The UofL Prostitution Scandal Rages On

There was a time, I now can admit, when I was really good at writing book reports on books I had not read. This is not the time for that. In evaluating the allegations soon to be brought forth in detail by a woman who says she was hired by former University of Louisville director of basketball operations Andre McGee to provide sexual services for men’s basketball recruits and players from 2010 to 2014, we can look at the smoke, we haven’t yet seen the fire. But it smells like something is burning. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday tightened the nation’s smog standard by nearly 7 percent, choosing a number that puts the Louisville area on the bubble for continued compliance. [C-J/AKN]

The Jeffersontown Police Chief spoke out Saturday and said gun violence in his town will not be tolerated. Sounds like Rick Sanders is back to pounding his chest? [WHAS11]

Dick Pitino may not read the new sexytime book but you know he’ll be listening to the audiobook! [H-L]

Things nearly turned deadly Thursday night in Jeffersontown as a father tried to buy a cellphone for his daughter. [WLKY]

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is stepping down in December after 7 years in the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Louisville has long been referred to as the River City, mainly due to its history as a flatboat and steamboat port carrying people and goods to and from the heartland from the city’s conception. But a big part of riverboat history that you may not know about lies right across the mighty Ohio River in Jeffersonville, Indiana. [WAVE3]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul said Saturday that his home state of Kentucky needs a governor willing to stand up to the federal government he aspires to lead from the White House. [ABC News]

Here’s hoping Greg Fischer doesn’t ruin Louisville’s chances at Google Fiber. Hopefully Google will rely on people like Ambassador Matthew Barzun and others. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer will join the city’s chief innovation officer, Ted Smith, on Monday to talk Google Fiber. [WFPL]

One Vatican official said there was “a sense of regret” that the pope had ever seen Kim Davis, a Kentucky county clerk who went to jail in September for refusing to honor a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and issue same-sex marriage licenses. [Reuters]

More than 360 local charities received donations Thursday as part of the Community Foundation of Louisville Inc.’s annual Give Local Louisville campaign. [Business First]

Several issues were brought to the stage, but Tuesday’s New Albany mayoral debate was bookended by who was missing from the discussion. [News & Tribune]

Death Murder Death Murder Death

Authorities have released the name of a woman who was found murdered near Churchill Downs. [WDRB]

Immigration and criminal defense lawyer Daniel Alvarez has gained the endorsement of Citizens for Better Judges in the highly contested Jefferson District Court race. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating a stabbing that happened in the 5100 block of Crafty Drive located in the Lynnview neighborhood. [WHAS11]

New ribbon advertising boards have been installed around the second tier of Rupp Arena, the first part of a two-year, $15 million technology upgrade for Lexington’s most recognized landmark. [H-L]

This got a lot less buzz than we expected. Particularly in light of the double-dipping. Louisville has a new chief of community building. Mayor Greg Fischer named Yvette Gentry to lead the department. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School personnel action document reveals 30 of the districts bus drivers and substitute bus drivers resigned, retired or were terminated from early August to the middle of September. [WAVE3]

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee is upset he was quoted in a television ad for Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. Duncan – who is from Inez, Ky., and now heads the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity – told WYMT his comments were taken out of context. “The comments that I made were as the chief executive officer of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. It had nothing to do with the Republican National Committee,” Duncan said Tuesday night in a phone interview. [WYMT]

Home repairs can be a frightful burden for Louisville residents who live in poverty or on fixed incomes. [WFPL]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

An empty elementary school in downtown Jeffersonville will soon be torn down to make way for a 93-room upper mid-scale hotel. [Business First]

Telling stories of epidemics and disasters through the eyes of those who lived — and died — in them, “Stories Behind the Stones: Disease, Disasters and the Downtrodden” offered tours of Fairview Cemetery over the weekend. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Still Loves Shooting People

Saturday was a big day for Louisville’s gay community. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police have recorded 77 suicides this year, a 30 percent jump compared to this time a year ago and one more than the city totaled all of last year. The suicide total also far exceeds the city’s homicide total this year, which stood at 53 as of Sept. 17. Officials at the state and city level, however, admit Louisville’s suicide count could be higher given that the police do not investigate all deaths that turn out to be ruled suicides. [C-J/AKN]

