Will TV Folks Leave Russell Alone Now?

From Autism to Alzheimer’s, music is healing what medicine can’t. In some cases, patients and students both are hearing the benefits of music therapy. [WDRB]

After losing the battle to keep the old Water Co. building intact, preservationists are now circulating petitions as a first step in trying to get the Odd Fellows Building in the Omni target block designated as a historic landmark. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Will Russell has only had to deal with this publicly because local television shysters made it a public matter, a spectacle, treated him as a carnival barker. [WHAS11]

A 10-year-old boy injured in a drive-by shooting is now helping to combat gun violence in Louisville that has reached its highest level in decades. [H-L]

A group called I Am Scott County is working on a second commercial to change perceptions about the southern Indiana county following an HIV outbreak. [WLKY]

Colorado Springs, the town where three people were killed and nine injured in an attack on a Planned Parenthood facility on Friday, is a hub for Christian evangelicals who are opposed to abortion. [HuffPo]

Attorneys representing 11 women went to court Monday to make Katina Powell pay for what they say are false allegations in her tell-all book ‘Breaking Cardinal Rules. [WAVE3]

Kentucky has the third highest rate of female incarceration in the world, imprisoning women nearly twice the rate of Thailand — the highest rated country in the world — and nearly twice the national average, according to a new report released by the non-profit group Prison Policy Initiative. [Richmond Register]

Federal health officials want to help Louisville deal with and prevent violence in the city and particularly in western neighborhoods, where gun violence has been a growing problem. [WFPL]

Of COURSE Mitch McConnell has sneakily attached a campaign finance rider to the spending bill! He wants to expand the amount of cash political parties can spend in coordination with candidates. [Politico]

In today’s weekly edition of Louisville Business First, you’ll find a package called “Where the Money Lives,” in which we look at various measures of affluence across the Louisville region. [Business First]

It’s no secret to anyone looking that the United States is in the midst of a real estate boom — and Southern Indiana is enjoying particularly low housing costs. [News & Tribune]

Yes, The Media’s Slut-Shaming Powell

Eric Crawford has no idea what slut-shaming is or he’s lying to you. [WDRB]

Greg Leichty donated $50 to independent Drew Curtis in Kentucky’s gubernatorial contest and plans to vote for the Fark.com founder. Just don’t ask Leichty, a University of Louisville communications professor, if other like-minded liberals ought to follow his example. “I’m not recommending that other people do,” Leichty said. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell’s lawyer, Larry Wilder, said his client was not subpoenaed in the investigation centered around “Breaking Cardinal Rules”. [WHAS11]

The Department of Justice has reached 70 settlements involving 457 hospitals in 43 states for more than $250 million related to cardiac devices that were implanted in patients in violation of Medicare coverage requirements, the Department of Justice announced Friday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just hours before a 19-year-old murder victim is honored, his family asks for help solving the case. [WLKY]

While much of the political attention is on the 2016 presidential race, there’s also a big election that’s not getting nearly as much coverage — and it’s taking place this week. As John Oliver pointed out on HBO’s “Last Week Tonight,” this week’s election could determine who might fall into the “Medicaid Gap” in several states. [HuffPo]

It is a sad and sobering statistic. One in five women will be a victim of sexual assault in college. [WAVE3]

By the time George W Bush left the White House, perceptions of the United States in the wider world were overwhelmingly negative. As the Obama presidency enters its final phase, how have attitudes shifted? (This is about Matthew Barzun) [BBC]

The Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office has begun issuing grand jury subpoenas in connection with allegations that escorts were provided to University of Louisville men’s basketball players and recruits, according to ESPN. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s gubernatorial candidates responded to a questionnaire from Preservation Kentucky regarding Kentucky’s Historic Preservation Tax Credit. [Click the Clicky]

Port of Indiana–Jeffersonville will receive $10 million in transportation grant money from the The U.S. Department of Transportation to enhance and expand the port’s infrastructure. [Business First]

Mayor Mike Moore is happy to present his record of the last four years as reason for his re-election, but challenger Dennis Julius, Jeffersonville city councilman, believes he could have done things better. [News & Tribune]

UofL Loves Flushing Cash Down The Drain

Here’s a lesson in stupid lawsuits that draw even more attention to a scandal you wish would go away. [WDRB]

With Halloween approaching, the mansion for the University of Louisville president in the Cherokee Triangle is once again decorated for the holiday, and President James Ramsey and his wife, Jane, may hand out treats to trick-or-treaters on Halloween night Saturday as they have in the past. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 and the Center for Women and Families are teaming up for a new challenge. [WHAS11]

Lexington could be poised to become the second city in Kentucky to increase the minimum wage. [H-L]

