River Gunshot City Morning Update

What, no mention of transfers and how those are handled? Nothing but TARC puppies & rainbows? Surely not. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is planning to boost participation in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program by assigning two health employees to reach new participants in the wake of eliminating half of their clinics. Probably too little, too late. [C-J/AKN]

One of two Louisville rappers shot early Monday morning after leaving a concert has died. [WHAS11]

Next week, the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees is expected to approve UK’s largest budget ever, a $3.4 billion document that reflects a burgeoning health care enterprise paired with continued reliance on tuition paid by out-of-state students. [H-L]

A 9-year-old boy who was shot in the leg Monday night continues to recover at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced Tuesday that the Pentagon has added “sexual orientation” as a protected class under its Military Equal Opportunity Policy. [HuffPo]

A community is left shaken more than 24 hours after a triple shooting alerted the Russell neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Coal companies and 14 states sued to stop a draft regulation to cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, a priority for the Obama administration. [NY Times]

Preservationists are having difficulty finding a suitable site for the Old Louisville Water Co. building. [WFPL]

Officially, the U.S. has a high school graduation rate of 81 percent — a historic high. But our months-long investigation, in partnership with reporters at 14 member stations, reveals that this number should be taken with a big grain of salt. [NPR]

A section of vacant properties on West Main Street near the Louisville Slugger Museum and Frazier History Museum are the target of a major redevelopment that could top $20 million. [Business First]

A former bookkeeper at a Jeffersonville business is facing federal charges on allegations she used company credit cards to make personal purchases, including firearms, funeral services and Halloween costumes. [News & Tribune]

County Attorney’s Office Sounds Fun

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office has reprimanded a prosecutor and ordered him to go to sensitivity training for making “insensitive and derogatory” comments about the family that owns Hwang’s Martial Arts Academy. [WDRB]

Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer will be called to testify before a Kentucky legislative committee this month over allegations that his office is not physically examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

You might have to dig a little deeper to pay for your college degree as the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is set to vote on a tuition hike Thursday. [WHAS11]

Ahmed Zayat spends big money buying and betting on horses, and brags about how successful he’s been at everything he’s set out to accomplish. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just days into a pilot program for police body cameras, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has gone on the record to address concerns from the public. [WLKY]

The leaders of six of Europe’s largest oil producers are calling for a plan to price planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, citing climate change as “a critical challenge for our world.” [HuffPo]

For the third consecutive year Ford Motor Company says it will shorten the annual summer shutdown at some of its plants in order to meet the demand by consumers for vehicles. [WAVE3]

New York City, Baltimore and other major cities have seen a recent rise in gun violence. The uptick has raised the alarm for many police departments that worry the summer months may make the problem worse. [NPR]

Louisville transportation officials are offering bus passes to young people this summer at a discounted rate. [WFPL]

More than 150 people in southeast Indiana have been diagnosed with HIV, the largest outbreak in state history. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. has completed the sale of its Concentra Inc. subsidiary for $1.06 billion in cash. [Business First]

Section 8 housing voucher system, social security income, food stamps — Kelli Orman wishes she didn’t have to rely on any of these low-income assistance services. [News & Tribune]

The TV Folks Love Scaring Meemaws

Instead of scaring the absolute living shit out of the elderly people watching television, maybe start educating the community about needle exchanges? Maybe do something about educating folks on the proper way to discard used needles? [WDRB]

After working into the early hours of last Wednesday morning, paramedic Jon Tyson wheeled into his garage, plugged a large black power cord into his electric-powered Nissan Leaf and hit the sack. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe if we keep killing people we won’t have to worry about the poor or the sick. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul led a successful effort to block renewal of the Patriot Act early Saturday morning, followed by a deeply divided Senate leaving Washington without taking action on the National Security Agency’s soon-to-expire power to collect Americans’ phone records. [H-L]

The Indiana attorney general’s office says the state had to pay more than $1.4 million in fees to plaintiffs’ attorneys in its unsuccessful attempt to maintain its ban on same-sex marriages. [WLKY]

With more and more U.S. states facing public transit funding cuts despite record-breaking commuter demand, many transit systems are being forced to consider service cuts or fare hikes, both of which disproportionally impact low-income riders and neighborhoods. [HuffPo]

A family who lost their son has spent years turning their personal tragedy into a community event to spread positivity. [WAVE3]

The sleepy United States senators thought they were done voting. But then, around 1 a.m. on the Saturday before Memorial Day, Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky and presidential candidate, marched spryly to the Senate floor to let it be known that, no, he would not agree to extend the federal government’s bulk collection of phone records program. Not even for one day. [NY Times]

Louisville residents use public transportation at one of the lowest rates among the nation’s largest cities, according to new research from the University of Michigan. [WFPL]

Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind’s long relationship with dogs, showing canine domestication may have occurred earlier than previously thought. [Reuters]

It’s time for a reminder about Adam Edelen and educational audits. An audit is NOT a forensic accounting investigation. It’s typically a random sampling that gets reviewed unless specific concerns are brought to light. Or, in the case of Montgomery County, not. Because specific concerns were deliberately ignored by Edelen’s team. When he says there was no fraud discovered? Remember: not a forensic accounting, not an in-depth investigation of every nook and cranny. [Business First]

