Here’s Your Morning Dose Of Awfulness

The long-awaited study of Louisville’s urban heat islands will be unveiled next week, the city’s top air-quality official said Wednesday. [WDRB]

Moore Traditional School Principal Vicki Lete will not continue in her post after this school year, the school’s decision making council decided Monday. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services in Frankfort ordered an emergency suspension on the license to operate for Lil’ Kings and Queens Daycare, located on Terry Road. [WHAS11]

He’s cool with raising taxes for a convention center most will never benefit from but wasn’t cool with helping small businesses or veterans. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two men were shot and as many as three people are on the run after Louisville police said a home invasion on Wednesday led to a shootout at two locations. [WLKY]

The Obama administration is preparing to broaden its military campaign against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria by increasing the number of Special Operations forces who advise Syrian rebels, and it is also considering the addition of Army attack helicopters to the fight against militants in Iraq. [HuffPo]

The identities of two people killed in a hit and run crash on Poplar Level Road on Tuesday have been released by the Jefferson County Coroner’s Office. [WAVE3]

If you missed it yesterday, here’s your chance to get caught up. Be sure to check out Joshua Powell, a corrupt former school superintendent, attempting to keep public records secret. [Page One]

A few months ago, when they became available, I signed up to get an advanced meter installed on my house. It was one of the energy-efficiency programs Louisville Gas and Electric was offering, and I was intrigued by its promise of letting me more closely track my energy usage through an online dashboard. [WFPL]

A little over six months ago, Keeneland and Red Mile opened a gambling parlor with 902 instant racing machines and a joint simulcasting room at the harness track. [More H-L]

State and federal regulators are doing a deep dive on any and all possible concerns surrounding the proposed acquisition of Humana Inc. by Aetna Inc. [Business First]

When a destructive tornado tore through Henryville on March 2, 2012, Louella Aker didn’t stop to think twice about helping her friends and neighbors who had suffered damage from the storm. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Watch John Yarmuth Speak Some Truth

In the summer of 2008, David Kaelin attended a series of meetings on the future of land along the Floyds Fork creek, which flows about two miles from his eastern Jefferson County farm. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville’s Faculty Senate is set to discuss its views on the fate of embattled President James Ramsey behind closed doors. [C-J/AKN]

While police continue to investigate who shot and killed a UofL student, her friends and family at a local church are responding to her death. [WHAS11]

For the first time, the Kentucky Revenue Department this year is asking taxpayers to wait. Kentucky and other states are becoming more forthright, telling taxpayers they’ll have to be patient and allow time for verification before refunds are sent. [H-L]

A Jefferson County judge is asking the state to dismiss ethics charges against him. Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has thrown out jury panels that lack diversity. [WLKY]

Landlords and property owners who exclude people with criminal records from renting or buying may be violating the law, according to new guidance released by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. [HuffPo]

Kentucky voters rarely have had clout in determining who the Democratic and Republican parties will nominate in the race for president. The Commonwealth has too few people and too few delegates at stake for a May primary to do little more than reinforce or contradict a result already reached. [WAVE3]

Even after years of education, training and experience as an obstetrician/gynecologist, I am never prepared to deliver the news that a pregnancy is abnormal. There is no good way to tell a pregnant woman — a woman who may already be wearing maternity clothes, thinking about names and decorating the nursery — that we have identified a fetal anomaly that can lead to significant, lifelong disability or even her baby’s death. [WaPo]

Like many folks, Louisvillians can be rebellious nostalgists, railing against the churn of urban change. [WFPL]

Few people are thanking the president for low unemployment. Instead, many discouraged workers are attracted to Donald J. Trump’s economic message. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville board of trustees and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin reached a settlement last month in Franklin Circuit Court with the Kentucky Justice Resource Center Inc. regarding a racial imbalance on the board. [Business First]

An agreement for a development at 10th and Spring streets that’s been in the works since May has finally been signed. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Just Got Waaaaay Worse

Delores Sisson says the first jump in rent of her subsidized apartment on W. Breckinridge Street happened two years ago – rising from $358 a month in 2014 to $438 a month last year and jumping to $652 a month this year. [WDRB]

Surprise! Greg Fischer and his team are lying about something again. This time that something benefits his wealthy friends and donors but no one has the guts to call him out on it. A little more transparency — something Fischer has never taken seriously — would go a long way. [C-J/AKN]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings. Police responded to a report of a shooting in the 1700 block of Berry Boulevard around 2:30 a.m. Sunday morning. [WHAS11]

As a boxer and humanitarian, Muhammad Ali stood out. So does the bright pink home in Kentucky where he shadowboxed and played pranks on his brother. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another pedestrian killed by a train in Louisville. [WLKY]

