The Weekend: Killing Time In Louisville

Just a reminder that these things continue to happen in Possibility City. [WDRB]

For so long, he searched for the word. To describe what he felt but dare not say aloud. To rationalize the thoughts that consumed his days. To understand why being Jennifer, despite his most fervent attempts, just didn’t feel right. [C-J/AKN]

And then this. A woman was rushed to the hospital after a shooting in the Parkland neighborhood on July 20. [WHAS11]

The power washer was spraying away another year’s worth of grime this week as residents of Fancy Farm prepared for the annual picnic at St. Jerome’s Parish, where Kentucky’s politicos flock on the first Saturday of August each year. [H-L]

But don’t worry! A theme park is adding a new roller coaster. Everything is fine. [WLKY]

The transition to a renewable economy may be a painful one, particularly in this era of aversion to active government. [HuffPo]

The start of a two day celebration for the 25th anniversary of the Signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act kicked off on Sunday in Shawnee Park. [WAVE3]

Just like in Kentucky, where it’s good for the Beshear Family’s wealthy donors and not so great for everyone else. The global economy is improving. Just don’t tell many of the people who live and work in it. [CBS News]

Following last month’s landmark Supreme Court ruling allowing gay marriage in Kentucky, Louisville’s tourism agency has ramped-up its outreach to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. [WFPL]

Japan’s Mitsubishi corporation is making a big apology. It’s not for any recall or defect in its products, which include automobiles, but for its use of American prisoners of war as forced labor during World War II. [NPR]

Dallas-based Omni Hotels & Resorts likely has a few interesting weeks ahead. [Business First]

A community literacy project using retired newspaper racks will kick-off Saturday in New Albany at the annual Monarch Celebration. [News & Tribune]

Why Is Bullitt County Still So Awful?

Kentucky State Police are now investigating the Bullitt County Animal Shelter.Shelter employee Delsie Williams says Kentucky State Police came to her Mt. Washington home on Monday afternoon with a search warrant. She says they took her cell phone, hard drive, laptops, desktop computers and other items. Her attorney tells WDRB he’s still trying to figure out the reason. [WDRB]

The city’s codes and regulations department hit Louisville metro government with a “public nuisance” violation for a piece of property it owns. In a Jan. 23 notice, a city inspector found the historic Colonial Garden sites in south Louisville had “several rotten structural beams” and that “all exterior surfaces need to be put into good repair.” [C-J/AKN]

A fundraiser will take place Wednesday at Spinelli’s Pizzeria in Downtown Louisville for an employee who was stabbed while delivering pizza to Norton Hospital. [WHAS11]

Kentucky has taken steps to prohibit electioneering on public property within 100 feet of polling places for the May 19 primary election. [H-L]

Visitation will be held Thursday for U.S. District Judge John Heyburn. [WLKY]

Food stamp recipients are more likely to be obese than the general population, according to new research from the federal government. [HuffPo]

The childhood home of Muhammad Ali will be restored, it’s new owner promises. George Bochetto, an attorney from Philadelphia, has bought half of the home and now shares ownership with real estate investor, Jared Weiss, of Las Vegas. [WAVE3]

Last year’s bid to undo Obama’s immigration actions deemed a failure, time to move on to other priorities. [Politico]

The Jefferson County Board of Education is seeking residents’ input on the shaping of the district’s five-year strategic plan. [WFPL]

Parents worry about a child getting a concussion in the heat of competition, but they also need to be thinking about what happens during practices, a study finds. High school and college football players are more likely to suffer a concussion during practices than in a game, according a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. [NPR]

Back in September, Sweden-based AB Electrolux announced plans to acquire GE Appliances, a Louisville-based division of General Electric Co., for $3.3 billion. At the time, officials with both companies speculated that the transaction would close in 2015, after making its way through the regulatory process. [Business First]

With eyes on the six months ahead, Mayor Mike Moore and City Councilman Dennis Julius are poised to battle for the mayor’s seat in November. [News & Tribune]

There’s All Kinds Of Teacher Fun Lately

The Economy Inn on Bardstown Road near the Watterson Expressway has been the center of controversy lately after failing recent inspections. [WDRB]

Olu Stevens may be a jackass sometimes but he said what needed to be said. [C-J/AKN]

Any predictions on how long Thunder Over Louisville will be a thing? [WHAS11]

Polls show former Kentucky Supreme Court Justice Will T. Scott running a distant last in the four-way primary to become the Republican nominee for governor on May 19. [H-L]

More than 200 teams were in Louisville over the weekend looking for a basketball championship. [WLKY]

If the Supreme Court legalizes same-sex marriage this year, it will be largely because of a group of gay Americans who were courageous enough to subject their families to public scrutiny in order to become the faces of a movement. [HuffPo]

