Puke Alert: Ali Funeral Ticket Scalpers

The Jefferson County Coroner’s office could soon be without a morgue in a battle between county and state. [WDRB]

When young Cassius Clay returned to his hometown in 1960 after winning an Olympic gold medal as a light heavyweight, he was greeted by hundreds of fans at the airport, and a 30-car motorcade followed him to Central High School, his alma mater. [C-J/AKN]

People are so disgusting that they scalped tickets FOR A FUNERAL! It’s so gross we’re still thinking about it more than 24 hours later. [WHAS11]

Have you seen what’s going on in Lexington? Houses and other buildings on 10-acre lots must be excluded from the total acreage before an agricultural exemption on property taxes can be given to a homeowner, according to an official legal opinion from the Kentucky Department of Revenue to Fayette County Property Valuation Administrator David O’Neill. [H-L]

Compassionate City has reached peak pedestrian accident. Getting hit by an LMPD cruiser takes the cake. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama mourned the death of boxing legend Muhammad Ali in a Saturday statement, remembering “The Greatest” for his talent and his spirit. [HuffPo]

Why we love Louisville: someone gets shot every day. [WAVE3]

A secret report warned that British spies may have put lives at risk because their surveillance systems were sweeping up more data than could be analyzed, leading them to miss clues to possible security threats. [The Intercept]

Demand for bourbon is putting pressure on the population of Kentucky’s white oak trees, which are used to make staves for whiskey barrels. [WFPL]

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Forty-five years after founding his fire-protection company, Richard Barber was considering an expansion plan. Meanwhile, an Indiana company was looking for growth opportunities. [Business First]

Getting some answers on the process and what’s coming forward for the Summit Springs development off State Street is the aim of a city council work session Monday night. [News & Tribune]

Fun Weekend Of Compassionate Shootings

Police are investigating a shooting that happened overnight near U of L’s campus. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools has agreed to pay $1.75 million to the family of a 16-year-old disabled boy who suffered two fractured legs —a life-threatening injury — after he was physically restrained by a teaching assistant. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The public is beginning tours of Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home. [WHAS11]

Hotel and motel stays in Fayette County will cost more this fall. On Thursday, the Urban County Council voted unanimously to increase the Fayette County hotel and motel tax by 2.5 percentage points to pay for a nearly $250 million overhaul and expansion of the Lexington Convention Center. That means hotel taxes will rise to 9.5 percent. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating the death of a woman in south Louisville. [WLKY]

The United States has killed the leader of the Afghan Taliban in an air strike in a remote border area just inside Pakistan, Afghanistan said on Sunday, in an attack likely to dash any immediate prospect for peace talks. [HuffPo]

Two people were shot early Sunday morning near the University of Louisville campus. [WAVE3]

Your risk of getting killed by a car goes up with every mile per hour. [ProPublica]

The Portland Investment Initiative, an organization founded by developer Gill Holland with the goal of purchasing and renovating real estate in the West Louisville neighborhood, has closed on two new properties. [WFPL]

Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, promised on Thursday to roll back some of America’s most ambitious environmental policies, actions that he said would revive the ailing U.S. oil and coal industries and bolster national security. [Reuters]

Two Louisville small businesses will receive more than $100,000 in loans that will aid in the advancement of two aging buildings. [Business First]

When Betty Watkins envisions what Charlestown might look like in five or 10 years, what she hopes for seems simple enough. [News & Tribune]

Gun Nuts Visited Murder City This Weekend

Louisville Metro Police are investigating a double homicide in the 4000 block of River Park Drive, near South 40th Street. [WDRB]

It’s a prime example of infill – using land in already developed areas for new homes. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! And not far away from the Expo Center, dozens gathered to pray for victims of gun violence. [WHAS11]

Donald Trump brought his brand of feel-good fascism back to Louisville to receive an endorsement from National Rifle Association leaders and to speak to its national convention. [Tom Eblen]

Police were called to the scene of a shooting near Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

Exaggerator took advantage of sloppy conditions and a “dream trip” to win the 141st running of the Preakness Stakes by 3-1/2 lengths in Baltimore on Saturday, ending Kentucky Derby winner Nyquist’s bid for the Triple Crown. And two horses died because of course they did. [HuffPo]

Many people gathered around the city Saturday at different events promoting unity and safety. [WAVE3]

A new study by the Pew Research Center spurred a rash of headlines last week about “the dying middle class.” But the word “dying” might be more appropriate if we were watching the regrettable-but-inevitable effects of natural forces at work. We’re not. We’re seeing the fruits of deliberate action – and sometimes of deliberate inaction – at the highest levels of power. The great American middle was never large enough, even at its height. It always excluded too many people – sometimes, shamefully, merely for their skin color. And now, instead of growing and becoming more inclusive, it’s fading away instead. [Bill Moyers]

