Surprise! More Bad UofL & JCPS News

A lawsuit against “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell may never see the light of day. [WDRB]

Greg Fischer made two key additions to his administration Wednesday in areas dealing with Louisville’s public safety and public assistance. The mayor announced Rashaad Abdur-Rahman will be the new director of the Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods office and Eric Friedlander will serve as acting director of the Community Services department. [C-J/AKN]

Data from Jefferson County Public Schools shows that a new grading scale appears to have increased the number of students getting A grades in classes. [WHAS11]

Glad to see there’s nothing important left to worry about. The University of Kentucky has sometimes been criticized for being a campus of independent units, with academic, athletics and health care divisions operating more separately than together. On a symbolic level, UK officials have decided that will no longer be the case. [H-L]

What the hell is this story about the guy killed in the Highlands? What? No, really, what the hell is that story? [WLKY]

The “Seinfeld” writer who coined “Festivus” wants Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) to stop tweeting about his beloved secular holiday. [HuffPo]

A JCPS bus driver was assaulted and robbed by students. The incident, according to the bus union president, happened on Friday at the Detrick Nichols compound off Taylor Blvd. [WAVE3]

While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky business groups are backing legislation that would expand expungements of some felony convictions. [WFPL]

The recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino have put pressure on local authorities to show they’re ready for that kind of violence. Some jurisdictions, such as Los Angeles, are stepping up exercises and terrorism simulations. [NPR]

With truckers in high demand, the online marketplace seeks to connect drivers with carriers that need something hauled. [Business First]

Some of Indiana’s grocery stores and liquor stores say a change in state law that allows alcohol sales on Christmas Day for the first time in decades won’t affect them because their stores are closed on that holiday. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

JCPS-LMPD Mess Blown Outta Proportion

Time Warner constantly sucks and constantly gets to take more of your money with little to no competition. [WDRB]

PEE ALERT! Louisville has a top-25 basketball team with a high ceiling, but the Cardinals aren’t ranked yet this season because of ongoing investigations into a book making major allegations against the program, coach Rick Pitino said. [C-J/AKN]

Supporters of Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens met with Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine on Monday afternoon, Nov. 30, urging him to withdraw his request to remove Stevens from criminal court cases. [WHAS11]

Before Gov. Steve Beshear leaves office and Gov.-elect Matt Bevin can reconstitute the racing commission, the regulatory body will take up some key business on Tuesday: a request for a gambling parlor at Turfway Park in Florence and Keeneland’s plan to open a quarter horse track and gambling parlor in Corbin. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department chief is reminding Jefferson County Public Schools exactly what officers can and cannot do when it comes to safety and security at schools. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama spoke out on Planned Parenthood following what appears to be a politically motivated shooting at one of the health care provider’s clinics in Colorado last week that left three people dead and nine others injured. [HuffPo]

After more than three months of meetings with local officials and community leaders, Clark County’s health officer, Dr. Kevin Burke, is gearing up to formally petition the state to set up the exchange program. [WAVE3]

One of the most prominent stains on the reputation of the much-mythologized Reagan administration was its response, or lack of response, to the AIDS crisis as it began to ravage American cities in the early and mid-1980s. President Reagan famously (though, not famously enough) didn’t himself publicly mention AIDS until 1985, when more than 5,000 people, most of them gay men, had already been killed by the disease. Filmmaker Scott Calonico’s new documentary short, When AIDS Was Funny, exclusively debuting on VF.com, shows how the Reagan administration reacted to the mounting problem in chilling fashion. Not even Reagan’s appointed mouthpiece, notorious press secretary Larry Speakes, had much to say about the crisis beyond derisive laughter. [Vanity Fair]

The future of Louisville’s bicycling infrastructure will be the topic of discussion at a pair of public meetings set for this week. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday said the United States has power to do more to prevent gun homicides like last week’s shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Hillsdale Furniture LLC has based its distribution operations in Bullitt County since 2008, but those services are returning home. [Business First]

Officials are looking at ways to make the Clark County Government Building more secure. [News & Tribune]

Another Sword Attack! It’s Been A Bit

Possibility City! Picture it: A city — the most compassionate city ever — two downtown bridges. Both named after assassinated presidents. Makes sense and sends the message that it’s possible here… possible to be murdered. [Deep Bridge Thoughts]

Police say a suspect tried to assault a man with a sword on Thanksgiving night — but the victim also had a weapon. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has authorized engineering work on two underground basins to hold a combination of rain and raw sewage during wet weather. [C-J/AKN]

An attorney fighting the release of the book, Breaking Cardinal Rules, is working to find out how many copies were sold in Kentucky. [WHAS11]

When Gloria Maldonado was still at Bryan Station High School, she remembers college reps coming to talk about the University of Kentucky. The first in her family to plan to go to college, “I didn’t even know what an alumni was,” she recalled. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Protesters from the Black Lives Matter movement are camped out in front of the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office in Louisville. [WLKY]