These anti-woman efforts aren’t just taking place in Floriduh, they’re also taking places in Kentucky. And Democrats are cheering the restrictionsi along every step of the way. [HuffPo]

See? All kinds of shootings. One person was injured in a shooting on Oak Street on Sunday. [WAVE3]

Reproductive rights advocates are warning that Indiana has become one of the most dangerous states for pregnant women, thanks to the governor’s decision to approve a sweeping new anti-abortion law that combines some of the harshest attacks on reproductive rights into one piece of legislation. [ThinkProgress]

The Louisville Metro Council rejected a bid from Louisville Gas and Electric to establish a natural gas franchise agreement. [WFPL]

We’ve been leading the pack when it comes to revealing information about new scandals. Find out how to keep up. [Page One]

A developer is asking Louisville Metro government and Jefferson County Public Schools for property tax breaks worth $11.3 million over the next 20 years so it can move forward with two apartment projects planned near the intersection of Baxter Avenue and Broadway. [Business First]

A Clark County judge on Friday confirmed the appeal of a candidate challenging the outcome of the recount in the Jeffersonville City Council At-large race. [News & Tribune]

This City Is So Super-Compassionate

Compassionate City. Homicide detectives are investigating after a person was fatally shot in the Algonquin neighborhood late Tuesday. [WDRB]

Portland has long fostered its green cred with a light rail, efforts to curb sprawl, bicycle-friendly policies, and in many people’s minds, it has maintained a crunchy granola atmosphere. I have some experience with Portland. I used to live there years ago, and nearly landed a job at The Oregonian before finding my way to Kentucky. But recently, that image has been tarnished a bit with – as weird as it sounds – the discovery by the U.S. Forest Service of tree moss containing toxic chemicals from the air. It even got the full New York Times treatment on March 2: Toxic Moss in Portland, Ore., Shakes Cities Green Ideals. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky businesses could invoke their religious beliefs to refuse service to gay, lesbian or transgender customers under a bill passed by the state Senate. [WHAS11]

We still maintain that this is probably one of Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes’ biggest accomplishments. [H-L]

Complaints about Louisville’s vacant and abandoned properties surged last year compared to 2014. [WLKY]

Donald Trump continued to beat the GOP field on Tuesday night, winning contests in Florida, North Carolina and Illinois, but dropping Ohio to John Kasich and struggling against Ted Cruz in Missouri. [HuffPo]

It may be round two for a public nuisance ordinance designed to deal with problem hotels. “Anytime you have a new ordinance, there’s going to be opportunities to make improvements,” Patrick Carrico, the President of the Bon Air Neighborhood Association, said. [WAVE3]

House Democrats on Tuesday showed their hand on the state budget, sending to the floor a budget that puts more money into pensions than Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposals while restoring cuts to education and creating less debt than which the governor called. [Ronnie Ellis]

The attorneys representing Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky say a lawsuit filed earlier this year by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration lacks the merit. [WFPL]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump predicted on Wednesday that there would be “riots” if he does not secure the GOP nomination, given his lead among delegates. [The Hill]

Can KentuckyOne fix what ails the state? No. But it’s sure gonna spend every last cent it’s got on public relations and getting media coverage. This is just the latest example of the hype. [Business First]

Indiana communities will soon get about $430 million to fix roads under a deal forged on the last day of the Legislature’s session. Getting much more than that means raising taxes — an option that many local leaders will find loathsome. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Still Loving The Christy Brown Shade

The federal government is throwing new resources at the growing heroin problem in Kentucky and throughout the nation. [WDRB]

Louisville planners recommended Thursday morning that short-term rentals be allowed in most zoning districts but that a special permit should be necessary if the unit is not a host’s primary residence. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The best part of this whole Speed Museum coverage? All the photos of Christy Brown throwing shade at Matt Bevin. May we all grow up to be as skilled as her. [WHAS11]

Lexington is apparently trying to imitate Louisville again. Second overnight shooting in a week. [H-L]

Valley Station may be one of the few areas of the city where Rand Paul would be welcomed with open arms. [WLKY]

Another Donald Trump supporter was caught on video evoking Nazis as he yelled at protesters following a rally in Cleveland on Saturday. “Go to Auschwitz,” the man said to the protesters after raising his arm in an apparent Nazi salute. “Go to fucking Auschwitz.” [HuffPo]

Really, all that shade Christy Brown threw was terrific. Somebody please give her an award. [WAVE3]