The attorney for the woman at the center of Louisville basketball’s recruitment sex scandal answered questions on local radio. [WLKY]

Tuberculosis has joined HIV/AIDS as the top infectious disease killer on the planet, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The downtown bridge project is one step closer to being completed. The bridge is officially connected from river bank to river bank across the Ohio. [WAVE3]

A group of nearly 40 representatives, from the Congressional Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses, wrote to Attorney General Loretta Lynch Wednesday morning, requesting that the Department of Justice do more to address gun violence in minority communities across the country. [Mother Jones]

The Louisville Water Company has finished the phase-out of two hazardous chemicals that were stored at both of the company’s water treatment plants. [WFPL]

A panel of medical experts said on Friday the prices of prescription medicines in the United States need to be brought in line with the value they bring to patients instead of continuing to let drugmakers set any price they choose. [Reuters]

The U.S. Department of Justice says AB Electrolux is stonewalling it in its fight over the GE Appliances merger, according to a report by legal site Law360. [Business First]

Construction on the renovated Jeffersonville marina — now called Fisherman’s Wharf — is complete, according to an announcement. [News & Tribune]

Another Deadly Weekend As Greg Fischer Pushes His Compassionate City Fallacy

If you missed it late Friday, a human trafficking task force has offered to train the University of Louisville in the wake of its latest scandal. [Page One]

Three people are dead after two separate shootings in Louisville took place Saturday morning. [WDRB]

A Jefferson district court judge on Friday ruled that the traffic school program that has generated more than $1.2 million in revenue for County Attorney Mike O’Connell’s office is unconstitutional. [C-J/AKN]

One man is dead after a shooting in the Lake Dreamland neighborhood Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

The city of Lexington might be paying the new 21c Museum Hotel more than $200,000 to replace sidewalks and put in other improvements on North Upper Street. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Family and friends surrounded police tape in the 800 block of West Evelyn Avenue on Saturday morning, while they waited to learn if their loved one was killed in a shooting on Saturday around 12:30 a.m. Two men died as a result of the shooting. [WLKY]

Targeting one of education’s most divisive issues, President Barack Obama on Saturday called for capping standardized testing at 2 percent of classroom time and said the government shares responsibility for turning tests into the be-all and end-all of American schools. [HuffPo]

Two Louisville families lost brothers and sons to gunfire near Churchill Downs early Saturday morning. [WAVE3]

The mayor of Lousville crossed the Atlantic to pay a a visit to Rotherham’s Advanced Manufacturing Park. Mayor Greg Fischer — the Kentucky city’s 50th mayor — paid a visit to the state-of-the-art research facility last Wednesday (21). [Click the Clicky]

An assistant University of Missouri-Kansas City basketball coach has resigned, saying he can’t do his job while battling what he called “false allegations” that he hired dancers to strip and have sex with recruits while he was a coach at Louisville. [WFPL]

Rufus Scales, 26 and black, was driving his younger brother Devin to his hair-cutting class in this genteel, leafy city when they heard the siren’s whoop and saw the blue light in the rearview mirror of their black pickup. Two police officers pulled them over for minor infractions that included expired plates and failing to hang a flag from a load of scrap metal in the pickup’s bed. But what happened next was nothing like a routine traffic stop. [NY Times]

Members of the Louisville-based Independent Pilots Association, a union that represents pilots for United Parcel Service Inc., has voted to authorize a strike against the Atlanta-based shipping giant. [Business First]

Two police agencies in Clark County have been awarded more than $50,000 for crime prevention and policing initiatives. [News & Tribune]

Powell’s The Devil & Not Athletics Honchos?

A Missouri company has dropped plans to buy land near Louisville International Airport viewed as a potential site for one of the city’s largest industrial buildings. [WDRB]

Facing a gauntlet of questions from western Louisville residents, the head of the Metropolitan Sewer District said his agency favors putting a proposed 20 million gallon underground waste basin in Shawnee Park’s Great Lawn rather than a more intrusive maintenance site closer to neighbors’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Katina Powell said she has no problems admitting to her involvement in the alleged strip shows and sex acts she said happened at UofL Minardi’s Hall from 2010-2014. [WHAS11]

The owner of KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell plans to spin off its China business into a separate, publicly traded company. [H-L]

With U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell urging a boycott of a federal rule to cut carbon emissions from power plants, a Kentucky citizen’s group is coming up with its own plan. And it’ll get absolutely nowhere because this is Kentucky, not the real world. [WLKY]

After a recent federal report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration called for an end to conversion therapy for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth, survivors of the practice joined HuffPost Live last week to discuss their traumatic experiences. [HuffPo]