Exaggerator has taken home the second gem in horse racing’s triple crown. The colt won a mud-filled Preakness Stakes on Saturday, handing rival Nyquist the first loss of his career and effectively ending his shot at a triple crown. [WFPL]

A powerful array of the Republican Party’s largest financial backers remains deeply resistant to Donald J. Trump’s presidential candidacy, forming a wall of opposition that could make it exceedingly difficult for him to meet his goal of raising $1 billion before the November election. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville is expanding its Enterprise CarShare program to downtown, offering the service for the public at its Health Sciences center. [Business First]

The Floyd County Commissioners voted 3-0 to fund LifeSpring Health System and Rauch, Inc. from the tax levy instead of the general fund. But minutes after taking that vote Tuesday, they reversed it, voting 2-1 to keep the two out of the levy. [News & Tribune]

Here’s Your Morning Dose Of Awfulness

The long-awaited study of Louisville’s urban heat islands will be unveiled next week, the city’s top air-quality official said Wednesday. [WDRB]

Moore Traditional School Principal Vicki Lete will not continue in her post after this school year, the school’s decision making council decided Monday. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services in Frankfort ordered an emergency suspension on the license to operate for Lil’ Kings and Queens Daycare, located on Terry Road. [WHAS11]

He’s cool with raising taxes for a convention center most will never benefit from but wasn’t cool with helping small businesses or veterans. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two men were shot and as many as three people are on the run after Louisville police said a home invasion on Wednesday led to a shootout at two locations. [WLKY]

The Obama administration is preparing to broaden its military campaign against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria by increasing the number of Special Operations forces who advise Syrian rebels, and it is also considering the addition of Army attack helicopters to the fight against militants in Iraq. [HuffPo]

The identities of two people killed in a hit and run crash on Poplar Level Road on Tuesday have been released by the Jefferson County Coroner’s Office. [WAVE3]

If you missed it yesterday, here’s your chance to get caught up. Be sure to check out Joshua Powell, a corrupt former school superintendent, attempting to keep public records secret. [Page One]

A few months ago, when they became available, I signed up to get an advanced meter installed on my house. It was one of the energy-efficiency programs Louisville Gas and Electric was offering, and I was intrigued by its promise of letting me more closely track my energy usage through an online dashboard. [WFPL]

A little over six months ago, Keeneland and Red Mile opened a gambling parlor with 902 instant racing machines and a joint simulcasting room at the harness track. [More H-L]

State and federal regulators are doing a deep dive on any and all possible concerns surrounding the proposed acquisition of Humana Inc. by Aetna Inc. [Business First]

When a destructive tornado tore through Henryville on March 2, 2012, Louella Aker didn’t stop to think twice about helping her friends and neighbors who had suffered damage from the storm. [News & Tribune]

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Watch John Yarmuth Speak Some Truth

In the summer of 2008, David Kaelin attended a series of meetings on the future of land along the Floyds Fork creek, which flows about two miles from his eastern Jefferson County farm. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville’s Faculty Senate is set to discuss its views on the fate of embattled President James Ramsey behind closed doors. [C-J/AKN]

While police continue to investigate who shot and killed a UofL student, her friends and family at a local church are responding to her death. [WHAS11]

For the first time, the Kentucky Revenue Department this year is asking taxpayers to wait. Kentucky and other states are becoming more forthright, telling taxpayers they’ll have to be patient and allow time for verification before refunds are sent. [H-L]

A Jefferson County judge is asking the state to dismiss ethics charges against him. Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has thrown out jury panels that lack diversity. [WLKY]

Landlords and property owners who exclude people with criminal records from renting or buying may be violating the law, according to new guidance released by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. [HuffPo]

Kentucky voters rarely have had clout in determining who the Democratic and Republican parties will nominate in the race for president. The Commonwealth has too few people and too few delegates at stake for a May primary to do little more than reinforce or contradict a result already reached. [WAVE3]

Even after years of education, training and experience as an obstetrician/gynecologist, I am never prepared to deliver the news that a pregnancy is abnormal. There is no good way to tell a pregnant woman — a woman who may already be wearing maternity clothes, thinking about names and decorating the nursery — that we have identified a fetal anomaly that can lead to significant, lifelong disability or even her baby’s death. [WaPo]

Like many folks, Louisvillians can be rebellious nostalgists, railing against the churn of urban change. [WFPL]

