Obama Visit Will Snarl Traffic Like Woah

Several Louisville Metro Council members have thrown support behind new legislation aimed at regulating large parties in abandoned buildings. [WDRB]

A national traffic-congestion study ranked Louisville as the 36th worst city in the United States, which will probably come as no surprise to Louisville commuters. It’s also the 128th worst on the international list. [C-J/AKN]

A lawsuit over bullying at Ramsey Middle School is expected to be filed against Jefferson County Public Schools Wednesday. [WHAS11]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday shortened the prison sentences of nearly two dozen drug convicts, including eight serving life in prison, in an act the White House said continues Obama’s push to make the justice system fairer by reducing harsh sentences that were handed down under outdated guidelines. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Way to go, JCPS, way to go. [WLKY]

Taxes are a pain. Health insurance is a pain. This year, Americans will suffer both when they file their income taxes. Ouch. [HuffPo]

The 141st Kentucky Derby isn’t until May 2, but the solid gold winner’s trophy arrived at Churchill Downs on Tuesday. [WAVE3]

No one in Louisville is surprised that Commissioner of Education Terry Holliday is tucking tail and running away. [Page One]

Proposed luxury apartments in Butchertown may get some help from the city. Louisville Metro Council’s Labor and Economic Development Committee signed off on a plan last week that would give a tax break for a new building between Main and Clay streets housing 263 luxury apartments. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court delivered a victory to state health departments on Tuesday, ruling that private Medicaid doctors cannot sue states to raise their reimbursement rates. [The Hill]

The Kentucky International Convention Center at 221 S. Fourth St. will be closing from August 2016 to summer 2018 to accommodate work on its $180 million expansion and renovation. [Business First]

Dr. Jerome Adams, Indiana’s state health commissioner, has a message for individuals potentially affected by the HIV outbreak in Scott County: You aren’t alone, and we can help you. [News & Tribune]

JCPS School Buses: Big, Yellow Accident Magnets

A 5-year-old girl was left alone on a school bus at a Jefferson County Public Schools bus compound Wednesday after she fell asleep and the driver failed to notice her, according to a JCPS spokesman. [WDRB]

The Greg Fischer kiss of death is a real thing and it is alive and well. [C-J/AKN]

Homicide detectives with Louisville Metro Police say they may have discovered additional human remains at a construction site in Lake Louisvilla in far eastern Jefferson County. [WHAS11]

The House and Senate gave final approval to Senate Bill 119, which includes language allowing school districts to waive some of their mandatory 1,062 instructional hours this year because of snow days, if the districts cannot make up the time by June 5. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Attorneys for accused killer and cannibal Joseph Oberhansley want a change of venue in his case. [WLKY]

Two police officers were shot outside the Ferguson Police Department just after midnight Thursday, police and eyewitnesses said. The shootings came during protests following the Ferguson police chief’s resignation on Wednesday afternoon. [HuffPo]

A school bus has been involved in a wreck on Taylor Boulevard and Berry Boulevard. [WAVE3]

Even though the two sides have narrowed their differences, the Democratic-controlled House and Republican-controlled Senate still have no agreement on how to attack the rise in heroin addiction and trafficking. [Ronnie Ellis]

Kitty Head remembers asking one of her adult education students years ago what his plans were for Thanksgiving. The man had been homeless and said he didn’t have any friends or family to spend time with during the holiday. [WFPL]

Of the million or so women who have abortions every year in the U.S., nearly a quarter end their pregnancy using medications. But just as states have been passing a record number of restrictions on surgical abortion, more are trying to limit this option as well. [NPR]

The Waterfront Development Corp. says a now-empty block of land along Witherspoon Street, between Floyd and Preston streets, could someday have a very valuable view, and officials are looking for ideas on what to do with the land. [Business First]

As if the state-level bickering, extended testing times and executive orders weren’t enough, Mother Nature has gotten in on the ISTEP+ slugfest. [News & Tribune]

How Much Time Has He Spent Raising Taxes?

Another day, another JCPS bus accident. They’re almost as plentiful as shootings or pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Can you imagine how much better off Louisville would be if Greg Fischer spent the amount of time he’s spent trying to raise your taxes on holding people like Sadiqa Reynolds accountable? With hours left for the local option sales tax to advance in the state Senate, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made a push Tuesday to rally support for the bill. [C-J/AKN]

A single vote upheld the decision to prevent James Helinger from returning to his post as a Buechel Police Lieutenant. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission will discuss the decline of important natural pollinators like bees and butterflies. The meeting Thursday in Frankfort will be open to the public. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City! One person was rushed to the hospital after an early morning shooting in Okolona. Was apparently a teen who was found shot in the groin. [WLKY]

