Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Dan Johnson Got More Egg On His Face

Louisville Metro Council’s public safety committee voted Tuesday to send the implementation of a local needle exchange program to a full council vote. [WDRB]

The Transit Authority of River City plans to cut bus service on several key routes, effective Aug. 16, to save about $1.2 million next fiscal year. [C-J/AKN]

One week before their stories will be shared on the floor of the Supreme Court, half a dozen same-sex couples from Kentucky and their attorneys met to celebrate progress to this point, and what could be a historic decision that changes how marriage is recognized in America. [WHAS11]

Nine people were indicted Tuesday on charges of spiriting away what Kentucky authorities say was more bourbon whiskey than one person could drink in a lifetime. But, uh, we could definitely drink that in a lifetime. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A former Louisville Metro Police Department school resource officer accused of putting a student in a chokehold until he passed out has been indicted on some charges in the case. [WLKY]

You don’t have to stop recording police when they’re out and about in public. [HuffPo]

A controversial proposal to merge Louisville’s city and suburban fire departments is likely dead after its only sponsor took his name off the legislation. Way to go, Dan Johnston, you’re a shining star of intelligence these days. [WAVE3]

Detroit just had the single largest tax foreclosure in American history. As many as 100,000 of the city’s residents — about a seventh of the total number — are now on track for what many are calling an eviction “conveyer belt.” [Mother Jones]

The local health department in the Southern Indiana community battling an HIV outbreak has handed out thousands of needles to residents since an exchange program went into effect April 4. [WFPL]

You don’t understand the world you live in if you haven’t read Eric Lipton’s three-part series in the New York Times on the staggering “explosion” of relentless, grimy lobbying of state attorneys general. Lipton just won a Pulitzer Prize for his work, and it’s truly deserved: it’s a masterpiece of investigative reporting, built on diligent use of open records laws by Lipton and Times researchers. [The Intercept]

First Savings Bank might consolidate some of its operations and move its headquarters from Clarksville to Jeffersonville. [Business First]

To Austin High School Principal Sherman Smith, it’s just bullying on a bigger stage. [News & Tribune]

Suck At Your Job? Get Rewarded At JCPS

The Jefferson County Board of Education is looking to extend Superintendent Donna Hargens’ contract by four years. Louisville’s wealthy electeds always reward those who bumble along. [WDRB]

A jury has awarded nearly $5 million to a courier for a Louisville law firm who suffered a traumatic brain injury when he was hit by a TARC bus. [C-J/AKN]

There was no woe on Louisville’s amazing Walnut Street in the 1950’s and early 60’s. [WHAS11]

Ann Parrish remembers trying to wrangle and bundle her two toddlers during last winter’s cold snap so they could get on a bus to find another place to stay. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian hit by a vehicle in Possibility City. [WLKY]

James Risen reiterated on Tuesday a warning about the White House that he delivered nearly one year ago. [HuffPo]

From digging out driveways to checking on area seniors Good Samaritans have been out and about performing good deeds despite the cold. [WAVE3]

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week, offering fresh evidence that the labor market was gathering steam. [Reuters]

It was about noon on Wednesday and Kenneth Williams hadn’t eaten breakfast. In fact, he hasn’t eaten since Tuesday afternoon–a peanut butter sandwich. [WFPL]

Google is warning that the government’s quiet plan to expand the FBI’s authority to remotely access computer files amounts to a “monumental” constitutional concern. [National Journal]

A Missouri real-estate developer is planning to build one of the largest industrial buildings in Jefferson County on land that it’s buying near Louisville International Airport. [Business First]

More students at Greater Clark County Schools are starting to take advantage of the state’s 21st Century Scholars program, and administrators hope to get more seventh- and eighth-graders to sign up early. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Bread & Circuses Can Only Get Crazier

It’s almost as if the new school board doesn’t know how to use their googler. They’re proposing moving school board meetings around to various school sites. Unfortunately, that idea from David Jones, has been a disaster for other districts — like Montgomery County. While it gives a tiny number of people a chance to come to a meeting and gives board members a chance to see inside schools, it ultimately creates confusion and makes it tough for transportation-challenged individuals to plan to attend meetings. What Jones isn’t telling anyone and the reporter is ignoring: This is yet another failed Terry Holliday idea. [WDRB]

