Compassionate City With A Bullet

The mother of two sons killed Sunday in the Shawnee neighborhood told WDRB the man who killed them preyed on them and was hoping to recruit them in his gang. [WDRB]

A lack of front door intercoms, a door propped open, overgrown shrubbery – these are some of the most common security vulnerabilities in schools, according to a Saturday panel about school safety during the National Rifle Association’s annual meeting in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

A judge has ended a restraining order that barred the city of Louisville from removing a 120-year-old monument to Confederate soldiers that sits near the University of Louisville. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s state universities are grappling with nearly a decade of budget cuts, about $170 million in all. Over the next two years, they’ll have to cut another 4.5 percent. As the schools prepare their biennial budgets, which have to be ready in June, they are announcing exactly how they will address deficits caused by decreased state support and increased costs for pensions and health care. Nationally, Kentucky is losing ground against other states, which are starting to reinvest in higher education. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Are we still pretending that other law enforcement officers there don’t know what happened? Okay. [WLKY]

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R) and officials in 10 additional states have filed a lawsuit against the Obama administration after it told schools and colleges to allow transgender students to use the bathroom that matches their gender identity to comply with existing civil rights laws. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Urban League, located at 1535 West Broadway, hosted a community conversation Tuesday night [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering about what’s going on in Frankfort? Let’s just say it’s a hot mess of a sex scandal involving legislators and law enforcement officers. [Page One]

A Louisville Catholic school will be the site of a new air pollution experiment, as researchers at the University of Louisville study whether trees and greenery can reduce pollution from a nearby roadway. [WFPL]

Most shootings with four deaths or injuries are invisible outside their communities. And most of the lives they scar are black. [NY Times]

Louisville Central Community Centers Inc. has named Kevin Fields Sr. president and chief operating officer. [Business First]

After reviewing some of the issues at each of the three campuses, some of the details of the demographic study and a survey to rank school needs, Doug Reiter chimed in with what he and others think it’ll take for West Clark Community Schools to get residents to vote in favor of the referendum. [News & Tribune]

MSD Will Probably Make You Crazy

JCPS wants to make sure no child goes hungry during the summer. Here’s how you can take advantage of the district’s largest summer meals effort to date. [WDRB]

In a move few expected, the Bullitt County Board of Education voted Monday night to postpone any consideration of redistricting until after January 2017. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, now GLI cares about something – the MSD rate hike. [WHAS11]

William Thielen, executive director of the Kentucky Retirement Systems, told the state pension fund’s board of trustees Thursday that he will retire effective Sept. 1 after five years in the job. [H-L]

If you can get shot in J-town, you can get shot anywhere. Compassionate City! Police are investigating a shooting in Jeffersontown in which one person was shot. [WLKY]

Oh, great, the NYC gays are trying to make Kim Davis a thing again. They apparently don’t realize that you’re not supposed to throw water on the damn Gremlins or whatever. CALM DOWN, BEYONCE, LET THE MONSTER STAY IN HER REDNECK CAVE! [HuffPo]

The Metropolitan Sewer District has taken 5 1/2 percent hikes every year. This year, MSD wants a 20 percent increase – the largest in almost a decade. The rate hike, which would need approval from the Louisville Metro Council, had us questioning what the money will pay for and how much your bill would go up. [WAVE3]

Shouts of “Shame, shame, shame,” erupted in the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday as Republican lawmakers narrowly defeated legislation to protect the civil rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender employees of government contractors. [Reuters]

Justin Schmidt grabbed some pizza and took a seat against the wall. It felt good to rest his legs. [WFPL]

When the ball dropped in Times Square on Jan. 1 of this year, more than half of the country disapproved of the job that President Obama was doing, according to Gallup. That boded poorly for the Democrats over the course of the year; presidential approval correlates to both how his party fares in the presidential race (even if he’s not on the ticket) but also to the results of Senate races. An unpopular Obama suggested a less popular whoever-was-about-to-win-the-Democratic-nomination. [WaPo]

Humana Inc. has learned a lot about Louisville over the past year — it knows our major health problems are diabetes, behavioral health and respiratory conditions, and it’s starting to understand why. [Business First]

Now that building permits are temporarily frozen in Charlestown’s business district, one business owner hoping to develop property said he’s looking at his options, which he said could include legal action. [News & Tribune]

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Let’s Lock All The Youth Up Or Something

If you missed it earlier this week, kids these days are horrible. [WDRB]

A judge has upheld Gov. Matt Bevin’s right to cut higher education in the current budget year, ruling that under Kentucky law the governor has the authority to reduce spending within state government. Wingate’s order rejects arguments in the high-profile lawsuit filed April 11 by Attorney General Andy Beshear. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Are y’all goin over to the shootin festival? [WHAS11]

Only about 20 percent of Kentucky’s 3.2. million registered voters made it to the polls for Tuesday’s primary election. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Guess what most gay people don’t give a flip about, Fairness Campaign: hate-filled, backward religious organizations. Maybe you should keep your money – donated mostly by gay people – out of church nonsense. [WLKY]

