New Albany Schools Have Come A Long Way

The New Albany Floyd County School board has added “sexual orientation” to its non-discrimination policy. [WDRB]

A University of Louisville study of asthma, older adults and indoor air quality is revealing a mix of potentially dangerous chemicals inside participants’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

The footage is hard to watch. “No mother ever wants to see anything like that and my daughter was clearly trying to get away from her and it hurt. It hurt a lot,” parent Valerie Gholston said. [WHAS11]

Top level administrators are being hired at the University of Kentucky at more than twice the rate of full-time faculty, according to UK employee statistics. [H-L]

Just hours after two people are arrested and brought in for questioning about a Tuesday night killing, the victim’s girlfriend hopes justice will be served. [WLKY]

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday there was “no data” to support the notion that the national debate over the use of force by police has made the country less safe, an idea that has sometimes been referred to as the “Ferguson effect.” [HuffPo]

Oh, right, that’s totally going to solve all of their problems. Just a few weeks after hosting a Halloween Party, a troubled motel on Bardstown Road is inviting the neighborhood over for another holiday event. [WAVE3]

Tell us more, Matt Bevin, about how great refugees have it and about how easy it is for them to find safety. LGBT refugees from across the Middle East flock to Turkey, escaping Islamist militias, sexual assault, and death threats. But what they find there leaves many in despair. [BuzzFeed]

With uncertainty about the future of his signature health initiative, Gov. Steve Beshear is touting the outcomes of Kentucky’s efforts to improve the well-being of residents. [WFPL]

More than half a dozen state governors have come out against President Obama’s plans to relocate several thousand Syrian refugees within the United States. Some have pledged to actively resist settlement of these refugees. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R), for example, signed a letter to Obama that begins “as governor of Texas, I write to inform you that the State of Texas will not accept any refugees from Syria in the wake of the deadly terrorist attack in Paris.” Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) issued an executive order instructing all “departments, budget units, agencies, offices, entities, and officers of the executive branch of the State of Louisiana” to “utilize all lawful means to prevent the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the State of Louisiana while this Order is in effect.” The problem for Jindal, Abbott and the other governors opposed to admitting refugees, however, is that there is no lawful means that permits a state government to dictate immigration policy to the president in this way. [ThinkProgress]

Surprise! UofL put Deborah Dietzler on leave. [Business First]

Residents within West Clark Community Schools’ boundaries won’t just vote for a president this time next year, but also a referendum project for the district. [News & Tribune]

They Poured Out Perfectly Fine Bourbon!

Thought everything was puppies and rainbows with the new person running Metro Animal Services? So much for hiring an underwear model to run an agency mired in scandal. Now Possibility City sees what happens when Greg Fischer puts these folks in charge. [C-J/AKN]

What, you thought Matt Bevin wasn’t a backward-ass bigot? [WDRB]

If there’s a bike lane, bicyclists better use it, or they may find themselves in jail. That’s the message a Louisville Metro Police officer gave to bicycling advocate and former mayoral candidate Jackie Green on Friday in the form of a double citation for blocking traffic and running a red light. [More C-J/AKN]

The Dare to Care Kids Café has expanded to include a new location. Children 18 and younger can now go to the Shawnee Community Center on South 37th Street for a hot, healthy meal between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The cost is free. [WHAS11]

Louisville Gas and Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. are asking regulators to allow them to own and operate charging stations for electric vehicles. [H-L]

WARNING! AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As authorities continue to investigate a shooting and carjacking in Old Louisville, many who live and work there say their community is no more dangerous than any other part of the metro. [WLKY]

Apparently, if you are a Democratic presidential candidate, there is no longer such a thing as being too strict about gun safety. All three candidates were locked in a fierce battle to prove their gun control bona fides at the Democratic debate at Drake University in Iowa on Saturday night. [HuffPo]

If you wanna pour out Elijah Craig, just send it here instead. It’s a big stink in the California neighborhood, even after some community leaders struck a deal with Heaven Hill Distillery for a proposed biodigester. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an anti-abortion group’s bid to force the federal government to reveal more information about a $1 million grant it made in 2011 to women’s health provider Planned Parenthood in New Hampshire. [Reuters]

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce President Dave Adkisson says he’s at odds with Governor-elect Matt Bevin over dismantling Kentucky’s health care exchange. [WFPL]

