Tolls Will Still Hit Poorest Hardest

Scott County, Indiana, wants its needle exchange program to keep running even after the governor’s executive order expires. [WDRB]

Trinity High officials on Wednesday touted their decision to begin random drug- and alcohol-testing of their 1,200-plus students, saying the move will act as a deterrent and could help keep students from becoming addicted later in life. [C-J/AKN]

Police in Lawrence, Ind. have located a Louisville pizza delivery driver’s car that was stolen May 3. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has approved a plan by Keeneland to move its simulcasting — betting on live horse races run elsewhere — to The Red Mile in Lexington. [H-L]

Officials approved a plan to minimize the effects of bridge tolls on low-income residents. And it won’t do much of that. [WLKY & Press Releases]

About a half-dozen states are considering cutting income taxes and simultaneously increasing sales or excise taxes — sparking debate on whether wealthier taxpayers will benefit disproportionately at the expense of those living on lower incomes. [HuffPo]

Ignore the bit where Connie Leonard snidely uses “Democrat” as an adjective. A lot of taxpayers are up in arms over recent home assessments in Metro Louisville. That’s because in many cases, assessed values jumped much higher than homeowners expected and certain neighborhoods are in more sticker shock than others. [WAVE3]

A federal appeals court panel ruled on Thursday that the NSA’s bulk collection of metadata of phone calls to and from Americans is not authorized by Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act, throwing out the government’s legal justification for the surveillance program exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden nearly two years ago. [The Intercept]

Louisville Metro Council members are scrutinizing new property assessments that, in some neighborhoods, have spiked by as much as 40 or even 150 percent. [WFPL]

Three men campaigning to lead the state of Kentucky faced potential voters Wednesday night in Booth Auditorium at the University of Pikeville. [WYMT]

Over the years, Papa John’s International Inc. has added a few non-pizza foods to its menu, including chicken wings, a giant chocolate chip cookie and, most recently, garlic knots. [Business First]

Democratic incumbent Jeff Gahan defeated challenger David White by almost 700 votes, or 60 percent to 39 percent, in the New Albany mayoral primary Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Can’t Stay Out Of The Dang News

Year-round employees in Jefferson County Public Schools — from central office staff and high school principals to custodians and some secretaries — will be forced to take two unpaid days in the coming school year under a proposal by Superintendent Donna Hargens. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Council’s government accountability committee wants answers about rising home assessments in certain neighborhoods. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police officers should start wearing their body cameras within the next couple months. [WHAS11]

Winter’s full fury arrived late in much of the country, but once it did it was relentless, forcing state transportation agencies to spend more than $1 billion to keep highways safe and passable, according to a first-of-its-kind survey. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man has been indicted in the dragging death of his friend, a crime that has left two families stunned. [WLKY]

This screwed up Louisville story made the national news. [HuffPo]

An August 2, 2016 trial date has been set for a southern Indiana man accused of raping his girlfriend, killing her and then consuming parts of her body. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s two U.S. senators have introduced legislation they say will level the playing field for American bourbon and whiskey producers. [WKYUFM]

People born poor are more likely to stay that way if they live in Jefferson County than if they live in surrounding Bullitt or Oldham counties, according to a recent Harvard study. [WFPL]

In New York City, supporters of public libraries say that respect for — and repair of — the libraries is long, well, overdue. [NPR]

A federal judge in Florida has dismissed a lawsuit that alleges Maker’s Mark is being misleading by calling its product “handmade.” [Business First]

Floyd County Clerk Christy Eurton huddled her staff before the office opened at 8 a.m. Thursday for an important discussion. It wasn’t a talk about next week’s primary election — a task that requires hours of preparation and dedication to successfully and accurately conduct — but rather Eurton attempted to calm her employees about the budget cuts issued by the Floyd County Council the night before. [News & Tribune]

Dan Johnson Got More Egg On His Face

Louisville Metro Council’s public safety committee voted Tuesday to send the implementation of a local needle exchange program to a full council vote. [WDRB]

The Transit Authority of River City plans to cut bus service on several key routes, effective Aug. 16, to save about $1.2 million next fiscal year. [C-J/AKN]

One week before their stories will be shared on the floor of the Supreme Court, half a dozen same-sex couples from Kentucky and their attorneys met to celebrate progress to this point, and what could be a historic decision that changes how marriage is recognized in America. [WHAS11]

Nine people were indicted Tuesday on charges of spiriting away what Kentucky authorities say was more bourbon whiskey than one person could drink in a lifetime. But, uh, we could definitely drink that in a lifetime. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A former Louisville Metro Police Department school resource officer accused of putting a student in a chokehold until he passed out has been indicted on some charges in the case. [WLKY]