What? WAVE slut-shaming someone for revealing what goes on at the University of Louisville? SURELY NOT! [WAVE3]

Civil rights lawyers are using a new strategy to change a common court practice that they have long argued unfairly targets the poor. At issue is the way courts across the country sometimes issue arrest warrants for indigent people when they fall behind on paying court fees and fines owed for minor offenses like traffic tickets. [NPR]

Jefferson County is vying for part of a huge pot of federal money meant to make communities more resilient during natural disasters. [WFPL]

The myth of welfare’s corrupting influence on the poor. Does welfare corrupt the poor? Few ideas are so deeply ingrained in the American popular imagination as the belief that government aid for poor people will just encourage bad behavior. [NY Times]

Industrial Terrorplex, a haunted house attraction at 835 Spring St. in Jeffersonville, will close its doors after Halloween wraps up at the end of this month, and construction could start on the next phase for the property by January. The owners of Industrial Terrorplex, Todd Moore and Terry Campbell, agreed to sell the property last year to Jeffersonville-based New Hope Services Inc., which planned to renovate the building into a senior housing facility. [Business First]

Stemming from two outstanding payments from the County Council, the option of suspending services to parts of the county will come to the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter at the Animal Control Authority meeting next month. [News & Tribune]

Felner’s Thankful For UofL Sex Scandal

Here is a new thing for old ladies sitting at home to freak out about. [WDRB]

The misery continues for many Louisville Water Co. customers trying to navigate a transition to a new $29 million computerized billing system, eight months after it went live. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, sure, let’s prosecute the victims here and not the rich as hell sports folks. [WHAS11]

Escort Katina Powell broke her silence on Tuesday, saying she has no proof that Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino knew that a former Cardinals staffer hired her and other dancers to strip and have sex with former recruits and players. [H-L]

The woman at the center of a recruiting scandal in the University of Louisville basketball program is speaking out publicly for the first time. [WLKY]

Vice President Joe Biden said he will not run for president in 2016. Biden announced his decision in a statement given from the White House on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Wait, wait, wait — rich white guys complaining about folks attempting to hold police accountable for admitted profiling? Surely not! [WAVE3]

We can’t afford to be cynical about the news that the most lucrative college hoops program in the country uses women as a form of currency. On revelations that the University of Louisville basketball program may have paid a self-described “Louisville Madam” to supply recruits with strippers and sex, the reactions have congregated into two camps: moralizers and cynics. [The Nation]

A zoning hearing on the future use of JBS Swift’s lot on Cabel Street in Butchertown has been delayed yet again. [WFPL]

Clinton said she has “serious concerns” with the proposed mergers between Anthem and Cigna and between Aetna and Humana that are currently underway. The deals will be under review by the Department of Justice for the next year or so, likely running into the next president’s tenure. [The Hill]

The University of Louisville School of Medicine’s probationary status with an accrediting body has been lifted after more than a year. [Business First]

The RDA, for now, is dead in Clark County. The Clark County Council signed an ordinance rescinding a previous vote and absolving any current membership the county would have with the Regional Development Authority. [News & Tribune]

Woah, This Is Clarksville’s First Black Cop?!

Community leaders and parents are saying enough is enough with all the recent violence in Louisville. [WDRB]

Four Louisville Metro Council members are pooling their resources to hire former Democratic Caucus Director Elizabeth Hoffman for an unspecified role in City Hall less than a month after she was fired. [C-J/AKN]

Seriously? Not even a mention of failing a polygraph being essentially meaningless? And we’re supposed to trust the teevee folks. [WHAS11]

ESPN reported Tuesday that five former University of Louisville basketball players and recruits told their “Outside the Lines” reporters that they attended parties at a campus dorm from 2010-14 that included strippers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Months after Crystal Rogers, 35, a mother of five disappears, new details are emerging about the case. [WLKY]

A key House Democrat suggested Monday that Vice President Joe Biden can’t win the Democratic nomination on his own and should not enter the contest. [HuffPo]

Thanks to a $250,000 grant, the Clarksville Police Department has hired three new officers, including the first African American to serve on the force. [WAVE3]

The two women who want to be Kentucky’s next lieutenant governor offered sharply contrasting views on education and economic policies in a televised debate on Kentucky Education Television Monday evening. [Ronnie Ellis]

Nearly 1,000 local leaders and neighborhood revitalization advocates from across the nation are in Louisville this week for the annual NeighborWorks America Community Leadership Institute. [WFPL]

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has granted Kentucky a one-year extension for meeting requirements of the stringent new identification security law known as REAL ID – meaning a Kentucky driver’s license is still sufficient for gaining access to the vast majority of federal installations. [Press Release]

