At Least Louisville Has Fine Bourbon

Louisville is obsessed with killing its people. Everything is puppies and rainbows, though. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville has been named one of the most LGBTQ-friendly campuses in the South by Campus Pride Index. [C-J/AKN]

This weekend marked the annual Newburg Community Days. For more than 50 years, the Newburg community began a tradition of a homecoming weekend in August to celebrate unity, pride and welcome back former residents. [WHAS11]

Everybody freaked out about the minimum wage again this weekend. [H-L]

At least he wasn’t shot? Metro police are investigating after a man was stabbed Sunday night. It occurred in the 1800 block of Frankfort Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WLKY]

A St. Louis County policeman who boasted of how he spent his “annual Michael Brown bonus” has prompted an investigation by the department. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Possibility City doesn’t take public transportation seriously. [WAVE3]

Less than a month after one of the University of Cincinnati’s police officers shot and killed an unarmed driver who was not a student during a traffic stop, the school said on Friday it would resume off-campus patrols. [Reuters]

Responding to backlash over his leadership changes at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear says he will appoint Prospect cattle breeder Jack Ragsdale as chairman emeritus of the committee he led for 41 years. [WFPL]

American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern has long portrayed her organization as a beacon of openness, once declaring “we made a commitment that we want to lead the effort in transparency.” But when the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, opened an inquiry last year into the Red Cross’ disaster work, McGovern tried to get it killed behind the scenes. [ProPublica]

Bourbon Women, a Louisville-based women’s group that’s focused on bourbon culture, will host its second annual “sip-osium” Friday, Aug. 21, through Sunday, Aug. 23. [Business First]

A representative for the recently formed Clarksville GOP filed a complaint Thursday regarding event permit requirements not being enforced by the town’s Planning and Zoning Department. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Yes, Tolls Are Still The Local Devil

And you thought people in Indiana wouldn’t get screwed. About three times as many residents of Clark County, Ind., travel to Louisville to work than do people commuting in the opposite direction, new data shows. [WDRB]

If you missed it last week, another Fischer official jumped ship. [C-J/AKN]

People are still the absolute worst. Metro Parks is dealing with a second case of vandalism at Algonquin Park in a little over a month. [WHAS11]

A Louisville woman who authorities say admitted to setting a series of fires throughout the city has been sentenced to 20 years in prison. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A JCPS student is home safe after being left at the wrong bus stop Thursday, and not being located until nearly 2 a.m. Friday. [WLKY]

Your tax dollars at work — all so Jack can score a few extra political points. Fifteen state attorneys general petitioned a federal court in Washington on Thursday to block new U.S. rules to curb carbon emissions from power plants, in the first of several expected legal challenges to the Obama administration measure. [HuffPo]

Gas prices at dozens of Louisville gas stations plummeted 50 cents overnight, less than two days after they spiked by the same amount amid speculation that problems at a Chicago-area refinery would cause shortages. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Department of Justice says that banning people from sleeping in public could be a violation of their constitutional rights. [Time]

For the first time, Kentucky State Fair-goers who take a TARC bus will pay half-price adult admission and, of course, not pay the $8 parking fee. [WFPL]

It should be easy to come up with a weekly column during a governor’s race, but the 2015 election between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway is unlike any I’ve ever seen. [Ronnie Ellis]

An Ohio development company plans to buy the former Mercy Academy property and build a four-story apartment complex on the East Broadway site. [Business First]

With just over two weeks until applications for the $84 million, statewide Regional Cities Initiative must be submitted, the board that’s required to submit the application locally has yet to be formed. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Seeing “Cordish” Is Like Seeing A Big Car Crash On The Side Of The Road

Because the company doesn’t investigate, it just covers things up and pays people off. However, Smith refused to explain how the company investigated the allegations on their own. “I will not go into that,” Smith said when he was asked how the company does it’s own investigations. [WDRB]

Dismayed by allegations of racial discrimination at 4th Street Live, activists denounced the entertainment district and its developer on Wednesday, suggesting that the developer has some civil rights groups in its pocket. [C-J/AKN]

The person police said is behind a threatening note left at the Louisville Jewish Community Center is now behind bars. [WHAS11]