The House passed a massive National Defense Authorization Act late Wednesday, and tucked inside of it, a provision that would allow federal contractors to fire employees for being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. [HuffPo]

Wednesday marked 10 years since Earon Harper was murder and 10 years since her daughter 2-year-old Erica Hughes was shot multiple times in the head and rushed to the hospital. [WAVE3]

The overdose death toll from opioids, both prescription drugs and heroin, has almost quadrupled since 1999. In 2014 alone, 28,000 people died of opioid overdoses, more than half from prescription drugs. [ProPublica]

This sort of thing is a big deal for food deserts. [WFPL]

On Friday afternoon, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a new rule regarding the implementation of nondiscrimination protections under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It guarantees that transgender people cannot be denied health care by professionals that receive federal funding, and also that it is discriminatory to refuse them access to transition-related services. [ThinkProgress]

The lowest-paid employee at 21st Century Parks Inc. earns just $1 per year. But “he may double his wage after this,” CEO Dan Jones said at the Louisville nonprofit’s fundraiser kickoff luncheon Monday, benefiting The Parklands of Floyds Fork. [Business First]

Indiana Department of Transportation officials met with contractor representatives and New Albany city engineer Larry Summers at Seymour District offices last week to launch a $811,000 Local Public Agency (LPA) project that will make improvements at the Spring Street/Silver Street intersection this summer. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Drama Must Just Be Never-Ending

Approximately $1.7 million is being cut by Jefferson County Public Schools by eliminating 25 central office positions, according to new information obtained through an open records request. [WDRB]

Former Metro Council President David Tandy has been hired by one of Louisville’s oldest and largest law firms as an attorney and lobbyist who will be tasked with finding opportunities for emerging minority and women-owned companies. [C-J/AKN]

From Safari and TeensConnect camps at the Louisville Zoo, to Summer Reading and the annual Cultural Pass, Louisville is offering dozens of programs designed to keep students’ minds and bodies active during the summer break, Mayor Greg Fischer announced. [WHAS11]

The drugmaker Purdue Pharma launched OxyContin two decades ago with a bold marketing claim: One dose relieves pain for 12 hours, more than twice as long as generic medications. [H-L]

Another day, another shooting or two. Police are investigating two shootings blocks apart in the Parkland neighborhood. [WLKY]

Two Boston brothers accused of urinating on and beating a homeless Mexican man and telling police “Donald Trump was right: All these illegals need to be deported,” were sentenced to prison on Monday, prosecutors said. [HuffPo]

A same-sex couple is accusing the Archdiocese of Louisville of discriminating against them after Catholic Cemeteries denied the design for their joint tombstone. [WAVE3]

Data released Friday by the Major Cities Chiefs Police Association, based on reports from more than 60 cities, showed notable increases in murders in about two dozen cities in the first three months of the year compared to last year and a 9 percent increase nationwide. [NY Times]

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin says the commonwealth has a lot in its favor when it comes to attracting manufacturers. [WFPL]

From the time we began reporting on the archive provided to us in Hong Kong by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, we sought to fulfill his two principal requests for how the materials should be handled: that they be released in conjunction with careful reporting that puts the documents in context and makes them digestible to the public, and that the welfare and reputations of innocent people be safeguarded. As time has gone on, The Intercept has sought out new ways to get documents from the archive into the hands of the public, consistent with the public interest as originally conceived. [The Intercept]

They’re people with advanced degrees who hail from all over the world, and they are relocating to Louisville. [Business First]

Floyd County finances improved by $878,000 Tuesday night. But what happens to that money was the main topic of discussion at the monthly Floyd County Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is What Louisville Deserves After Decades Of Dumb Abramson Cheerleading And Sitting In Denial

Can you imagine if education reporters focused on the root of problems instead of reporting on scandals after the fact? Maybe they could start with not writing fluff once in a while… like when an education commissioner is being ousted and one particular education reporter fell for his spin. [WDRB]

Louisville’s most vulnerable populations face a big hit this summer after local homeless agencies and service providers announced Monday morning that they will have to make up for an 11 percent cut in federal funding. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Surprise! Everybody is getting shot left and right. [WHAS11]

Kentucky transportation officials have started an online service for people to renew their license plates. [H-L]

Another day, another shooting in Compassionate City. Everything is puppies and rainbows. Don’t worry. There’s no crime in Cherokee Triangle, nothing ever happens in St. Matthews. One person is taken to the hospital after a shooting Saturday in the Shawnee neighborhood. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama says his economic legacy is a lot better than he gets credit for. “I actually compare our economic performance to how, historically, countries that have wrenching financial crises perform,” he told The New York Times recently. “By that measure, we probably managed this better than any large economy on Earth in modern history.” [HuffPo]

The Metro Council primary offers a broad field to replace three veterans who did not seek reelection. [WAVE3]