You don’t have to stop recording police when they’re out and about in public. [HuffPo]

A controversial proposal to merge Louisville’s city and suburban fire departments is likely dead after its only sponsor took his name off the legislation. Way to go, Dan Johnston, you’re a shining star of intelligence these days. [WAVE3]

Detroit just had the single largest tax foreclosure in American history. As many as 100,000 of the city’s residents — about a seventh of the total number — are now on track for what many are calling an eviction “conveyer belt.” [Mother Jones]

The local health department in the Southern Indiana community battling an HIV outbreak has handed out thousands of needles to residents since an exchange program went into effect April 4. [WFPL]

You don’t understand the world you live in if you haven’t read Eric Lipton’s three-part series in the New York Times on the staggering “explosion” of relentless, grimy lobbying of state attorneys general. Lipton just won a Pulitzer Prize for his work, and it’s truly deserved: it’s a masterpiece of investigative reporting, built on diligent use of open records laws by Lipton and Times researchers. [The Intercept]

First Savings Bank might consolidate some of its operations and move its headquarters from Clarksville to Jeffersonville. [Business First]

To Austin High School Principal Sherman Smith, it’s just bullying on a bigger stage. [News & Tribune]

Growing Rift Between Fischer & Reality

Par for the course with Greg Fischer: neglect until it’s time to tear them down. Three buildings on the site of an Omni hotel planned in downtown Louisville will be razed after engineers determined they pose “imminent safety concerns,” Louisville Metro government said Thursday. [WDRB]

Six months after retiring as Clark County sheriff and agreeing to plead guilty to two counts of making false statements to FBI, Danny Rodden signed a new plea agreement this week that calls for dropping a charge that he counseled the destruction of evidence to cover up an encounter with a prostitute. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police are crediting a man with saving a baby from a potentially dangerous situation over Easter weekend. That baby was found abandoned in the middle of the street in downtown Louisville. [WHAS11]

Venturing into the epicenter of Kentucky’s fight against heroin addiction, national drug czar Michael Botticelli on Thursday touted needle-exchange programs as effective grassroots initiatives to combat the spread of infectious disease and to steer heroin users into treatment. [H-L]

As Louisville’s murder rate continues to climb, local groups continue efforts to stem the violence in the community. [WLKY]

Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential campaign will center on boosting economic security for the middle class and expanding opportunities for working families, while casting the former senator and secretary of state as a “tenacious fighter” able to get results, two senior advisers said Saturday. President Barack Obama all but endorsed her, saying “I think she would be an excellent president.” [HuffPo]

Louisville residents who live east of Interstate 65 inside the Watterson Expressway might see a jump in property taxes due to new assessments. One person who won’t is Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, whose home assessment dropped from $1.7 million $1.5 million, about a 12 percent dip. [WAVE3]

General Electric Co will shed most of its finance unit and return as much as $90 billion to shareholders as it becomes a “simpler” industrial business instead of an unwieldy hybrid of banking and manufacturing. [Reuters]

An expansive, multi-modal transportation plan is still in the works for Louisville, despite recent delays. [WFPL]

Seattle restaurant data demolishes wingnut arguments against a $15 minimum wage. [Think Progress]

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear has to be piling up the frequent flier miles these days. After an economic development trip to Japan late last year and a trip to Europe in early February, where he courted automakers in Germany and Sweden, Beshear announced Friday that he will return to Asia. [Business First]

New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook’s pay and benefits will remain suspended until her May hearing appealing a decision to fire her from the department. [News & Tribune]

If you missed it last week, the now former embattled Montgomery County Schools superintendent was fired with a list of sixteen pages of charges read against him. [Page One & More Page One]

Obama Visit Will Snarl Traffic Like Woah

Several Louisville Metro Council members have thrown support behind new legislation aimed at regulating large parties in abandoned buildings. [WDRB]

A national traffic-congestion study ranked Louisville as the 36th worst city in the United States, which will probably come as no surprise to Louisville commuters. It’s also the 128th worst on the international list. [C-J/AKN]

A lawsuit over bullying at Ramsey Middle School is expected to be filed against Jefferson County Public Schools Wednesday. [WHAS11]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday shortened the prison sentences of nearly two dozen drug convicts, including eight serving life in prison, in an act the White House said continues Obama’s push to make the justice system fairer by reducing harsh sentences that were handed down under outdated guidelines. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Way to go, JCPS, way to go. [WLKY]

Taxes are a pain. Health insurance is a pain. This year, Americans will suffer both when they file their income taxes. Ouch. [HuffPo]

The 141st Kentucky Derby isn’t until May 2, but the solid gold winner’s trophy arrived at Churchill Downs on Tuesday. [WAVE3]

