All The News Is About Shootings & Such

Located about a mile from each other, Roosevelt-Perry and Byck elementary schools have long served the children of the Russell neighborhood – the majority of whom come from low-income families. [WDRB]

Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has filed a federal suit alleging the state’s Judicial Conduct Commission, which is considering possible disciplinary action against the judge, has violated his First Amendment rights. [C-J/AKN]

If you live in Louisville, you’re going to get shot dead or run over by a car. Or maybe hit by a train or school bus. Right? That’s the sense one gets by watching local news. [WHAS11]

Windstream announced Monday that it is launching one-gigabit Internet service in Lexington, as Windstream and Time Warner continue to battle for area customers. In a news release, Windstream said it was the first provider to bring the service to residential and small business customers in Fayette County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man is dead following a shooting at the intersection of 32nd and Kentucky streets. [WLKY]

But Matt Bevin, your half-wit governor, would have! Republican presidential candidate John Kasich said Sunday that he wouldn’t have signed a North Carolina law that banned cities in the state from passing anti-discrimination measures and mandated that transgender people use the public bathrooms for the gender they were assigned at birth. [HuffPo]

Another day, another shooting on Compassionate City. This time involving a juvenile. [WAVE3]

Here’s more of the University of Kentucky just TRYING to make you hate it. Moonshine packs a punch in this corner of Appalachia, where making hooch is steeped in local lore. But when Colin Fultz, the grandson of a bootlegger, opened a gourmet distillery here last fall, he ran afoul of a spirit even more potent than white lightning: University of Kentucky basketball. [NY Times]

Louisville’s planning commission is calling a public hearing to get input on proposed zoning regulations for short-term rentals. [WFPL]

It is only April, but some on Wall Street are already predicting a rotten 2016 for U.S. banks. [Reuters]

Kevin Cogan, who is battling to build a high-rise condominium in Cherokee Triangle, said the ease with which people can appeal rulings could start sinking big projects. [Business First]

Angela Renfro promised herself that if she ever escaped her life in prostitution and human trafficking, she would help every woman and child she could. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Dark Cloud Lifted, Donald Trump Left

Teenagers like weed, surprise. Two duPont Manual High School students were arrested and charged with trafficking marijuana after a routine narcotics sweep at the school on Friday. [WDRB]

Oh hell, the local paper’s new education reporter is relying on a study from the Bluegrass Institute. So much for her potential. [C-J/AKN]

In case you’re wondering what all the racists who showed up to the Trump event think? Have a look at them and their fun, half-literate signage. [WHAS11]

Republican Ben Carson brought his struggling campaign for president to Lexington Monday, and used the event to denounce the recent tone of the GOP nomination battle. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! That sense of doom you felt yesterday? It was because Donald Trump came to town. [WLKY]

When Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) decided that he would keep Antonin Scalia’s Supreme Court seat vacant so the next president could decide, he might not have anticipated exactly how ugly the campaign was about to turn in his party. [HuffPo]

Just in case you needed another reason to keep your middle school-aged children off social media… [WAVE3]

Sen-Ching (Samson) Cheung is an associate professor in the University of Kentucky College of Engineering’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a faculty member within the UK Center for Visualization and Virtual Environments. Like most professors, he is deeply involved in engineering research. For most of his academic career, his research has been in the area of multimedia information analysis. [Richmond Register]

As negotiations over the city’s budget surplus continue, another group is seeking a slice of the funds. [WFPL]

“Stronger Together” is not the name of the latest social-media fitness app. It’s a grant proposed in President Obama’s new budget, reviving an idea that hasn’t gotten much policy attention in decades: diversity in public schools. If the request is approved, $120 million will go to school districts for programs intended to make their schools more diverse. [NPR]

Louisville-based spirits distiller Brown-Forman Corp. has told about 79 production workers at its bottle, shipping and and warehouse operations not to come to work for the next three weeks. [Business First]

After a roughly eight-month testing phase, the Jeffersonville Police Department is changing the body camera technology its officers use. The switch comes after what JPD Sgt. Isaac Parker said was a series of mechanical issues with the cameras, including problems with battery life and camera lenses. [News & Tribune]

Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls

The principal of Stuart Middle School has been reassigned and transferred to Central High School as an assistant principal. [WDRB]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The University of Louisville announced Thursday that it’s kicking off a capital fundraising campaign for its previously announced plans to expand Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [C-J/AKN]

Labor leaders at Brown-Forman have filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board accusing the spirits maker of unfair labor practices. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto has formed a task force to advise him on what to do about a controversial mural in Memorial Hall. [H-L]

Another day, yet another JCPS bus crash. Everyone is numb to news like this. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama has said that a college degree “has never been more valuable.” But if you borrow to finance your degree, the immediate returns are the lowest they’ve been in at least a generation, new data show. [HuffPo]

In just a few short months, tolls across WAVE Country will be a reality. The price will range from $1 to $4 per way for everyday drivers, but getting that discounted rate may be harder than you think. [WAVE3]

