The Compassionate Murders Continue

Another day, another fun murder in Compassionate City. LMPD homicide detectives are investigating after a man was shot and killed in Louisville’s Shawnee neighborhood early Tuesday. [WDRB]

In about six months Kentucky courts must offer emergency civil legal protections for a member of a dating couple in an abusive or violent relationship, but court officials across the state first must figure out how to make the new law work in their courts. [C-J/AKN]

Oldham County only needs about 1,200 signatures to expand packaged alcohol sales to groceries, convenience stores and liquor stores. [WHAS11]

Just in case you were wondering why nothing ever happens when legislators are unethical mountains of awful? John Schaaf, who has been legal counsel for the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission since 2004, will become its news executive director Aug. 1. [H-L]

Jeffersonville is breaking ground on a new, less expensive way to stop sewage overflow from being released into the Ohio River. [WLKY]

Tens of thousands of people are deported each year for minor drug offenses, even if they served their time long ago, because of draconian U.S. drug laws, according to a report released Tuesday by the international advocacy group Human Rights Watch. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man was taken into custody for allegedly shooting a father and his son. [WAVE3]

Nobody disputes the fact that Deng Manyoun attacked a Louisville police officer with a flag pole on Saturday afternoon. What is up for debate — among police and the public in Kentucky — is whether the officer’s split-second decision to respond by firing two bullets into the 35-year-old was justified. [WaPo]

In the coming weeks Louisville residents and visitors will have a new option to get around the city. [WFPL]

As the iconic American gun maker Colt Defense struggled to stay in business after losing a key contract to supply M4 rifles to the U.S. Army, the company was paying a range of political allies, including the National Rife Association, the consulting firm set up by retired Army General Stanley McChrystal, and other trade groups and lobbying outfits. [The Intercept]

After a successful event in Louisville in April, the VEX Robotics World Championship will return to the city for the next four years. [Business First]

The New Albany Human Rights Commission declined Friday to make a statement opposing comments made earlier this month by City Councilman Dan Coffey that some have labeled as demeaning toward gays and transgender individuals. [News & Tribune]

Departing Eugene School District Superintendent Sheldon Berman has a new job more than 3,100 miles from Eugene. Berman will serve for one year as the Andover Public Schools interim superintendent in Andover, Mass., during the coming school year. Those “negative, untrue reports” he’s talking about? You already know they were backed up by government documents, telephone records and first-hand accounts. These shysters are why kids can’t have nice things. [Register-Guard]

Another Gun Death, Pedestrians Hit, Possibility City Prepares For A Happy New Year!

Another day, another instance of pedestrians being hit by a car. Two people were hit by a car on Dixie Highway near Pendleton Road at approximately 3:30 Tuesday afternoon. [WDRB]

In an ongoing legal battle, Norton Healthcare has struck back at Kosair Charities, which in a suit last May alleged that Norton misused contributions to enhance its bottom line and “line the pockets” of its executives. [C-J/AKN]

The annual program that helps prevent disconnection from utility services for low income residents of Louisville begins Monday, January 12. [WHAS11]

A federal prosecutor is seeking a much longer prison sentence for Morgan County Judge-Executive Tim Conley than the term called for under advisory sentencing guidelines. Here’s hoping he gets it! [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another fun shooting death in Possibility City. [WLKY]

Don’t tell Greg Fischer… Here’s proof that it’s possible for a burger joint to both pay its workers well and still make money. [HuffPo]

A whistleblower who threw the New Albany Police Department into turmoil has been fired. [WAVE3]

In many ways, Kentucky, a poor state with a starkly unhealthy populace, has become a symbol of the Affordable Care Act’s potential. [NY Times]

The health department in Washington, D.C., has an interest in implementing many of the approaches to public health found in Louisville, said Dr. LaQuandra Nesbitt, Louisville’s public health director. [WFPL]

Gun related deaths of U.S. law enforcement officers rose by 56 percent in 2014 compared to the previous year, with about one-third of officers killed in an ambush, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

C.T. “Skip” Miller, executive director of the Louisville International Airport, said airports nationwide are adjusting to a “new era” as airlines dwindle in number and try to stabilize their finances. [Business First]

A policewoman who accused fellow officers of lying about their time records, and her superiors of retaliating against her for reporting the allegations, may face disciplinary charges. [News & Tribune]

Louisville’s Apparently Just A Giant Heat Island

Gallopalooza is back and this time it’s with a bourbon twist. [WDRB]

More people are dying in LMPD shootings and racist wingnuts are freaking out. [C-J/AKN]

Anthony Merida said when he arrived at Porcia Mills’ South Louisville apartment complex Friday to check on her and their son it was obvious very quickly something wasn’t right. [WHAS11]

A contract has been awarded to make more improvements to bring the Purchase Parkway in western Kentucky up to interstate highway standards and eventual designation as Interstate 69. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are searching for answers after 24-year-old Porcia Mills’ boyfriend was arrested and charged in her death. [WLKY]

