Some Fun Humana Things Happening…

Wait, 448 square feet is tiny? In May, WDRB took you to Louisville’s very first permanent tiny house, which had just broken ground. Five months later, we take you inside now that the house is finished. [WDRB]

In her first comments to a reporter since the publication of her book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” Katina Powell said in a brief interview Friday that her daughters support the book in which she claims she provided them as escorts for University of Louisville players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

After months of community meetings discussing the site for the proposed West Louisville FoodPort, organizers held an event to celebrate the season as well share more information about the project Saturday. [WHAS11]

Democrat Andy Beshear and Republican Whitney Westerfield are the men publicly running to be Kentucky’s next attorney general. But behind the scenes, scores of corporations, wealthy businessmen, lawyers, lobbyists and labor unions have given several million dollars to two independent groups loosely affiliated with the Democratic and Republican parties, which are spending that money on a barrage of attack ads meant to influence voters. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A triple shooting in Louisville’s Portland neighborhood leaves two dead and one injured. [WLKY]

Migrants streaming across the Balkans reached Slovenia on Saturday, diverted overnight by the closure of Hungary’s border with Croatia in the latest demonstration of Europe’s disjointed response to the flow of people reaching its borders. [HuffPo]

Of all the things that are hard to understand, shots fired at a visitation are near the top of the list. Especially, when it was gun fire that claimed the life of the 22-year-old in the casket. [WAVE3]

Maybe we’ll take homelessness this seriously in Louisville some day. Hawaii’s governor has signed an emergency proclamation to deal with the problem of homelessness, saying the state faces the country’s highest per capita rate of homelessness and more needs to be done to house the indigent. [Reuters]

West Louisville residents are organizing against a proposed biodigester plant, where organic waste would be converted into methane gas. The efforts come as Louisville Metro officials — including Mayor Greg Fischer — and the energy company behind the proposal work to educate the community about the technology. [WFPL]

It used to be a given: When your kids reached school age, they’d strap on their backpacks and head for the neighborhood elementary school. Or, you’d pay a hefty tuition to send them to private school. In the last two decades, a third option has emerged. Today, there are more than 6,000 charter schools in the country. And lately, they’ve been the subject of passionate and often acrimonious debate about the right way to fix public education in America. [NPR]

The guests have arrived, the band is playing and bride and groom are meeting at the altar. Then the chaplain asks, “does anyone object?” That’s the question Monday for insurers Humana Inc. and Aetna Inc., as shareholders of both companies vote on whether to approve a merger that would combine Humana’s growing Medicare business with Aetna’s portfolio to create the second-largest managed-care company in the United States. [Business First]

Legislation, its effects on funding public schools and the advent of major changes in public education are the discussion table for a meeting of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education on Wednesday, Oct. 21. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Administrative Dumpster Fire Part 850

Oldham County voters will soon decide if alcohol will be sold throughout the county. [WDRB]

When will taxpayers have to stop paying Bonnie Hackbarth’s lying ass? [C-J/AKN]

Criticizing teachers probably isn’t the smartest thing for this principal to do. [More C-J/AKN]

Yet another reason Donna Hargens and her shady pal, Bonnie Hackbarth, have got to go. [WHAS11]

In the ever expanding universe of Kentucky bourbon, it can be hard to keep up with new distilleries and new things to sample. But it is so much fun trying. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are still investigating after a body was found inside a box. [WLKY]

A worsening political dispute on the front lines of the fight against the Islamic State group threatens one of the few silver linings for U.S. policy in the Middle East. [HuffPo]

A silent killer may be responsible for taking the lives of a Louisville couple. Deputy Coroner Cindy Thoene said Donald Hayes, 64, Barbara Hayes, 57, and their two dogs were discovered dead inside their home in the 9400 block of Dawson Hill Road around 3:15 p.m. on Oct.12. [WAVE3]

University of Louisville is investigating claims that a former staffer hired escorts to have sex with basketball players and recruits. [NPR]

People living with sickle cell disease may have a new treatment option that can cure them of the blood disorder. [WFPL]

One Texas lawyer is helping companies opt out of workers’ compensation and write their own rules. What does it mean for injured workers? [ProPublica]

A new report from global commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield and its Louisville affiliate, Commercial Kentucky Inc., shows a continual decline in office vacancy while projecting a somewhat rosy outlook for the local economy. [Business First]

The Clarksville Town Council shied away from granting start-up funds to the Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana at Monday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Administration Just Needs To Go

Louisville Metro Police found a body in a box in southern Jefferson County Tuesday afternoon, according to a spokesperson. [WDRB]

Two Humana Inc. shareholders have filed suit to block Aetna’s purchase of the Louisville-based health care giant, contending that the $37 billion acquisition isn’t a good deal for stockholders who stood to benefit from the company’s bright future. [C-J/AKN]

Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore has issued an executive order to put more firefighters on the streets. [WHAS11]

The most celebrated jockey in Lexington this month won’t be riding in Keeneland’s fall meet, or afterward at the Breeders’ Cup. In fact, he died 119 years ago. [H-L]

The college basketball season tips off in about four weeks, but for the University of Louisville the focus is on what did or didn’t happen off the court. [WLKY]

Appalachia struggles with a disproportionate disease burden, and poor sleep is part of it. [HuffPo]

Jefferson County Public School leaders met on Monday for the first time since one of their key administrators ended his employment with the district. [WAVE3]

Jennifer Lawrence has written an essay expressing her anger at getting paid less than her male co-stars. [BBC]

Louisville’s electric vehicle enthusiast group will cut the ribbon this weekend on the group’s first public vehicle charger. [WFPL]

Earlier this month, Wal-Mart trumpeted that it had beaten a goal it set five years ago: to open at least 275 stores in food deserts by 2016. That targeted expansion into “neighborhoods without access to fresh affordable groceries” came as part of the retailer’s “healthier food initiative,” lauded by — and launched with — First Lady Michelle Obama in 2011. Wal-Marts have been popping up in lower-income urban areas where grocery stores are scarce ever since. [NPR]

The Louisville-Lexington area’s economy is currently firing on all cylinders, blowing by the nation at large, according to a new study from The PNC Financial Services Group. And the good news is expected to continue through the end of the year and into 2016, according to PNC. [Business First]

Clarksville residents should soon see more police patrols in their neighborhoods thanks to a $250,000 grant awarded to the Clarksville Police Department. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Era: Nothing But Scandals & Sex

What this means is Mark Hebert (haha, just kidding/trying to get a rise out of Hebert) is prolly spilling the hooker tea. A former University of Louisville basketball player has given investigators a version of events that indicates strippers were in the players’ dorm on at least one occasion, a source close to the investigation told WDRB News. [WDRB]

You already knew Donna Hargens is as bad as the previous two heads of JCPS. None of this will come as a surprise to you, as it apparently does to education reporters. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, please, no one is shocked someone with integrity jumped ship from JCPS. [WHAS11]

Aww, lookit, Jimbo Ramsey has another sex scandal on his hands. And this one will probably cost him more than Robert Felner and the rest of the bunch combined. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Council’s Intergovernmental Affairs Committee received an update on the city’s Needle Exchange Program. So far, after almost four months, the program has had more than 800 participants, and more than 300 of them have come back more than once. [WLKY]

If you want to stop violence against people, stop violence against animals. [HuffPo]

A vegetable garden along Southwestern Parkway in the Shawnee neighborhood is sowing more than seeds. [WAVE3]

Some prominent Northern Kentucky Republicans have told the Enquirer they support Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. The bitterness among many Republicans against the tea party, which has challenged many in leadership recent years, might catch up to Republican candidate Matt Bevin, often seen as an outsider candidate who has heavy tea party support. []

21st Century Parks is scheduled to open the third of four parks next week. The quartet will eventually make up the Parklands of Floyds Fork — a donor-supported public park system near I-265 in eastern Jefferson County. [WFPL]

The lack of accurate information about police-involved shootings is roiling the nation’s law enforcement community, leaving officials unable to say whether high-profile killings are isolated events or part of an alarming trend, FBI Director James B. Comey said Wednesday. [WaPo]

Louisville’s Republic Bancorp Inc. has expanded its reach in Florida with the $32.3 million purchase of St. Petersburg, Fla.-based Cornerstone Community Bank. [Business First]

If you’ve ever seen an elderly person or a child in need and couldn’t resist lending a helping hand, then you might know how Jeffersonville police officer Amber Tharp feels every moment of every day. [News & Tribune]

Miss The Goober Debate? Don’t Worry

As winter approaches, there’s good news for Louisville Gas and Electric customers. If approved by the Kentucky Public Service Commission, the utility’s residential natural gas customers can expect to see a decrease of nearly 15 percent on an average heating bill. [WDRB]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Well, that sounds more fun than prostitutes. University of Louisville police said a person was hurt in a small explosion in the Shumaker Research Building. [WHAS11]

Guess we should be glad we’re not dealing with what Lexington is dealing with. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Community services and volunteers came together to cater to Louisville’s homeless community. [WLKY]

The Affordable Care Act’s chief aim is to extend coverage to people without health insurance. One of the 2010 law’s primary means to achieve that goal is expanding Medicaid eligibility to more people near the poverty level. But a crucial court ruling in 2012 granted states the power to reject the Medicaid expansion. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky School for the Blind has been a part of the community since 1842. Its mission is provide comprehensive education services to all Kentucky students who are blind and visually impaired. But three mothers say that is not happening.