Brown-Forman CEO Paul Varga said Wednesday that the company aspires to grow Woodford Reserve, Old Forester, the Herradura tequila family and other major labels into billion-dollar brands. [H-L]

Property owners near GE Appliance Park have until Saturday, Aug. 1 to submit claims for cleanup costs related to April’s six-alarm fire. [WLKY]

It’s a whole new day for Republican presidential contenders making their second bid for the White House. Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is making serious efforts to woo black voters, and is becoming one of the fiercest critics of real estate mogul Donald Trump. Meanwhile former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, known for his stringent opposition to same-sex marriage, is softening his rhetoric about gay people. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? A dog left inside a car in the hot sun died from heat exhaustion, leading to the arrest of an Oldham County woman. [WAVE3]

Though most states are slowing their emissions, the report shows eight states moving in the opposite direction, each seeing an increase in its emissions rate between 2008 and 2015. They include Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Idaho and Alaska. [Climate Central]

Barry Barker would rather not talk about some buses in TARC’s fleet. They’re buses like the one Metro Councilman Tom Owen rode into downtown early Tuesday morning. That bus stalled and had to be banged, slammed and shoved by the driver to get running again, Owen said. [WFPL]

Even as immigration remains a hot topic in the U.S. presidential campaign, the number of people emigrating from Mexico to the United States, legally and illegally, has dropped sharply in recent years, research published Wednesday shows. [Reuters]

U.S. News & World Report released its annual Best Hospitals List Tuesday, which ranks hospitals on medical specialties such as cancer, cardiology, orthopedics and so on. [Business First]

The state will pay $124,500 to end a lawsuit brought by a man who wasn’t provided with a sign language interpreter during his mother’s criminal hearings in 2010 and 2011. In March, the U.S. District Court Southern District of Indiana in New Albany found in favor of Steven Prakel after he claimed courts and judges in Dearborn County failed to hire an interpreter during his mother’s hearings related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated and driving on a suspended license charges. [News & Tribune]

River Gunshot City Morning Update

What, no mention of transfers and how those are handled? Nothing but TARC puppies & rainbows? Surely not. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is planning to boost participation in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program by assigning two health employees to reach new participants in the wake of eliminating half of their clinics. Probably too little, too late. [C-J/AKN]

One of two Louisville rappers shot early Monday morning after leaving a concert has died. [WHAS11]

Next week, the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees is expected to approve UK’s largest budget ever, a $3.4 billion document that reflects a burgeoning health care enterprise paired with continued reliance on tuition paid by out-of-state students. [H-L]

A 9-year-old boy who was shot in the leg Monday night continues to recover at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced Tuesday that the Pentagon has added “sexual orientation” as a protected class under its Military Equal Opportunity Policy. [HuffPo]

A community is left shaken more than 24 hours after a triple shooting alerted the Russell neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Coal companies and 14 states sued to stop a draft regulation to cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, a priority for the Obama administration. [NY Times]

Preservationists are having difficulty finding a suitable site for the Old Louisville Water Co. building. [WFPL]

Officially, the U.S. has a high school graduation rate of 81 percent — a historic high. But our months-long investigation, in partnership with reporters at 14 member stations, reveals that this number should be taken with a big grain of salt. [NPR]

A section of vacant properties on West Main Street near the Louisville Slugger Museum and Frazier History Museum are the target of a major redevelopment that could top $20 million. [Business First]

A former bookkeeper at a Jeffersonville business is facing federal charges on allegations she used company credit cards to make personal purchases, including firearms, funeral services and Halloween costumes. [News & Tribune]

County Attorney’s Office Sounds Fun

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office has reprimanded a prosecutor and ordered him to go to sensitivity training for making “insensitive and derogatory” comments about the family that owns Hwang’s Martial Arts Academy. [WDRB]

Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer will be called to testify before a Kentucky legislative committee this month over allegations that his office is not physically examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

You might have to dig a little deeper to pay for your college degree as the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is set to vote on a tuition hike Thursday. [WHAS11]

Ahmed Zayat spends big money buying and betting on horses, and brags about how successful he’s been at everything he’s set out to accomplish. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just days into a pilot program for police body cameras, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has gone on the record to address concerns from the public. [WLKY]

The leaders of six of Europe’s largest oil producers are calling for a plan to price planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, citing climate change as “a critical challenge for our world.” [HuffPo]

