Where’s All That Compassion, Louisville?

More than a decade ago, lawmakers in Frankfort passed the same sex marriage ban that was overturned Friday by the Supreme Court. Reaction at the Capitol to the ruling was muted and mixed. [WDRB]

If Louisville health-care giant Humana sells, as expected, analysts and consultants who track the health care industry predict that a takeover would drastically shrink the local workforce. [C-J/AKN]

By a vote of 25 to 1, the Louisville Metro Council on Thursday approved the FY 2016 Capital and Operating Budgets for Metro Louisville. [WHAS11]

Luke Barlow and Jim Meade of Bardstown met 48 years ago and married in 2009 in Iowa. But, as Barlow said 90 minutes after the Supreme Court declared their marriage legal in Kentucky, the two men had never held hands in public here. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A large LGBT crowd gathered downtown at Jefferson Square to kick-off the celebrations. [WLKY]

Justice Antonin Scalia may have penned the most colorful dissent to Friday’s landmark Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality, but his colleague Clarence Thomas wrote the weirdest. [HuffPo]

Seems like maybe the issue here isn’t panhandling? And maybe the city should do a better job of, you know, being compassionate? [WAVE3]

Despite challenging lower court rulings throwing out Kentucky’s ban on same sex marriage, Gov. Steve Beshear moved quickly to comply with Friday’s historic U.S. Supreme Court ruling invalidating such bans in all 50 states. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Louisville Metro Council on Thursday approved a $873 million budget for the upcoming 2016 fiscal year, with a caveat that the total could increase by roughly $5 million for road paving if surplus funds are not available at the end of this fiscal year. [WFPL]

The authors of the 1968 Fair Housing Act wanted to reverse decades of government-fostered segregation. But presidents from both parties declined to enforce a law that stirred vehement opposition. [ProPublica]

You probably know that Louisville-based Humana Inc. is an acquisition target. Late last week, it was reported that Aetna Inc. has made an offer on the company. [Business First]

A Supreme Court decision handed down Friday that allows same-sex couples to legally marry in all 50 states wasn’t the only thing Melissa and Erin Love had to celebrate. The two Jeffersonville women, who share 2 and 6-year-old sons, tied the knot in Clark County exactly one year ago yesterday, making the historic day even more notable. [News & Tribune]

Even Bill Lamb Calls Letter Absurd

Conservative Bill Lamb is causing racist white peoples’ heads to explode. When Bill Lamb is on the same side as Attica Scott when it comes to the FOP’s threatening letter? All hell is gonna break loose. [WDRB]

A joint interim Kentucky legislative committee called Wednesday for updating the rules governing property tax assessments while questioning Jefferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer about whether his office is examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

efferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer appeared Wednesday morning before a legislative panel at Kentucky’s Capitol to explain and defend his office’s valuation practices. [WHAS11]

Pope Francis’ call for urgent action to combat climate change isn’t having much influence on members of Congress from the coal state of Kentucky, who are working this week to block the centerpiece of the president’s agenda to limit the greenhouse gases that are warming the planet. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Council’s budget committee voted to add more than $5 million for road repairs. [WLKY]

Those who believe slavery was not a central point of conflict in the Civil War may wish to peruse the South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi and Texas declarations of secession. Those documents all explicitly cite threats to slavery as reasons for secession. Mississippi’s declaration goes so far as to say that “a blow at slavery is a blow at commerce and civilization.” [HuffPo]

Critics are questioning lawmakers jumping on the anti-confederate bandwagon and the president of the NAACP Kentucky State Conference and Louisville Chapter Raoul Cunningham said he’s just fine with that. [WAVE3]

The old gay Louisville. A writer returns to the city where he was raised—and exiled—to find what was lost when gay life entered the mainstream. [TNR]

The Louisville Metro Tree Commission holds its final meeting this evening and is expected to vote on a draft ordinance that could create a new tree commission and new city policies for tree management. [WFPL]

An overwhelming majority of Americans say they believe protests against unfair government treatment make the United States a better country. Unless, that is, the protesters are black. [WaPo]

For Tim Gramig, a longtime broker Louisville’s commercial real estate market, opportunity has knocked twice this year. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan failed to sign an ordinance calling for certain financial information be provided to the New Albany City Council at the last meeting of each month. In response, the council voted unanimously Thursday to again approve the measure, and thus overrode the pocket veto of Gahan. A pocket veto occurs when an executive takes no action on a bill as opposed to an outright veto of the measure. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Clowns Panic Over Needles

Why not work to educate the man? Maybe try to get him and people tossing about veiled threats and racist dog whistles to realize that crap isn’t okay? [WDRB]

One week into the opening of Louisville’s syringe exchange, health officials doled out 1,352 clean syringes to drug users and collected just 189. So get with the program, small town Kentucky! [C-J/AKN]

There is new information on a deadly night of crime sprees leading up to a Canadian tourist’s murder on Derby day. [WHAS11]

For Rand Paul, the rubber is meeting the road. In the wake of last week’s racist shootings in Charleston, S.C., the Republican Party has been torn on the issue of whether the Confederate flag should continue to fly on the grounds of the state Capitol in Columbia. [H-L]

Don’t worry, everything is puppies and rainbows with JCPS’ Donna Hargens! [WLKY]

After getting the cold shoulder, U.S. health insurer Anthem Inc. said it’s raising its offer to buy smaller rival Cigna Corp. for about $47 billion, including cash and stock. [HuffPo]

