Jim Ramsey-UofL Funtimes Just Won’t Quit, Now Involves Fun Foundation Construction Shenanigans

What this story doesn’t tell you is that one guy is paying for everything out of his own pocket. That means he’s making massive campaign contributions to Trump in violation of FEC limits. [WDRB]

James Ramsey, who was forced to resign last month as president of the University of Louisville, apparently plans to stay awhile at its foundation, where he is still president. The foundation is constructing new offices at its building at 215 Central Ave., for Ramsey and Kathleen Smith, his chief of staff, according to a university official and several tradesmen who were busy working Friday on the space. [C-J/AKN]

Surprise! TARC is making cuts/alterations/changing routes again. Just what Compassionate Possibility City needs – more (bad) transportation changes for the working poor. [WHAS11]

We’ve been yelling about it for years and here you go. Many people in Lexington who see doctors at University of Kentucky HealthCare write checks to the Kentucky Medical Services Foundation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Muhammad Ali tribute hanging at Spalding University has disappeared. [WLKY]

The Justice Department plans to stop using privately run prisons that typically house undocumented federal inmates following a report finding they are less safe than those that are federally run, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates said Thursday. [HuffPo]

A man was arrested after a three-hour standoff with police in the Shawnee neighborhood Saturday afternoon. [WAVE3]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 8 percentage points among likely voters, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Friday. [Reuters]

Over the past decade, the news about Kentucky’s coal industry has been reliably bad. The latest numbers show the state is mining the smallest amount of coal since about 1934, and there are fewer coal miners employed here than anytime in the 20th century. [WFPL]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has made a direct appeal to African-American voters, saying “What do you have to lose?” [BBC]

University of Louisville Hospital is back in compliance after concerns were raised about patient safety. [Business First]

The Tri-County Health Coalition, based in New Albany, has opened its doors to homeless community members to come in and cool off in the summer heat. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City Loves It Some Gun Violence

The Louisville Metro Planning Commission has stopped reviewing “conservation subdivisions” in Jefferson County while it looks into whether regulations approved in 2008 achieve a goal of saving green space. [WDRB]

Responding to public concerns about lead in public drinking water supplies, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has created a work group to review existing government regulations or practices and potentially make recommendations for changes. But the agency that created the work group, which includes a variety of public officials, intends to exclude the general public – potentially violating the state open meetings law. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police confirm that one woman has died and two men are injured after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey Calvin Borel, a three-time winner of the Kentucky Derby, has informed his agent, Larry Melancon, that he is retiring effective immediately. [H-L]

A bill giving death benefits to families of EMS workers killed in the line of duty has been signed into law by the governor. [WLKY]

The biggest question of the political season is whether Donald Trump will get enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination before the convention. Prediction markets, which allow people to bet on future events using real money, estimate an average 61 precent chance of a contested Republican convention with two or more votes required. The chance Trump will fail to get to the required 1,237 delegates before the convention, they estimate, is 69 percent. [HuffPo]

A man was shot in front of a Louisville clothing store on Saturday over a pair of new athletic shoes, Louisville Metro Police said. [WAVE3]

From late Friday Afternoon… “The governor’s unilateral action in cutting the appropriated funding of colleges, universities and community colleges was outside of his authority. The law on budget reductions is straightforward. It requires a declared shortfall that does not exist. If it did, the last budget bill that was passed and signed into law dictates the steps that must be taken. We are therefore requesting the governor withdrawal his order. We are confident he will comply.” [Attorney General Andy Beshear]

This could be one of the dumbest moves from JCPS yet and Allison Martin isn’t helping matters. Jefferson County Public School officials are declining to discuss gang activity in local schools with a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from the United States has proved popular from the beginning. When he first articulated it following the Paris terrorist attacks in November, he surged in the polls and hasn’t slumped since. And while progressives might want to believe the appeal of Trump’s divisive idea is limited to a small subset of conservatives, a new poll indicates Islamophobia actually runs deep across the spectrum of the American electorate. [ThinkProgress]

A legal dispute between the four daughters of late Louisville real estate developer Al J. Schneider focuses on a belief by two of those daughters that the trustees for the estate want to quickly liquidate the company’s millions in real estate assets — to a point that beneficiaries would not receive the fair value for those properties. [Business First]

While Clarksville continues to focus on revitalizing the community through extensive development and redevelopment efforts, the town is making plans to ensure proper infrastructure is in place to improve conditions and handle growth. [News & Tribune]

Brown Gave Master Class In Throwing Shade

Community activist Angela Newby-Bouggess has died. [WDRB]

Nearly 500 sexual assault kits that would have continued to sit untested in the Louisville Metro Police property room will now be sent for lab testing after a shift in LMPD philosophy. The department is sending 1,386 untested rape kits to Kentucky State Police for testing – 463 more than originally intended. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “We have to start opening our eyes and reconciling the fact that these things happened,” says Attorney Larry Wilder, a statement he has repeated since October when his client’s book Breaking Cardinal Rules hit store shelves. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission has dedicated 88 acres to an existing preserve in Pulaski County. [H-L]

