Revisiting Ramsey’s Big Reality Disconnect

You may have to watch your step more closely when crossing at least one downtown street. A pedway allowing easy access to the convention center will be going away. [WDRB]

How many scandalous hires does this make for Greg Fischer? The man has no concept of vetting new hires. Where are the liberal hand-wringers now? Every time a shitty hire is revealed, they freak out and attack. Every. Time. But suddenly they’re quiet. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! School time horror stories. “I had a chair thrown across the room and the kid looked at me–this is second grade–and said “what the f*** did I do b****,” Lucretia Gue, a former first grade teacher at Frayser Elementary School said. [WHAS11]

In 2006, senators of the University of Kentucky’s student government passed a resolution to remove a mural in Memorial Hall that showed scenes of state history, including black workers in a tobacco field, black musicians playing for white dancers, and a Native American with a tomahawk. They told then-President Lee Todd that it was degrading to ethnic and racial groups. [H-L]

Local teevee folks are still freaking out about a white lady married to a preacher. When was the last time they freaked out like this over a person of color? Or over someone not tied to some random church? [WLKY]

Here’s one more indication that American teachers work really, really hard — and don’t make nearly enough. An analysis released Tuesday by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development looks at the state of education around the world, examining everything from intergenerational mobility in education to graduation rates to teacher pay. [HuffPo]

The YMCA of Louisville and the YMCA of Southern Indiana are merging, organization leaders announced during the 25th annual YMCA Mayor’s Thanksgiving Breakfast. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, R-Cookie Tree, said after a town hall at the Highlands Museum and Discovery Center he is in conversations with the CEO of AK Steel about how to keep hundreds of jobs at Ashland Works afloat. [Ashland Independent]

James Ramsey has been thinking a lot lately about stepping down from his role as president of the University of Louisville. That’s all it took for him to think about resigning? Not the myriad scandals, people going to prison, tens of millions of dollars swindled?! [WFPL]

About half of Americans, 49 percent, say that racism is “a big problem,” according to a new national poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation. [The Hill]

Electrolux announced plans to buy General Electric Co.’s Louisville-based appliance division for $3.3 billion last year. But the government sued to block the deal in July, citing concerns that it would suppress competition. [Business First]

A bill to include LGBT people in existing anti-discrimination laws is on the slate for the State Senate’s upcoming legislative session. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

New Albany Schools Have Come A Long Way

The New Albany Floyd County School board has added “sexual orientation” to its non-discrimination policy. [WDRB]

A University of Louisville study of asthma, older adults and indoor air quality is revealing a mix of potentially dangerous chemicals inside participants’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

The footage is hard to watch. “No mother ever wants to see anything like that and my daughter was clearly trying to get away from her and it hurt. It hurt a lot,” parent Valerie Gholston said. [WHAS11]

Top level administrators are being hired at the University of Kentucky at more than twice the rate of full-time faculty, according to UK employee statistics. [H-L]

Just hours after two people are arrested and brought in for questioning about a Tuesday night killing, the victim’s girlfriend hopes justice will be served. [WLKY]

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday there was “no data” to support the notion that the national debate over the use of force by police has made the country less safe, an idea that has sometimes been referred to as the “Ferguson effect.” [HuffPo]

Oh, right, that’s totally going to solve all of their problems. Just a few weeks after hosting a Halloween Party, a troubled motel on Bardstown Road is inviting the neighborhood over for another holiday event. [WAVE3]

Tell us more, Matt Bevin, about how great refugees have it and about how easy it is for them to find safety. LGBT refugees from across the Middle East flock to Turkey, escaping Islamist militias, sexual assault, and death threats. But what they find there leaves many in despair. [BuzzFeed]

With uncertainty about the future of his signature health initiative, Gov. Steve Beshear is touting the outcomes of Kentucky’s efforts to improve the well-being of residents. [WFPL]

More than half a dozen state governors have come out against President Obama’s plans to relocate several thousand Syrian refugees within the United States. Some have pledged to actively resist settlement of these refugees. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R), for example, signed a letter to Obama that begins “as governor of Texas, I write to inform you that the State of Texas will not accept any refugees from Syria in the wake of the deadly terrorist attack in Paris.” Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) issued an executive order instructing all “departments, budget units, agencies, offices, entities, and officers of the executive branch of the State of Louisiana” to “utilize all lawful means to prevent the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the State of Louisiana while this Order is in effect.” The problem for Jindal, Abbott and the other governors opposed to admitting refugees, however, is that there is no lawful means that permits a state government to dictate immigration policy to the president in this way. [ThinkProgress]