This man helps American cities hide their homeless populations. His tactics are being put to use in Louisville by Greg Fischer. But no one wants to talk about it because how dare anyone question puppies and rainbows. [HuffPo]

Parents within West Clark Community Schools are voicing concerns over school conditions and overcrowding at Silver Creek High School in Clark County. [WAVE3]

Louisville businessman Hal Heiner leads the crowded race for the Republican party’s nominee for Kentucky’s next governor who would then likely take on Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [WKYT]

John Schnatter’s long-running, multi-generational ties to the University of Louisville just grew $4.64 million deeper. [WFPL]

A new study has found that when transgender young people are allowed to fully identify with their gender and take steps toward transition, it significantly improves their depression and anxiety. [Think Progress]

When Lily DeRosia read about the mandatory overtime and long shifts forced on workers at the Louisville company that makes Girl Scout cookies, she was inspired to try to do something about it. [Business First]

Floyd County is in the process of hiring a public works director. [News & Tribune]

Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Cities Don’t Have So Many Murders

Internal reviews conducted by the Kentucky Department of Education at three of Jefferson County’s lowest performing schools show progress is being made towards improving achievement, but that some changes must still be made. [Toni Konz]

Does anyone really buy into this Fischer transparency schtick anymore? n the wake of criticisms that public officials were deleting electronic messages, Mayor Greg Fischer Monday said that every person serving on a board or commission will be issued an email address to conduct all official government business. [C-J/AKN]

Two of Louisville’s largest employers are urging Kentucky lawmakers to reject Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s push for the state to allow a local option sales tax. [WHAS11]

A move to raise the minimum wage in Kentucky’s largest city has resulted in a lawsuit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another couple of senseless murders in Possibility City. [WLKY]

To Washington insiders he is Dr Evil: the hidden orchestrator of industry campaigns against the Humane Society, Mothers against Drunk Driving, and other seemingly uncontroversial groups. Now Richard Berman, a one-time lobbyist turned industry strategist, has zeroed in on another target: Barack Obama’s new power plant rules. [HuffPo]

What began as a call for help along Interstate 71 ended with police discovering a car crash with a man shot dead inside Wednesday. The shooting forced southbound I-71 closed near the Gene Snyder Freeway for hours impacting travel for hundreds of people. [WAVE3]

Brown-Forman is among 16 organizations across the United States recognized for climate action. [EPA]

The recent revelation that breathalyzer tests are video recorded at the Louisville jail may lead to an influx of filings to re-opened drunk driving cases in the near future. [WFPL]

Wanna dig through Churchill Downs’ quarterly and full year earnings results? [External PDF Link]

The Kentucky Derby Festival unveiled its 2015 Pegasus Pins at an event at Hard Rock Café and it doesn’t suck. [Business First]

Slick, icy roads didn’t stop New Albany residents from packing the Carnegie Center for Art & History to discuss a hot-button issue Saturday. [News & Tribune]

About Having Compassion For The Homeless…

The Jefferson County Board of Education is being asked by its teachers union to hold off extending the contract of Superintendent Donna Hargens to allow time for “stakeholder involvement.” [WDRB]

The animal-rights group PETA is continuing its push for federal regulators to take action against Tim Stark, a Charlestown man who has run the nonprofit organization Wildlife in Need on his property since 1999. [C-J/AKN]

Cracked and dripping ceilings – buckets litter every room. This is how Patrick Christner and Megan Tate have been spending their week post President’s Day snowstorm. [WHAS11]

Last fall, Pike County school board chairman Charles Johnson made a motion for the district to set what’s known as a “compensating” tax rate, which means property taxes would be adjusted to produce the same revenue as the year before. [H-L]

The parents of a toddler who was accidentally killed hope to build a community park in his honor. [WLKY]

The World Food Program is confronting its worst challenge since World War II in trying to tackle five top-level humanitarian crises at the same time, the head of the U.N. agency said Friday. [HuffPo]

A group of firefighters is hoping to spark a movement and inspire warm acts of kindness in the recent cold temperatures. [WAVE3]

When the season’s first cold snap hit in November, Kenneth Winfield arrived at Louisville’s St. John Center for Homeless Men — his hands icy cold after sleeping outdoors. [USA Today]

All eyes are on Kentucky’s state senators to see if they’ll move on the House’s proposed statewide smoking ban. [WFPL]

It was a short week for the Kentucky General Assembly, which canceled three days of meetings because of a severe winter storm. But while the House decided to forgo its scheduled Thursday and Friday meetings, the Senate was in session those two days. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Kentucky Retail Federation, Kentucky Restaurant Association and Louisville-based company Packaging Unlimited have filed a lawsuit that seeks to prevent Louisville from hiking its minimum wage. [Business First]

After weeks of debate and discussion, the Floyd County Election Board got exactly what it wanted. [News & Tribune]