Another day, another fun pedestrian accident in Possibility Compassionate City! [WLKY]

The White House has narrowed its search for a Supreme Court nominee to three federal appeals court judges, Sri Srinivasan, Merrick Garland and Paul Watford, a source familiar with the selection process said on Friday. [HuffPo]

If she can do it, you can do it. One year after her story went viral, Asia Ford returned to the Rodes City Run 10K Saturday. [WAVE3]

Obama Administration transparency is a lot like Fischer Administration transparency. It’s not a real thing. Two years ago last month, I filed a public-records request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency as part of my reporting into the flawed response to Hurricane Sandy. Then, I waited. [ProPublica]

Kelly Downard has apparently turned into all bark and no bite. No clue what happened to him but he’s been entirely neutered. [WFPL]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A pair of sisters is opening a barber shop that will be a little different than most others. [Business First]

Two contracts up for a vote in April got some scrutiny by the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s board of trustees work session Monday. [News & Tribune]

There Are Now Daily Scandals At UofL

We hear this racial tension stems from a small number of bigoted white people who obviously come from horribly backward families. But the University of Louisville didn’t send out an email or issue a statement until AFTER the media and members of the local legal community started poking around. [WDRB]

More than one-fourth of Louisville roads are considered in poor condition or worse and it will cost about $110 million to fully rehabilitate those thousands of miles, according to a Metro Public Works report provided to Mayor Greg Fischer last year. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! According to WHAS11’s news partner The Courier Journal, a University of Louisville trustee is requesting personal records from Charlie Strong, a former U of L football coach, in connection with his divorce proceedings. [WHAS11]

Spending and programs at Kentucky’s 15 Area Development Districts would face more scrutiny and financial reporting under a bill filed Friday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Apparently, everybody is freaking out because a car smashed into a pizza joint on Bardstown Road. [WLKY]

If shame is the only real tool that President Barack Obama has to force the U.S. Senate to consider a Supreme Court nomination in his final year, let the shames begin. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) declared over the weekend — within hours of the news that Justice Antonin Scalia had died — that the Senate should not even hold hearings on a replacement. [HuffPo]

A discussion on the Louisville downtown civil rights demonstrations was held Sunday in honor of Black History month. [WAVE3]

Churchill Downs Racetrack [yester]today announced a multi-year agreement with Fanatics, the largest retailer of officially licensed sports merchandise, to exclusively operate both online and on-site retail for the Kentucky Derby race weekend, starting with the 2016 event. [Press Release]

A surplus spending plan backed by Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is being held up in a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

In 1992, Bill Clinton ran for president promising to “end welfare as we know it.” In 2016, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders should promise to bring welfare back. [NY Magazine]

Three former local Kroger Co. employees have filed a class-action lawsuit against the Cincinnati-based supermarket giant, claiming it failed to pay them for overtime work. [Business First]

Clark County is gearing up for the 2016 primary election by fine-tuning some of the processes for getting out absentee ballots and deciding how many total ballots will be needed. [News & Tribune]

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School Board Made Anti-Transparency Move, Horne & Jones The Ringleaders

On Thursday, February 11th, there will be an Open Records Training Session for members of the Metro Council and their staff in Council Chambers beginning at 12:30pm. This session will be for informational and instructional purposes only and will update any changes in the Open Records Law of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It will also cover Metro Government Guidelines for Social Media. [Press Release]

Surprise! David Jones, Stephanie Horne and crew want to stifle open discussion of issues at Jefferson County Board of Education meetings. [WDRB]

The agency that Metropolitan Sewer District Executive Director Tony Parrott led in Cincinnati before coming to Louisville is going to get a state audit following a Gannett newspaper’s investigation of its finances. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting here in Compassionate City! This time it was a postal worker in the West End. [WHAS11]

Less than a week after Rand Paul ended his presidential campaign, some of the Kentucky senator’s top supporters in the state legislature have backed Marco Rubio ahead of the state’s Republican presidential caucus next month. [H-L]

What a fun day of shooting yesterday turned out to be. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton is concerned for the future of women’s reproductive rights. [HuffPo]

A new mayor was elected in Shepherdsville, hours after the former mayor resigned. [WAVE3]

Jefferson County Public Schools superintendet Donna Hargens wants authority to hire principals without Site-Based Decision-Making council input. But we discovered Hargens has a terrible track record of hiring the worst of the worst when there’s no SBDM accountability. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Federal officials say Kentucky could have to return more than $57 million in unused grant money because of Republican Gov. Matt Bevin’s decision to dismantle kynect. [WFPL]

Much has been said about the dangers of oil trains following several high-profile accidents, including a fiery 2013 crash in Quebec that killed 50 people. Now a report from Greenpeace points to another potential hazard that could be even deadlier: chlorine trains. [Click the Clicky]