A female teacher at Academy @ Shawnee has been suspended while officials investigate claims of inappropriate conduct with a student. [WAVE3]

In the first legal test of the Obama administration’s plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, two of three federal judges hearing a challenge to the regulations on Thursday expressed skepticism about weighing in before they are formally adopted. [Reuters]

Jefferson County Public Schools administrators are asking the Kentucky Board of Education to give schools some leeway on test scores from students learning English. [WFPL]

Since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more than 16.5 million people — particularly low-income Americans and people of color — have enrolled in an insurance plan for the first time, giving proponents of the health care law reason to praise it as a tool in protecting marginalized populations. A new study, however, points out that will take much more than Obamacare itself to close the persistent racial and socioeconomic disparities in health care access. [ThinkProgress]

Just days after Norton Commons announced plans for a bourbon-themed bed and breakfast, the 600-acre residential and business development in northeast Jefferson County, unveiled plans Friday for a luxury apartment complex at the corner of Meeting Street and Norton Commons Boulevard. [Business First]

A high school teacher was suspended and is under investigation following allegations of inappropriate electronic communication with a student, according to an email sent to Clarksville Community Schools parents and guardians Thursday. [News & Tribune]

It’s Possibility Pedestrian Death City!

This should be embarrassing to everyone in Louisville. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and other city officials kicked off the “Look Alive Louisville” pedestrian safety program Thursday. [WDRB]

Really, it’s just embarrassing. With Louisville averaging 16 pedestrian deaths during each of the past five years, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Thursday a new safety program called “Look Alive Louisville” that is designed to greatly reduce pedestrian fatalities. [C-J/AKN]

So many questions in West Buechel…and getting answers is proving to be difficult. [WHAS11]

For decades, if not for the past 141 years, racing fans have looked with envy upon a coveted section of seats in the Churchill Downs grandstand, where only 20 sets of lucky horse owners could sit. [H-L]

A loan to finance the East End Crossing section of the Ohio River Bridges Project was announced Thursday U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. [WLKY]

The private prison industry’s growing role in immigrant detention is due in part to Congress’ requiring the federal government to maintain some 34,000 detention beds, according to a report released Wednesday. The report, drafted by Grassroots Leadership, a nonprofit based in Austin, Texas, calls on Congress to eliminate the immigrant detention quota from its 2016 appropriations request. [HuffPo]

The owners of a troubled Bardstown Road hotel, who provided a tour to WAVE 3 News on Wednesday, said they were focused on passing a city inspection next week before renovating the lodge. [WAVE3]

A new strain of dog flu from Asia that started infecting pets in Chicago this January has spread to thousands of dogs in Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio and Indiana and killed six, animal health officials said. [Reuters]

Louisville can’t figure out how to manage a flipping animal shelter. So there’s little chance it can handle a fancy sports team. Advocates of Louisville having a pro sports franchise focused for years on bringing the National Basketball Association to the city. [WFPL]

As a historic constitutional showdown over gay marriage looms this month at the U.S. Supreme Court, attorneys are fighting over another bitterly disputed issue: their fees. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) says it again will pursue a contract to provide Medicaid managed-care services to the state of Kentucky. [Business First]

A group of developers still hopes to market six lots along Bank Street for commercial and residential use, but they want the New Albany Redevelopment Commission to readjust its asking price for the properties. [News & Tribune]

We Were First! Kentucky Hated The Gays Before Indiana

Just in case you needed another instance of Greg Fischer having no idea what he’s talking about. He’s to be applauded on the needle exchange front but we all know he didn’t “misspeak” — he just had no idea what was going on. [WDRB]

Oh, now David Jones wants a closer look at the JCPS budget? How convenient. He thinks he can sit on his hands for ages and only wake up after tension boils over the top. [C-J/AKN]

A man found dead after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood in West Louisville has now been identified. [WHAS11]

For the first time in the history of this tobacco state, the House voted on — and passed — a bill to ban indoor smoking statewide in workplaces and other public spaces, such as bars and restaurants. And then the Senate assigned House Bill 145 to its Committee on Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection, where it saw no further action. [H-L]

Way to go, Louisville, now your old people are shooting each other. [WLKY]

The National Collegiate Athletic Association expressed concern Thursday with a new “religious freedom” law in Indiana that could open the door to legalized discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. [HuffPo]

Watching this AirBnB slap fight between Greg Fischer and the Metro Council is tons of fun. [WAVE3]

There is significant evidence that cop cams cut down on most civilian complaints. But a close examination of violent encounters with the police caught on tape suggests that even with seemingly incontrovertible video evidence, questions will often linger. The kind of sea change that police reform activists desire will still likely escape them. [HuffPo]