Apollo Global Management says it’s buying specialty grocery store chain Fresh Market Inc., for $1.36 billion, in a deal that adds a premium of more than 20 percent to Fresh Market’s closing stock price last week. [NPR]

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced federal funding for several Kentucky health care centers to help fight the state’s opioid epidemic. [WFPL]

How hot was it last month globally? It was so hot that the famed Iditarod sled race in Alaska brought in extra snow from hundreds of miles away by train. [ThinkProgress]

Two-thirds of state economic development spending benefits big businesses, according to a sample of three states analyzed by Good Jobs First. [Business First]

One of the last things left before Gateway Park opens in Clarksville is to wait for the grass to fill in. [News & Tribune]

Wait. Nope. Another Bad Week For JCPS

JCPS has received 115 calls through its bullying tipline. Fifty-two calls have come from middle schools, 31 from elementary schools, and 25 from high schools, while seven calls have come from other areas. [WDRB]

Jessica Green needs to hold Greg Fischer’s feet to the fire. She’s one of the few people who could do it and get away with it. Metro Council members blasted Mayor Greg Fischer’s administration Thursday for failing to alert them about a key vacancy on the planning commission last summer that resulted in an appointment being made without the mayor’s or council’s approval. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An 18-year-old Jeffersontown High School student appeared in front of a judge Friday morning, charged with a felony after police say he and two other students beat another student, leaving him for dead. [WHAS11]

Just what Kentucky needs! Another tax increase. The very thing the working poor cannot afford is sales tax. [H-L]

The new and improved Speed Museum has reopened its doors. The museum had been closed for 3 1/2 years for renovations and construction of a new wing. [WLKY]

In NPI’s telling, white Americans are increasingly under siege in their own country, doomed to be a hated minority as people of color grow ever more numerous and politically powerful. And Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy has given the group’s members more hope than ever that help is on the way. [HuffPo]

There are new developments for a firefighter’s widow fighting with state government over whether her husband died in the line of duty. [WAVE3]

Kashiya Nwanguma, a student at the University of Louisville who is black, attended a Trump rally in Louisville this month, she says, to better understand the Trump phenomenon. She said in an interview this week that she suddenly felt the crowd’s attention turn to her after Trump saw the anti-Trump sign she was holding and asked that she be removed. Someone promptly snatched it out of her hand. Next, she was being roughly shoved by several white men. “I think a lot of it has to do with ignorance that’s rooted in fear of the other,” said Nwanguma, 21, when asked about the incident Thursday. “None of the people who were attacking me even knew what was on my sign. I obviously stood out in the crowd based on my appearance.” [WaPo]

Louisville has officially kicked off an education and advocacy campaign to promote the use of solar energy. [WFPL]

More than 30 states have enacted some version of voter ID law in recent years. How much do these laws change voting rules and what impact could they have on the general election? [ProPublica]

“‘Population health” has become something of a trend in the health care industry. [Business First]

The Clark County Council will vote Monday, March 14, on a budget revision to account for cuts dictated in the state certified budget order, for the sixth year in a row. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Can’t Catch A Break With Hargens

It’s one thing after another with Donna Hargens. Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens admits the district made a “data entry discrepancy” in reporting to the state the number of times students were either physically held down or confined to a room last school year. [WDRB]

One victim was found in a garbage can. A second was beaten to death and set on fire, his body found burning on a sidewalk. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The story of Katina Powell, the UofL basketball scandal, and possible new details will be getting nationwide attention once again. Powell sat down with ESPN’s Outside the Lines for the second time on March 8 in Louisville for another interview. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky state Senate has approved a bill that would give public school districts an incentive for starting school in late August. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It was bizarre-o watching Greg Fischer speak at a Jefferson County Board of Education meeting. [WLKY]

Can you imagine the Kentucky Democratic Party doing something like this? Of course you can’t. We can’t. The KDP not only fears the gays, it fears women. So something like this isn’t going to happen any time soon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro police are investigating after two people were shot in the Chickasaw neighborhood late Tuesday night. [WAVE3]

House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said Tuesday he expects the House to vote on a two-year state budget plan early next week, one which will restore most of Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed funding cuts to education. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville has won a gold ranking in sustainability from a global group, making it the first university in Kentucky to achieve gold status. [WFPL]

“Religious Liberty” is the new FEAR THE GAY buzzword. Candidates in Kentucky sure are taking advantage of it. [FiveThirtyEight]

Believe it or not, CEOs and investors of these innovative software and technology companies have Congress to thank for an upcoming banner year for startups. [Business First]

Several ongoing projects in downtown Jeffersonville may look stalled, but work inside and behind the scenes is moving forward. [News & Tribune]