Louisville-based Al J. Schneider Co. has hired Louisville real estate firm CBRE Group Inc. of Louisville to assess the possible sale of its downtown Louisville office properties, which includes the 25-story Waterfront Plaza and One Riverfront Plaza on Main Street. [Business First]

River Valley Middle School eighth-graders got a close look Friday at what careers in STEM fields could look like. [News & Tribune]

All This Snow Makes Day Drinking OK

WDRB is apparently still freaking out over kids misbehaving on school buses. [WDRB]

Brown-Forman Corporation has received an initial go-ahead from city regulators to start major work on its Old Forester Distillery and visitors experience project at 117-119 W. Main St. [C-J/AKN]

We’d tell you what WHAS11 was freaking out about but their website was down all day. And their crotchety old twitter people have us blocked, unlike every other media outlet in town, because they probably can’t take jokes. Even WDRB knows how to take a joke. Eric Flack can take a joke. Can you imagine? It’s the most hilarious thing since A Kentucky Newspaper started blocking our websites due to criticism of its atrocious Felner coverage. [Deep WHAS11 Funtimes]

Preliminary estimates from a consulting firm hired by the city show the cost will be $175 to $200 million to build a fiber-optic network to increase sluggish Internet speeds and expand Internet access in Fayette County. [H-L]

SNOOOOOOOOOWWWWWPOOOOOOCALYYYYYYYYYPSEEEEEEEEE! [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), still disappointed at being left off the main stage at last week’s GOP presidential debate, expressed disapproval of polling criteria during a campaign stop at a barbershop on Monday afternoon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police confirmed Wednesday that remains found in Oldham County were those of a UPS pilot missing since May. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder of what Julie Raque Adams has been doing to poor women in Kentucky. While she flits about Frankfort talking about how great she is for wealthy, Republican women? Poor people are suffering as a direct consequense of her imposing her antiquated religious beliefs on the Commonwealth. [Page One]

Police departments across Kentucky began outfitting officers with body cameras last year, but don’t expect state troopers to join their ranks anytime soon. [WFPL]

For years there have been calls for more transparency in Kentucky’s retirement systems, especially the system for lawmakers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republic Bancorp Inc. CEO Steve Trager has just gained control of an additional 671,808 shares of the bank-holding company’s stock, according to a Jan. 8 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. [Business First]

Cheaper cigarettes are the lure for people in Illinois who cross the Wabash River to visit the Smoker Friendly tobacco outlets in Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Donna Hargens Is Now In Meltdown Mode

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Donna Hargens is right when she says Jefferson County Public Schools are not in a crisis. She’s in a crisis. Of her own making. [WDRB]

When the Ohio River Bridges Project and Spaghetti Junction were redesigned in 2011 to trim $1.5 billion from the project budget, Louisville waterfront officials lost a chance to add up to 40 acres to Waterfront Park, widely viewed as a community gateway. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Jefferson County Public Schools approved a measure Monday evening that will have more students college and career ready. [WHAS11]

Kentucky legislators, who often call for greater transparency from the struggling state employee pension system, keep their own retirement accounts in a much better-financed system that publicly offers no information about itself. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two murders in four days. It was the deadliest weekend in recent memory, in what police say has been the deadliest year in the city since 1979. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry hailed the newly passed international climate change agreement as a major achievement that could help turn the tide on global warming, but got a quick reminder that Republicans will fight it all the way. So of course Mitch McConnell lost his mind. [HuffPo]

In it’s seventh year, Big Momma’s Soul Kitchen is worried they may not be able to keep up their annual tradition of free Christmas dinner for hundreds in Louisville. [WAVE3]

“Facts matter, science matters, data matters. That’s what this hearing is about.” That’s how Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), the chairman of the Senate’s Subcommittee on Space, Science, and Competitiveness, began a Monday hearing he called about the reality of human-caused climate change. Cruz — who is also running for president — does not believe that human-caused climate change is real, which he made clear at Monday’s hearing. He did not make it clear that 97 percent of climate scientists disagree with him, but such is life in the U.S. Senate, where 70 percent of Republicans largely side with Cruz. [ThinkProgress]

Recently, I spent a week in Germany studying the country’s energy transition. Elected officials and businesses there have committed the country to aggressive renewable energy goals during the past couple decades; meanwhile, they’ve also mandated phase-outs for nuclear and coal-fired power plants. [WFPL]

Looking to improve Medicaid managed care for all Kentuckians, House Speaker Greg Stumbo pre-filed legislation that would end unnecessary delays in Medicaid payments to healthcare providers and recipients while setting a baseline limit on how much money must be spent on care on Friday. [Floyd County Times]

Yum! Brands Inc. CEO Greg Creed said he wasn’t shocked by yesterday’s downgrade from Standard & Poor’s Rating Service that cut his company’s debt rating to junk status. [Business First]

The Jeffersonville City Council At-large race recount is on a temporary hiatus. The recount, which started Saturday around 9:30 a.m., was put on halt around 5 p.m. after four of the 30 precincts had been counted, said Larry Wilder, attorney for the Republican candidates. [News & Tribune]

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