Finally, An End To A Terrible Week

A spokeswoman for insurance giant Humana says the company is increasing security after receiving a report of graffiti found inside a restroom. [WDRB]

This is what lobbyists can get you. Norton Healthcare has secured city agreement to issue up to $725 million in tax-exempt bonds, with much of the proceeds targeted for helping to pay for a long list of capital projects. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell, author of Breaking Cardinal Rules, has now added her name to a lawsuit against some UofL students who claimed their degrees were diminished by her claims. [WHAS11]

Growing abuse of the powerful painkiller fentanyl drove the number of overdose deaths in Kentucky to a new record high in 2015, according to a report released Tuesday. [H-L]

Officials with MSD, LG&E and the Louisville Water Company announced the date for the 27th annual Ohio River sweep — June 18. [WLKY]

John McCain is responsible for the Orlando massacre because he has long pushed homophobic policies. [HuffPo]

Indiana State Police are asking for the public’s help in solving two homicide cases. On May 11, the bodies of Sarah Ipock, 30, and an unidentified male were pulled from the Ohio River by separate barge crews. [WAVE3]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

It seems unlikely that Louisville Metro Council members will approve a large sewer rate increase after a contentious budget hearing Wednesday. [WFPL]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. plans to build a four-story nursing home in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

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All The Kudos To Greg Fischer

Louisville Metro Police are responding to a report of a shooting in the Middletown area. [WDRB]

A Louisville Metro Police officer is in stable condition after he was shot late Saturday night in the Russell neighborhood after a foot chase with a Louisville man, police said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This was the most insane story of the week locally, right? [WHAS11]

The publisher and author of escort Katina Powell’s book alleging that former Louisville men’s basketball staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers for sex parties at the Cardinals’ dormitory have countersued Louisville students, saying they attempted to “extort” a monetary settlement in their action alleging Powell and the book devalued their education. [H-L]

Metro United Way and the Center for Women and Families announced a partnership for 211 to expand its services in Louisville. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton’s first speech since she won a majority of pledged delegates in the Democratic presidential race included remarks about how abortion relates to other issues. That’s groundbreaking for a presidential candidate. [HuffPo]

Mayor Greg Fischer is calling on Louisville and southern Indiana residents to join him in marching in the Kentuckiana Pride Parade on Friday as a show of compassion and unity. [WAVE3]

Muhammad Ali was extolled on Friday as a boxer of incomparable grace, a magnetic entertainer and a man of conviction who gave a voice to the oppressed, as a two-day celebration of “The Greatest” came to a rousing end in his Kentucky hometown. [Reuters]

A woman who was shot by a Jefferson County constable in a Walmart parking lot has agreed to settle her lawsuit against the county government. The county will pay $75,000 in damages to Pedro and Tammie Ortiz on behalf of Constable David Whitlock, who shot Tammie Ortiz in November 2011. That brings the cost of the shooting for Jefferson County taxpayers to six figures, since the county has already paid more than $37,000 to Whitlock’s attorneys. [WFPL]

Rousing tributes have been paid to boxing legend Muhammad Ali at a memorial service in his home city of Louisville, Kentucky. [BBC]

A Louisville-based package-design company is expanding internationally. [Business First]

In the hopes of taking advantage of expected growth, the City of Charlestown could create a redevelopment authority board that would be able to borrow money and get to work. [News & Tribune]

Everyone Finally Realizes Hargens Sucks

The school day started with another loud show of support for Jefferson County Public Schools teachers and other employees. [WDRB]

As many legal experts had expected, a lawsuit has been dismissed in which University of Louisville students claimed Katina Powell’s book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” diminished the value of their education. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Yet another murder here in Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky will lose $12.6 million next year thanks to a 4.5 percent cut in state funding. At the same time, student financial aid and scholarships will increase by more than $20 million, and fixed costs for things such as utilities and employee health insurance are on the rise. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An improvement plan for the Greater Clark County Schools is stopped by the state. [WLKY]

Goudy’ll be in Louisville for the upcoming NRA funtimes. Remember the House Select Committee on Benghazi? The ninth official probe into what really happened in the Sept. 11, 2012, attacks on the U.S. consulate in eastern Libya? [HuffPo]

