You Already Know What JCPS Has Done

Jack Conway’s office says JCPS broke the law with too many redactions. But here’s the deal: Helene Kramer was allegedly trash-talking re: that high-level employee’s sexual orientation and Donna Hargens allowed it to occur. She didn’t stop it. She’s never taken it seriously and refuses to admit that real harm was done. Everyone wants to piss and moan and bicker over whether or not those details should be revealed. I’m not gonna identify the individual until they decide to come forward but let’s get real here. That’s what happened. Several of us in the local media world have had the allegations in our possession for months and months and everyone’s just been sitting on it while trying to find a way to get JCPS to cough up the specifics. And all the mainstream media outlets have been afraid to reveal what the victim claims off-the-record occurred. [WDRB]

The Administration for Children and Families has given Jefferson County Public Schools the all-clear after the agency last year found a deficiency in the school district’s Head Start program. [C-J/AKN]

Where’s the media outrage over this murder? The victim’s life is no less valuable than that of anyone else. [WHAS11]

Under most circumstances, global stock market volatility would be enough to unnerve those in a commercial arena preparing for its bellwether exercise. But both the strength of key indictors and a wave of industry momentum heading into the Keeneland September Yearling Sale make for a positive forecast for the 12-day auction when it begins Monday. [H-L]

Muhammad and Lonnie Ali have made a donation to the University of Louisville Athletics. [WLKY]

More than half of the tax cuts proposed in former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s (R) tax plan would flow to America’s wealthiest citizens, according to a report released by the nonpartisan group Citizens for Tax Justice, which advocates for “requiring the wealthy to pay their fair share.” [HuffPo]

All the WAVE gays freaked out over Cher. Like lost their minds freaked out. It was kind of a big gay deal. [WAVE3]

The Obama administration has said it will allow 10,000 Syrian refugees to resettle in the US over the next year. Is this enough? And are there any risks? [BBC]

The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services released a comprehensive plan to reduce health disparities earlier this week, and efforts are already under way in Louisville that address some of the findings. [WFPL]

Every day in America, mortgage companies attempt to foreclose on homeowners using false documents. It’s a byproduct of the mortgage securitization craze during the housing bubble, when loans were sliced and diced so haphazardly that the actual ownership was confused. [The Incercept]

Earlier this week, I took a tour of Norton Commons, the self-contained urbanist community in northeastern Jefferson County that eventually will extend into Oldham County as it is completed in the next 10 to 15 years. [Business First]

The New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter has launched a unique fundraising effort to benefit local animals. [News & Tribune]

MSD Monster Grows, No One Notices

A Kentucky company has been dumping toxic waste into public waters for over a year and the leaders of Bullitt Utilities say the company can’t afford to fix this problem. [WDRB]

This sounds like a disaster in the making. Louisville officials are creating another level of bureaucracy, of sorts, with the promise that it can help save tens of millions of dollars and slow rate increases for city water and sewer customers. [C-J/AKN]

The city of Hillview, Ky. filed for bankruptcy protection, Chapter Nine, on Aug. 20. [WHAS11]

The state is looking for volunteers to review cases of children placed in foster care in 35 counties. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! To date, dozens of people have been killed on the streets of Louisville, and many of the victims are under the age of 25. [WLKY]

Scientists at Ohio State University say they’ve grown the first near-complete human brain in a lab. Maybe Rand Paul will receive it as a transplant. [HuffPo]

An increase in property assessments means Jefferson County Public Schools will not ask for a tax rate increase for the 2015-2016 school year. [WAVE3]

New disclosures about the National Security Agency’s partnership with AT&T could reignite constitutional challenges to the spy agency’s efforts to wiretap the Internet. [ProPublica]

Why is there such a large gap between the number of Kentucky students who graduate high school on time and those who go straight to college? [WFPL]

Birthright citizenship is enshrined in the 14th Amendment, but Donald Trump and other candidates are keeping alive the idea that some Americans should not have equal rights at birth. [The Nation]

Mayor Greg Fischer says he’s “very bullish” on Louisville as a spot to possibly expand Major League Soccer, and Wayne Estopinal, Louisville City FC’s operating manager, plans to meet with Fischer next week to discuss his team’s current situation and start talks on building a stadium specifically for soccer. [Business First]

Floyd County may soon have only one recycling site for residents to drop-off items. The Floyd County Council voted 4-3 against giving solid waste $70,000 in additional appropriations, which Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley said would keep all sites open through the end of the year. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

No Puppies & Rainbows This Morning

The Clark County Sheriff suspended the county jail’s work program after investigators uncovered a plan to deliver drugs and cell phones to inmates involved. [WDRB]

Upset over plans to build methane plants in residential neighborhoods, the Coalition for Sustainable West Louisville announced Tuesday that it is calling for a boycott of suppliers of the planned food hub on 30th Street. [C-J/AKN]

This is worth reviewing again. The Century Foundation released a report that puts Louisville as the tenth worst city in the US for concentrated black poverty. [WHAS11]

