Sadly, There Won’t Be 40 Days Of Peace

The 2015 Dirt Bowl Championship was held Sunday at Shawnee Park, but basketball wasn’t the only reason for the event. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and other community leaders helped announce a 40 Days of Peace Campaign, which will start Thursday. [WDRB]

When Jefferson County Public Schools launched a contest in 2013 for its “Schools of Innovation,” the plan was to find ideas for helping students so out-of-the-box that they could “make bureacrats gasp.” [C-J/AKN]

School starts on Wednesday for students in Jefferson County and officials are continuing the annual tradition of helping parents with making the bus commute smoother. [WHAS11]

More than 93 percent of teachers and 89 percent of education leaders who were evaluated have been rated “exemplary” or “accomplished” in the first year of statewide implementation of Kentucky’s Professional Growth and Effectiveness System. [H-L]

An area festival showcased the wide variety of hemp – a crop many are hoping to bring back to the Bluegrass. [WLKY]

Asked if his flat tax plan would further separate the haves from the have-nots, GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-WTF) said Sunday that income inequality is the result of some Americans working harder than others, rather than economic policies. [HuffPo]

A Kentucky non-profit organization is pushing for the legalization of medical marijuana. [WAVE3]

Robert Freeman has been helping people extract public information from New York state agencies for four decades. He is the executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government, a division of the New York Department of State that advises the public on the Freedom of Information Law — the state statute authorizing access to public records. [ProPublica]

Louisville home buyers and sellers interested in environmentally friendly elements and technology have a new way to identify those features on their homes. [WFPL]

Rand Paul in an interview Sunday called Donald Trump, who refused to rule out a third-party run during the first GOP debate, a “fake conservative.” [The Hill]

Nashville, Tenn., gets called a boomtown so frequently these days that it borders on cliche. Yet it’s clear that the city just three hours away down Interestate 65 has seen significant growth in the past several years. [Business First]

Options available for the city to address blighted commercial buildings, some of which have been shuttered for years, will be a topic during the next New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

No Such Thing As Fischer Transparency

Roughly 30 members of the local city and government employee union rallied outside JCPS headquarters Monday saying it’s been more than two years since the district talked wages. [WDRB]

Of course Greg Fischer’s stunt broke state law. Did anyone ever expect this man to truly be transparent? To truly be up-front? Please. Not even the Brown Family is in his corner. First-rate shyster that the Democrats are afraid to oust. The news director of WAVE-3 is accusing Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer of violating Kentucky’s open meetings law after banning photographs and video footage during a press briefing to review new designs for the downtown Omni Hotel project. [C-J/AKN]

During the JCPS board meeting July 27 the board voted to hand over control of the Challenger Learning Center to the Kentucky Science Center. [WHAS11]

Would-be independent gubernatorial candidate Drew Curtis is making the trip to Fancy Farm in far Western Kentucky this weekend, and he said he has a speech prepared just in case. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Officials in Clarksville, Indiana, are seeing results after stepping up security at the local town hall. [WLKY]

Senators overruled heated conservative opposition Monday and added a measure reviving the federal Export-Import Bank to must-pass highway legislation. But House Republicans declared the transportation bill dead on arrival. [HuffPo]

One of the defining characteristics of democracy in the 21st century is that nearly every member of the public can watch the government in action. Through live broadcasts and daily TV news reports, citizens can see and hear the deliberations and decisions that affect their daily lives. [WAVE3]

Wondering how messed up your outgoing Commissioner of Education is in the world of corrupt superintendents? Here’s a fun deposition. [Page One]

An ordinance that affordable housing advocates consider a big step forward in Louisville’s quest to boost living options for low-income residents is being held up in a Metro Council ad hoc committee. [WFPL]

Will the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice give in to a literal hate group? [ThinkProgress]

It seems like just yesterday British distilling giant Diageo PLC broke ground on a $115 million distillery in Shelby County. But it wasn’t yesterday. It was actually last August. And now, less than a year since that groundbreaking, some warehousing operations at the facility already are up and running. [Business First]