Surprise! UofL put Deborah Dietzler on leave. [Business First]

Residents within West Clark Community Schools’ boundaries won’t just vote for a president this time next year, but also a referendum project for the district. [News & Tribune]

Yes, The Media’s Slut-Shaming Powell

Eric Crawford has no idea what slut-shaming is or he’s lying to you. [WDRB]

Greg Leichty donated $50 to independent Drew Curtis in Kentucky’s gubernatorial contest and plans to vote for the founder. Just don’t ask Leichty, a University of Louisville communications professor, if other like-minded liberals ought to follow his example. “I’m not recommending that other people do,” Leichty said. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell’s lawyer, Larry Wilder, said his client was not subpoenaed in the investigation centered around “Breaking Cardinal Rules”. [WHAS11]

The Department of Justice has reached 70 settlements involving 457 hospitals in 43 states for more than $250 million related to cardiac devices that were implanted in patients in violation of Medicare coverage requirements, the Department of Justice announced Friday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just hours before a 19-year-old murder victim is honored, his family asks for help solving the case. [WLKY]

While much of the political attention is on the 2016 presidential race, there’s also a big election that’s not getting nearly as much coverage — and it’s taking place this week. As John Oliver pointed out on HBO’s “Last Week Tonight,” this week’s election could determine who might fall into the “Medicaid Gap” in several states. [HuffPo]

It is a sad and sobering statistic. One in five women will be a victim of sexual assault in college. [WAVE3]

By the time George W Bush left the White House, perceptions of the United States in the wider world were overwhelmingly negative. As the Obama presidency enters its final phase, how have attitudes shifted? (This is about Matthew Barzun) [BBC]

The Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office has begun issuing grand jury subpoenas in connection with allegations that escorts were provided to University of Louisville men’s basketball players and recruits, according to ESPN. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s gubernatorial candidates responded to a questionnaire from Preservation Kentucky regarding Kentucky’s Historic Preservation Tax Credit. [Click the Clicky]

Port of Indiana–Jeffersonville will receive $10 million in transportation grant money from the The U.S. Department of Transportation to enhance and expand the port’s infrastructure. [Business First]

Mayor Mike Moore is happy to present his record of the last four years as reason for his re-election, but challenger Dennis Julius, Jeffersonville city councilman, believes he could have done things better. [News & Tribune]

Who’ll Get Rich Off The Dixie Highway $?

A Bullitt County District Court Judge has dismissed all charges against a man who shot down a drone he said was flying over his property. [WDRB]

She’s great but Donna Hargens probably won’t listen to her at all. Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens has taken her first step to refill her decimated cabinet, naming Dena Dossett as the district’s new chief of data management. [C-J/AKN]

A safer, better Dixie Highway is in the works thanks to a nearly $17 million grant awarded to the city. It will be used for the Transforming Dixie Highway project which will ease congestion and make the area safer for both drivers and pedestrians from Broadway to the Gene Snyder Freeway. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is going to break with tradition when the General Assembly convenes in January — instead of asking for money for new buildings, UK is going to ask for funding to fix up older ones in the campus core. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro police are investigating two weekend shootings that left three men dead. [WLKY]

This is worth remembering as Amazon does all of its temporary hiring here in the metro area. [HuffPo]

Why do we, as a city, keep acting as if these neighborhood meetings over murders are going to solve everything? It’s admirable and all but… seriously. Nothing’s gonna change until our elected leadership changes. The Oakdale Neighborhood Association announced an emergency meeting in response to early Saturday morning’s double homicide. [WAVE3]

The US Ambassador to the UK has told Sky News that his country’s gun violence problem is the number one issue for the British people he has met in his two years in the London embassy. [Sky]

Housing, legal and data experts will be on hand for two events next week aimed at examining the impact a Supreme Court ruling earlier this year will have on fair housing in Louisville. [WFPL]

University students have less privacy for their campus health records than they would have if they sought care off campus. Schools say they are trying to seek the right balance between privacy and safety. [ProPublica]

Sweden-based AB Electrolux says it will likely spend about $64.6 million in integration costs related to the purchase of Louisville-based GE Appliances. [Business First]

Clark County has started steps to secure a grant to assess potential redevelopment spots for environmental contamination issues. [News & Tribune]

Now The KSB Is On A PR Spin Push

The Kentucky School for the Blind brings visually impaired kids together with a day of fun outside on the track. [WDRB]