No one in Louisville is surprised that Commissioner of Education Terry Holliday is tucking tail and running away. [Page One]

Proposed luxury apartments in Butchertown may get some help from the city. Louisville Metro Council’s Labor and Economic Development Committee signed off on a plan last week that would give a tax break for a new building between Main and Clay streets housing 263 luxury apartments. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court delivered a victory to state health departments on Tuesday, ruling that private Medicaid doctors cannot sue states to raise their reimbursement rates. [The Hill]

The Kentucky International Convention Center at 221 S. Fourth St. will be closing from August 2016 to summer 2018 to accommodate work on its $180 million expansion and renovation. [Business First]

Dr. Jerome Adams, Indiana’s state health commissioner, has a message for individuals potentially affected by the HIV outbreak in Scott County: You aren’t alone, and we can help you. [News & Tribune]

JCPS School Buses: Big, Yellow Accident Magnets

A 5-year-old girl was left alone on a school bus at a Jefferson County Public Schools bus compound Wednesday after she fell asleep and the driver failed to notice her, according to a JCPS spokesman. [WDRB]

The Greg Fischer kiss of death is a real thing and it is alive and well. [C-J/AKN]

Homicide detectives with Louisville Metro Police say they may have discovered additional human remains at a construction site in Lake Louisvilla in far eastern Jefferson County. [WHAS11]

The House and Senate gave final approval to Senate Bill 119, which includes language allowing school districts to waive some of their mandatory 1,062 instructional hours this year because of snow days, if the districts cannot make up the time by June 5. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Attorneys for accused killer and cannibal Joseph Oberhansley want a change of venue in his case. [WLKY]

Two police officers were shot outside the Ferguson Police Department just after midnight Thursday, police and eyewitnesses said. The shootings came during protests following the Ferguson police chief’s resignation on Wednesday afternoon. [HuffPo]

A school bus has been involved in a wreck on Taylor Boulevard and Berry Boulevard. [WAVE3]

Even though the two sides have narrowed their differences, the Democratic-controlled House and Republican-controlled Senate still have no agreement on how to attack the rise in heroin addiction and trafficking. [Ronnie Ellis]

Kitty Head remembers asking one of her adult education students years ago what his plans were for Thanksgiving. The man had been homeless and said he didn’t have any friends or family to spend time with during the holiday. [WFPL]

Of the million or so women who have abortions every year in the U.S., nearly a quarter end their pregnancy using medications. But just as states have been passing a record number of restrictions on surgical abortion, more are trying to limit this option as well. [NPR]

The Waterfront Development Corp. says a now-empty block of land along Witherspoon Street, between Floyd and Preston streets, could someday have a very valuable view, and officials are looking for ideas on what to do with the land. [Business First]

As if the state-level bickering, extended testing times and executive orders weren’t enough, Mother Nature has gotten in on the ISTEP+ slugfest. [News & Tribune]

How Much Time Has He Spent Raising Taxes?

Another day, another JCPS bus accident. They’re almost as plentiful as shootings or pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Can you imagine how much better off Louisville would be if Greg Fischer spent the amount of time he’s spent trying to raise your taxes on holding people like Sadiqa Reynolds accountable? With hours left for the local option sales tax to advance in the state Senate, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made a push Tuesday to rally support for the bill. [C-J/AKN]

A single vote upheld the decision to prevent James Helinger from returning to his post as a Buechel Police Lieutenant. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission will discuss the decline of important natural pollinators like bees and butterflies. The meeting Thursday in Frankfort will be open to the public. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City! One person was rushed to the hospital after an early morning shooting in Okolona. Was apparently a teen who was found shot in the groin. [WLKY]

This man helps American cities hide their homeless populations. His tactics are being put to use in Louisville by Greg Fischer. But no one wants to talk about it because how dare anyone question puppies and rainbows. [HuffPo]

Parents within West Clark Community Schools are voicing concerns over school conditions and overcrowding at Silver Creek High School in Clark County. [WAVE3]

Louisville businessman Hal Heiner leads the crowded race for the Republican party’s nominee for Kentucky’s next governor who would then likely take on Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [WKYT]

John Schnatter’s long-running, multi-generational ties to the University of Louisville just grew $4.64 million deeper. [WFPL]

A new study has found that when transgender young people are allowed to fully identify with their gender and take steps toward transition, it significantly improves their depression and anxiety. [Think Progress]

When Lily DeRosia read about the mandatory overtime and long shifts forced on workers at the Louisville company that makes Girl Scout cookies, she was inspired to try to do something about it. [Business First]

Floyd County is in the process of hiring a public works director. [News & Tribune]