What Shade Will Anchorage Throw Next?

Louisville Metro Police arrested a man and charged him with murder but some of the suspect’s friends say he shouldn’t have been charged at all. [WDRB]

A judge has thrown out a lawsuit by the city of Anchorage against Bellewood Presbyterian Home for Children, rejecting the small city’s effort to block the center from accepting youths officials deem too dangerous for the neighborhood. Imagine that. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS students have just three more days of summer break, and on August 8 the Louisville Urban League hosted a summit to get students excited to get back to the classroom. [WHAS11]

In April 2005, President George W. Bush hailed “clean coal” as a key to “greater energy independence,” pledging $2 billion in research funds that promised a new golden age for America’s most abundant energy resource. [H-L]

Apparently, “middle town” is a place now. Louisville Metro Bomb Squad say a suspicious package left at a Target department store in middle town was a false alarm. [WLKY]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich drew applause during Thursday’s Republican presidential debate for saying that he accepted gay marriage even though it was counter to his “traditional” views. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police officers who shot and killed an 18-year-old who was wielding a knife were carrying Tasers, prompting some people to wonder why they didn’t try using them first. [WAVE3]

A majority of Americans, white and black, believe that more needs to be done to fight racism in the United States, following a year of protests over the treatment of minorities by police, according to a Pew Research Center survey released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Jefferson County Public Schools administrators are recommending no property tax rate increase for the 2015-16 fiscal year, the school district announced Friday. [WFPL]

After thinking about it overnight, Republican candidate for state auditor Mike Harmon announced Thursday Jesse Benton will cut ties to Harmon’s campaign. [Ronnie Ellis]

Retailers and bars can now buy Jim Beam bourbon by the barrel. The new sales program started in July. Clermont, Ky.-based Jim Beam is owned by Beam Suntory Inc., a Japanese company that has its U.S. headquarters in Deerfield, Ill. This isn’t the parent company’s first run at a by-the-barrel sales program. It’s been selling Knob Creek this way since 2011. [Business First]

Members of the Floyd County Council held a work session Monday afternoon to ask questions, and have some answered, concerning the formation of a Regional Development Authority. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Short-Term Rental Cat Fight Takes Shape

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Leaders with Louisville Metro Council are asking for additional input while they work out details of an ordinance aimed at creating more regulatory oversight in the short term housing market. You should at least have to live in the homes you’re renting out like a hotel. [WDRB]

Another guy without a gun was shot and killed by police officers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Stop signs will soon be placed at a railroad crossing where two people were seriously injured this week in Buechel on Crawford Ave. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Department of Education is seeking public feedback on dozens of proposed social studies standards. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two years after Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis was killed in the line of duty, police continue to investigate. [WLKY]

Bloomberg Philanthropies on Wednesday announced the first eight cities it has selected to participate in a new pilot program to improve life in America’s cities. Chattanooga, Tennessee; Louisville, Kentucky; Kansas City, Missouri; Mesa, Arizona; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Jackson, Mississippi; Seattle and New Orleans will be the first to benefit from the What Works Cities Initiative. The project intends to spend $42 million over three years to help U.S. cities address issues like economic development, public health, crime and transportation. [HuffPo]

The developers tasked with rehabbing the iconic 800 Building in downtown Louisville want the taxpayers to help foot the bill. Now, that is a step closer to happening. [WAVE3]

In the early morning hours of June 30, 1995, a fire sparked to life in Kristine Bunch’s mobile home. It fanned out across the floor and climbed up the walls, then formed an impassable barrier across the middle of the trailer. Bunch, 21, snapped awake in the living room. Her three-year-old son, Tony, shrieked for her on the other side of the flames. [Mother Jones]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Later this month, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will escape for a family retreat to mourn his late son, Beau, but also to mull, as his dying son urged him to do, a campaign for president. Some of Mr. Biden’s friends and allies worry that he will decide it is a good idea. [NY Times]

Greater Louisville Inc. has named Deana Epperly Karem vice president of economic development. Karem is the current executive director of the Oldham County Chamber and Economic Development. She’ll start work at GLI on Sept. 1. [Business First]

When Floyd County Solid Waste Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley receives a complaint about the two mobile recycling sites that were closed recently due to budget cuts, she refers them to the people who ordered the reductions. [News & Tribune]

People Dying & You’re Mad Over A Lion

Told ya Jack’s probably gonna win. Conway, the Democratic nominee, leads Bevin 45 percent to 42 percent, with 13 percent of voters undecided. Curtis polled at 8 percent, leaving Conway with 43 percent and Bevin with 38 percent. [H-L]

