We Already Know Some Officers Racially Profile

Make sure you’re caught up on the latest in the Will Coursey sex scandal. Complete with newspaper and video realness, gurl. [Page One]

Louisville has grown slightly this decade, but new Census estimates show outlying areas are adding people at a faster rate. [WDRB]

A burst of cannon fire signaled the end of three years of work — and multiple delays — on the Big Four Bridge Wednesday night, as Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and Jeffersonville, Ind. Mayor Mike Moore met in the middle to celebrate the official rededication. [C-J/AKN]

A Louisville man was arrested after allegedly filing a false insurance claim because he did not want to pay for his truck repairs. [WHAS11]

Anthany Beatty said Wednesday that a change in leadership was needed to repair the city’s relationship with the University of Kentucky because of the now suspended Rupp Arena renovation. [H-L]

It’s time for them to put up or shut up. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer teamed up with Lexington Mayor Jim Gray at the Muhammad Ali Center to announce new projects to strengthen the region’s global competitiveness on Thursday morning. [WLKY]

Kentucky history gets a little tipsy Saturday, with the Filson Bourbon Academy at Belle’s Cocktail House in Lexington. [H-L]

The bagpipes set the pace, step by step as the crowd inched closer to a meeting point that took millions of dollars and years to create. [WAVE3]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

The results of a year-long study to determine whether Louisville Metro Police officers racially profile when making traffic stops should be available “later this summer,” police officials said on Wednesday. [WFPL]

Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren will join Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes Sunday on the University of Louisville campus for a rally on college affordability. [Ronnie Ellis]

For eateries along Frankfort Avenue, the annual Taste of Frankfort Avenue fund-raiser for the Clifton Center has been a part of their summer for years. [Business First]

Most administrators for the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp. will get a 1.95 percent raise for the 2014-15 school year after a vote from the district’s board of trustees. [News & Tribune]

Yes, hell froze over yesterday. The Courier-Journal referenced us TWICE IN A SINGLE DAY. Maybe the paper finally realizes we’re fans and a useful resource for promotion and not the enemy? [More C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer’s Silver Spoon Is Showing Again

The University of Kentucky has struck a new multimedia rights deal that makes it among the highest-paid universities in the country for athletic and campus media rights. [WDRB]

But Jim King can’t do a goddamn thing about Metro Animal Services? He just sits on his hands making excuses. The Louisville Metro Council budget approved Thursday applies the brakes to Mayor Greg Fischer’s urban bike network, blocking further spending on new bike lanes unless certain conditions are met. [C-J/AKN]

Jefferson County Public Schools is cutting take-home cars to save cash. [WHAS11]

It is still legal to deny Americans housing because of their sexual orientation under federal law, which does not prohibit discrimination based on sexuality. Federal studies have shown that even when the law prohibits it, sexual minorities are routinely shut out of housing opportunities that are made available to straight people. [NY Times]

Friends are rallying to show support for the family a Kentucky Marine. [WLKY]

Violent and legal: the shocking ways school kids are being pinned down and isolated against their will. [ProPublica]

Police and a Louisville family are searching for a missing 12-year-old girl who they fear may be trying to connect with a man she met online. [WAVE3]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Greg Fischer once again proves how much of a damn fool he truly is. Raising the minimum wage hasn’t been much of a topic in Louisville? Really? Louisville gets what it deserves by electing these idiots. [WFPL]

Economists say there are more than 2 million “missing households” in the U.S. — young people who bunk with family or friends rather than buying their own home. New data suggest this trend continues. [NPR]

Is there good news ahead for Almost Family Inc.? [Business First]

Members of the State Budget Committee took a detailed look Friday at how Gov. Mike Pence would pay for “Healthy Indiana Plan 2.0,” his proposal to expand insurance coverage using a state-run plan instead of traditional Medicaid. [News & Tribune]

Seriously, Just Build The Damn Walmart Already

The heroin epidemic is terrible but no one is paying attention to a group of people having a funtimes walk on the Big Four Bridge. [WDRB]

All the fights over the West End Walmart are adding up to be some of the dumbest in years here in Possibility City. There is NOTHING in that part of town. It won’t kill businesses and it won’t choke local jobs. We hate Walmart, too, but… Get the hell over it. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another cyclist killed here in Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray announced Wednesday that he is scuttling a $351 million renovation of Rupp Arena and attached convention center after the University of Kentucky told city and state officials that it was interested only in a scaled-back Rupp Arena renovation. [H-L]

There was a celebration of life and a call to stop gun violence Saturday. [WLKY]

Walkable cities aren’t just easy to navigate — they’re also richer and have higher percentages of college grads, according to a new study. [HuffPo]