Sheronda Morris couldn’t help but identify when she saw the video of a 14-year-old girl being carried to safety after suffering a non-life threatening gunshot wound at the Pegasus Parade on May 5. [WAVE3]

By seizing the Republican presidential nomination for Donald J. Trump on Tuesday night, he and his millions of supporters completed what had seemed unimaginable: a hostile takeover of one of America’s two major political parties. [NY Times]

The long-awaited state audit of the University of Louisville and its separate, nonprofit foundation is delayed. [WFPL]

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, the presidency of George W. Bush changed instantly. In a new collection of never-before-seen photographs from that day, the president can be seen responding to the worst terrorist attack in United States history — an event that would redefine his time in office and propel the nation into two wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. [PBS]

Two big drug companies will pay Kentucky almost $4.8 million. [Business First]

The November slate of six candidates for the Clark County Council At-large race is set with Democrats advancing two incumbents and a current Republican council member losing in the primary. [News & Tribune]

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Brown Gave Master Class In Throwing Shade

Community activist Angela Newby-Bouggess has died. [WDRB]

Nearly 500 sexual assault kits that would have continued to sit untested in the Louisville Metro Police property room will now be sent for lab testing after a shift in LMPD philosophy. The department is sending 1,386 untested rape kits to Kentucky State Police for testing – 463 more than originally intended. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “We have to start opening our eyes and reconciling the fact that these things happened,” says Attorney Larry Wilder, a statement he has repeated since October when his client’s book Breaking Cardinal Rules hit store shelves. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission has dedicated 88 acres to an existing preserve in Pulaski County. [H-L]

Another day, another fun pedestrian accident in Possibility Compassionate City! [WLKY]

The White House has narrowed its search for a Supreme Court nominee to three federal appeals court judges, Sri Srinivasan, Merrick Garland and Paul Watford, a source familiar with the selection process said on Friday. [HuffPo]

If she can do it, you can do it. One year after her story went viral, Asia Ford returned to the Rodes City Run 10K Saturday. [WAVE3]

Obama Administration transparency is a lot like Fischer Administration transparency. It’s not a real thing. Two years ago last month, I filed a public-records request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency as part of my reporting into the flawed response to Hurricane Sandy. Then, I waited. [ProPublica]

Kelly Downard has apparently turned into all bark and no bite. No clue what happened to him but he’s been entirely neutered. [WFPL]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A pair of sisters is opening a barber shop that will be a little different than most others. [Business First]

Two contracts up for a vote in April got some scrutiny by the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s board of trustees work session Monday. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Can’t Catch A Break With Hargens

It’s one thing after another with Donna Hargens. Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens admits the district made a “data entry discrepancy” in reporting to the state the number of times students were either physically held down or confined to a room last school year. [WDRB]

One victim was found in a garbage can. A second was beaten to death and set on fire, his body found burning on a sidewalk. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The story of Katina Powell, the UofL basketball scandal, and possible new details will be getting nationwide attention once again. Powell sat down with ESPN’s Outside the Lines for the second time on March 8 in Louisville for another interview. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky state Senate has approved a bill that would give public school districts an incentive for starting school in late August. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It was bizarre-o watching Greg Fischer speak at a Jefferson County Board of Education meeting. [WLKY]

Can you imagine the Kentucky Democratic Party doing something like this? Of course you can’t. We can’t. The KDP not only fears the gays, it fears women. So something like this isn’t going to happen any time soon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro police are investigating after two people were shot in the Chickasaw neighborhood late Tuesday night. [WAVE3]

House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said Tuesday he expects the House to vote on a two-year state budget plan early next week, one which will restore most of Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed funding cuts to education. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville has won a gold ranking in sustainability from a global group, making it the first university in Kentucky to achieve gold status. [WFPL]

“Religious Liberty” is the new FEAR THE GAY buzzword. Candidates in Kentucky sure are taking advantage of it. [FiveThirtyEight]

Believe it or not, CEOs and investors of these innovative software and technology companies have Congress to thank for an upcoming banner year for startups. [Business First]

Several ongoing projects in downtown Jeffersonville may look stalled, but work inside and behind the scenes is moving forward. [News & Tribune]

