Local Media Turns Into 1980s D.A.R.E.

We love that the West End is seeing a rebirth of sorts. There’s a new push to boost home sales in Louisville’s poorest neighborhoods. [WDRB]

The dumb is thick in Oldham County. A lawsuit that questions the validity of Oldham County’s recent wet-dry referendum could delay officials’ plans to expand alcohol sales countywide. [C-J/AKN]

The clerk-treasurer of Selllersburg, Indiana has filed a complaint saying she has faced retaliation after raising questions about the town spending. [WHAS11]

Will Jim Gray beat Rand Paul? Probably not with his current team that consists almost entirely of Conway people. Stranger things have happened, though. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another shooting in Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Any high school in the U.S. that wants to carry an emergency opioid overdose reversal kit will now be able to get one free of charge, thanks to a new initiative announced Monday by the Clinton Foundation and the drug’s manufacturer. [HuffPo]

Quick, everybody freak out about drugs! A new trend is leading down a dangerous path. People think they are buying prescription pills to get high, but they are given something even more addictive. [WAVE3]

With the new year comes the continued challenge for area nonprofits to serve as many families and residents in need as possible. To energize those efforts, employees of Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company are lending a hand. Coupled with financial support from the LG&E and KU Foundation, the utilities’ voluntary employee-giving campaign, Power of One, raised more than $1.7 million in contributions. [Richmond Register]

A cedar log carved into a double helix with a chainsaw. A collection of wood veneer scraps twisted and wrapped to look like a tree trunk. A round sculpture built out of woven straw that is implanted with mushroom spores. [WFPL]

Of all things for Adam Edelen to attack, he chose to hit Rand Paul on foreign policy. That may be the only thing most Democrats can stomach from Paul. He’s also wrong about sexual orientation. Anti-gay discrimination is alive and well in Kentucky. Hell, the Kentucky Democratic Party runs so quickly away from the gays that it’s alarming. We can all agree that Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) is a delusional troll. But Adam Edelen needs to check his straight, white, male privilege once in a while before spouting off in another sweaty rant. [Roll Call]

The $5.4 billion price tag for GE Appliances was “a pleasant surprise,” General Electric Co. CEO Jeff Immelt said. [Business First]

For better or worse, an ordinance to require approval from the New Albany City Council for additional appropriations on projects was rejected at Thursday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Will Ruin Your Wednesday

Median household income was flat or declined in all but four of Kentucky’s 120 counties in the years following the Great Recession, according to new Census Bureau data. [WDRB]

Kentucky State Reformatory was overcrowded and hazardous for inmates and staff before inmates’ federal lawsuit. [C-J/AKN]

Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. [WHAS11]

John Yarmuth is right – Kentucky Democrats probably won’t have a viable senate candidate to run against Rand Paul. Half his staff is under federal indictment and KDP is handing him a re-election victory. [H-L]

A program that allows Lexington parking ticket recipients to cover their fines with canned goods for the hungry has collected 5 tons of food during the holidays. [WLKY]

The Obama administration on Monday defended its deportation tactics and confirmed it has begun raids on families, despite Democratic candidates and immigrant advocates saying officials could be sending mothers and children to their deaths. [HuffPo]

Twenty-eight bottles of the most sought-after bourbon will be available to the public, after it is released from the court. [WAVE3]

Or will they? Franklin County’s sheriff says the bourbon will be destroyed. [H-L]

Mega road fund cuts were initiated by Matt Bevin and almost no one noticed. But we did. [Page One]

A pair of community groups are hosting a forum next week that aims to discuss the state of race relations in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. manufacturing contracted further in December as lower oil prices undercut spending in the energy sector while construction spending fell in November for the first time in nearly 1-1/2 years, suggesting the economy ended 2015 with less momentum. [Reuters]

Springhurst Health and Rehab is undergoing a $5.2 million expansion project that should be done by mid-2016. [Business First]

Patti Hall saw a need in her Sellersburg community that wasn’t being fulfilled, so about two years ago, she decided to fill it. [News & Tribune]

LG&E Wants Even More Of Your Sweet Cash

The longtime member of the Jefferson County Board of Education who lost her bid for re-election Tuesday says she will continue to advocate for children. [WDRB]

With nearly all votes counted, Jefferson County District Court Judge Donald Armstrong was on track to be ousted by voters Tuesday, despite the throng of prosecutors who challenged incumbent judges. [C-J/AKN]

Hundreds of people are expected to line up outside a Louisville liquor store Sunday all for the chance to buy a rare bottle of bourbon. [WHAS11]