LMPD Chief Conrad promises real changes. We’ll believe it when we see it. [WAVE3]

Leave it to backwater Republicans to complain about Louisville’s needle exchange. [WKYT]

On any given night, as many as 300 people in Southern Indiana are sleeping in shelters, cars or on the street, according to a street count earlier this year. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a Los Angeles ordinance that lets police view hotel guest registries without a warrant violates the privacy rights of business owners, taking away what the city called a vital tool to fight prostitution and other crimes. [Reuters]

Greater Louisville Inc. said the 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly produced some definitive wins, but it also said that the state legislature missed key opportunities to move the state forward and help it become more business-friendly. [Business First]

After about two months on the job, new Jeffersonville Police Department Chief Kenny Kavanaugh says additional officers are needed to meet the demand of law enforcement within the city. [News & Tribune]

Is There A Murder Every Other Day?

City leaders in Jeffersonville have released an ambitious new plan to help fight homelessness in the city. [WDRB]

The makeup of the membership of the metro panel that decides some key zoning-related cases is facing a legal challenge. State law requires the membership of the seven-member Metro Board of Zoning Adjustment to be diverse and reflect the demographics of Metro Louisville. But the newly filed lawsuit notes that the board has only one African-American and two women among its membership. [C-J/AKN]

The ongoing discussions about the relationship between the police and the community continue with a ‘monthly race summit’ that is set to start Thursday evening. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul of Kentucky, running for president on a platform of keeping the government out of people’s business, took a deep breath when asked at a recent stop in Philadelphia whether he’d make addressing abortion a part of his campaign. Pander to bigots = you’re a bigot. [H-L]

The coroner has identified the man shot and killed at a downtown restaurant. Compassionate City. It’s Possible here. [WLKY]

American gun owners are far more likely to injure themselves or someone else with their firearm than to stop a criminal, according to a new study from a group calling for tighter gun control. [HuffPo]

There’s a lot that we can learn from our past so we can move forward in the future. In light of what we’re going through in our country with outrage in cities like Ferguson, Baltimore, even here in Louisville, there is a demand for change when it comes to encounters between police, city leaders and minorities. [WAVE3]

This is not a time for peace and quiet. Only scared white people want peace and quiet. [NY Times]

Independent candidate for governor Drew Curtis needs to get 5,000 signatures by Aug. 11 in order to appear on the ballot in November’s general election. [WFPL]

When Audrey Haynes sat down before the legislature’s Medicaid Oversight and Advisory Committee Wednesday, she expected the data she brought would persuade lawmakers that Kentucky’s expansion of Medicaid has been good for the state. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville Foundation is moving ahead on the second phase of building out the ShelbyHurst Office and Research Park, which would include a conference hotel and numerous commercial developments on the University of Louisville’s Shelby Campus. [Business First]

The police presence was strong at Clarksville’s most recent town council meeting. Not only were four reserve officers stationed at the door, manning the new metal detectors, but they appeared on the council’s agenda as well. [News & Tribune]

The Compassionate Murders Continue

Another day, another fun murder in Compassionate City. LMPD homicide detectives are investigating after a man was shot and killed in Louisville’s Shawnee neighborhood early Tuesday. [WDRB]

In about six months Kentucky courts must offer emergency civil legal protections for a member of a dating couple in an abusive or violent relationship, but court officials across the state first must figure out how to make the new law work in their courts. [C-J/AKN]

Oldham County only needs about 1,200 signatures to expand packaged alcohol sales to groceries, convenience stores and liquor stores. [WHAS11]

Just in case you were wondering why nothing ever happens when legislators are unethical mountains of awful? John Schaaf, who has been legal counsel for the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission since 2004, will become its news executive director Aug. 1. [H-L]

Jeffersonville is breaking ground on a new, less expensive way to stop sewage overflow from being released into the Ohio River. [WLKY]

Tens of thousands of people are deported each year for minor drug offenses, even if they served their time long ago, because of draconian U.S. drug laws, according to a report released Tuesday by the international advocacy group Human Rights Watch. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man was taken into custody for allegedly shooting a father and his son. [WAVE3]

Nobody disputes the fact that Deng Manyoun attacked a Louisville police officer with a flag pole on Saturday afternoon. What is up for debate — among police and the public in Kentucky — is whether the officer’s split-second decision to respond by firing two bullets into the 35-year-old was justified. [WaPo]

In the coming weeks Louisville residents and visitors will have a new option to get around the city. [WFPL]

As the iconic American gun maker Colt Defense struggled to stay in business after losing a key contract to supply M4 rifles to the U.S. Army, the company was paying a range of political allies, including the National Rife Association, the consulting firm set up by retired Army General Stanley McChrystal, and other trade groups and lobbying outfits. [The Intercept]

After a successful event in Louisville in April, the VEX Robotics World Championship will return to the city for the next four years. [Business First]

The New Albany Human Rights Commission declined Friday to make a statement opposing comments made earlier this month by City Councilman Dan Coffey that some have labeled as demeaning toward gays and transgender individuals. [News & Tribune]

Departing Eugene School District Superintendent Sheldon Berman has a new job more than 3,100 miles from Eugene. Berman will serve for one year as the Andover Public Schools interim superintendent in Andover, Mass., during the coming school year. Those “negative, untrue reports” he’s talking about? You already know they were backed up by government documents, telephone records and first-hand accounts. These shysters are why kids can’t have nice things. [Register-Guard]