One of the three teens accused of violently beating a Louisville homeless man in June says they did it as a game. [WHAS11]

One year ago, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway met with a group of out-of-state trial lawyers who urged him to pursue litigation against the oil industry over a now-disused gasoline additive — methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE — found to contaminate groundwater. [John Cheves]

Louisville police are investigating after a man was shot early Saturday morning. [WLKY]

Nearly 1,000 people showed up at the Islamic Center of Louisville, Kentucky, on Friday to paint over anti-Muslim graffiti that appeared Wednesday night, according to a center director. [HuffPo]

Bleachers were packed at Western High School’s home football game Friday evening, hours after an anonymous active shooter threat. [WAVE3]

Republican candidate for governor Matt Bevin is up on the air with his first television ad of the general election following weeks of ads by his Democratic opponent Jack Conway and those on his behalf by the Republican Governor’s Association. Don’t look for any surprises. The ad relies on trusted Republican strategy of tying any Democratic opponent to President Barack Obama, who is deeply unpopular in Kentucky. [Ronnie Ellis]

Somi Babar huddled Thursday morning with a group of mothers, peering at the white exterior walls of the Louisville Islamic Center. [WFPL]

Federal Reserve policymakers appeared deeply divided on Saturday over how seriously problems in the world economy will effect the U.S., a fracture that may be difficult for Fed Chair Janet Yellen to mend as she guides the central bank’s debate over whether to hike interest rates. [Reuters]

Oh, that won’t be terrible at all. A new television show that connects Louisville-area entrepreneurs with local financial backers has named initial members of its panel. [Business First]

A company that operates dozens of nursing homes across Indiana — including three in Clark County — fired its top executive Friday, three days after federal agents searched his home and the company’s headquarters. [News & Tribune]

You Already Know What JCPS Has Done

Jack Conway’s office says JCPS broke the law with too many redactions. But here’s the deal: Helene Kramer was allegedly trash-talking re: that high-level employee’s sexual orientation and Donna Hargens allowed it to occur. She didn’t stop it. She’s never taken it seriously and refuses to admit that real harm was done. Everyone wants to piss and moan and bicker over whether or not those details should be revealed. I’m not gonna identify the individual until they decide to come forward but let’s get real here. That’s what happened. Several of us in the local media world have had the allegations in our possession for months and months and everyone’s just been sitting on it while trying to find a way to get JCPS to cough up the specifics. And all the mainstream media outlets have been afraid to reveal what the victim claims off-the-record occurred. [WDRB]

The Administration for Children and Families has given Jefferson County Public Schools the all-clear after the agency last year found a deficiency in the school district’s Head Start program. [C-J/AKN]

Where’s the media outrage over this murder? The victim’s life is no less valuable than that of anyone else. [WHAS11]

Under most circumstances, global stock market volatility would be enough to unnerve those in a commercial arena preparing for its bellwether exercise. But both the strength of key indictors and a wave of industry momentum heading into the Keeneland September Yearling Sale make for a positive forecast for the 12-day auction when it begins Monday. [H-L]

Muhammad and Lonnie Ali have made a donation to the University of Louisville Athletics. [WLKY]

More than half of the tax cuts proposed in former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s (R) tax plan would flow to America’s wealthiest citizens, according to a report released by the nonpartisan group Citizens for Tax Justice, which advocates for “requiring the wealthy to pay their fair share.” [HuffPo]

All the WAVE gays freaked out over Cher. Like lost their minds freaked out. It was kind of a big gay deal. [WAVE3]

The Obama administration has said it will allow 10,000 Syrian refugees to resettle in the US over the next year. Is this enough? And are there any risks? [BBC]

The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services released a comprehensive plan to reduce health disparities earlier this week, and efforts are already under way in Louisville that address some of the findings. [WFPL]

Every day in America, mortgage companies attempt to foreclose on homeowners using false documents. It’s a byproduct of the mortgage securitization craze during the housing bubble, when loans were sliced and diced so haphazardly that the actual ownership was confused. [The Incercept]

Earlier this week, I took a tour of Norton Commons, the self-contained urbanist community in northeastern Jefferson County that eventually will extend into Oldham County as it is completed in the next 10 to 15 years. [Business First]

The New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter has launched a unique fundraising effort to benefit local animals. [News & Tribune]