Metro Council members questioned the city paying millions to Cordish Co. as part of the downtown Omni tower that will include a hotel and apartments even though the company is no longer involved in the project. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. But there’s nothing to see here, move along. Just ignore it. Pay attention to Greg Fischer’s bread and circuses and everything will be all right. [WHAS11]

A judge in Kentucky has granted a divorce to a same-sex couple despite the fact the state doesn’t recognize gay marriage. [H-L]

Kentucky State Police renew their plea to the public for information that will lead to Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis’ killer. [WLKY]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up another broad challenge to President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law. [HuffPo]

Prospect police are searching for a man who pointed a gun at a woman as she left a daycare Tuesday morning, according to Chief Jeff Sherrard. [WAVE3]

At 8:16 a.m. on the morning of January 9, 2014, the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection received the first of what would quickly become an avalanche of complaints. [The Atlantic]

Louisville’s new fleet of electric buses are lighter, quieter and cleaner than the old, carbon monoxide-emitting trolleys residents have grown accustomed to seeing (and perhaps riding) downtown. [WFPL]

The researchers also say they detected crude MCHM in the Ohio River at Louisville, Kentucky, meaning the chemical traveled at least 390 miles downriver from the spill. [Think Progress]

One of the Midwest’s largest law firms has named a new leader at its Louisville office. Geoff White has been named member-in-charge of Frost Brown Todd LLC in Louisville, assuming the role from John R. McCall, who held the position for just more than two years. [Business First]

The lawsuit that put a halt to the Gateway Development Project at 10th and Spring streets in Jeffersonville last year has been settled in principle, and a new request for proposals for the project has been issued by the city’s redevelopment commission. [News & Tribune]

The Norm: One Hot JCPS Mess After Another

A student at Ball State University wants to start a conversation about mental illness and suicide through film, but he needs the public’s help. [WDRB]

Appealing his firing in the wake of high-profile testing violations, former Male High School Principal David Mike wrapped up his case on Friday before a state tribunal — arguing that he wasn’t guilty of trying to cheat on ACT tests and did not try to cover it up during investigations. [C-J/AKN]

The Transit Authority of River City plans to unveil an old fixture once housed in its Union Station facility which was almost placed out for junk nearly four decades ago. [WHAS11]

Tree advocates and state transportation officials are at odds over whether plantings in urban areas are more beneficial to the environment or more detrimental to road safety. [H-L]

When will local media stop giving this guy the spotlight? [WLKY]

The Senate passed the $1.1 trillion government funding bill Saturday night that will keep Uncle Sam in business through next September, while handing lucrative Christmas presents to Wall Street and political parties. [HuffPo]

The Clark County Sheriff’s office said it has recovered some of the items stolen in a string of break-ins. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul has filed a bill seeking to repeal President Obama’s executive order that delays deportation of five million immigrants. [The Hill]

Today is the last day for the public to submit ideas and comments on the proposals from Move Louisville, an initiative to increase mobility between downtown and the rest of Jefferson County. [WFPL]

Parents of almost half the young children killed by a gunman at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, two years ago on Sunday have taken initial steps toward filing lawsuits tied to one of the deadliest school shootings in U.S. history. [Reuters]

South End Services Inc. of Louisville removed the final pieces of a set of bleachers at old Cardinal Stadium. The stadium is managed by the Kentucky State Fair Board. [Business First]

In its impound lot, the New Albany Police Department has four militarized Humvee vehicles worth more than $3.7 million combined. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is Finally Reviewing Monstrous Salaries

TARC celebrated its 40th birthday Monday by announcing it will soon have the largest fleet of all-electric buses in the country. TARC will put a fleet of 10 new Zerobuses on the road by the end of the year. [WDRB]