Roundabouts. Love them or hate them, they’re the crux of the new Ind. 265/Ind. 62/Port Road interchange that is part of the east-end crossing project. And they’re among the first in Southern Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Support That JCPS Clothing Program

Just more of that well-known Greg Fischer transparency! Greg Fischer’s office called a meeting but banned cameras as it planned to update local media on the Omni Hotel project. [WAVE3]

Officials with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office arrested a man who authorities say passed contraband to a Metro Corrections inmate. [WDRB]

One by one, women board a breast-cancer screening van in southwestern Jefferson County to receive mammograms. [C-J/AKN]

We’d share more information with you but the new comms person at JCPS is apparently a disaster who refuses to communicate with anyone who doesn’t drink the Kool-aid. The JCPS annual Clothing Assistance Program Blitz kicked off Monday morning. [WHAS11]

Even after years of talk about a “war on coal,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell startled some of his constituents in March when he urged open rebellion against a White House proposal for cutting pollution from coal-fired power plants. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just a reminder that, sure, there’s fun crap happening but your leadership is effectively ignoring the shooting problem in this city. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama fired back at former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R) on Monday after the 2016 Republican presidential candidate invoked the specter of the Holocaust in comments regarding the Iran nuclear deal. [HuffPo]

History was made Sunday when the the city’s first statue honoring a woman was unveiled at Cathedral of the Assumption. [WAVE3]

In L.A. and cities across the United States, it is effectively illegal to be dirt poor in a country where more than 45 million people live in poverty. [The Intercept]

Harrison County, Indiana, officials are being sued in federal court by a former employee of the county clerk’s office who claims she was fired after refusing to process a same-sex marriage license. [WFPL]

New York state recently announced an increase in the minimum wage for fast food workers, to $15 an hour. It’s the fruit of a three-year labor campaign. But there’s another group of workers out there that hasn’t had a real wage increase in decades. [NPR]

The advertising and marketing agency Power Creative has developed a new executive leadership team. CEO David Power said he’s promoted three employees to serve as chief operating, innovation and marketing officers. He created the three positions to better define roles. [Business First]

This time last year, onlookers from the Big Four Bridge were met with the sight of dilapidated docks and an eroding, uneven shoreline at Jeffersonville’s Ohio River bank. [News & Tribune]

Major Reality Check For Greg Fischer

You thought everything was going swell for Greg Fischer?

His lack of transparency has gotten so bad that Gill Holland is speaking up:

As much as our city government and the Omni developers most likely want the critical letters to the editor to stop, the reality is that the groundswell of citizen dismay is growing. An increasing number of Louisvillians are realizing there are several significant issues with the Omni situation.


There are two main problems with this deal. One is financial. The clause of the contract where the city contractually promises NOT to incentivize any other significant (more than 400 rooms) hotel group within a mile of downtown for almost 10 years is of utmost concern. In my mind, the city will grow significantly in the next decade, and we will need another major hotel. But nope, that can’t happen, not if it is within a mile. What if a developer wants to build a 400-room hotel overlooking the upcoming Waterfront Park West? Nope. This clause is a competition killer, and government should encourage competition, not stifle it.

The second problem is a general lack of transparency and community involvement in this deal.


As concerned citizens and various constituencies write their letters to the editor and do their design charrettes, it doesn’t seem like the city has any true interest in hearing what citizens are saying, because the “deal is done.”

Instead of bucking up and saying things could have been done better, city government seems to be entrenching.

Click here to read the entire letter.

There’s a lot more where that came from.

Let The Minimum Wage Freakout Begin

A Louisville Metro Council member is asking the mayor to take action concerning the Economy Inn on Bardstown Road. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Clerk Bobbie Holsclaw is turning over to Louisville Metro Government more than $2.46 million as surplus from fees she collected during her fourth, four-year term than ran through 2014. [C-J/AKN]

A Jefferson County Circuit judge has upheld an ordinance raising the city’s minimum wage to $9 an hour over the next three years. [WHAS11]

Redefining marriage for the nation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed one another. The 5-4 decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges reverses a Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that upheld state bans of same-sex marriage in Kentucky, Ohio, Michigan and Tennessee. Lower courts in all four states had struck down the bans as unconstitutional. [H-L]