Let’s all just bite our tongues and allow our eyes to roll back in our heads. Democratic state Treasurer Todd Hollenbach was the odd man out of statewide elections this year, unable to seek re-election because of term limits while some of the biggest names in Kentucky politics are campaigning for governor and attorney general. But the 55-year-old hopes to stay in public office as he filed Tuesday to run for district judge in the 30th judicial district of Jefferson County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WLKY]

An ambitious pilot program to help former chronically homeless people in Utah has proven to be successful despite some legal challenges. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. Maybe Emperor Fischer can appoint someone just as incompetent as Sadiqa Reynolds to figure this out. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, whose campaign is struggling with deep fundraising and organizational problems, has fixated on throwing grenades at GOP frontrunner Donald Trump, hardly the strategy of a thriving campaign. [Politico]

A new, more rigorous version of the GED test has led to a dramatic drop in the number of Kentuckians receiving a high school equivalency diploma. Final numbers from the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education show there were 1,663 GED diplomas awarded in the 2015 fiscal year. That’s down from 7,083 — a 77 percent decline — in 2014, and a drop of 81 percent in 2013, the last full year the old version of the test was used. [WFPL]

Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin and the state House GOP caucus are calling for de-funding of Planned Parenthood in Kentucky. But Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear and his health secretary say the Republicans don’t understand how federally funded family planning and women’s health services work. [Richmond Register]

A new Securities and Exchange Commission filing shows that Humana Inc. started pursuing a partner in October, and Aetna Inc. wasn’t the first to be involved. [Business First]

While some city leaders touted the health of New Albany’s tax-increment financing districts Tuesday, State Rep. Ed Clere warned spending TIF dollars on projects such as an aquatic center could leave taxpayers “swimming in debt.” [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

What Shade Will Anchorage Throw Next?

Louisville Metro Police arrested a man and charged him with murder but some of the suspect’s friends say he shouldn’t have been charged at all. [WDRB]

A judge has thrown out a lawsuit by the city of Anchorage against Bellewood Presbyterian Home for Children, rejecting the small city’s effort to block the center from accepting youths officials deem too dangerous for the neighborhood. Imagine that. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS students have just three more days of summer break, and on August 8 the Louisville Urban League hosted a summit to get students excited to get back to the classroom. [WHAS11]

In April 2005, President George W. Bush hailed “clean coal” as a key to “greater energy independence,” pledging $2 billion in research funds that promised a new golden age for America’s most abundant energy resource. [H-L]

Apparently, “middle town” is a place now. Louisville Metro Bomb Squad say a suspicious package left at a Target department store in middle town was a false alarm. [WLKY]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich drew applause during Thursday’s Republican presidential debate for saying that he accepted gay marriage even though it was counter to his “traditional” views. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police officers who shot and killed an 18-year-old who was wielding a knife were carrying Tasers, prompting some people to wonder why they didn’t try using them first. [WAVE3]

A majority of Americans, white and black, believe that more needs to be done to fight racism in the United States, following a year of protests over the treatment of minorities by police, according to a Pew Research Center survey released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Jefferson County Public Schools administrators are recommending no property tax rate increase for the 2015-16 fiscal year, the school district announced Friday. [WFPL]

After thinking about it overnight, Republican candidate for state auditor Mike Harmon announced Thursday Jesse Benton will cut ties to Harmon’s campaign. [Ronnie Ellis]

Retailers and bars can now buy Jim Beam bourbon by the barrel. The new sales program started in July. Clermont, Ky.-based Jim Beam is owned by Beam Suntory Inc., a Japanese company that has its U.S. headquarters in Deerfield, Ill. This isn’t the parent company’s first run at a by-the-barrel sales program. It’s been selling Knob Creek this way since 2011. [Business First]

Members of the Floyd County Council held a work session Monday afternoon to ask questions, and have some answered, concerning the formation of a Regional Development Authority. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Short-Term Rental Cat Fight Takes Shape

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Leaders with Louisville Metro Council are asking for additional input while they work out details of an ordinance aimed at creating more regulatory oversight in the short term housing market. You should at least have to live in the homes you’re renting out like a hotel. [WDRB]

Another guy without a gun was shot and killed by police officers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Stop signs will soon be placed at a railroad crossing where two people were seriously injured this week in Buechel on Crawford Ave. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Department of Education is seeking public feedback on dozens of proposed social studies standards. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two years after Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis was killed in the line of duty, police continue to investigate. [WLKY]

Bloomberg Philanthropies on Wednesday announced the first eight cities it has selected to participate in a new pilot program to improve life in America’s cities. Chattanooga, Tennessee; Louisville, Kentucky; Kansas City, Missouri; Mesa, Arizona; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Jackson, Mississippi; Seattle and New Orleans will be the first to benefit from the What Works Cities Initiative. The project intends to spend $42 million over three years to help U.S. cities address issues like economic development, public health, crime and transportation. [HuffPo]

The developers tasked with rehabbing the iconic 800 Building in downtown Louisville want the taxpayers to help foot the bill. Now, that is a step closer to happening. [WAVE3]

