NYE Dept Of Awful Update Stuff

Louisville International Airport is filling four out of five available airplane seats, the highest rate since at least 2007. [WDRB]

We can’t keep track of all the UofL scandals these days! Two former University of Louisville biosafety employees who lost their jobs last year following federal investigations of biological safety practices have filed a federal lawsuit against the university, claiming repeated violations of health and safety regulations and an attempted cover-up by university officials. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Get a grip, Julie Raque Adams, and quit it with the fear mongering. It’s like you want to lose your state senate seat. [WHAS11]

Kentucky child welfare officials place too many children with mental health problems in institutions for too long when they could be better served by relatives or foster families, according to a leading child advocacy group. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The family of a teenager charged with murder in the death of another teen said they want the truth to come out. [WLKY]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Leave it to Louisville teevee folks to continue the Mall St. Matthews freak out. [WAVE3]

When officers take the lives of those they are sworn to protect and serve, they undermine their own legitimacy. [The Atlantic]

A prominent member of Louisville’s Board of Zoning Adjustment and Planning Commission has resigned his positions. [WFPL]

Open data has contributed to dramatic improvements in a wide array of fields over the past few decades, affecting how we look at astronomy, genetics, climate change, sports and more. But until recently, crime has gone without the open analysis prevalent in other fields because crime data has been closely held by law enforcement agencies and has usually only been released in bulk at monthly, quarterly or annual intervals. [FiveThirtyEight]

When most of the assets of the Sam Swope Auto Group were sold to a Florida company earlier this year, the purchase price was not disclosed. But now we at least know the price of the bulk of the real estate involved. [Business First]

Counties in Southern Indiana are working on securing a grant that would help strengthen partnerships between local manufacturing industries and their workforces. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Local Media Has Lost Its Damn Mind

Yep, local teevee folks are still freaking out. Sadly, people like Toni Konz have no idea how much damage their hyping is causing. Gotta keep meemaw afraid, of course. [WDRB]

Local media is still shitting the floor over misbehaving kids. Based on the reaction from teevee news readers and a select few current/former C-J reporters, you’d think this is the first time in history teenagers have behaved as unruly heathens. [C-J/AKN]

Okay, so maybe local teevee folks aren’t just freaking out – they’re *this close* to pooping in the floor. [WHAS11]

America’s newest family of Syrian refugees flew in late at night, and Sarhan Aldobai, 36, looked down from the plane at the distant lights of his new home. His wife was nursing their baby in the next seat. His five other children had fallen asleep. Sarhan took out the small world map he had carried since leaving Syria in 2012 and tried to trace the plane’s path. [H-L]

A southern Indiana official is refusing to certify election results for the Jeffersonville City Council, saying he has reason to believe at least one recount team did not accurately count returns. [WLKY]

The seven children had just crossed the river, shoes still caked with mud, when U.S. Border Patrol agents stopped them. [HuffPo]

Losing. Their. Damn. Minds. Exacerbated by the hype pushed by WDRB that 100% of JCPS kids are out-of-control devils. [WAVE3]

A Lexington couple is trying to raise thousands of dollars for a way to help their eight-year-old son. Jo and Donnie Grayson’s son, Thatcher, has autism. As he gets older, they worry more about him. [WKYT]

Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District is beginning work on a new air monitoring system that is designed to help pinpoint the causes of ozone pollution. [WFPL]

As soon as next year, a driver’s license may no longer be enough for airline passengers to clear security in some states, if the Department of Homeland Security has its way. [NY Times]

Loganberry Court in Louisville is the most expensive street in Kentucky. The average home price for Loganberry Court, which is off of Mockingbird Gardens Drive and near the Crescent Hill Golf Course, is $2,208,300. [Business First]

I sat in a rocker on Trish Roehm’s porch, between a dog bowl and a water bucket both as big as last spring’s potholes. When Bandit was not in my face, Flash or Otisco or Bonnie or Carmel or Trigger was. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

The Compassionate Murders Continue

Another day, another fun murder in Compassionate City. LMPD homicide detectives are investigating after a man was shot and killed in Louisville’s Shawnee neighborhood early Tuesday. [WDRB]