Marlow Cook may forever be remembered by Louisvillians as the Jefferson County Executive who purchased the Belle of Louisville, but I remember him not only as my first boss, but also as someone who directly and significantly shaped my life and the lives of so many in public life [John Yarmuth]

The Louisville Metro Council will soon consider measures to streamline the process for bringing ultra-fast Internet access, including a plan to condense the franchise-granting authority of Jefferson County’s suburban cities for communication services into one entity. [WFPL]

In Kentucky, more men than women die pedestrian deaths. [Click the Clicky]

Jim Ramsey knows his days at the University of Louisville are numbered. [Business First]k

Clarksville has decided not to open its pool this year due to ongoing renovations. That decision should reap benefits for New Albany’s River Fun Water Park. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Surprise! More Bad UofL & JCPS News

A lawsuit against “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell may never see the light of day. [WDRB]

Greg Fischer made two key additions to his administration Wednesday in areas dealing with Louisville’s public safety and public assistance. The mayor announced Rashaad Abdur-Rahman will be the new director of the Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods office and Eric Friedlander will serve as acting director of the Community Services department. [C-J/AKN]

Data from Jefferson County Public Schools shows that a new grading scale appears to have increased the number of students getting A grades in classes. [WHAS11]

Glad to see there’s nothing important left to worry about. The University of Kentucky has sometimes been criticized for being a campus of independent units, with academic, athletics and health care divisions operating more separately than together. On a symbolic level, UK officials have decided that will no longer be the case. [H-L]

What the hell is this story about the guy killed in the Highlands? What? No, really, what the hell is that story? [WLKY]

The “Seinfeld” writer who coined “Festivus” wants Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) to stop tweeting about his beloved secular holiday. [HuffPo]

A JCPS bus driver was assaulted and robbed by students. The incident, according to the bus union president, happened on Friday at the Detrick Nichols compound off Taylor Blvd. [WAVE3]

While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky business groups are backing legislation that would expand expungements of some felony convictions. [WFPL]

The recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino have put pressure on local authorities to show they’re ready for that kind of violence. Some jurisdictions, such as Los Angeles, are stepping up exercises and terrorism simulations. [NPR]

With truckers in high demand, the online marketplace seeks to connect drivers with carriers that need something hauled. [Business First]

Some of Indiana’s grocery stores and liquor stores say a change in state law that allows alcohol sales on Christmas Day for the first time in decades won’t affect them because their stores are closed on that holiday. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Brown Puts Her Money Where Her Mouth Is And Other Wealthy Scions In The City Should Follow Her Dang Lead

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

The transformation of a former public housing complex in Louisville is almost finished. Construction is continuing at the renovated Sheppard Square in Smoketown. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Board of Education Chairman David Jones Jr. said he wants to hear more information on the idea of bringing in an outside operator to run some of the district’s lowest-performing schools. [C-J/AKN]

The Judge Stevens slap fight is getting out-of-control crazy. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics will receive a $12 million gift from Papa John’s Pizza founder and CEO John Schnatter and the Charles Koch Foundation, officials announced Tuesday. [H-L]

Seriously, Tom Wine is in teabagger meltdown mode. What on earth? How dare anyone bring up race in Possibility City! A legal battle between a local judge and a top prosecutor is heating up again, and the prosecutor is asking for the judge’s removal. [WLKY]

ICYMI: Bill sits down with former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear to discuss his time in office and his plans for the future. [KET]

The hotel will bring 140 more hotel rooms to Louisville and will be in one of the city’s trendiest neighborhoods. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission (KSNPC) has presented its Biological Diversity Protection Award to Christy Lee Brown of Louisville. The annual award is given to an individual or organization that has made a significant contribution to the knowledge and protection of Kentucky’s biodiversity. “Brown is truly an international leader promoting a holistic understanding and appreciation of the earth and its environs,” said Don Dott, executive director of the KSNPC. “She leads and inspires others in the fields of sustainable food production, environmental quality and its fundamental role in human health, the interrelatedness of our natural systems, and of biodiversity protection and the conservation of land.” [Press Release]

Horrible walrus Jim Gooch has returned to embarrass the Commonwealth. A bill pre-filed in the General Assembly would declare Kentucky a “sanctuary state” for people and companies who don’t want to follow federal environmental laws that will restrict carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission (PSC) has affirmed its earlier approval of combustion waste landfills at power plants operated by the state’s two largest electric utilities, despite sharp increases in the cost of the facilities. But the PSC, in an order issued today, declined requests by Kentucky Utilities Co. (KU) and Louisville Gas & Electric Co. (LG&E) to extend that approval to future expansions of the landfills. The landfills are at the Trimble County Generating Station and at the Ghent Generating Station in Carroll County. [Press Release]

LG&E and KU Energy LLC wants to get much more involved in the solar energy world. To make this happen, the utility company plans to offer individual, renewable solar-generation facilities to industrial and business customers. [Business First]