Friends and family could hear the clanking of medals as Team Kentucky got off their plane, returning from the 2014 Special Olympics USA Games Saturday. [WAVE3]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. Come on – help us stop having to run this. [Click Here For Details]

Though a coalition of west Louisville neighborhood leaders are demanding an urban-styled Walmart, a prominent civil rights organization says the 300 expected jobs matter more to residents. [WFPL]

Young delinquents are much more likely than their peers to die violently as adults. And girls are at particular risk. Lack of access to preventive care is partly to blame, researchers say. [NPR]

The lawsuit between Norton Healthcare Inc. and the University of Louisville, related to Kosair Children’s Hospital, is expected to go before a Franklin Circuit Court judge at 9 a.m. [Business First]

An Umbaugh and Associates report says the Jeffersonville Sewer Department has the bonding capacity it needs to move forward with a project aimed at curbing sewer overflows into the Ohio River, but concerns about the city’s future sewer needs still linger. [News & Tribune]

These Awful Shootings & Stabbings Need To End

Louisville police chief Steve Conrad says if you want to keep the city safe, you have to pay for it. And that’s why he wants an additional $7 million. [WDRB]

Woah, mob violence overtime cost the city almost a million dollars. But at least people are going back downtown. [C-J/AKN & More C-J/AKN]

The University of Kentucky’s operating budget will hit two milestones in the upcoming fiscal year — its total will reach $3 billion for the first time and state support will slip below 10 percent for the first time. [H-L]

We all wish surveys like this meant more for Louisville than they actually do. [Governing]

When will these crazy ass shootings stop here in Possibility City? [WHAS11]

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that a federal law seeking to improve accountability for environmental spills and pollution can be circumvented by certain kinds of state laws. [NPR]

Louisville isn’t content with daily shootings. Gotta start with the daily stabbings. [WLKY]

The number of sex offenses reported at American colleges and universities went up in the last decade even as overall campus crime decreased, according to an Education Department survey that also suggests high schools are safer than they used to be. [HuffPo]

This summer, several dozen JCPS schools began serving breakfast and lunch free of charge as part of the district’s Summer Food Service program. [WAVE3]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Muhammad Ali is renewing his ties with the African country where he won his epic “Rumble in the Jungle” fight 40 years ago. The Muhammad Ali Center has announced plans for a Sept. 20 benefit concert marking the anniversary of the bout. [WFPL]

Will 2014 be the hottest year on record? As the odds on El Niño keep rising, so does the chance of a disturbing new global temperature high. [Mother Jones]

This year’s Forecastle Festival will be using a lot more of Waterfront Park. [Business First]

New Albany Police Chief Todd Bailey hasn’t located any city ordinances that restrict vehicle weight, though he said Tuesday he would support working with local officials on such restriction measures. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Just Can’t Catch A Break In The News

A JCPS teacher sues the principal of Moore Traditional High School, alleging years of discrimination based on sexual orientation. [WDRB]

It’s the fall of 1985 and the 17-year-old version of me steps on to the campus of Morehead State University. I really have no clue how I made it this far and, even scarier, I have no clue where I am going. College was just the predetermined next step, and like Steve Martin’s character in The Jerk, I wasn’t sure of my special purpose. [Scott Utterback]

It’s because Cordish got all the money. An area tagged for revitalization has some locals still scratching their heads. [WHAS11]

A University of Kentucky professor’s 40-second demonstration during the World Cup could have a lasting impact. On June 12, a paralyzed spinal cord injury patient will kick the first ball of the World Cup in Sao Paulo using an exoskeleton and brain-computer technology. [H-L]

People in Clifton Heights are freaking out because they’re seeing coyotes. Have they forgotten they live right by the dang river and tons upon tons of wooded areas? [WLKY]

Nicholasville, the county seat of Jessamine, sits just a half hour away from the heart of Lexington. The quaint Central Kentucky town is one many move to in hopes of escaping the hustle of the city. It’s a town you’d think upon first glance to be the perfect bedroom community of a small American city. Just remember that appearances can be deceiving. [Page One]

A judge struck down tenure and other job protections for California’s public school teachers as unconstitutional Tuesday, saying such laws harm students — especially poor and minority ones — by saddling them with bad teachers who are almost impossible to fire. [HuffPo]

With gas prices hovering around $4 a gallon many residents have been wondering why prices are as high as they are in our area. University of Louisville Associate professor of Economics Jose Fernandez said we are experiencing an increase over last year at the pump. [WAVE3]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

An ordinance raising the minimum wage for city employees sailed through the Louisville Metro Council last week without much fanfare or opposition. Though the ordinance affects only five city workers, some see it as significant in a larger citywide minimum-wage push. [WFPL]

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell became nearly $3 million richer in 2013, according to new financial disclosure records. [The Hill]

The Courier-Journal has eliminated seven editor positions in a realignment of newsroom resources. No one is surprised. [Business First]

Although raises are scarce in the Clark County government, nine Clark County employees are getting a raise at one time — and the increases will benefit both the county and the employees. [News & Tribune]

WDRB Spreading Race-Baiting Hype. Again.