African American leaders in Louisville are speaking out against Kentucky’s U.S. senators and their efforts to block the confirmation of Loretta Lynch as U.S. attorney general. [WFPL]

Remember when Kentucky enacted this legislation in 2013 and no one batted an eyelash? Thousands of people marched in Indiana’s largest city on Saturday to protest a state law that supporters contend promotes religious freedom but detractors see as a covert move to support discrimination against gay people. [Reuters]

If you can’t find the right people for these jobs you aren’t even trying to look for them. Period. [Business First]

Jeffersonville’s embarrassingly bad mayor has shown himself once more? [News & Tribune]

Get Ready: Everybody Is Gonna Get Run Over

Good fucking grief. And you wonder why there’s a behemoth of a racial divide in Louisville. [WDRB]

What? Tom Owen has gone against his word to his constituents? Surely not. Dollars to doughnuts he blames it on old age or something shady like that. Several Louisville Metro Council members have proposed a resolution asking Metro Government to stop issuing and enforcing violations against homeowners renting space through websites such as Airbnb as the city weighs new regulations to address such rentals. [C-J/AKN]

The city of Jeffersonville has a new police chief. Mayor Mike Moore has appointed 21-year police veteran Kenny Kavanaugh to the post. Kavanaugh is the first African American to lead the department. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky students from the Bluegrass State will pay 3 percent more for tuition and fees this fall, an increase that brings tuition to $10,780 a year for first-year students. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian struck in Possibility City! An 8-year-old girl was injured Monday evening after being hit by a car. [WLKY]

An obscure item in the president’s new budget would put an end to the longstanding practice of states and cities using tax-exempt bonds to finance professional sports arenas, a practice that costs the U.S. Treasury $146 million, according to a 2012 Bloomberg analysis. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there was another one. Police and an EMS crew are responding after a pedestrian was hit by a vehicle on East Muhammad Ali Boulevard at South Jackson Street. [WAVE3]

A hundred years from now, humans may remember 2014 as the year that we first learned that we may have irreversibly destabilized the great ice sheet of West Antarctica, and thus set in motion more than 10 feet of sea level rise. [WaPo]

The public will have a chance later this month to offer input on the tentative selection of a Virginia company to handle electronic tolling on new Ohio River bridges linking Kentucky and Indiana. [WFPL]

Will T. Scott, the 67-year-old former state Supreme Court Justice running for the Republican nomination for governor, trails three other Republicans in the polls and in fundraising. [Ronnie Ellis]

Growth in Kentucky’s bourbon industry is probably something you’re aware of by now. But that growth has helped fuel an escalation of related services. [Business First]

The Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications cut short its investigation of former Clark County Judge Jerry Jacobi, after he agreed to never again seek a judicial office. [News & Tribune]

How Will Hipsters Hate On Norton Commons Now?

Norton Commons, the New Urban development in northeastern Jefferson County, is about to build what it calls “the largest 100-percent geothermal residential community in the United States.” [WDRB]

In recent months, several Westport Village businesses have left the shopping center and a group of tenants has filed a lawsuit against the development’s new owners. [C-J/AKN]

A father and son are facing assault charges after they allegedly attacked a Doss High School basketball coach after a game Jan. 24, but they claim the coach is the one who assaulted them. [WHAS11]

Does it seem like President Obama and the new Congress are off to a bumpy start? No worries. Kentucky is sending help, in the spirit of compromise and bourbon. [H-L]

Major preparations are underway at Slugger Field to welcome a new pro soccer team to town. [WLKY]

Legal marijuana is the fastest-growing industry in the United States and if the trend toward legalization spreads to all 50 states, marijuana could become larger than the organic food industry. [HuffPo]

PEE ALERT! Calling his ticket historic, a Louisville businessman has filed to run for governor and is shaking up the Republican primary. [WAVE3]

A significant number of American companies plan to raise wages in the next three months, a survey showed on Monday, bolstering expectations of an acceleration in wage growth this year. [Reuters]

A majority of Kentuckians think that the state’s domestic violence laws should include unmarried couples who haven’t live together and those who don’t share a child. [WFPL]

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA. Hahahhahahahaaha. Matt Bevin. Hahahahahahahahhaha. [H-L]

New Albany Mayor Jeff Gahan will call a special meeting of the City Council tomorrow night, where he will ask the council to consider a $7 million bond package to help modernize the General Mills plant. [Business First]

A bill that would increase the number of magistrates Clark County Circuit Court is authorized to appoint from two to three passed through committee Wednesday and will be considered by the full Indiana House of Representatives. [News & Tribune]