A prosecutor released hundreds of pages of additional documents Saturday from the investigation into the police shooting of Michael Brown, including an interview transcript of a friend who initially asserted that he had seen Brown get shot in the back. [HuffPo]

Nationwide Americans are marching, protesting the recent lack of indictments in the killings of Eric Garner and Michael Brown. [WAVE3]

Both Rand Paul and Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes scored major Pinocchios this year. [WaPo]

Politico on Tuesday took a deep look at urban heat islands, an issue that has gotten increasing focus particularly in Louisville—because studies show that the city’s heat struggles are particularly worrisome. [WFPL & Politico]

For the past 18 months, Americans from Albany to Oregon have voiced growing alarm over the rising number of oil-laden freight trains coursing through their cities, a trend they fear is endangering public safety. [Reuters]

Children on Medicaid in Kentucky are prescribed psychotropic drugs — for conditions such attention deficit disorder, anxiety or depression — at a rate that more than doubles the national average. [Business First]

As the Jeffersonville Police Department moves into its new home on 10th Street, city officials are discussing what to do with the soon empty offices in City Hall. [News & Tribune]

Maybe The CWF Could’ve Informed Everybody

The Center for Women and Families is falling well short of its goal to collect $30,000 in gift cards for the holiday season, according to a news release. [WDRB]

Is this the beginning of Zipcar taking over Louisville? Cross your fingers. [C-J/AKN]

Ready to be terrified? Hundreds of elves flooded the Galt House Tuesday morning–trying to break a world record. [WHAS11]

One of the arguments often made against government involvement in health care is that it impedes the action of the marketplace which, if left unfettered, could solve all our problems. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. [WLKY]

The United Nations children’s agency UNICEF declared 2014 a devastating year for children on Monday with as many as 15 million caught in conflicts in Central African Republic, Iraq, South Sudan, Syria, Ukraine and the Palestinian territories. [HuffPo]

Charlestown Mayor Bob Hall’s controversial proposal to tear down hundreds of homes in favor of a large development failed to win city council approval Monday. [WAVE3]

The GOP is refocusing its attention on the courts as it searches for any way to weaken President Obama’s signature healthcare law while he continues to wield a veto pen. [The Hill]

Indiana state Sen. Michael Crider wants federal investigators to provide the public with an update on its investigation of a troubled exotic animal refuge in Charlestown, Ind. [WFPL]

Last week we got an actually good employment report — arguably the first truly good report in a long time. The U.S. economy added well over 300,000 jobs; wages, which have been stagnant for far too long, picked up a bit. [NY Times]

Rain and cooler weather over the summer has led to a bountiful, healthy crop of Christmas trees in Indiana, and that has the state’s tree farmers celebrating. [Business First]

For the second time in just more than two years, the city has taken legal action against a New Albany dump truck business. [News & Tribune]

Yet Another Stinky Mess For MSD This Week

Another day, another senseless murder in Possibility City. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has boosted salaries of several top executives by up to 11.6 percent and paid out annual performance payments, including a $32,760 bonus to Executive Director Greg Heitzman. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville International Airport putting a stop to ride-sharing companies from picking up passengers. [WHAS11]

Poor Andy Beshear. More than a year away from being sworn in to an office he hasn’t even won, and already his integrity in that office is open to question because of his unprecedented fund-raising. Not to mention the shadow cast on the administration of his father, Gov. Steve Beshear, as state contractors, lobbyists and appointees have lined up at 87 fund-raising events to give almost $1.5 million to the son’s campaign for attorney general. [H-L]

New court records show how investigators may have gotten a break in an unsolved murder. [WLKY]

The white police officer who killed Michael Brown has resigned from the Ferguson Police Department, his attorney said Saturday, nearly four months after the fatal confrontation with the black 18-year-old that fueled protests in the St. Louis suburb and across the nation. [HuffPo]

An estimated 3,000 to 4,000 coats were handed out during a different kind of Black Friday transaction in Kentuckiana: the Free Coat Exchange. [WAVE3]

The U.N. Committee against Torture urged the United States on Friday to fully investigate and prosecute police brutality and shootings of unarmed black youth and ensure that taser weapons are used sparingly. [Reuters]

The number of Kentuckians who are “underbanked”—that is, people who don’t participate in the banking system—has increased. Nearly a third of Kentuckians (33.2 percent) are considered “underbanked,” according to a recently released report from Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. [WFPL]

Urban agriculture is playing an increasingly important role in global food security, a study has suggested. [BBC]

Bardstown Road Aglow has grown tremendously since its first year. When founder Rosemary Bailey started it 29 years ago, only six businesses participated, recalled Kelli Milligan, owner Renaissance by Design. The antique store was one of the six. [Business First]

Area parents looking to have a night out on the town will want to circle Monday on their calendars, because that’s the deadline to register children for Clarksville Parks & Recreation’s inaugural Parents’ Night Out. [News & Tribune]