Union workers at Appliance Park are getting ready to vote on a new contract. [WLKY]

Paleontologists in South Africa have announced the name for a new dinosaur species, but they didn’t have to do any digging to find the creature’s bones. [HuffPo]

A young woman was killed after a hit-and-run at 26th Street and Broadway, and the 19-year-old’s family members said they are begging for answers and justice. [WAVE3]

North Carolina and Tennessee are the latest states to side with telecoms, which have long lobbied against allowing cities to become Internet providers. [ProPublica]

Twelve years after first meeting and almost four years after being engaged, Tadd Roberts and Benjamin Moore on Friday became the first same-sex couple to be legally married in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. President Barack Obama said on Friday that for too long Americans have been “blind” to the “unique mayhem” caused by gun violence in this country. [Reuters]

Emptier words have never been spoken. Wiederwohl stresses the importance of transparency in public sector. [Business First]

Fired by the New Albany Merit Commission for conduct unbecoming an officer, Laura Schook is claiming two of the board members who voted to terminate her are serving illegally based on city ordinance. [News & Tribune]

Council Holding Fischer Accountable

A bipartisan group of Louisville Metro Council members wants more information about how Mayor Greg Fischer nominates people to scores of city boards and commissions. But not David Yates — he cowardly removed his name as a sponsor. [WDRB]

How do people even have kids knowing this crap can happen? Too terrifying to think about. [C-J/AKN]

For the first time the public is seeing a second incident where a school resource officer appears to punch a middle school student. [WHAS11]

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is calling for a 140-mile extension of the Mountain Parkway from Prestonsburg to Beckley, W.Va., at a cost of $8 billion to $10 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood that left one man hospitalized. [WLKY]

College graduates, brace yourselves for some disappointing news. Wages for university grads are 2.5 percent lower than what they were 15 years ago, according to the latest edition of the Economic Policy Institute’s annual report on the labor market prospects of new workers. [HuffPo]

A New Albany councilman referred to a colleague as a “lying piece of (expletive)” during a debate over public prayer on Monday. Councilman Dan Coffey made the comment into an open microphone, yet denied using the curse word during a brief, tense interview after the meeting. [WAVE3]

On Wednesday, when President Barack Obama spoke at the US Coast Guard Academy’s commencement ceremony, he called climate change “an immediate risk to our national security.” In recent months, the Obama administration has repeatedly highlighted the international threats posed by global warming and has emphasized the need for the country’s national security agencies to study and confront the issue. [Mother Jones]

The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced more than $54 million in grant funds to clean up contaminated brownfields sites around the country, and one of the projects getting funding is in Louisville. [WFPL]

The lawyer for the man who alleges that Ahmed Zayat has not paid a $2 million gambling debt filed a $10 million libel suit on Monday against Zayat, the owner of American Pharoah. [NY Times]

Cecilia Henderson, the 71-year-old widow of Angel’s Envy bourbon creator Lincoln Henderson, is suing her son, saying that Wesley Henderson has “effectively stolen” her share of proceeds from a recent sale to Bacardi Ltd. [Business First]

A community that successfully addresses homelessness is a united one, according to Michael Stoops, the director of community organizing at the National Coalition for the Homeless. [News & Tribune]

Brosko & Robinson Finally Showed Up

Wondering what’s wrong with Greg Fischer’s administration?

Sure, I’ll foam at the mouth about Greg Fischer and Metro Animal Services again.

Here’s something we’ve been telling you for a year:

From WAVE3’s Theo Keith:

Two senior Animal Services staffers, Margaret Brosko and Donald Robinson, received new jobs within the administration despite the issues under their watch. Brosko is now a spokeswoman for Fischer, while Robinson is an assistant director at Develop Louisville, the city’s land development arm.

Both admitted to procedural mistakes Monday while denying more troubling allegations.

“To be completely honest, this has been really difficult because there’s not a day that goes (by) when I worked at Metro Animal Services that I didn’t think, ‘What can I do tomorrow to save one more dog,'” Brosko said, becoming emotional in front of the committee.