The Courier-Journal’s horse racing reporter, Jennie Rees, who’s been with the paper for 34 years, will leave after accepting a buyout offer from the paper’s parent company. [Business First]

After three city department heads decried the measure, New Albany City Councilman Kevin Zurschmiede pulled his ordinance to adopt the International Property Maintenance Code on Thursday night. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun Humana Things Happening…

Wait, 448 square feet is tiny? In May, WDRB took you to Louisville’s very first permanent tiny house, which had just broken ground. Five months later, we take you inside now that the house is finished. [WDRB]

In her first comments to a reporter since the publication of her book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” Katina Powell said in a brief interview Friday that her daughters support the book in which she claims she provided them as escorts for University of Louisville players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

After months of community meetings discussing the site for the proposed West Louisville FoodPort, organizers held an event to celebrate the season as well share more information about the project Saturday. [WHAS11]

Democrat Andy Beshear and Republican Whitney Westerfield are the men publicly running to be Kentucky’s next attorney general. But behind the scenes, scores of corporations, wealthy businessmen, lawyers, lobbyists and labor unions have given several million dollars to two independent groups loosely affiliated with the Democratic and Republican parties, which are spending that money on a barrage of attack ads meant to influence voters. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A triple shooting in Louisville’s Portland neighborhood leaves two dead and one injured. [WLKY]

Migrants streaming across the Balkans reached Slovenia on Saturday, diverted overnight by the closure of Hungary’s border with Croatia in the latest demonstration of Europe’s disjointed response to the flow of people reaching its borders. [HuffPo]

Of all the things that are hard to understand, shots fired at a visitation are near the top of the list. Especially, when it was gun fire that claimed the life of the 22-year-old in the casket. [WAVE3]

Maybe we’ll take homelessness this seriously in Louisville some day. Hawaii’s governor has signed an emergency proclamation to deal with the problem of homelessness, saying the state faces the country’s highest per capita rate of homelessness and more needs to be done to house the indigent. [Reuters]

West Louisville residents are organizing against a proposed biodigester plant, where organic waste would be converted into methane gas. The efforts come as Louisville Metro officials — including Mayor Greg Fischer — and the energy company behind the proposal work to educate the community about the technology. [WFPL]

It used to be a given: When your kids reached school age, they’d strap on their backpacks and head for the neighborhood elementary school. Or, you’d pay a hefty tuition to send them to private school. In the last two decades, a third option has emerged. Today, there are more than 6,000 charter schools in the country. And lately, they’ve been the subject of passionate and often acrimonious debate about the right way to fix public education in America. [NPR]

The guests have arrived, the band is playing and bride and groom are meeting at the altar. Then the chaplain asks, “does anyone object?” That’s the question Monday for insurers Humana Inc. and Aetna Inc., as shareholders of both companies vote on whether to approve a merger that would combine Humana’s growing Medicare business with Aetna’s portfolio to create the second-largest managed-care company in the United States. [Business First]

Legislation, its effects on funding public schools and the advent of major changes in public education are the discussion table for a meeting of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education on Wednesday, Oct. 21. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Administrative Dumpster Fire Part 850

Oldham County voters will soon decide if alcohol will be sold throughout the county. [WDRB]

When will taxpayers have to stop paying Bonnie Hackbarth’s lying ass? [C-J/AKN]

Criticizing teachers probably isn’t the smartest thing for this principal to do. [More C-J/AKN]

Yet another reason Donna Hargens and her shady pal, Bonnie Hackbarth, have got to go. [WHAS11]

In the ever expanding universe of Kentucky bourbon, it can be hard to keep up with new distilleries and new things to sample. But it is so much fun trying. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are still investigating after a body was found inside a box. [WLKY]

A worsening political dispute on the front lines of the fight against the Islamic State group threatens one of the few silver linings for U.S. policy in the Middle East. [HuffPo]

A silent killer may be responsible for taking the lives of a Louisville couple. Deputy Coroner Cindy Thoene said Donald Hayes, 64, Barbara Hayes, 57, and their two dogs were discovered dead inside their home in the 9400 block of Dawson Hill Road around 3:15 p.m. on Oct.12. [WAVE3]

University of Louisville is investigating claims that a former staffer hired escorts to have sex with basketball players and recruits. [NPR]

People living with sickle cell disease may have a new treatment option that can cure them of the blood disorder. [WFPL]

One Texas lawyer is helping companies opt out of workers’ compensation and write their own rules. What does it mean for injured workers? [ProPublica]

A new report from global commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield and its Louisville affiliate, Commercial Kentucky Inc., shows a continual decline in office vacancy while projecting a somewhat rosy outlook for the local economy. [Business First]

The Clarksville Town Council shied away from granting start-up funds to the Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana at Monday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]