A third high school student from Rowan County has discovered a star. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A public meeting is set to present the new routes for treating roads during snow and ice events in Louisville. [WLKY]

Voters in four red states approved ballot initiatives to raise their state minimum wages on Tuesday, sending another message to Washington that Americans support a higher wage floor. But Greg Fischer is still clueless. [HuffPo]

A dog with gunshot wounds to the head and neck whose tail had been cut off, exposing the bone, is recovering after she was flown to Louisville for emergency treatment, according to The Arrow Fund. [WAVE3]

If you missed all the fun concession and victory speeches on election night, go dig in right away. [Page One]

All six Louisville Metro Council seats being challenged in Tuesday’s election remain in similar party hands, according to the results. [WFPL]

It wasn’t as close as everyone thought after all. Incumbent Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell rolled to an easy and early victory over Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes. [Ronnie Ellis]

Bend over and grab your ankles! LG&E and KU Energy LLC plans to seek rate increases from the Kentucky Public Service Commission. [Business First]

Come January, there’ll be a new sheriff in town. And for what’s believed to be the first time in Clark County history, it will be a Republican. [News & Tribune]

No One Is Surprised By Last Night’s Results

Democratic U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth is easily winning re-election in Kentucky’s 3rd congressional district. [WDRB]

In Louisville, only the nose knows when it comes to enforcing odor regulations. As JBS Swift and the city wrestle over complaints of a slaughterhouse stench, the company is now questioning the city’s reliance on a decades-old subjective odor standard that’s enforced through a sniff test by Air Pollution Control District field inspectors. [C-J/AKN]

Really, this is the dumbest thing ever. It’s a real shame for this city. [WHAS11]

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell held off Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes in Tuesday’s election to win a sixth term and quite possibly a promotion to majority leader of the United States Senate. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Pleasure Ridge Park Fire Department cleared the scene of the fire at Liberty Tire. [WLKY]

Republicans in Congress may be in no mood to hike the minimum wage, but four conservative-leaning states are poised to do it on their own. [HuffPo]

Two Louisville Metro Police Department officers are being investigated by the department. [WAVE3]

Republicans struck a powerful first blow in Kentucky in U.S. congressional elections on Tuesday in their drive to control the U.S. Senate and dramatically tip the balance of power away from President Barack Obama and his Democrats. [Reuters]

The tire company off Dixie Highway where a fire raged Monday hasn’t been in compliance with Kentucky’s tire storage laws since June 6. And in an unfortunate coincidence, state inspectors arrived at the site this morning for a follow-up inspection just as the fire started. [WFPL]

Verizon and AT&T have been quietly tracking the Internet activity of more than 100 million cellular customers with what critics have dubbed “supercookies” — markers so powerful that it’s difficult for even savvy users to escape them. [WaPo]

Papa John’s International predicts that 2014 will end better than the Louisville-based pizza chain had originally anticipated. [Business First]

Indiana’s riverboat casinos would be allowed to move to on-land sites and the state’s horse track casinos could have live dealers run table games under recommendations from a legislative committee. [News & Tribune]

YAY! It’s Katie King Coronation Day, Louisville!

We’re obviously joking.

The former owner of a mastiff is facing animal cruelty charges after the dog’s four-pound tumor went untreated for months. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency next week will begin a second round of air sampling at eight homes near the long-closed Lees Lane hazardous waste landfill, after discovering 13 homes with elevated levels of toxic vapors in crawl spaces. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It is one school board race where the candidates have name and face recognition. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s U.S. Senate election could be a close race, but the battle for the airwaves has already been won. [H-L]

The Simpsons came to life in Louisville yesterday. A shelter-in-place has been ordered for a one square mile area around fire that broke out near Dixie Highway. [WLKY]

You’ll like this story, dog people. [HuffPo]

As they gathered for a reflection ceremony Sunday, friends and family of Ryan Kinnion said they are still looking for answers in his death more than a month after he was found by the side of River Road. [WAVE3]

Democratic Senate hopeful Alison Lundergan Grimes’ campaign appears to have shelled out $17,000 to shuttle Hillary Clinton into Kentucky to attend a rally last month. [Politico]

More than six months after Kentucky lawmakers passed legislation allowing limited trials for cannabidiol epilepsy treatments, doctors have not been able to begin them. [WFPL]

Sen. Rand Paul seems to be dealing with an internal battle over how to approach quarantines in the U.S. for people who may have been exposed to Ebola. [TPM]

A project to redevelop three buildings along the fabled section of West Main Street known as Whiskey Row should begin in mid-2015 and will take about 18 months to complete. [Business First]