Hesen would not definitively say whether Brosko or Robinson had to apply for their new positions within the administration. Both received only minimal pay increases with their new roles, city payroll records indicate.

They got their promotions as a way to get them out of Animal Services, a way to make them more high-profile, a way to keep them quiet. That’s how the Greg Fischer world works and the city is beginning to wake up to that reality.

But if you watched yesterday’s Animal Services ad hoc meeting at Metro Council, you were probably more than awake. You were most likely outraged.

Watching Margaret Brosko repeatedly refuse to directly answer questions while claiming she did everything possible to provide care for Sadie was rage-inducing. Even when she was called on the carpet by every council member present.

When Donald Robinson was called out for lying about when authorization for care was provided, he passed the buck and blamed the victim, Heather Adkins. Then he started blaming someone new — Amanda Crook, one of the most beloved employees of Metro Animal Services and the current employee of the month.

What took the cake was Ellen Hesen throwing out the agency’s fabricated live release rate — which still can’t be verified (because it’s made up). She continued to claim this was all just “semantics”, as Greg Fischer used in the now-infamous press release and Kelly Downard ripped her a new one. Downard told her Council wouldn’t stop investigating just because she told them to and reminded her of every hypocrisy he could muster in the moment.

Hesen’s testimony was so absurd that Kevin Kramer’s blood pressure was likely at a dangerous level. Kramer took the opportunity to remind Hesen that the mayor hasn’t issued a public apology to Heather Adkins, which he was supposed to acknowledge when also apologizing for the use of the term “semantics.” He gave Hesen the opportunity to apologize yesterday but she continued to pass the buck, blaming the people who tried to hold Margaret Brosko and Donald Robinson accountable. It’s as if Hesen knows it’s okay to spew nonsense because she’s close to locking in her retirement. Integrity be damned.

Kellie Watson, the mayor’s embarrassingly bad attorney, claimed that the Council had received all emails that were outstanding. What she once claimed couldn’t be released because the documents were part of the Public Integrity Unit’s faux investigation? She now says don’t exist. Though, Councilman Kramer pointed out that they have evidence those emails do actually exist.

It was a real shit show. Fischer’s people finally showed up but didn’t answer questions.

Here’s what you really want to see — the video:


Watch all 1hr 44min of it. It’s worth it. Particularly if you want a glimpse of a train wreck.

More thoughts about Brosko and Robinson…

Something tells us they didn’t apply for their jobs, otherwise Brosko wouldn’t have had to ask Kellie Watson how to answer the question — she’d remember applying.

Amanda Crook’s mother is going to eat these people alive as a result of Robinson’s claims. Amanda is afraid to say anything because she fears losing her job and losing access to help animals in need. And you know Sadiqa Reynolds will shut her out in a heartbeat because she’s done it over and over.

Brosko claims she constantly worries about the animals and tries to do everything she can to save them. Which must be why she adopted a Pit to impress her former girlfriend, only to return it to LMAS a few short weeks later. Yep, there’s documentation to back this up:




Margaret “fostered” the dog on December 11, 2013, despite it never leaving Manslick. On December 14, 2013, her girlfriend, Tiffany, adopted the dog. She returned it the very next day.

And what about the dog Angie Fenton (she gave me permission last year to use her name but I’ve chosen not to until now) tried like crazy to adopt? Only to be blown off by Margaret? Remember Hadley? The one that just disappeared? The one Margaret claims was sent to Ohio? The dog LMAS sources tell us was euthanized and incinerated.


So let’s quit it with this story of caring about animals. It’s just not based in reality.

Note: Theo Keith is the only mainstreamer who has had the guts to question the Fischer Administration throughout this mess. He ought to be commended.

Update: Spare me the bitching & moaning, Fischer folks. This is clearly a personal rant.

ANOTHER UPDATE: For anyone interested, you may contact me to get a copy of the Public Integrity Unit file that was just made available or try accessing the records here.

FINAL UPDATE: Yes, we’ll do a highlight video clip of the hearing and try to run it this week. Once the rage subsides.