Can We Just All Focus On The West End? Just For Once? Please?

Oldham County voters may soon decide whether to expand alcohol sales. The Oldham County Chamber of Commerce says it now has enough signatures to ask for a special election. [WDRB]

Members of Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, have scheduled a series of meetings with Jefferson County legislators in early September to discuss business-related issues as well as legislation expected to come up during the 2016 General Assembly convening in January. [C-J/AKN]

On a stage set to celebrate the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 52nd annual Country Ham Breakfast & Auction concluded Thursday morning, Aug. 27, with a show-stealing $400,000 bid for the Kentucky State Fair’s Grand Champion Ham. [WHAS11]

Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Arrests were made Thursday morning at the annual ham breakfast at the Kentucky State Fair. [WLKY]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

The goal to bring 43 new homes to the Russell neighborhood started a decade ago, and Thursday, Mayor Greg Fischer announced a plan to make good on that promise. [WAVE3]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

Jim Wathen has been selling military merchandise at the Kentucky State Fair for nearly a decade. By noon on a recent weekday, he had already restocked a rack of Confederate flags. He said the 3-by-3-inch Confederate flag, his top seller, is a piece of military history. [WFPL]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

A study released Wednesday shows that congested roads are costing the typical Louisville metro area driver more than 40 hours in delays annually and almost $1,050 in lost time and burned fuel. [Business First]

Former New Albany Police Department Officer Laura Schook is proceeding with a federal case against the city as well as an appeal of the decision to fire her in May, and she’s doing so without an attorney. [News & Tribune]

Just Flipping Give Cahoots The Boot

Wednesday is the first day of school for approximately 4,000 early childhood education students in JCPS — but 1,100 have not turned in the required immunization forms and will not be allowed to attend class. [WDRB]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

The Civilian New Albany Traffic Supervisor has resigned amid an investigation into the supervisor’s implementation and execution of duties, according to New Albany Police Chief Todd Bailey. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

An effort to revitalize west Louisville is gearing up. Many people consider Broadway and Ninth Street the dividing line between downtown and west Louisville. [WLKY]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

We brought you the video after a large fight broke out recently in the busy bar area of Bardstown Road. Business owners said after the closings of Jim Porters, Phoenix Hill and several bars downtown, much more traffic headed to the Highlands. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Foiled in state court, a Jefferson County Public Schools teacher filed a federal court suit Monday claiming the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System illegally raised teachers’ share of pension contributions to shore up a retirement plan that is only half-funded. They sure have shopped this story around an awful lot. [WFPL]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

Two hour-long dramas about the world of Kentucky bourbon may be coming to TV soon. [Business First]

Twelve added employee positions — mostly in the public safety sector — are major components of Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore’s proposed 2016 budget. [News & Tribune]

Hating The Gays Is Really Expensive

Horse racing fans can now purchase their tickets to Churchill Downs races through Ticketmaster, according to a press release from the racetrack. [WDRB]

Louisville leaders have spent decades preaching about the need for a better-trained workforce to strengthen the local economy and improve prospects for workers facing increasingly complex and technologically advanced workplaces. [C-J/AKN]

The Cardinals have returned to their nest. The University of Louisville is once again bustling with students on the first day of classes. [WHAS11]

The private attorneys whom Beshear hired to handle the state’s appeals have a $260,000 contract, of which $231,348 had been paid by July 20, according to state records. Total cost to taxpayers: $2,351,297. [H-L]

The coroner has released the name of a teenager found fatally shot Saturday night outside a southwest Jefferson County apartment building. [WLKY]

Students in America’s schools are much, much poorer than they were nine years ago. In 2006, 31 percent of America’s students attended schools in “high-poverty” districts, meaning that 20 percent or more of the district’s students lived below the federal poverty line. [HuffPo]

Be prepared: the living dead are ready to take over Louisville. And they’re not talking about the way you feel after listening to Greg Fischer speak. [WAVE3]

If you’ve followed the saga involving Joshua Powell and Montgomery County Schools? This episode of This American Life will send chills down your spin. [This American Life]