Fighting Over Grass As Folks Go Hungry

Some say growing grass on abandoned properties in Louisville is a growing problem. [WDRB]

Jack Conway went to western Louisville on Saturday and promised that he would appoint African Americans to the University of Louisville’s board of trustees if he were elected governor. [C-J/AKN]

The oil bust has been largely a supply-driven phenomenon. Unlike the last time that oil prices were this low — during the 2008-2009 financial crisis — this past year’s price collapse has not been because of destruction in demand, but due to too much supply. [WHAS11]

While standardbreds took to the track outside during Red Mile’s regular meet Saturday night, fans of casino gaming took their seats inside for the historic track’s first night of slots-style wagering. [H-L]

Who knew this was a thing? A crowd favorite returned to the Ohio River along Waterfront Park Saturday. A team from Waggener High School was one of 30 teams competing in the Annual Dragon Boat Festival. [WLKY]

Kamilah Brock says the New York City police sent her to a mental hospital for a hellish eight days, where she was forcefully injected with powerful drugs, essentially because they couldn’t believe a black woman owned a BMW. [HuffPo]

With the stroke of a paintbrush, a west Louisville man is transforming shoes. Dinero Andretti creates custom artwork for any shoe and any customer. Some customers have requested specific designs for causes. [WAVE3]

Hidden in the haze of the petrochemical plants and beyond the seemingly endless traffic jams, a Texas city has grown so large that it is poised to pass Chicago as the third biggest in the United States in the next decade. [Reuters]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is looking into concerns that deliberate and systemic bias pollute the process of allocating funds associated with the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, as more than $300,000 allocated for the program this year went unused. [WFPL]

Governor Steve Beshear announced today that U.S. Deputy Secretary of Transportation Victor Mendez, a champion for the nation’s vital transportation infrastructure, will visit Louisville next week to speak to an automotive conference and to view progress on the downtown Ohio River bridge project. [Press Release]

Louisvillians are practically salivating for a major-league sports team to support. [Business First]

Most employee positions or big purchases, with an exception for public safety, will not yet be approved for next year’s budget, but the Jeffersonville City Council is still discussing what’s to come during its annual budget workshops. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City’s Back To Shooting Everyone

The future of a Louisville YMCA branch is in jeopardy as traffic at the Berrytown location continues to be low despite numerous efforts to boost attendance. [WDRB]

The more attention news directors give this troubled kid, the worse he gets. It’s almost worse than the way Louisville media folks try to eat each other alive out in fits of jealousy and bitterness. [C-J/AKN]

Two men accused in a Louisville bar attack say they were offered money to carry out the crime. [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ordered Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to appear in his courtroom Thursday and explain why she should not be held in contempt of court, according to Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins. All of her deputy clerks are supposed to join her, Watkins said. [H-L]

Police are investigating two shootings and are not yet saying if the two incidents are related. [WLKY]

All across the country, Americans are finding that the prices of the prescription drugs they need are soaring. Tragically, doctors tell us that many of their patients can no longer afford their medicine. As a result, some get sicker. Others die. [HuffPo]

A new festival is set to highlight a multitude of talented artists from Louisville and across Kentucky. The Golden Culture Art and Music Festival is making history as it brings attention to an often over-looked local music subculture: hip-hop. [WAVE3]

Homeschooling has been legal throughout the United States for about 25 years, but regulations vary dramatically by state. Only two states require background checks for parents who choose to homeschool, and just ten require parents to have a high school degree. [ProPublica]

Kentucky lags behind national averages for ACT college-readiness benchmarks in core subjects, with the biggest deficit in math. [WFPL]

As many as 6.9 million Americans haven’t made payments on their student loans in nearly a year, which is up 6 percent from last year, according to data released last week by the U.S. Department of Education. A 2013 Federal Reserve Bank of New York report shows that the delinquency rate may actually be higher than people think because half of student loans are in forbearance, deferment or grace periods. [Think Progress]

By the time Tom Jurich, vice president and director of athletics for the University of Louisville, addressed the media at a news conference this morning, word had spread that U of L planned a $55 million expansion of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [Business First]

In the small Parke County town of Rockville, population 2,591, police officers are donning new body cameras before they head out on patrol. [News & Tribune]