Few people are thanking the president for low unemployment. Instead, many discouraged workers are attracted to Donald J. Trump’s economic message. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville board of trustees and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin reached a settlement last month in Franklin Circuit Court with the Kentucky Justice Resource Center Inc. regarding a racial imbalance on the board. [Business First]

An agreement for a development at 10th and Spring streets that’s been in the works since May has finally been signed. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Just Got Waaaaay Worse

Delores Sisson says the first jump in rent of her subsidized apartment on W. Breckinridge Street happened two years ago – rising from $358 a month in 2014 to $438 a month last year and jumping to $652 a month this year. [WDRB]

Surprise! Greg Fischer and his team are lying about something again. This time that something benefits his wealthy friends and donors but no one has the guts to call him out on it. A little more transparency — something Fischer has never taken seriously — would go a long way. [C-J/AKN]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings. Police responded to a report of a shooting in the 1700 block of Berry Boulevard around 2:30 a.m. Sunday morning. [WHAS11]

As a boxer and humanitarian, Muhammad Ali stood out. So does the bright pink home in Kentucky where he shadowboxed and played pranks on his brother. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another pedestrian killed by a train in Louisville. [WLKY]

These anti-woman efforts aren’t just taking place in Floriduh, they’re also taking places in Kentucky. And Democrats are cheering the restrictionsi along every step of the way. [HuffPo]

See? All kinds of shootings. One person was injured in a shooting on Oak Street on Sunday. [WAVE3]

Reproductive rights advocates are warning that Indiana has become one of the most dangerous states for pregnant women, thanks to the governor’s decision to approve a sweeping new anti-abortion law that combines some of the harshest attacks on reproductive rights into one piece of legislation. [ThinkProgress]

The Louisville Metro Council rejected a bid from Louisville Gas and Electric to establish a natural gas franchise agreement. [WFPL]

We’ve been leading the pack when it comes to revealing information about new scandals. Find out how to keep up. [Page One]

A developer is asking Louisville Metro government and Jefferson County Public Schools for property tax breaks worth $11.3 million over the next 20 years so it can move forward with two apartment projects planned near the intersection of Baxter Avenue and Broadway. [Business First]

A Clark County judge on Friday confirmed the appeal of a candidate challenging the outcome of the recount in the Jeffersonville City Council At-large race. [News & Tribune]

This City Is So Super-Compassionate

Compassionate City. Homicide detectives are investigating after a person was fatally shot in the Algonquin neighborhood late Tuesday. [WDRB]

Portland has long fostered its green cred with a light rail, efforts to curb sprawl, bicycle-friendly policies, and in many people’s minds, it has maintained a crunchy granola atmosphere. I have some experience with Portland. I used to live there years ago, and nearly landed a job at The Oregonian before finding my way to Kentucky. But recently, that image has been tarnished a bit with – as weird as it sounds – the discovery by the U.S. Forest Service of tree moss containing toxic chemicals from the air. It even got the full New York Times treatment on March 2: Toxic Moss in Portland, Ore., Shakes Cities Green Ideals. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky businesses could invoke their religious beliefs to refuse service to gay, lesbian or transgender customers under a bill passed by the state Senate. [WHAS11]

We still maintain that this is probably one of Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes’ biggest accomplishments. [H-L]

Complaints about Louisville’s vacant and abandoned properties surged last year compared to 2014. [WLKY]

Donald Trump continued to beat the GOP field on Tuesday night, winning contests in Florida, North Carolina and Illinois, but dropping Ohio to John Kasich and struggling against Ted Cruz in Missouri. [HuffPo]

It may be round two for a public nuisance ordinance designed to deal with problem hotels. “Anytime you have a new ordinance, there’s going to be opportunities to make improvements,” Patrick Carrico, the President of the Bon Air Neighborhood Association, said. [WAVE3]

House Democrats on Tuesday showed their hand on the state budget, sending to the floor a budget that puts more money into pensions than Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposals while restoring cuts to education and creating less debt than which the governor called. [Ronnie Ellis]

The attorneys representing Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky say a lawsuit filed earlier this year by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration lacks the merit. [WFPL]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump predicted on Wednesday that there would be “riots” if he does not secure the GOP nomination, given his lead among delegates. [The Hill]

Can KentuckyOne fix what ails the state? No. But it’s sure gonna spend every last cent it’s got on public relations and getting media coverage. This is just the latest example of the hype. [Business First]

Indiana communities will soon get about $430 million to fix roads under a deal forged on the last day of the Legislature’s session. Getting much more than that means raising taxes — an option that many local leaders will find loathsome. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]