Nearly half a century after the saga of “Mountain Jane Doe” began, local authorities in the small mining town of Harlan, Kentucky, say they are one step closer to identifying the murder victim first recovered from a remote trail outside of town in 1969. [Reveal]

The upcoming primary elections will likely be the deciding vote for a handful of Louisville Metro Council races. [WFPL]

Hillary Clinton is nearing the end of a long Democratic primary that will almost certainly leave her as the party’s presidential nominee. [The Hill]

How long til Fischer gives everything to Cordish again? You know it’s only a matter of time. [Business First]

The Clark County Election Board officially ruled on the 130 provisional ballots cast in the primary election Friday, with totals not changing any races. [News & Tribune]

Everyone Finally Realizes Hargens Sucks

The school day started with another loud show of support for Jefferson County Public Schools teachers and other employees. [WDRB]

As many legal experts had expected, a lawsuit has been dismissed in which University of Louisville students claimed Katina Powell’s book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” diminished the value of their education. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Yet another murder here in Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky will lose $12.6 million next year thanks to a 4.5 percent cut in state funding. At the same time, student financial aid and scholarships will increase by more than $20 million, and fixed costs for things such as utilities and employee health insurance are on the rise. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An improvement plan for the Greater Clark County Schools is stopped by the state. [WLKY]

Goudy’ll be in Louisville for the upcoming NRA funtimes. Remember the House Select Committee on Benghazi? The ninth official probe into what really happened in the Sept. 11, 2012, attacks on the U.S. consulate in eastern Libya? [HuffPo]

Sheronda Morris couldn’t help but identify when she saw the video of a 14-year-old girl being carried to safety after suffering a non-life threatening gunshot wound at the Pegasus Parade on May 5. [WAVE3]

By seizing the Republican presidential nomination for Donald J. Trump on Tuesday night, he and his millions of supporters completed what had seemed unimaginable: a hostile takeover of one of America’s two major political parties. [NY Times]

The long-awaited state audit of the University of Louisville and its separate, nonprofit foundation is delayed. [WFPL]

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, the presidency of George W. Bush changed instantly. In a new collection of never-before-seen photographs from that day, the president can be seen responding to the worst terrorist attack in United States history — an event that would redefine his time in office and propel the nation into two wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. [PBS]

Two big drug companies will pay Kentucky almost $4.8 million. [Business First]

The November slate of six candidates for the Clark County Council At-large race is set with Democrats advancing two incumbents and a current Republican council member losing in the primary. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Ting not your thing? Want to be on the AT&T network with unlimited talk and text and cheap data? Join Cricket and you’ll get a $25 referral credit, $50 port-in credit and another $50 if you’re leaving T-Mobile. [Cricket]

Outsiders: Check Out Our Fun Murder Rate

The signs have been made, the T-shirt color has been selected and the community has been alerted. [WDRB]

A Jefferson County Circuit Court judge on Tuesday agreed to delay until May 25 a hearing on a temporary injunction that has halted the removal of a controversial Confederate monument near the University of Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The riverfront is quiet again as crews are breaking down the stage.[WHAS11]

Kentucky Retirement Systems operate openly and transparently. Unless you’re talking about anything beyond the surface, of course. [H-L]

It appears Bardstown’s mayor will stay in office despite the efforts of several city council members to remove him. [WLKY]

Donald Trump, the real estate magnate and reality television star who has said Mexican immigrants are rapists and has called for banning all Muslims from the U.S., won the Republican primary in the pivotal state of Indiana on Tuesday night. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), his most serious remaining challenger, dropped out. Trump is now the presumptive nominee of the Republican Party. [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City. [WAVE3]

Meanwhile, shady-ass Republicans, because they’ve been paid, are trying to limit damages. Nightmare stories of nurses giving potent drugs meant for one patient to another and surgeons removing the wrong body parts have dominated recent headlines about medical care. Lest you assume those cases are the exceptions, a new study by patient safety researchers provides some context. [WaPo]

It’s Derby Week in Louisville, which means large crowds at the racetrack all week long. On the other side of the track from the grandstand, hundreds of backside workers tend to the horses, working long days, often far away from their families, living in temporary housing until the racing season takes them to another track in another state. [WFPL]

According to a report from the Energy Information Agency, American coal use for electricity dropped 29 percent in 2015, compared to its peak usage in 2007. That means consumption hit 1,045 million short tons in 2007, and dropped fairly steadily to 739 million short tons last year. [ThinkProgress]

Mark Bertolini is not a fan of the Affordable Care Act — at least, not yet. But the Aetna Inc. CEO says he could get behind it if the government made some changes that he thinks would make it easier for companies like his to turn a profit on compliant plans and the exchanges where they’re sold. [Business First]

In a seemingly inexhaustible campaign, Republican presidential hopeful Ted Cruz is digging his heels into Indiana, a state he calls “incredibly important” in winning the nomination. [News & Tribune]