Four seats have competition for the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s board of trustees this election with nine candidates in the race, four of whom are incumbents. [News & Tribune]

Katie & Jim King Once Again Buying A Judgeship

What? A wealthy group funded in part by David Jones, Jr’s family is trying to choke JCPS and force neighborhood and charter schools? Surely not. Surely this Hal Heiner-tied group isn’t trying to further segregate our school system on both racial and economic fronts. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools continues to struggle hiring teachers who are demographically similar to its student population, despite the district’s efforts to recruit more minority teachers from a wider variety of schools, Chief Operations Officer Mike Raisor said Monday. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! When you drive the streets of Clark County, you can’t go far without seeing signs for the Sheriff’s race. [WHAS11]

Campaigns and independent groups just spent millions of dollars to convince Kentucky voters that everyone running for Congress this fall is a villain hoping to inflict grievous harm on hard-working families. [John Cheves]

The American Foundation hosted the “Out of the Darkness Community Walk” Saturday to spread suicide prevention awareness. [WLKY]

America has been through a roller coaster ride of job creation and job loss over the last 15 years. But sometimes it can be difficult to really grasp just how wild that ride has been. [HuffPo]

If you’ve been downtown lately you’ve probably noticed it isn’t very quiet. The music of development is in the air. Currently, seven hotel projects, ranging from family affordable to luxury, are in the works. [WAVE3]

In Kentucky Mitch McConnell leads Alison Lundergan Grimes 50/42, with Libertarian David Patterson getting 3%. [PPP Polls]

Katie King and Daddy’s Money are once again a topic of conversation because they don’t know when to quit. In the final weeks of her judicial race, Jefferson County District Judge Katie King has once again loaned her campaign an influx of cash. [WFPL]

In Kentucky, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leads Democrat Alison Grimes by nine points among likely voters, 50 percent to 41 percent. [NBC News]

Twenty-one tenants in Westport Village are suing the shopping center’s owner, Camelot Acquisition LLC. [Business First]

After the official slate of candidates for Clark County came out, Mike Kane, Clarksville Community Schools board member, though he was running unopposed. But a surprise challenger came in after a mistake at the license branch was noticed. [News & Tribune]

Yarmuth To Push Council On Minimum Wage

Louisville police have started a new search for a company to outfit officers with body cameras, slowing down an effort already behind the department’s self-imposed schedule. [WDRB]

To get a feel for just how bitter the contract dispute is between the Metropolitan Sewer District and one of its two unions, Laborers International Union of North America Local 576, just read a letter a union organizer tells me me LIUNA delivered to the board. [C-J/AKN]

Indiana alcohol sales will be legal for an extra hour on Sunday morning with the end of daylight saving time. [WHAS11]

“We’ve had people come from all over America to help us ditch Mitch,” said Bill Londrigan, president of Kentucky’s AFL-CIO. Asking for a show of hands from those who had traveled from out of state, Londrigan encouraged those whose hands shot up to say where they were from, and shouts of Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey rang out from the crowd. [H-L]

Two LMPD officers are on administrative duties after a man police say fired at those officers was killed. [WLKY]

During Obama’s first five years as president, the Justice Department and the U.S. military brought seven criminal prosecutions for national security leaks — more than twice as many as all previous presidents put together. [Yahoo]

The candidates for Floyd County Sheriff are criticizing each other for lacking the experience necessary for the job. [WAVE3]

His Democratic opponent argues Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell supports tax breaks that encourage businesses to ship jobs overseas. But that message won’t get much support at Campbellsville Apparel, a textile company which supplies materials for federal government contracts and which employs a lot of folks who once worked at Fruit of the Loom — a company which moved jobs from Kentucky to Mexico. [Ronnie Ellis]

With her back turned, Jo Ann Smith couldn’t see if the approaching bus was the one she was waiting for. Her bus would come from the west, but standing at the corner of Fifth Street and Broadway, she positioned herself to the east because on Monday the blustery wind was full of leaves. She didn’t want a face full of fall foliage. [WFPL]

On Thursday afternoon, Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3) will testify before the Louisville Metro Council’s Labor and Economic Development Committee. Yarmuth will discuss the proposed ordinance to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour in Louisville. [Press Release]

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis has named a new leader for its Louisville branch. [Business First]

The poverty rate in Southern Indiana increased by nearly 60 percent from 2000 to 2010 after decreasing by 12 percent in the 1990s, according to a study by an Indiana University Southeast research team. [News & Tribune]