A Northern Kentucky city sued the Kentucky Retirement Systems Monday over what it described as “illegal and imprudent investments” involving hundreds of millions of dollars in public pension money. In its lawsuit, filed in Kenton Circuit Court, the city of Fort Wright said KRS violates the law with risky investments in hedge funds, venture capital funds, private equity funds, leveraged buyout funds and other “alternative investments” that have produced small returns and excessive management fees, possibly in excess of $50 million over the last five years. [John Cheves]

John David Dyche loves race-baiting. And ignorant — because that’s what he is, purposefully ignorant — keeping schools racially integrated improving education. He apparently hasn’t read any of the big stories from the past several weeks on race, education and the south. At least he cares enough to try to talk about some of these things and that’s more than we can say for 99% of people. [WDRB]

The Louisville area is the 17th-deadliest metropolitan area for pedestrians, according to a new study from the National Complete Streets Coalition, a Washington D.C.-based organization that examined fatal wreck data in the country’s 51 largest metro areas. [C-J/AKN]

This is apparently the most important thing happening in Louisville. Have you heard about the social media phenomenon called hidden cash? [WHAS11]

Over the years, under both Republican and Democratic administrations, we’ve made progress in protecting our air and water from harmful mercury, arsenic, soot and other types of pollutants. Every time we’ve done it, people have claimed the economic costs weren’t worth the health and environmental benefits. They’ve been wrong every time because the higher standards sparked innovations in new technologies and ways of doing business that increased growth and created jobs. [Bill Clinton]

Five men have filed a lawsuit against the operators of Fourth Street Live, alleging they were denied entry because of their race. This Cordish nonsense needs to end. [WLKY]

Locals can definitely relate to this. Viewers aren’t the only ones disappointed with local news these days. [HuffPo]

Kentucky business groups said Monday that a federal proposal to reduce carbon emissions at power plants would lead to higher utility bills and scare companies from the state. But that’s only one slanted part of the story. [WAVE3]

Will these Louisville and Lexington leaders also bring back tips for corrupt administrations? Because Charlotte’s mayor is in a heap of legal trouble. [Business First]

Or maybe they’ll learn how to write and push bills to charge police officers and fire fighters for disclosing fracking checmicals. [Mother Jones]

Local arts organizations that receive funding through the Kentucky Arts Partnership grants could see significant cuts in support for the next fiscal year. [WFPL]

The University of Kentucky has received a $1.9 million grant to graduate more students in the STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. [H-L]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Jeffersonville attorney Brad Jacobs has entered the race for Clark County Circuit County No. 2 judge. [News & Tribune]

Council Republicans Must Love Being Hated

Uh…. One person was injured when JCPS bus #9703 hit the wall of Westport Middle School Thursday morning. [WDRB]

With $13 million bankrolled for improvements in the emerging Nulu neighborhood east of downtown, consultants have recommended redesigning part of East Market Street as a boulevard, with a median divider and an 8-foot-wide bike trail on the south side of the street. [C-J/AKN]

Dozens came together in Louisville on Wednesday to honor fallen Jefferson County Officers. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is awarding an honorary degree to a black student who was denied admission in 1946. [H-L]

Heroin is making headlines as a younger population is discovering the dangerous opiate. Warning: ridiculous auto-play video. [WLKY]

For the moment, plug-in electric cars account for an abysmally small portion of the U.S. car market. But turning that around may not require anything more complicated than a few changes to building codes. [Think Progress]

This is a terrific story ruined by a terrible headline. ‘Mayor plants bush, gives proclamation to institute.’ [WAVE3]

Alison Grimes is only one campaign ad into the U.S. Senate race but state and federal ethical concerns are already being raised. [Page One]

The Nielsen company says it is closing a call center in Radcliff where 237 people are employed. [WLEX18]

The University of Louisville J.B. Speed School of Engineering has been named to General Electric Co.’s “executive schools” list. [Business First]

Please, Republicans, keep it up so you can be even less relevant as the Democrats do things that are actually corrupt. This? This isn’t one of those things. The members of the Louisville Metro Council Republican caucus plan to fight back against a proposed ban on using plastic bags to store yard waste. [WFPL]

Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson is scheduled to convene two grand juries later this month, but his office has provided only limited information regarding the matters of either proceeding. [News & Tribune]