The possibility of arming a trained teacher in a school was discussed at West Clark Community Schools board meeting this week. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Another Sword Attack! It’s Been A Bit

Possibility City! Picture it: A city — the most compassionate city ever — two downtown bridges. Both named after assassinated presidents. Makes sense and sends the message that it’s possible here… possible to be murdered. [Deep Bridge Thoughts]

Police say a suspect tried to assault a man with a sword on Thanksgiving night — but the victim also had a weapon. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has authorized engineering work on two underground basins to hold a combination of rain and raw sewage during wet weather. [C-J/AKN]

An attorney fighting the release of the book, Breaking Cardinal Rules, is working to find out how many copies were sold in Kentucky. [WHAS11]

When Gloria Maldonado was still at Bryan Station High School, she remembers college reps coming to talk about the University of Kentucky. The first in her family to plan to go to college, “I didn’t even know what an alumni was,” she recalled. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Protesters from the Black Lives Matter movement are camped out in front of the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office in Louisville. [WLKY]

World leaders are meeting in Paris this month in what amounts to a last-ditch effort to avert the worst ravages of climate change. Climatologists now say that the best case scenario — assuming immediate and dramatic emissions curbs — is that planetary surface temperatures will increase by at least 2 degrees Celsius in the coming decades. [HuffPo]

Saturday night, as Louisville added another murder to its yearly total, more than 50 people gathered in the Russell neighborhood to hold a vigil for peace. [WAVE3]

Governor Steve Beshear [yesterday] presented a ceremonial check representing $1.5 million in federal funding for a project to improve conditions in downtown Louisville for pedestrians and people with disabilities, among others. [Press Release]

A group of 13 protesters on Monday attempted to occupy Jefferson County Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine’s office at Sixth and Liberty streets in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

“We’re not gonna take it anymore,” a crowd of thousands sang as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump entered a South Carolina convention center on Tuesday night as a 1980s heavy metal song by the band Twisted Sister blared from speakers. The billionaire real-estate developer’s packed rallies have been among the liveliest events in the long build-up to the November 2016 U.S. presidential election. But they are increasingly becoming known for their undercurrent of aggression, which escalated into a physical altercation over the weekend when white Trump supporters attacked a black protester at his rally, to the candidate’s approval. [Reuters]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. says labor costs will increase by 1.5 percent annually during the next four years as a result of a new labor agreement with the United Auto Workers union. [Business First]

Animal control services were immediately restored to Floyd County on Friday, but neither the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Control Authority, the city nor the county are closer to resolving disagreements on funding. [News & Tribune]

Revisiting Ramsey’s Big Reality Disconnect

You may have to watch your step more closely when crossing at least one downtown street. A pedway allowing easy access to the convention center will be going away. [WDRB]

How many scandalous hires does this make for Greg Fischer? The man has no concept of vetting new hires. Where are the liberal hand-wringers now? Every time a shitty hire is revealed, they freak out and attack. Every. Time. But suddenly they’re quiet. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! School time horror stories. “I had a chair thrown across the room and the kid looked at me–this is second grade–and said “what the f*** did I do b****,” Lucretia Gue, a former first grade teacher at Frayser Elementary School said. [WHAS11]

In 2006, senators of the University of Kentucky’s student government passed a resolution to remove a mural in Memorial Hall that showed scenes of state history, including black workers in a tobacco field, black musicians playing for white dancers, and a Native American with a tomahawk. They told then-President Lee Todd that it was degrading to ethnic and racial groups. [H-L]

Local teevee folks are still freaking out about a white lady married to a preacher. When was the last time they freaked out like this over a person of color? Or over someone not tied to some random church? [WLKY]

Here’s one more indication that American teachers work really, really hard — and don’t make nearly enough. An analysis released Tuesday by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development looks at the state of education around the world, examining everything from intergenerational mobility in education to graduation rates to teacher pay. [HuffPo]

The YMCA of Louisville and the YMCA of Southern Indiana are merging, organization leaders announced during the 25th annual YMCA Mayor’s Thanksgiving Breakfast. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, R-Cookie Tree, said after a town hall at the Highlands Museum and Discovery Center he is in conversations with the CEO of AK Steel about how to keep hundreds of jobs at Ashland Works afloat. [Ashland Independent]

James Ramsey has been thinking a lot lately about stepping down from his role as president of the University of Louisville. That’s all it took for him to think about resigning? Not the myriad scandals, people going to prison, tens of millions of dollars swindled?! [WFPL]

About half of Americans, 49 percent, say that racism is “a big problem,” according to a new national poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation. [The Hill]

Electrolux announced plans to buy General Electric Co.’s Louisville-based appliance division for $3.3 billion last year. But the government sued to block the deal in July, citing concerns that it would suppress competition. [Business First]

A bill to include LGBT people in existing anti-discrimination laws is on the slate for the State Senate’s upcoming legislative session. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]