In about six months Kentucky courts must offer emergency civil legal protections for a member of a dating couple in an abusive or violent relationship, but court officials across the state first must figure out how to make the new law work in their courts. [C-J/AKN]

Oldham County only needs about 1,200 signatures to expand packaged alcohol sales to groceries, convenience stores and liquor stores. [WHAS11]

Just in case you were wondering why nothing ever happens when legislators are unethical mountains of awful? John Schaaf, who has been legal counsel for the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission since 2004, will become its news executive director Aug. 1. [H-L]

Jeffersonville is breaking ground on a new, less expensive way to stop sewage overflow from being released into the Ohio River. [WLKY]

Tens of thousands of people are deported each year for minor drug offenses, even if they served their time long ago, because of draconian U.S. drug laws, according to a report released Tuesday by the international advocacy group Human Rights Watch. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man was taken into custody for allegedly shooting a father and his son. [WAVE3]

Nobody disputes the fact that Deng Manyoun attacked a Louisville police officer with a flag pole on Saturday afternoon. What is up for debate — among police and the public in Kentucky — is whether the officer’s split-second decision to respond by firing two bullets into the 35-year-old was justified. [WaPo]

In the coming weeks Louisville residents and visitors will have a new option to get around the city. [WFPL]

As the iconic American gun maker Colt Defense struggled to stay in business after losing a key contract to supply M4 rifles to the U.S. Army, the company was paying a range of political allies, including the National Rife Association, the consulting firm set up by retired Army General Stanley McChrystal, and other trade groups and lobbying outfits. [The Intercept]

After a successful event in Louisville in April, the VEX Robotics World Championship will return to the city for the next four years. [Business First]

The New Albany Human Rights Commission declined Friday to make a statement opposing comments made earlier this month by City Councilman Dan Coffey that some have labeled as demeaning toward gays and transgender individuals. [News & Tribune]

Departing Eugene School District Superintendent Sheldon Berman has a new job more than 3,100 miles from Eugene. Berman will serve for one year as the Andover Public Schools interim superintendent in Andover, Mass., during the coming school year. Those “negative, untrue reports” he’s talking about? You already know they were backed up by government documents, telephone records and first-hand accounts. These shysters are why kids can’t have nice things. [Register-Guard]

Another Gun Death, Pedestrians Hit, Possibility City Prepares For A Happy New Year!

Another day, another instance of pedestrians being hit by a car. Two people were hit by a car on Dixie Highway near Pendleton Road at approximately 3:30 Tuesday afternoon. [WDRB]

In an ongoing legal battle, Norton Healthcare has struck back at Kosair Charities, which in a suit last May alleged that Norton misused contributions to enhance its bottom line and “line the pockets” of its executives. [C-J/AKN]

The annual program that helps prevent disconnection from utility services for low income residents of Louisville begins Monday, January 12. [WHAS11]

A federal prosecutor is seeking a much longer prison sentence for Morgan County Judge-Executive Tim Conley than the term called for under advisory sentencing guidelines. Here’s hoping he gets it! [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another fun shooting death in Possibility City. [WLKY]

Don’t tell Greg Fischer… Here’s proof that it’s possible for a burger joint to both pay its workers well and still make money. [HuffPo]

A whistleblower who threw the New Albany Police Department into turmoil has been fired. [WAVE3]

In many ways, Kentucky, a poor state with a starkly unhealthy populace, has become a symbol of the Affordable Care Act’s potential. [NY Times]

The health department in Washington, D.C., has an interest in implementing many of the approaches to public health found in Louisville, said Dr. LaQuandra Nesbitt, Louisville’s public health director. [WFPL]

Gun related deaths of U.S. law enforcement officers rose by 56 percent in 2014 compared to the previous year, with about one-third of officers killed in an ambush, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

C.T. “Skip” Miller, executive director of the Louisville International Airport, said airports nationwide are adjusting to a “new era” as airlines dwindle in number and try to stabilize their finances. [Business First]

A policewoman who accused fellow officers of lying about their time records, and her superiors of retaliating against her for reporting the allegations, may face disciplinary charges. [News & Tribune]