Anti-Jim Ramsey Chorus Getting Louder

The University of Louisville basketball team won’t play in either the Atlantic Coast or NCAA basketball tournaments. But that doesn’t mean there is a lack of news surrounding the program. [WDRB]

When will the Jefferson County Board of Education act to hold Donna Hargens accountable? Never, most likely. David Jones and his pals can’t see the forest for the trees. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting in Possumbility Compassionate City! [WHAS11]

After reading about peaceful protesters being cursed and assaulted at Donald Trump rallies, I went online to watch videos of his appearance in Louisville last week. They reveal much about the Republican candidate, the followers he attracts and his effect on them. [Tom Eblen]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Remember stories like this the next time you complain about first responders. They save your lives and the lives of your pets. [WLKY]

Twenty million previously uninsured people have gained health coverage since the Affordable Care Act became law in 2010, President Barack Obama said during a speech in Milwaukee Thursday. [HuffPo]

A well-respected professor emeritus and surgeon who’s spent much of his life helping build the reputation of the University of Louisville is now weighing in on the ongoing controversy surrounding UofL President Dr. James Ramsey. [WAVE3]

The GOP presidential race has been brutal and often vulgar. So how do you talk to kids about it? [NPR]

Proposed regulations saying where short-term rental units may be located in Louisville will go before a city planning committee later this week. [WFPL]

Gov. Matt Bevin took to social media Monday, the day before four critical special House elections, to pressure House Democrats to pass a budget. [Ronnie Ellis]

John Schnatter, along with the Charles Koch Foundation, has awarded a $3.25 million grant to Schnatter’s alma mater, Ball State University, in order to fund the new John H. Schnatter Institute for Entrepreneurship and Free Enterprise. [Business First]

Judge Vicki Carmichael was not one of three finalists selected for the Indiana Supreme Court on Friday. [News & Tribune]

The Sadiqa Reinvention Tour Is Underway

Turnaround efforts at Jefferson County’s eight chronically low-performing middle schools have presented ‘unique challenges’ when it comes to improving academic achievement and increasing student growth. [WDRB]

Pbbbbbbt. Louisville Urban League President and CEO Sadiqa Reynolds is pitching Mayor Greg Fischer’s office and Metro Council members on dedicating part of the city’s $10 million surplus to the civil rights group’s housing redevelopment program. [C-J/AKN]

One of Katina Powell’s attorneys, Bart McMahon, confirms she is scheduled to meet with NCAA investigators Monday afternoon, March 7. [WHAS11]

For many years, this editorial board’s position on the death penalty has been keep it but fix it, because some crimes are so heinous that no other punishment will do. We now must concede that the death penalty is not going to be fixed and, in fact, probably cannot be fixed at any defensible cost to taxpayers. [H-L]

Convenience stores and gas stations in Oldham County can now apply for a packaged liquor license after voters expanded alcohol sales in December. [WLKY]

After learning that Donald Trump apparently kept a volume of Adolf Hitler’s speeches at his bedside, Bill Maher made a scary comparison between the GOP front-runner at the German dictator on “Real Time with Bill Maher” on Friday. [HuffPo]

A firefighter’s widow claims Kentucky Retirement Systems is playing hardball with her in her time of need. [WAVE3]

Tim Cook got almost $400 million of restricted stock when he was named Apple chief executive in 2011, succeeding Steve Jobs. Regardless of whether Apple shareholders fared well or badly over the grant’s 10-year term, all Cook needed to do to collect that stock (worth about $700 million at today’s price) was keep his job. It was the kind of deal that pay mavens derisivelycall “pay for pulse.” [ProPublica]

Holy crap! After all the havoc Sadiqa Reynolds wreaked in Metro Government, she’s now trying to spin some tale of hopefulness. And media outlets are taking her seriously. We’ll take that hack seriously the day she takes responsibility for her role in the Metro Animal Services shenanigans. Spoiler alert: Sadiqa will never do that. [WFPL]

Regulations that limit heavy metal pollution from oil- and coal-fired power plants will continue to be enforced by the EPA — at least for now — thanks to Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. [ThinkProgress]

The nation’s largest pharmacy retailer is about to open a smaller location in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

Residents in need of a watchful eye now have three designated safe place locations under surveillance at the Clark County Government Center in Jeffersonville. [News & Tribune]

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