discounted rate may be harder than you think. [WAVE3]

Marlow Cook may forever be remembered by Louisvillians as the Jefferson County Executive who purchased the Belle of Louisville, but I remember him not only as my first boss, but also as someone who directly and significantly shaped my life and the lives of so many in public life [John Yarmuth]

The Louisville Metro Council will soon consider measures to streamline the process for bringing ultra-fast Internet access, including a plan to condense the franchise-granting authority of Jefferson County’s suburban cities for communication services into one entity. [WFPL]

In Kentucky, more men than women die pedestrian deaths. [Click the Clicky]

Jim Ramsey knows his days at the University of Louisville are numbered. [Business First]k

Clarksville has decided not to open its pool this year due to ongoing renovations. That decision should reap benefits for New Albany’s River Fun Water Park. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

It’s Morning In Our Possumbilly City

A major twist, Monday, in a lawsuit filed against the University of Louisville. The governor’s office has now switched sides. [WDRB]

PEE ALERT! In the wake of a public fight between its former chairman and vice chairman, the Metropolitan Sewer District board has proposed adding a loyalty provision to its ethics policy. Oh, and no tweeting during board meetings. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS have launched a bullying tipline which students, parents and others can use to report bulling at their school. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin spoke at a Republican presidential forum in New Hampshire Saturday afternoon, less than 24 hours after declaring a state of emergency and activating the Kentucky National Guard to help residents stranded by a massive snowstorm. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just a few years ago he was a local high school basketball star. Now his family wants to know why someone would take his life. [WLKY]

Flint was a failure of government — but it didn’t have to be so. And government wasn’t the root of the problem. It was about the people, and ideas they advocate, who have taken control of governments across the country. [HuffPo]

A former mayoral write-in candidate and bicycling advocate was back in court after being cited by police while riding on a city street. [WAVE3]

Mitch McConnell made a quiet move [last] week on a sweeping war authorization measure written by one of his most hawkish members — an effort to pressure the White House to craft a war proposal more to the GOP’s liking. [Politico]

The 16-year-old girl who died in a Kentucky juvenile-detention center last week was found unresponsive on a bed in a private room, according to the state Justice and Public Safety Cabinet. [WFPL]

Bourbon is a bigger deal than coal because it brings in gobs of tourism dollars. Tourists our pouring into Kentucky to visit distilleries on Kentucky Bourbon Trail and Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Tour. [Richmond Register]

A new collection of bank health ratings shows three Louisville-area financial institutions are in excellent financial shape, while three more might want to do some bank-cardio. [Business First]

The Indiana Supreme Court has established six commercial courts throughout the state, and one is in Floyd County. [News & Tribune]

Freak Out: Your Water’s Prolly Poison

Louisville Metro Animal Services remains the worst place on earth and no one seems keen on improving the situation. Even Kelly Downard turned cowardly and gave up. Louisville firefighters were called to Louisville Metro Animal Services just after 10:30 Friday night, early reports indicated no animals were harmed. [WDRB]

This is fascinating coming from the newspaper that asked its arts reporter to prove her position mattered. Arts leaders and advocates are hearing reports that the state budget Gov. Matt Bevin is planning to reveal on Tuesday would eliminate the Kentucky Arts Council, which has a budget of $3.3 million. [C-J/AKN]

Many schools have already scheduled make-up days to recover the days lost during this week’s snow closings. [WHAS11]

Is anyone surprised? A year after state officials created a nationally recognized public-private partnership to build America’s best statewide broadband network, opponents are trying to kill it. Some telecom and cable companies that now provide Internet service around the state, along with several right-wing advocacy groups, are pushing legislators and Gov. Matt Bevin to rethink the project, called KentuckyWired. [H-L]

Even though LMAS is a disaster, you should still pitch in to help. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) really doesn’t like idea that President Barack Obama could use executive power to make more corporations disclose campaign spending. [HuffPo]

This is important news you can use. Mr. Peabody will ride almost anything. He loves to ride a bike. And on Thursday, he rode a sled in Louisville’s Seneca Park. [WAVE3]

Water authorities across the US are systematically distorting water tests to downplay the amount of lead in samples, risking a dangerous spread of the toxic water crisis that has gripped Flint, documents seen by the Guardian show. [The Guardian]

Isn’t it fun how Jim Ramsey continues to make excuses for all of his scandals? He’s still defending Robert Felner when he thinks there aren’t reporters around. [WFPL]

A ProPublica analysis of political fundraising shows conservative House Republicans have less and less in common with their party’s leaders, whose donors sometimes more closely resemble those of Democrats. [ProPublica]

How much do you pay for your Medicare Advantage premium? That number could go up for seniors enrolled on a plan from Louisville-based insurer Humana Inc. or Connecticut’s Aetna Inc., if the merger of those two companies goes through. [Business First]

Before he became judge, Brad Jacobs thought he knew the prevalence of Clark County’s substance abuse problem as one of the county’s busiest criminal attorneys. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Continues To Muck Things Up

In November, the University of Louisville Board of Trustees filed a motion in Franklin Circuit Court to dismiss a lawsuit by the Kentucky Justice Resource Center contending the board has too few minority members in violation of state law. [WDRB]

The city must pay former Jefferson County Constable David Whitlock about $33,000 in wages for more than five years of unpaid work, a Jefferson Circuit Court judge has ruled, and may owe other peace officers similar back salaries. [C-J/AKN]

A man whose drone was shot down over a Bullitt County home is now suing that shooter in federal court. [WHAS11]

Really, there aren’t more pressing educational issues to tackle instead of pandering in an election year? A Kentucky Republican state senator from London has introduced a bill that he said could have prevented biblical references from being cut from a presentation of A Charlie Brown Christmas at a Johnson County elementary school. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Some southern Indiana families face an uncertain future after city officials in Charlestown revived controversial plans that could lead to tearing down a neighborhood. [WLKY]

The nation’s largest LGBT civil rights organization, Human Rights Campaign, endorsed Hillary Clinton for president on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

A routine appointment vote this month for the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Merit Board was anything but routine after a Louisville Metro councilman asked to table or postpone a vote to reappoint two people to that board. [WAVE3]

A federal judge on Tuesday ruled President Obama cannot use executive privilege to keep records on the “fast and furious” gun-tracking program from Congress. [The Hill]

Superintendent Donna Hargens says Jefferson County Public Schools is working to ensure that Louisville families are aware of its offerings in anticipation of a new push for state charter school legislation. [WFPL]

One European country can’t seem to stop breaking records when it comes to wind power. [ThinkProgress]

Is your favorite Louisville restaurant making the grade? [Business First]

The Clark County Clerk’s office was granted an $10,800 additional appropriation this week in part to help with transferring the influx of Jeffersonville city court cases that are coming in. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]