Michael Crone asked who in the room knew a bully or a victim or a witness to bullying. Only a few hands raised. Crone knew better. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Loves Cutting TARC Routes

TARC is asking for the public’s opinion about possibly cutting service on three of its busiest routes. [WDRB]

Clarksville Community Schools — which Superintendent Kimberly Knott called “the neediest school district in Southern Indiana” — stands to lose more than $500,000 under Indiana’s new budget, which was signed last week by Gov. Mike Pence and introduces changes to the school funding formula. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway is suing Marathon Petroleum Corp. over high gas prices. The 2015 gubernatorial candidate filed the complaint Tuesday with the United States District Court for the Western District of Kentucky – one week ahead of the state’s primary election. [WHAS11]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. Judicial corruption is a big deal in the rest of the state. [H-L]

Following a heated public meeting, the Floyd County Council is holding off on a decision to cut half of the county’s animal control budget. [WLKY]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

People are freaking out because police found marijuana growing at the scene of a shooting. [WAVE3]

Jerry Abramson sends emails to the White House staff. [White House]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Indianapolis-based American Senior Communities LLC plans to build a new facility in Louisville. [Business First]

To downtown Jeffersonville resident McNeil Wynn, TARC is vital in his everyday commute to Louisville. [News & Tribune]

Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Dan Johnson Got More Egg On His Face

Louisville Metro Council’s public safety committee voted Tuesday to send the implementation of a local needle exchange program to a full council vote. [WDRB]

The Transit Authority of River City plans to cut bus service on several key routes, effective Aug. 16, to save about $1.2 million next fiscal year. [C-J/AKN]

One week before their stories will be shared on the floor of the Supreme Court, half a dozen same-sex couples from Kentucky and their attorneys met to celebrate progress to this point, and what could be a historic decision that changes how marriage is recognized in America. [WHAS11]

Nine people were indicted Tuesday on charges of spiriting away what Kentucky authorities say was more bourbon whiskey than one person could drink in a lifetime. But, uh, we could definitely drink that in a lifetime. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A former Louisville Metro Police Department school resource officer accused of putting a student in a chokehold until he passed out has been indicted on some charges in the case. [WLKY]

You don’t have to stop recording police when they’re out and about in public. [HuffPo]

A controversial proposal to merge Louisville’s city and suburban fire departments is likely dead after its only sponsor took his name off the legislation. Way to go, Dan Johnston, you’re a shining star of intelligence these days. [WAVE3]

Detroit just had the single largest tax foreclosure in American history. As many as 100,000 of the city’s residents — about a seventh of the total number — are now on track for what many are calling an eviction “conveyer belt.” [Mother Jones]

The local health department in the Southern Indiana community battling an HIV outbreak has handed out thousands of needles to residents since an exchange program went into effect April 4. [WFPL]

You don’t understand the world you live in if you haven’t read Eric Lipton’s three-part series in the New York Times on the staggering “explosion” of relentless, grimy lobbying of state attorneys general. Lipton just won a Pulitzer Prize for his work, and it’s truly deserved: it’s a masterpiece of investigative reporting, built on diligent use of open records laws by Lipton and Times researchers. [The Intercept]

First Savings Bank might consolidate some of its operations and move its headquarters from Clarksville to Jeffersonville. [Business First]

To Austin High School Principal Sherman Smith, it’s just bullying on a bigger stage. [News & Tribune]

Suck At Your Job? Get Rewarded At JCPS

The Jefferson County Board of Education is looking to extend Superintendent Donna Hargens’ contract by four years. Louisville’s wealthy electeds always reward those who bumble along. [WDRB]

A jury has awarded nearly $5 million to a courier for a Louisville law firm who suffered a traumatic brain injury when he was hit by a TARC bus. [C-J/AKN]

There was no woe on Louisville’s amazing Walnut Street in the 1950’s and early 60’s. [WHAS11]

Ann Parrish remembers trying to wrangle and bundle her two toddlers during last winter’s cold snap so they could get on a bus to find another place to stay. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian hit by a vehicle in Possibility City. [WLKY]

James Risen reiterated on Tuesday a warning about the White House that he delivered nearly one year ago. [HuffPo]

From digging out driveways to checking on area seniors Good Samaritans have been out and about performing good deeds despite the cold. [WAVE3]

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week, offering fresh evidence that the labor market was gathering steam. [Reuters]

It was about noon on Wednesday and Kenneth Williams hadn’t eaten breakfast. In fact, he hasn’t eaten since Tuesday afternoon–a peanut butter sandwich. [WFPL]

Google is warning that the government’s quiet plan to expand the FBI’s authority to remotely access computer files amounts to a “monumental” constitutional concern. [National Journal]

A Missouri real-estate developer is planning to build one of the largest industrial buildings in Jefferson County on land that it’s buying near Louisville International Airport. [Business First]

More students at Greater Clark County Schools are starting to take advantage of the state’s 21st Century Scholars program, and administrators hope to get more seventh- and eighth-graders to sign up early. [News & Tribune]