River Gunshot City Morning Update

What, no mention of transfers and how those are handled? Nothing but TARC puppies & rainbows? Surely not. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is planning to boost participation in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program by assigning two health employees to reach new participants in the wake of eliminating half of their clinics. Probably too little, too late. [C-J/AKN]

One of two Louisville rappers shot early Monday morning after leaving a concert has died. [WHAS11]

Next week, the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees is expected to approve UK’s largest budget ever, a $3.4 billion document that reflects a burgeoning health care enterprise paired with continued reliance on tuition paid by out-of-state students. [H-L]

A 9-year-old boy who was shot in the leg Monday night continues to recover at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced Tuesday that the Pentagon has added “sexual orientation” as a protected class under its Military Equal Opportunity Policy. [HuffPo]

A community is left shaken more than 24 hours after a triple shooting alerted the Russell neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Coal companies and 14 states sued to stop a draft regulation to cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, a priority for the Obama administration. [NY Times]

Preservationists are having difficulty finding a suitable site for the Old Louisville Water Co. building. [WFPL]

Officially, the U.S. has a high school graduation rate of 81 percent — a historic high. But our months-long investigation, in partnership with reporters at 14 member stations, reveals that this number should be taken with a big grain of salt. [NPR]

A section of vacant properties on West Main Street near the Louisville Slugger Museum and Frazier History Museum are the target of a major redevelopment that could top $20 million. [Business First]

A former bookkeeper at a Jeffersonville business is facing federal charges on allegations she used company credit cards to make personal purchases, including firearms, funeral services and Halloween costumes. [News & Tribune]

Hope Henderson Doesn’t Copy Secrecy

A family is trying to figure out why their dad was stabbed at a Louisville gas station. [WDRB]

A backup power generator at a pumping station could have prevented April’s massive flooding and a big sewage spill at Louisville’s Morris Forman Water Quality Treatment Center, state officials have concluded. [C-J/AKN]

The Phoenix Hill Tavern (PHT) and Jim Porter’s Good Time Emporium closed permanently on Monday, June 1. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics has wrapped up a 10-year, $2.5 million donation from BB&T that will result in a new program on capitalism and funding toward the college’s $65 million renovation. But Gatton officials stepped back from the more controversial aspects of the original 2004 agreement, including a requirement for an Ayn Rand reading room, named for the novelist and free market philosopher. [H-L]

A Louisville park is hosting a night of camping in June as part of a national celebration. [WLKY]

U.S. police have shot and killed 385 people during the first five months of this year, a rate of more than two a day, the Washington Post reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

A minister has a new plan to try to curb crime in West Louisville. [WAVE3]

It’s almost like these folks in Henderson didn’t bother talking to anyone living in the real world in Louisville. [Henderson Gleaner]

A resident must work full-time and earn at least $14.17 an hour to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment in Louisville, according to a recent study from the National Low Income Housing Coalition. [WFPL]

Among African American adults with low education and income levels, the increase in risk of heart disease or stroke associated with living in poverty is largest for women and people under age 50, according to a large new study. [Reuters]

Ford Motor Co. CEO Mark Fields said aluminum-body F-Series Super Duty Trucks will be launched next year and that the design will “wow people.” [Business First]

Parts of South Clarksville could be the next Newport, Ky., or at least a bustling addendum to the Louisville metropolitan area. [News & Tribune]

Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Get Ready: Everybody Is Gonna Get Run Over

Good fucking grief. And you wonder why there’s a behemoth of a racial divide in Louisville. [WDRB]

What? Tom Owen has gone against his word to his constituents? Surely not. Dollars to doughnuts he blames it on old age or something shady like that. Several Louisville Metro Council members have proposed a resolution asking Metro Government to stop issuing and enforcing violations against homeowners renting space through websites such as Airbnb as the city weighs new regulations to address such rentals. [C-J/AKN]

The city of Jeffersonville has a new police chief. Mayor Mike Moore has appointed 21-year police veteran Kenny Kavanaugh to the post. Kavanaugh is the first African American to lead the department. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky students from the Bluegrass State will pay 3 percent more for tuition and fees this fall, an increase that brings tuition to $10,780 a year for first-year students. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian struck in Possibility City! An 8-year-old girl was injured Monday evening after being hit by a car. [WLKY]

An obscure item in the president’s new budget would put an end to the longstanding practice of states and cities using tax-exempt bonds to finance professional sports arenas, a practice that costs the U.S. Treasury $146 million, according to a 2012 Bloomberg analysis. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there was another one. Police and an EMS crew are responding after a pedestrian was hit by a vehicle on East Muhammad Ali Boulevard at South Jackson Street. [WAVE3]

A hundred years from now, humans may remember 2014 as the year that we first learned that we may have irreversibly destabilized the great ice sheet of West Antarctica, and thus set in motion more than 10 feet of sea level rise. [WaPo]

The public will have a chance later this month to offer input on the tentative selection of a Virginia company to handle electronic tolling on new Ohio River bridges linking Kentucky and Indiana. [WFPL]

Will T. Scott, the 67-year-old former state Supreme Court Justice running for the Republican nomination for governor, trails three other Republicans in the polls and in fundraising. [Ronnie Ellis]

Growth in Kentucky’s bourbon industry is probably something you’re aware of by now. But that growth has helped fuel an escalation of related services. [Business First]

The Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications cut short its investigation of former Clark County Judge Jerry Jacobi, after he agreed to never again seek a judicial office. [News & Tribune]