If the prevailing judgment about the 2015 gubernatorial race is that no one is excited about it, then Tuesday evening’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway probably didn’t set any fires under prospective voters. [Ronnie Ellis]

What the hell is wrong with all these backward-ass gun nuts these days? We love us some guns but come on, people, enough with the bigotry. Louisville Metro Police officials say they are monitoring developments in the days leading up to a rally planned for this weekend outside the Islamic Center on River Road. [WFPL]

Leading theologians from the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) are making news this week for again speaking out against ex-gay therapy, also known as reparative or conversion therapy. But what these theologians have been saying at the annual Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC) conference about how to respond to LGBT people belies the supposed progress of rejecting these harmful, ineffective treatments. [ThinkProgress]

The University of Louisville men’s basketball team is highly decorated: Multiple Final Four appearances and three national titles, the most recent in 2013. [Business First]

If you’re pleased with the city’s progress over the last four years, Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore thinks he’s the obvious pick for Jeffersonville mayor come Nov. 3. [News & Tribune]

Latest UofL Dumpster Fire Rages On

Louisville Metro Fire needs your help identifying someone it calls a person of interest in a fire that killed three people. [WDRB]

The veteran journalist who co-authored a book filled with explosive allegations against the University of Louisville men’s basketball program said Monday that the escort he wrote with is “pretty damn credible.” [C-J/AKN]

University of Louisville announced on Tuesday, Oct. 6, it is reviewing allegations regarding the men’s basketball program. [WHAS11]

Eleven employees in the Jefferson County public school district have filed a lawsuit saying they shouldn’t be forced to pay union fees if they don’t want to be part of the union. [H-L]

You should probably go to this pumpkin thing. The third annual Jack-O-Lantern Spectacular will be held Oct. 8 through Nov. 1 at Iroquois Park. [WLKY]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took a shot this week at President Barack Obama’s immigration strategy from his first years in office, saying it wouldn’t work with today’s GOP. [HuffPo]

Changes could be coming to the Original Highlands. The Board of Zoning adjustments gave the green light for Edwards Communities Development Company to build 194 apartments on the site where Mercy Academy sits empty on East Broadway. [WAVE3]

Girls, many of whom have suffered a range of trauma at home, make up a growing share of children arrested and detained across the country. [ProPublica]

An academic conference on the environmental history of the Ohio River Valley kicks off in Louisville later this week. [WFPL]

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. [WaPo]

American Commercial Lines Inc., which is based in Jeffersonville, announced Thursday that it has agreed to acquire AEP River Operations LLC from American Electric Power Co. Inc. AEP River Operations is a commercial inland barge company that delivers about 45 million tons of products each year. The company is based in Chesterfield, Mo., and has operations in Paducah, Ky., and Convent, Algiers and Belle Chasse, La., the News and Tribune reports. [Business First]

Victims of domestic violence in need of immediate legal protection in Floyd County now have a place to turn to after regular business hours. [News & Tribune]

Sexytime To Bring Down UofL Finally?

So it’s not Robert Felner or the myriad other swindlers who bring the University of Louisville to its knees, it’s prostitution? Commonwealth’s Attorney Thomas Wine says his office is in consultation with the University of Louisville Police Department and the Louisville Metro Police Department Crimes Against Children Unit regarding the possible criminal violations revealed in her book. [WDRB]

Thank goodness there’s at least one education reporter in town who won’t spin and obfuscate regarding test scores. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City and your elite leaders don’t bat an eyelash. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal shooting in the 400 block of Marret Avenue. [WHAS11]

Ty Handy has been appointed as president of Jefferson Community and Technical College in Louisville effective Jan. 1, Kentucky Community and Technical College System President Jay Box announced. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Protesters rallied Monday outside the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. [WLKY]

Last week, the Taliban began the process of retaking Afghanistan, starting with the northern city of Kunduz. [HuffPo]

The former stripper whose sex-for-money claims rocked the University of Louisville basketball program last week said she tried to contact the NCAA before publishing her book, according to a report. [WAVE3]

The National Rifle Association and other anti-gun-control groups are formidable, but political trends may be loosening their grip on lawmakers. [ProPublica]

The ethereal glow that radiates from thousands of freshly carved pumpkins is coming back to Iroquois Park this week. [WFPL]

The tell-all book claiming that a former University of Louisville staffer hired escorts for players and recruits is topping charts. [WKYT]

People will never stop trying to ruin bourbon, apparently. [Business First]

U.S. District Court magistrate recommended this week to certify the civil suit against former Clark County Circuit No. 2 Judge Jerry Jacobi and other former court officials as a class action lawsuit that could represent more than 60 former participants in the county’s drug court program. [News & Tribune]