Louisville isn’t green yet, another study concludes. As green as city officials like to call Louisville, studies continue to show we rank poorly in a number of environmental indicators — the latest coming from a personal finance website, WalletHub. [C-J/AKN]

If you have any concerns about the proposed methane plant in West Louisville, then mark your calendars for a chance to weigh in. [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ordered Kentucky’s Democratic governor to weigh in on whether altered marriage licenses issued by Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis’ office are valid. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The investigation continues into a body that was found Tuesday in a box in the Fairdale area. [WLKY]

Just like the Islamic State, radical domestic hate groups can use social media to spread messages and inspire attacks in the United States, a top counterterrorism official said Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The search continues for two men accused of beating up a man on his bicycle who says he was just minding his own business. It happened last month along Dixie Highway. A restaurant server witnessed the attack and was able to stop it. According to the police report, they just started punching him and kicking him for no apparent reason. [WAVE3]

From his first days as commander in chief, the drone has been President Barack Obama’s weapon of choice, used by the military and the CIA to hunt down and kill the people his administration has deemed — through secretive processes, without indictment or trial — worthy of execution. There has been intense focus on the technology of remote killing, but that often serves as a surrogate for what should be a broader examination of the state’s power over life and death. [The Intercept]

David Jones knew there was extensive unrest. Stephanie Horne knew there was extensive unrest. But Jones is being pretty honest while Horne is feigning surprise. A real shame the community doesn’t get better representation on the board. [WFPL]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto has a small army of recruiters who blanket the state to persuade high school students to attend the state’s flagship university. [Ashland Independent]

Kroger Co. is the nation’s largest supermarket chain, and now it’s claiming another title, Forbes reports. The Cincinnati-based grocer will begin offering transgender workers full health benefits on Jan. 1, including surgery and drug therapy for gender reassignment. The move makes Kroger, the nation’s fifth-largest employer, the largest retail chain to offer such benefits to its employees. [Business First]

Floyd County is not immune to the heroin problem in Southern Indiana. And with the drug use comes another issue — discarded syringes and needles being thrown in streets and yards. [News & Tribune]

UofL Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves. In Other Words? Told Ya So Years Ago, Nothing Has Changed

Who could have known, over the past eight years, that there’s a morale problem with faculty and staff at the University of Louisville??? Vicious and disrespectful: that’s how some faculty and staff describe the work environment at the University of Louisville. [WDRB]

African Americans living in Kentucky saw their average yearly incomes drop by more than 11 percent in one year, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released this week. The poverty rate also rose for black Kentuckians at a rate four times more than the rest of the state from 2013 to 2014. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 has learned, through MetroSafe, there is a shooting in the 3800 block of Vermont Avenue, in the Shawnee area. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Metro police said a 66-year-old man found dead last week was slain. Police said Michael Davis was killed sometime last Monday. [WLKY]

Seventy-three law enforcement agencies across the country will receive $20 million in federal grants to help them purchase and implement the use of body cameras, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance announced Monday. [HuffPo]

Crowds rallied together Sunday near the corner of 17th and Broadway with concerns of a new biodigester planned for the West Louisville neighborhood that would deal with methane gas. [WAVE3]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan touted two Louisville educational institutions Thursday during a stop in the city. [WFPL]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services is updating and expanding its surgical facilities in a $2.4 million project. [Business First]

Shane Corbin said his role as Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning director has been an exciting one. [News & Tribune]

Just Flipping Give Cahoots The Boot

Wednesday is the first day of school for approximately 4,000 early childhood education students in JCPS — but 1,100 have not turned in the required immunization forms and will not be allowed to attend class. [WDRB]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

The Civilian New Albany Traffic Supervisor has resigned amid an investigation into the supervisor’s implementation and execution of duties, according to New Albany Police Chief Todd Bailey. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

An effort to revitalize west Louisville is gearing up. Many people consider Broadway and Ninth Street the dividing line between downtown and west Louisville. [WLKY]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

We brought you the video after a large fight broke out recently in the busy bar area of Bardstown Road. Business owners said after the closings of Jim Porters, Phoenix Hill and several bars downtown, much more traffic headed to the Highlands. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Foiled in state court, a Jefferson County Public Schools teacher filed a federal court suit Monday claiming the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System illegally raised teachers’ share of pension contributions to shore up a retirement plan that is only half-funded. They sure have shopped this story around an awful lot. [WFPL]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

Two hour-long dramas about the world of Kentucky bourbon may be coming to TV soon. [Business First]

Twelve added employee positions — mostly in the public safety sector — are major components of Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore’s proposed 2016 budget. [News & Tribune]