Lynn Winter Must Live In An Alternate Universe

Jeffersonville Police have a new multimillion dollar building on 10th Street, but there’s already a problem that will cost tens of thousands to fix. [WDRB]

Ugh, really, Lynn Winter? Just ugh. [C-J/AKN]

What could be a simple scenic ride on River Road east of downtown Louisville, may not always be that simple. [WHAS11]

Ross Zirkle, a printmaker and University of Kentucky art professor, was known for his devotion to students. Even when he died from cancer in 2007 at the age of 52, he continued to teach, donating his body to UK’s anatomy department to help train future doctors, dentists and nurses. But Zirkle’s family was dismayed recently to learn that his cremated remains had been sitting on a shelf at UK since 2012. He was not buried at the Lexington Cemetery until December, nearly eight years after his death. [H-L]

Two men were arrested early Thursday morning in connection with a Wednesday slaying. [WLKY]

Americans largely think the current tax system favors the wealthy and needs to be reformed, but not very many expect to be personally affected by President Barack Obama’s proposed reforms. [HuffPo]

Clarence Williams, who has led Metro Government’s Youth Detention Services since 2002, announced his resignation on Wednesday. [WAVE3]

Across the commonwealth, volunteers will be looking high and low to get the most accurate count possible the help understand how many homeless people are living in different areas. [Ashland Independent]

The State of the City fro the perspective of Louisville residents. [WFPL]

Ford Motor Co on Thursday said it would keep relying on North America for its profit this year as the No. 2 U.S. automaker signaled that losses in Europe would be more than previously forecast. [Reuters]

A New York-based pharmaceutical provider for holistic oncology and hematology care is considering an expansion into Louisville. [Business First]

Two-term New Albany City Councilman Kevin Zurschmiede will run for mayor this year, and he’s expected to be the lone Republican candidate seeking the position. [News & Tribune]

How Much Greg Fischer Fluff Can You Handle?

What the christ??? Talk about crazy fluff. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer says 2014 has been a great year for our city, setting us up for a successful new year. [WDRB]

Violent crime in Louisville was up about 10 percent in 2014, breaking a downward trend the city had seen since 2012, police data shows. [C-J/AKN]

The man at the center of an election recount in Clark County has passed away. Larry Wilder, Kelly Harrod’s attorney, said Harrod died Thursday morning. [WHAS11]

Last spring, University of Kentucky tobacco researcher Rich Mundell handed out hundreds of tobacco plants to willing takers at the Lexington Farmers Market. The plants were part of an experiment, and Mundell asked that recipients be willing to share information with him about how the plants did in home gardens. [H-L]

Exciting! Maybe we’ll have another fun meth spree in the metro area. [WLKY]

Flu season is in full swing in the United States, and the proportion of deaths related to flu infections have reached epidemic threshold, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

This New Year fluff bullshit with the mayor and other politicians has got to stop. No wonder no one ever has a real clue about what’s going on. The mainstream just gives reach-arounds and dumb smiles. [WAVE3]

The UN Security Council has rejected a resolution demanding an end to the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories within three years. [BBC]

Even the local NPR affiliate got in on the Greg Fischer fluff train. [WFPL]

Rumors and endorsements continue in the 2015 governor’s race that looks like it will become even more interesting. But suddenly it’s the Republican primary that looks like a dogfight rather than the Democratic race that may turn out to be anti-climactic. [Ronnie Ellis]

Aw, this is kind of sad. BF fell for Steve Beshear’s claimed ten biggest accomplishments email blast. [Business First]

Barbara Bratcher Haas may be retiring as a full-time Clark County officeholder, but her run with politics is far from over. [News & Tribune]

When Will Hargens & JCPS Do What’s Right?

Louisville police are investigating a stabbing. We all can agree that’s better than another shooting. Maybe. [WDRB]

Oh, look, your local newspaper finally realized the Jefferson County Public Schools redactions are kinda corrupt. Despite initially telling those involved at JCPS that there just wasn’t much of a story there, of course. [C-J/AKN]

Rapper and actor Percy “Master P” Miller is offering a reward to help bring a killer to justice. [WHAS11]

A sports thing happened with Lexington and people in Louisville are upset. [H-L]

Need another reason to avoid certain areas of the Metro? One man was injured Saturday afternoon in an accidental shooting outside Bass Pro Shops in Clarksville. [WLKY]

The United States and NATO formally ended their war in Afghanistan on Sunday with a ceremony at their military headquarters in Kabul as the insurgency they fought for 13 years remains as ferocious and deadly as at any time since the 2001 invasion that unseated the Taliban regime following the Sept. 11 attacks. But we all know it’s not really over. [HuffPo]

And just in case you needed yet another reason to avoid malls at all costs. [WAVE3]

The United States Supreme Court decides cases involving the nation’s most pressing legal issues, affecting the daily lives of hundreds of millions of Americans — and yet so much about its functioning is shrouded in mystique and exclusivity. [NY Times]

First-year teachers are employed at high-poverty schools in Jefferson County at double the rate of the rest of Kentucky, according to a new report recently released by the U.S. Department of Education. [WFPL]

Elder care challenges prompt tech executives to create startups and apps. [Reuters]

A pre-filed bill for the upcoming session of the Kentucky General Assembly could give Louisville-Jefferson County Metro Government legal cover when it comes to a fight over the city’s recent minimum-wage increase. [Business First]

Woah, what the heck is with 12-year-olds running the courts in Indianner? A new judge will to rule over the Clarksville Town Court. [News & Tribune]