An investigation by the Louisville Fire Department found GE could have done more to prevent a fire that destroyed a building at Appliance Park, but company officials say investigators are wrong and they have the video to prove it. [WDRB]

Fire investigators have blamed the total loss of a General Electric warehouse on outdated Appliance Park equipment that failed when fire crews rushed to the scene April 3. [C-J/AKN]

A shooting just before midnight has sent a victim to the hospital, only hours after fatal shooting in the same area. [WHAS11]

A lawsuit filed in federal court in California against Maker’s Mark Distillery was dismissed on Monday. The plaintiffs had alleged that they were mislead by the premium bourbon’s claims on the label to be “handmade” but U.S. District Judge John A. Houston found that the claim “cannot reasonably be interpreted as meaning literally by hand nor that a reasonable consumer would understand the term to mean no equipment or automated process was used to manufacture the whisky.” [H-L]

Metro police are investigating a stabbing at a south Louisville bar. But everything is puppies and rainbows in Possibility City. [WLKY]

There’s a simple, popular solution that Republican leaders in Congress could grab hold of to get themselves out of their embarrassing public fight over the highway bill, and President Barack Obama could help force them to do it. [HuffPo]

Louisville officials spent at least $2.5 million on additional security measures after a night of mob violence rocked the city in 2014, according to records obtained by WAVE 3 News. [WHAS11]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Rowan County has thrown bigoted hypocrite Kim Davis to the wolves. [WFPL]

In the US, poverty, deprivation and exploitation draw thousands of its own children down into a dark underworld that offers few ways out. [BBC]

United Parcel Service Inc. says it’s already working closely with retail customers on planning for this year’s peak season — even though there are indications of a softer shipping season this year. [Business First]

As statewide numbers showed a climbing trend, school districts in Clark and Floyd counties also realized an increase of children living in poverty. [News & Tribune]

Hide That Medicare Bit Behind Fire Coverage

General Electric Co. will no longer provide supplemental Medicare plans to about 130,000 former hourly workers and their spouses across the country — the latest in a series of moves aimed at cutting the company’s expenses for retiree benefits. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board on Monday made final a rate increase of 5.5 percent, starting Aug. 1, and approved the salary and compensation package for its incoming executive director. [C-J/AKN]

The Downtown Development Review Overlay committee, or DDRO, voted on Wednesday, July 29, to approve the Omni design plan. [WHAS11]

Humana Inc. on Wednesday reported second-quarter earnings of $431 million. [H-L]

Nearly four months after the fire at GE’s Appliance Park, fire officials release the results from the investigation into what went wrong. GE disputes the findings. Maj. Henry Ott said the company is ‘”cherry picking” facts to protect its interests. [WLKY]

After the Republican Party took a drubbing at the polls on Election Day 2012, RNC Chairman Reince Priebus ordered an autopsy. The party, the coroner’s report found a few months later, had alienated women and minorities and came off as plutocratic. [HuffPo]

After several tense exchanges between Kentucky’s candidates for governor, Republican Matt Bevin during a media interview accused a WAVE 3 News reporter of working for his rival. [WAVE3]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Tuesday named Gabriel Fritz to be the new director of the Office of Housing and Community Development, an appointment that comes as the city prioritizes its affordable housing needs. Here’s hoping he isn’t scandal-ridden. [WFPL]

There weren’t many substantive insights drawn from Monday’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway before a Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Business Summit crowd. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro Council is planning to hold two public hearings on the creation of special taxing districts to give financial help to two projects. [Business First]

The city has the discretion to release the full disciplinary record of fired New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook and is not required to provide the documents by law, Indiana Public Access Counselor Luke Britt stated in an advisory opinion issued Monday at the request of the News and Tribune. [News & Tribune]

Even Bill Lamb Calls Letter Absurd

Conservative Bill Lamb is causing racist white peoples’ heads to explode. When Bill Lamb is on the same side as Attica Scott when it comes to the FOP’s threatening letter? All hell is gonna break loose. [WDRB]

A joint interim Kentucky legislative committee called Wednesday for updating the rules governing property tax assessments while questioning Jefferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer about whether his office is examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

efferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer appeared Wednesday morning before a legislative panel at Kentucky’s Capitol to explain and defend his office’s valuation practices. [WHAS11]

Pope Francis’ call for urgent action to combat climate change isn’t having much influence on members of Congress from the coal state of Kentucky, who are working this week to block the centerpiece of the president’s agenda to limit the greenhouse gases that are warming the planet. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Council’s budget committee voted to add more than $5 million for road repairs. [WLKY]