World leaders are meeting in Paris this month in what amounts to a last-ditch effort to avert the worst ravages of climate change. Climatologists now say that the best case scenario — assuming immediate and dramatic emissions curbs — is that planetary surface temperatures will increase by at least 2 degrees Celsius in the coming decades. [HuffPo]

Saturday night, as Louisville added another murder to its yearly total, more than 50 people gathered in the Russell neighborhood to hold a vigil for peace. [WAVE3]

Governor Steve Beshear [yesterday] presented a ceremonial check representing $1.5 million in federal funding for a project to improve conditions in downtown Louisville for pedestrians and people with disabilities, among others. [Press Release]

A group of 13 protesters on Monday attempted to occupy Jefferson County Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine’s office at Sixth and Liberty streets in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

“We’re not gonna take it anymore,” a crowd of thousands sang as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump entered a South Carolina convention center on Tuesday night as a 1980s heavy metal song by the band Twisted Sister blared from speakers. The billionaire real-estate developer’s packed rallies have been among the liveliest events in the long build-up to the November 2016 U.S. presidential election. But they are increasingly becoming known for their undercurrent of aggression, which escalated into a physical altercation over the weekend when white Trump supporters attacked a black protester at his rally, to the candidate’s approval. [Reuters]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. says labor costs will increase by 1.5 percent annually during the next four years as a result of a new labor agreement with the United Auto Workers union. [Business First]

Animal control services were immediately restored to Floyd County on Friday, but neither the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Control Authority, the city nor the county are closer to resolving disagreements on funding. [News & Tribune]

Will TV Folks Leave Russell Alone Now?

From Autism to Alzheimer’s, music is healing what medicine can’t. In some cases, patients and students both are hearing the benefits of music therapy. [WDRB]

After losing the battle to keep the old Water Co. building intact, preservationists are now circulating petitions as a first step in trying to get the Odd Fellows Building in the Omni target block designated as a historic landmark. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Will Russell has only had to deal with this publicly because local television shysters made it a public matter, a spectacle, treated him as a carnival barker. [WHAS11]

A 10-year-old boy injured in a drive-by shooting is now helping to combat gun violence in Louisville that has reached its highest level in decades. [H-L]

A group called I Am Scott County is working on a second commercial to change perceptions about the southern Indiana county following an HIV outbreak. [WLKY]

Colorado Springs, the town where three people were killed and nine injured in an attack on a Planned Parenthood facility on Friday, is a hub for Christian evangelicals who are opposed to abortion. [HuffPo]

Attorneys representing 11 women went to court Monday to make Katina Powell pay for what they say are false allegations in her tell-all book ‘Breaking Cardinal Rules. [WAVE3]

Kentucky has the third highest rate of female incarceration in the world, imprisoning women nearly twice the rate of Thailand — the highest rated country in the world — and nearly twice the national average, according to a new report released by the non-profit group Prison Policy Initiative. [Richmond Register]

Federal health officials want to help Louisville deal with and prevent violence in the city and particularly in western neighborhoods, where gun violence has been a growing problem. [WFPL]

Of COURSE Mitch McConnell has sneakily attached a campaign finance rider to the spending bill! He wants to expand the amount of cash political parties can spend in coordination with candidates. [Politico]

In today’s weekly edition of Louisville Business First, you’ll find a package called “Where the Money Lives,” in which we look at various measures of affluence across the Louisville region. [Business First]

It’s no secret to anyone looking that the United States is in the midst of a real estate boom — and Southern Indiana is enjoying particularly low housing costs. [News & Tribune]

Yes, The Media’s Slut-Shaming Powell

Eric Crawford has no idea what slut-shaming is or he’s lying to you. [WDRB]

Greg Leichty donated $50 to independent Drew Curtis in Kentucky’s gubernatorial contest and plans to vote for the Fark.com founder. Just don’t ask Leichty, a University of Louisville communications professor, if other like-minded liberals ought to follow his example. “I’m not recommending that other people do,” Leichty said. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell’s lawyer, Larry Wilder, said his client was not subpoenaed in the investigation centered around “Breaking Cardinal Rules”. [WHAS11]

The Department of Justice has reached 70 settlements involving 457 hospitals in 43 states for more than $250 million related to cardiac devices that were implanted in patients in violation of Medicare coverage requirements, the Department of Justice announced Friday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just hours before a 19-year-old murder victim is honored, his family asks for help solving the case. [WLKY]

While much of the political attention is on the 2016 presidential race, there’s also a big election that’s not getting nearly as much coverage — and it’s taking place this week. As John Oliver pointed out on HBO’s “Last Week Tonight,” this week’s election could determine who might fall into the “Medicaid Gap” in several states. [HuffPo]

It is a sad and sobering statistic. One in five women will be a victim of sexual assault in college. [WAVE3]