In the early morning hours of June 30, 1995, a fire sparked to life in Kristine Bunch’s mobile home. It fanned out across the floor and climbed up the walls, then formed an impassable barrier across the middle of the trailer. Bunch, 21, snapped awake in the living room. Her three-year-old son, Tony, shrieked for her on the other side of the flames. [Mother Jones]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Later this month, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will escape for a family retreat to mourn his late son, Beau, but also to mull, as his dying son urged him to do, a campaign for president. Some of Mr. Biden’s friends and allies worry that he will decide it is a good idea. [NY Times]

Greater Louisville Inc. has named Deana Epperly Karem vice president of economic development. Karem is the current executive director of the Oldham County Chamber and Economic Development. She’ll start work at GLI on Sept. 1. [Business First]

When Floyd County Solid Waste Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley receives a complaint about the two mobile recycling sites that were closed recently due to budget cuts, she refers them to the people who ordered the reductions. [News & Tribune]

People Dying & You’re Mad Over A Lion

Told ya Jack’s probably gonna win. Conway, the Democratic nominee, leads Bevin 45 percent to 42 percent, with 13 percent of voters undecided. Curtis polled at 8 percent, leaving Conway with 43 percent and Bevin with 38 percent. [H-L]

An investigation by the Louisville Fire Department found GE could have done more to prevent a fire that destroyed a building at Appliance Park, but company officials say investigators are wrong and they have the video to prove it. [WDRB]

Fire investigators have blamed the total loss of a General Electric warehouse on outdated Appliance Park equipment that failed when fire crews rushed to the scene April 3. [C-J/AKN]

A shooting just before midnight has sent a victim to the hospital, only hours after fatal shooting in the same area. [WHAS11]

A lawsuit filed in federal court in California against Maker’s Mark Distillery was dismissed on Monday. The plaintiffs had alleged that they were mislead by the premium bourbon’s claims on the label to be “handmade” but U.S. District Judge John A. Houston found that the claim “cannot reasonably be interpreted as meaning literally by hand nor that a reasonable consumer would understand the term to mean no equipment or automated process was used to manufacture the whisky.” [H-L]

Metro police are investigating a stabbing at a south Louisville bar. But everything is puppies and rainbows in Possibility City. [WLKY]

There’s a simple, popular solution that Republican leaders in Congress could grab hold of to get themselves out of their embarrassing public fight over the highway bill, and President Barack Obama could help force them to do it. [HuffPo]

Louisville officials spent at least $2.5 million on additional security measures after a night of mob violence rocked the city in 2014, according to records obtained by WAVE 3 News. [WHAS11]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Rowan County has thrown bigoted hypocrite Kim Davis to the wolves. [WFPL]

In the US, poverty, deprivation and exploitation draw thousands of its own children down into a dark underworld that offers few ways out. [BBC]

United Parcel Service Inc. says it’s already working closely with retail customers on planning for this year’s peak season — even though there are indications of a softer shipping season this year. [Business First]

As statewide numbers showed a climbing trend, school districts in Clark and Floyd counties also realized an increase of children living in poverty. [News & Tribune]

Hide That Medicare Bit Behind Fire Coverage

General Electric Co. will no longer provide supplemental Medicare plans to about 130,000 former hourly workers and their spouses across the country — the latest in a series of moves aimed at cutting the company’s expenses for retiree benefits. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board on Monday made final a rate increase of 5.5 percent, starting Aug. 1, and approved the salary and compensation package for its incoming executive director. [C-J/AKN]

The Downtown Development Review Overlay committee, or DDRO, voted on Wednesday, July 29, to approve the Omni design plan. [WHAS11]

Humana Inc. on Wednesday reported second-quarter earnings of $431 million. [H-L]

Nearly four months after the fire at GE’s Appliance Park, fire officials release the results from the investigation into what went wrong. GE disputes the findings. Maj. Henry Ott said the company is ‘”cherry picking” facts to protect its interests. [WLKY]

After the Republican Party took a drubbing at the polls on Election Day 2012, RNC Chairman Reince Priebus ordered an autopsy. The party, the coroner’s report found a few months later, had alienated women and minorities and came off as plutocratic. [HuffPo]

After several tense exchanges between Kentucky’s candidates for governor, Republican Matt Bevin during a media interview accused a WAVE 3 News reporter of working for his rival. [WAVE3]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Tuesday named Gabriel Fritz to be the new director of the Office of Housing and Community Development, an appointment that comes as the city prioritizes its affordable housing needs. Here’s hoping he isn’t scandal-ridden. [WFPL]

There weren’t many substantive insights drawn from Monday’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway before a Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Business Summit crowd. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro Council is planning to hold two public hearings on the creation of special taxing districts to give financial help to two projects. [Business First]

The city has the discretion to release the full disciplinary record of fired New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook and is not required to provide the documents by law, Indiana Public Access Counselor Luke Britt stated in an advisory opinion issued Monday at the request of the News and Tribune. [News & Tribune]