Max St. John cringes when he hears a gay slur tossed out in the hallways of his school. “It’s disheartening,” he said. “It makes you feel less than human.” [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A community came together Monday evening to rally around one woman and protest a much larger issue. [WHAS11]

When 61-year-old Glen Turley lost his job as a coal company truck driver, he did what many people his age shudder to consider: He went back to school to find a new career. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Buffalo Trace captured international attention last fall when 65 cases of 20-year-old Pappy Van Winkle bourbon disappeared without a trace. Now, 13 months later, Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton, who once promised to “bring Pappy home” says “Pappy” is gone. [WLKY]

With Democrats holding the White House and Republicans controlling both chambers of Congress, it’s been suggested that the odds are slim of any major legislation becoming law over the next two years. But officials in the Obama administration and on Capitol Hill say there is one issue that may have enough cross-party appeal to break through the logjams. That issue is criminal justice reform. [HuffPo]

From teachers, to administrators and bus drivers, a review will look at the more than 500 positions within Jefferson County Public Schools and how much they get paid. [WAVE3]

U.S. President Barack Obama on Monday said Internet service providers should be regulated more like public utilities to make sure they grant equal access to all content providers, touching off intense protests from cable and telecoms companies and Republican lawmakers. [Reuters]

A Jefferson County Public Schools teacher filed a lawsuit Monday against the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System, which has been called one of the worst-funded pension systems for educators in the U.S. [WFPL]

Congressman John Yarmuth is one of only seven of 30 Democrats from the 2006 wave returning to Washington next year. [WaPo]

Louisville Metro Council could vote soon on a measure to raise the minimum wage in Louisville. [Business First]

The parties involved in funding the construction of a heavy haul corridor between the River Ridge Commerce Center and the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville said that the project could cost much more than anticipated. [News & Tribune]

Yarmuth To Push Council On Minimum Wage

Louisville police have started a new search for a company to outfit officers with body cameras, slowing down an effort already behind the department’s self-imposed schedule. [WDRB]

To get a feel for just how bitter the contract dispute is between the Metropolitan Sewer District and one of its two unions, Laborers International Union of North America Local 576, just read a letter a union organizer tells me me LIUNA delivered to the board. [C-J/AKN]

Indiana alcohol sales will be legal for an extra hour on Sunday morning with the end of daylight saving time. [WHAS11]

“We’ve had people come from all over America to help us ditch Mitch,” said Bill Londrigan, president of Kentucky’s AFL-CIO. Asking for a show of hands from those who had traveled from out of state, Londrigan encouraged those whose hands shot up to say where they were from, and shouts of Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey rang out from the crowd. [H-L]

Two LMPD officers are on administrative duties after a man police say fired at those officers was killed. [WLKY]

During Obama’s first five years as president, the Justice Department and the U.S. military brought seven criminal prosecutions for national security leaks — more than twice as many as all previous presidents put together. [Yahoo]

The candidates for Floyd County Sheriff are criticizing each other for lacking the experience necessary for the job. [WAVE3]

His Democratic opponent argues Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell supports tax breaks that encourage businesses to ship jobs overseas. But that message won’t get much support at Campbellsville Apparel, a textile company which supplies materials for federal government contracts and which employs a lot of folks who once worked at Fruit of the Loom — a company which moved jobs from Kentucky to Mexico. [Ronnie Ellis]

With her back turned, Jo Ann Smith couldn’t see if the approaching bus was the one she was waiting for. Her bus would come from the west, but standing at the corner of Fifth Street and Broadway, she positioned herself to the east because on Monday the blustery wind was full of leaves. She didn’t want a face full of fall foliage. [WFPL]

On Thursday afternoon, Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3) will testify before the Louisville Metro Council’s Labor and Economic Development Committee. Yarmuth will discuss the proposed ordinance to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour in Louisville. [Press Release]

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis has named a new leader for its Louisville branch. [Business First]

The poverty rate in Southern Indiana increased by nearly 60 percent from 2000 to 2010 after decreasing by 12 percent in the 1990s, according to a study by an Indiana University Southeast research team. [News & Tribune]