Those who believe slavery was not a central point of conflict in the Civil War may wish to peruse the South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi and Texas declarations of secession. Those documents all explicitly cite threats to slavery as reasons for secession. Mississippi’s declaration goes so far as to say that “a blow at slavery is a blow at commerce and civilization.” [HuffPo]

Critics are questioning lawmakers jumping on the anti-confederate bandwagon and the president of the NAACP Kentucky State Conference and Louisville Chapter Raoul Cunningham said he’s just fine with that. [WAVE3]

The old gay Louisville. A writer returns to the city where he was raised—and exiled—to find what was lost when gay life entered the mainstream. [TNR]

The Louisville Metro Tree Commission holds its final meeting this evening and is expected to vote on a draft ordinance that could create a new tree commission and new city policies for tree management. [WFPL]

An overwhelming majority of Americans say they believe protests against unfair government treatment make the United States a better country. Unless, that is, the protesters are black. [WaPo]

For Tim Gramig, a longtime broker Louisville’s commercial real estate market, opportunity has knocked twice this year. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan failed to sign an ordinance calling for certain financial information be provided to the New Albany City Council at the last meeting of each month. In response, the council voted unanimously Thursday to again approve the measure, and thus overrode the pocket veto of Gahan. A pocket veto occurs when an executive takes no action on a bill as opposed to an outright veto of the measure. [News & Tribune]

County Attorney’s Office Sounds Fun

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office has reprimanded a prosecutor and ordered him to go to sensitivity training for making “insensitive and derogatory” comments about the family that owns Hwang’s Martial Arts Academy. [WDRB]

Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer will be called to testify before a Kentucky legislative committee this month over allegations that his office is not physically examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

You might have to dig a little deeper to pay for your college degree as the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is set to vote on a tuition hike Thursday. [WHAS11]

Ahmed Zayat spends big money buying and betting on horses, and brags about how successful he’s been at everything he’s set out to accomplish. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just days into a pilot program for police body cameras, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has gone on the record to address concerns from the public. [WLKY]

The leaders of six of Europe’s largest oil producers are calling for a plan to price planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, citing climate change as “a critical challenge for our world.” [HuffPo]

For the third consecutive year Ford Motor Company says it will shorten the annual summer shutdown at some of its plants in order to meet the demand by consumers for vehicles. [WAVE3]

New York City, Baltimore and other major cities have seen a recent rise in gun violence. The uptick has raised the alarm for many police departments that worry the summer months may make the problem worse. [NPR]

Louisville transportation officials are offering bus passes to young people this summer at a discounted rate. [WFPL]

More than 150 people in southeast Indiana have been diagnosed with HIV, the largest outbreak in state history. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. has completed the sale of its Concentra Inc. subsidiary for $1.06 billion in cash. [Business First]

Section 8 housing voucher system, social security income, food stamps — Kelli Orman wishes she didn’t have to rely on any of these low-income assistance services. [News & Tribune]

JCPS & MSD Want More Of Your Money

The Jefferson County Board of Education may need to seek a 4 percent property tax revenue increase later this summer in order to balance its $1.4 billion budget for the 2015-16 year, according to a tentative budget approved by the board on Monday night. [WDRB]

For the second year in a row, the Metropolitan Sewer District board is looking at a 5.5 percent increase in customers’ rates. [C-J/AKN]

The American Red Cross is hoping you have what it takes to be a hero. Unless you’re gay, then you’re dead to them. [WHAS11]

Jefferson County Public Schools has a budget that’s four times that of the Lexington-Fayette County government. [H-L]

Louisville police are working to identify a woman whose body was pulled from the Ohio River on Tuesday. [WLKY]

North American energy ministers said on Monday they had set up a working group on climate change and energy, a partnership designed to help Canada, the United States and Mexico harmonize policies. [HuffPo]

Terror can he heard in the voices of two women who called 911 and told the operator they were being shot at after leaving a gas station. [WAVE3]

The Distillery Innovation and Excise Tax Reform Act unveiled Tuesday would drop the current tax rate for distilled spirits from $13.50 per proof gallon to $2.70 per proof gallon on the first 10,000 gallons of productions for all distillers and then $9 per proof gallon after that. [The Hill]

A new health ranking of senior citizen health in the U.S. puts Kentucky near the bottom of the list. [WFPL]

One of the most basic facts about the Trans-Pacific Partnership is also the most important: It’s huge. [NPR]

Last week, I wrote about a study that indicated that women-owned businesses in Kentucky were growing more slowly than those in other states. [Business First]

The rows and rows of homemade chocolates nestled behind glass cases at Schimpff’s Confectionery soon will double. [News & Tribune]