For the third consecutive year Ford Motor Company says it will shorten the annual summer shutdown at some of its plants in order to meet the demand by consumers for vehicles. [WAVE3]

New York City, Baltimore and other major cities have seen a recent rise in gun violence. The uptick has raised the alarm for many police departments that worry the summer months may make the problem worse. [NPR]

Louisville transportation officials are offering bus passes to young people this summer at a discounted rate. [WFPL]

More than 150 people in southeast Indiana have been diagnosed with HIV, the largest outbreak in state history. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. has completed the sale of its Concentra Inc. subsidiary for $1.06 billion in cash. [Business First]

Section 8 housing voucher system, social security income, food stamps — Kelli Orman wishes she didn’t have to rely on any of these low-income assistance services. [News & Tribune]

The TV Folks Love Scaring Meemaws

Instead of scaring the absolute living shit out of the elderly people watching television, maybe start educating the community about needle exchanges? Maybe do something about educating folks on the proper way to discard used needles? [WDRB]

After working into the early hours of last Wednesday morning, paramedic Jon Tyson wheeled into his garage, plugged a large black power cord into his electric-powered Nissan Leaf and hit the sack. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe if we keep killing people we won’t have to worry about the poor or the sick. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul led a successful effort to block renewal of the Patriot Act early Saturday morning, followed by a deeply divided Senate leaving Washington without taking action on the National Security Agency’s soon-to-expire power to collect Americans’ phone records. [H-L]

The Indiana attorney general’s office says the state had to pay more than $1.4 million in fees to plaintiffs’ attorneys in its unsuccessful attempt to maintain its ban on same-sex marriages. [WLKY]

With more and more U.S. states facing public transit funding cuts despite record-breaking commuter demand, many transit systems are being forced to consider service cuts or fare hikes, both of which disproportionally impact low-income riders and neighborhoods. [HuffPo]

A family who lost their son has spent years turning their personal tragedy into a community event to spread positivity. [WAVE3]

The sleepy United States senators thought they were done voting. But then, around 1 a.m. on the Saturday before Memorial Day, Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky and presidential candidate, marched spryly to the Senate floor to let it be known that, no, he would not agree to extend the federal government’s bulk collection of phone records program. Not even for one day. [NY Times]

Louisville residents use public transportation at one of the lowest rates among the nation’s largest cities, according to new research from the University of Michigan. [WFPL]

Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind’s long relationship with dogs, showing canine domestication may have occurred earlier than previously thought. [Reuters]

It’s time for a reminder about Adam Edelen and educational audits. An audit is NOT a forensic accounting investigation. It’s typically a random sampling that gets reviewed unless specific concerns are brought to light. Or, in the case of Montgomery County, not. Because specific concerns were deliberately ignored by Edelen’s team. When he says there was no fraud discovered? Remember: not a forensic accounting, not an in-depth investigation of every nook and cranny. [Business First]

Michael Crone asked who in the room knew a bully or a victim or a witness to bullying. Only a few hands raised. Crone knew better. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Loves Cutting TARC Routes

TARC is asking for the public’s opinion about possibly cutting service on three of its busiest routes. [WDRB]

Clarksville Community Schools — which Superintendent Kimberly Knott called “the neediest school district in Southern Indiana” — stands to lose more than $500,000 under Indiana’s new budget, which was signed last week by Gov. Mike Pence and introduces changes to the school funding formula. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway is suing Marathon Petroleum Corp. over high gas prices. The 2015 gubernatorial candidate filed the complaint Tuesday with the United States District Court for the Western District of Kentucky – one week ahead of the state’s primary election. [WHAS11]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. Judicial corruption is a big deal in the rest of the state. [H-L]

Following a heated public meeting, the Floyd County Council is holding off on a decision to cut half of the county’s animal control budget. [WLKY]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

People are freaking out because police found marijuana growing at the scene of a shooting. [WAVE3]

Jerry Abramson sends emails to the White House staff. [White House]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Indianapolis-based American Senior Communities LLC plans to build a new facility in Louisville. [Business First]

To downtown Jeffersonville resident McNeil Wynn, TARC is vital in his everyday commute to Louisville. [News & Tribune]