Louisville’s new effort to make dangerous intersections safer could have unforeseen consequences. Metro Police have begun ticketing jaywalking pedestrians and motorists who don’t yield at crosswalks. Rolf Eisinger, the city’s bicycle and pedestrian coordinator, said Metro government is seeking to prevent pedestrian deaths. But the crackdown could have a disproportionate effect on minorities and low-income people. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama has been briefed on developments in global financial markets, the White House said on Monday after world stock markets plunged. [Reuters]

When more than 1,500 acres inside the 6,000-acre River Ridge Commerce Center recently received megasite certification, it did so under the exacting standards of the automotive industry. [Business First]

During a strategic plan update, Greater Clark County Schools Superintendent Andrew Melin said whichever way the district’s referendum shakes out, administrators will be busy after November. [News & Tribune]

MSD Monster Grows, No One Notices

A Kentucky company has been dumping toxic waste into public waters for over a year and the leaders of Bullitt Utilities say the company can’t afford to fix this problem. [WDRB]

This sounds like a disaster in the making. Louisville officials are creating another level of bureaucracy, of sorts, with the promise that it can help save tens of millions of dollars and slow rate increases for city water and sewer customers. [C-J/AKN]

The city of Hillview, Ky. filed for bankruptcy protection, Chapter Nine, on Aug. 20. [WHAS11]

The state is looking for volunteers to review cases of children placed in foster care in 35 counties. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! To date, dozens of people have been killed on the streets of Louisville, and many of the victims are under the age of 25. [WLKY]

Scientists at Ohio State University say they’ve grown the first near-complete human brain in a lab. Maybe Rand Paul will receive it as a transplant. [HuffPo]

An increase in property assessments means Jefferson County Public Schools will not ask for a tax rate increase for the 2015-2016 school year. [WAVE3]

New disclosures about the National Security Agency’s partnership with AT&T could reignite constitutional challenges to the spy agency’s efforts to wiretap the Internet. [ProPublica]

Why is there such a large gap between the number of Kentucky students who graduate high school on time and those who go straight to college? [WFPL]

Birthright citizenship is enshrined in the 14th Amendment, but Donald Trump and other candidates are keeping alive the idea that some Americans should not have equal rights at birth. [The Nation]

Mayor Greg Fischer says he’s “very bullish” on Louisville as a spot to possibly expand Major League Soccer, and Wayne Estopinal, Louisville City FC’s operating manager, plans to meet with Fischer next week to discuss his team’s current situation and start talks on building a stadium specifically for soccer. [Business First]

Floyd County may soon have only one recycling site for residents to drop-off items. The Floyd County Council voted 4-3 against giving solid waste $70,000 in additional appropriations, which Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley said would keep all sites open through the end of the year. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

At Least Louisville Has Fine Bourbon

Louisville is obsessed with killing its people. Everything is puppies and rainbows, though. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville has been named one of the most LGBTQ-friendly campuses in the South by Campus Pride Index. [C-J/AKN]

This weekend marked the annual Newburg Community Days. For more than 50 years, the Newburg community began a tradition of a homecoming weekend in August to celebrate unity, pride and welcome back former residents. [WHAS11]

Everybody freaked out about the minimum wage again this weekend. [H-L]

At least he wasn’t shot? Metro police are investigating after a man was stabbed Sunday night. It occurred in the 1800 block of Frankfort Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WLKY]

A St. Louis County policeman who boasted of how he spent his “annual Michael Brown bonus” has prompted an investigation by the department. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Possibility City doesn’t take public transportation seriously. [WAVE3]

Less than a month after one of the University of Cincinnati’s police officers shot and killed an unarmed driver who was not a student during a traffic stop, the school said on Friday it would resume off-campus patrols. [Reuters]

Responding to backlash over his leadership changes at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear says he will appoint Prospect cattle breeder Jack Ragsdale as chairman emeritus of the committee he led for 41 years. [WFPL]

American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern has long portrayed her organization as a beacon of openness, once declaring “we made a commitment that we want to lead the effort in transparency.” But when the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, opened an inquiry last year into the Red Cross’ disaster work, McGovern tried to get it killed behind the scenes. [ProPublica]

Bourbon Women, a Louisville-based women’s group that’s focused on bourbon culture, will host its second annual “sip-osium” Friday, Aug. 21, through Sunday, Aug. 23. [Business First]

A representative for the recently formed Clarksville GOP filed a complaint Thursday regarding event permit requirements not being enforced by the town’s Planning and Zoning Department. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]