By the time George W Bush left the White House, perceptions of the United States in the wider world were overwhelmingly negative. As the Obama presidency enters its final phase, how have attitudes shifted? (This is about Matthew Barzun) [BBC]

The Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office has begun issuing grand jury subpoenas in connection with allegations that escorts were provided to University of Louisville men’s basketball players and recruits, according to ESPN. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s gubernatorial candidates responded to a questionnaire from Preservation Kentucky regarding Kentucky’s Historic Preservation Tax Credit. [Click the Clicky]

Port of Indiana–Jeffersonville will receive $10 million in transportation grant money from the The U.S. Department of Transportation to enhance and expand the port’s infrastructure. [Business First]

Mayor Mike Moore is happy to present his record of the last four years as reason for his re-election, but challenger Dennis Julius, Jeffersonville city councilman, believes he could have done things better. [News & Tribune]

UofL Loves Flushing Cash Down The Drain

Here’s a lesson in stupid lawsuits that draw even more attention to a scandal you wish would go away. [WDRB]

With Halloween approaching, the mansion for the University of Louisville president in the Cherokee Triangle is once again decorated for the holiday, and President James Ramsey and his wife, Jane, may hand out treats to trick-or-treaters on Halloween night Saturday as they have in the past. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 and the Center for Women and Families are teaming up for a new challenge. [WHAS11]

Lexington could be poised to become the second city in Kentucky to increase the minimum wage. [H-L]

The attorney for the woman at the center of Louisville basketball’s recruitment sex scandal answered questions on local radio. [WLKY]

Tuberculosis has joined HIV/AIDS as the top infectious disease killer on the planet, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The downtown bridge project is one step closer to being completed. The bridge is officially connected from river bank to river bank across the Ohio. [WAVE3]

A group of nearly 40 representatives, from the Congressional Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses, wrote to Attorney General Loretta Lynch Wednesday morning, requesting that the Department of Justice do more to address gun violence in minority communities across the country. [Mother Jones]

The Louisville Water Company has finished the phase-out of two hazardous chemicals that were stored at both of the company’s water treatment plants. [WFPL]

A panel of medical experts said on Friday the prices of prescription medicines in the United States need to be brought in line with the value they bring to patients instead of continuing to let drugmakers set any price they choose. [Reuters]

The U.S. Department of Justice says AB Electrolux is stonewalling it in its fight over the GE Appliances merger, according to a report by legal site Law360. [Business First]

Construction on the renovated Jeffersonville marina — now called Fisherman’s Wharf — is complete, according to an announcement. [News & Tribune]

Another Deadly Weekend As Greg Fischer Pushes His Compassionate City Fallacy

If you missed it late Friday, a human trafficking task force has offered to train the University of Louisville in the wake of its latest scandal. [Page One]

Three people are dead after two separate shootings in Louisville took place Saturday morning. [WDRB]

A Jefferson district court judge on Friday ruled that the traffic school program that has generated more than $1.2 million in revenue for County Attorney Mike O’Connell’s office is unconstitutional. [C-J/AKN]

One man is dead after a shooting in the Lake Dreamland neighborhood Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

The city of Lexington might be paying the new 21c Museum Hotel more than $200,000 to replace sidewalks and put in other improvements on North Upper Street. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Family and friends surrounded police tape in the 800 block of West Evelyn Avenue on Saturday morning, while they waited to learn if their loved one was killed in a shooting on Saturday around 12:30 a.m. Two men died as a result of the shooting. [WLKY]

Targeting one of education’s most divisive issues, President Barack Obama on Saturday called for capping standardized testing at 2 percent of classroom time and said the government shares responsibility for turning tests into the be-all and end-all of American schools. [HuffPo]

Two Louisville families lost brothers and sons to gunfire near Churchill Downs early Saturday morning. [WAVE3]

The mayor of Lousville crossed the Atlantic to pay a a visit to Rotherham’s Advanced Manufacturing Park. Mayor Greg Fischer — the Kentucky city’s 50th mayor — paid a visit to the state-of-the-art research facility last Wednesday (21). [Click the Clicky]

An assistant University of Missouri-Kansas City basketball coach has resigned, saying he can’t do his job while battling what he called “false allegations” that he hired dancers to strip and have sex with recruits while he was a coach at Louisville. [WFPL]

Rufus Scales, 26 and black, was driving his younger brother Devin to his hair-cutting class in this genteel, leafy city when they heard the siren’s whoop and saw the blue light in the rearview mirror of their black pickup. Two police officers pulled them over for minor infractions that included expired plates and failing to hang a flag from a load of scrap metal in the pickup’s bed. But what happened next was nothing like a routine traffic stop. [NY Times]

Members of the Louisville-based Independent Pilots Association, a union that represents pilots for United Parcel Service Inc., has voted to authorize a strike against the Atlanta-based shipping giant. [Business First]

Two police agencies in Clark County have been awarded more than $50,000 for crime prevention and policing initiatives. [News & Tribune]