Carter Caves may be the “best kept secret of the park system,” according to its park manager, but it may also be Carter County’s best-kept secret for how to truly open up recreational tourism in the northeast region of Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

Gov.-elect Matt Bevin’s pledge to scale back the Medicaid expansion and dismantle Kynect, Kentucky’s award-winning health insurance exchange, has caused concern among health clinics. [Business First]

An advertising campaign to drive students to Clarksville Community Schools cost more than $163,000, but the 83 students it’s credited with bringing in gave the district an extra $548,000 in tuition support from the state for the district. [News & Tribune]

Stumbo Lackey Wants To Be Pretzeldent

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

The Centers for Disease Control is in Scott County, Indiana, testing hundreds of people for HIV. [WDRB]

This should be an awkward Greg Stumbo-style disaster. David Yates is jumping into the race for Metro Council president next year in an effort to unify Louisville Democrats, suggesting incumbent David Tandy is losing support among the splintered majority caucus. [C-J/AKN]

The search is on for a murder suspect police say shot and killed a man near a Valley Station business Tuesday evening. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s police department hopes to have its officers equipped with body cameras by June. [H-L]

A pedestrian was struck and killed by an LMPD wrecker in the 4900 block of Southside Drive. [WLKY]

As friends and family gathered Tuesday at the funeral of Tyshawn Lee — one of the youngest Chicago residents lost to gun violence this year — to mourn and remember the boy, Father Michael Pfleger delivered a fiery eulogy indicting the city over the execution of a 9-year-old child. [HuffPo]

Here comes the positive media spin from Chad Carlton and crew about tolls. And whattya know, they couldn’t even get the facts straight about when the area last saw tolls. [WAVE3]

The last time Kentucky elected a Republican governor he ran into trouble with the Democratic attorney general. [Ronnie Ellis]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

In its ongoing Failure Factories series, the Tampa Bay Times is investigating the disastrous effects of the Pinellas County School Board’s 2007 decision to abandon school integration in favor of “neighborhood schools.” Schools in high-poverty black communities were promised additional funding and resources. Then the promises weren’t met, and performance at the schools has plummeted. [ProPublica]

An organization led by Louisville’s high-profile rehabilitation king Gill Holland has recently received $250,000 in private funding. [Business First]

New police body camera video shows a struggle during an arrest in Clarksville for which a local business owner was later found not guilty. [News & Tribune]

No, Voting Machines Are Not To Blame

Can you imagine if there were accountability like this for Jim Ramsey and the University of Louisville? Of course you can’t, don’t even try. [WDRB]

Surely no one is surprised that Greg Fischer and his crew tried to pull the wool over the eyes of everyone in the West End. [C-J/AKN]

Indiana’s first statewide program that pays for addiction and mental health treatment for convicted felons sent to community corrections instead of jail or prison is now underway. [WHAS11]

In case you thought the Republican Party of Kentucky was going to actually accomplish something? It no longer has a full-time chairman. A wealthy figurehead does not a functioning party make. Mac Brown is the next chairman of the Republican Party of Kentucky. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police say a 16-year-old boy stabbed his father in the chest Monday morning at a home on Saint Claire Drive. [WLKY]

When it comes to accreditors, the private organizations paid by colleges to help them maintain access to nearly $150 billion annually in federal student aid, the U.S. Department of Education seems to think sunlight is the best disinfectant. [HuffPo]

Of course John Boel is back to fearmongering. Leave it to him to try to crap all over needle exchanges. [WAVE3]

From last week but more relevant today. Just a reminder – the people screaming about alleged voting machine rigging have no clue what they’re talking about. They’re the folks who get everything they know about politics from MSNBC and have no concept of what goes on in Kentucky. [Page One]

Kentucky’s next state auditor, Danville Republican Rep. Mike Harmon, said he’s not sure if he’ll continue the investigation of the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees and its relationship with the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the school’s $1.1 billion endowment. [WFPL]

Three major companies, citing the under-representation of minorities in science and technology fields, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold affirmative action in university admissions in a closely watched case to be argued next month. [Reuters]

Almost Family Inc. has acquired Home Care by Black Stone, a Kenwood, Ohio-based nursing services provider, for $40 million. [Business First]

Community members are invited to help shape the future of their town by attending the “Envision South Clarksville” workshop for the South Clarksville Redevelopment Plan starting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10, at Ohio Falls United Methodist Church, 917 S. Virginia Ave., Clarksville. [News & Tribune]