LG&E Wants Even More Of Your Sweet Cash

The longtime member of the Jefferson County Board of Education who lost her bid for re-election Tuesday says she will continue to advocate for children. [WDRB]

With nearly all votes counted, Jefferson County District Court Judge Donald Armstrong was on track to be ousted by voters Tuesday, despite the throng of prosecutors who challenged incumbent judges. [C-J/AKN]

Hundreds of people are expected to line up outside a Louisville liquor store Sunday all for the chance to buy a rare bottle of bourbon. [WHAS11]

A third high school student from Rowan County has discovered a star. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A public meeting is set to present the new routes for treating roads during snow and ice events in Louisville. [WLKY]

Voters in four red states approved ballot initiatives to raise their state minimum wages on Tuesday, sending another message to Washington that Americans support a higher wage floor. But Greg Fischer is still clueless. [HuffPo]

A dog with gunshot wounds to the head and neck whose tail had been cut off, exposing the bone, is recovering after she was flown to Louisville for emergency treatment, according to The Arrow Fund. [WAVE3]

If you missed all the fun concession and victory speeches on election night, go dig in right away. [Page One]

All six Louisville Metro Council seats being challenged in Tuesday’s election remain in similar party hands, according to the results. [WFPL]

It wasn’t as close as everyone thought after all. Incumbent Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell rolled to an easy and early victory over Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes. [Ronnie Ellis]

Bend over and grab your ankles! LG&E and KU Energy LLC plans to seek rate increases from the Kentucky Public Service Commission. [Business First]

Come January, there’ll be a new sheriff in town. And for what’s believed to be the first time in Clark County history, it will be a Republican. [News & Tribune]

No One Is Surprised By Last Night’s Results

Democratic U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth is easily winning re-election in Kentucky’s 3rd congressional district. [WDRB]

In Louisville, only the nose knows when it comes to enforcing odor regulations. As JBS Swift and the city wrestle over complaints of a slaughterhouse stench, the company is now questioning the city’s reliance on a decades-old subjective odor standard that’s enforced through a sniff test by Air Pollution Control District field inspectors. [C-J/AKN]

Really, this is the dumbest thing ever. It’s a real shame for this city. [WHAS11]

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell held off Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes in Tuesday’s election to win a sixth term and quite possibly a promotion to majority leader of the United States Senate. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Pleasure Ridge Park Fire Department cleared the scene of the fire at Liberty Tire. [WLKY]

Republicans in Congress may be in no mood to hike the minimum wage, but four conservative-leaning states are poised to do it on their own. [HuffPo]

Two Louisville Metro Police Department officers are being investigated by the department. [WAVE3]

Republicans struck a powerful first blow in Kentucky in U.S. congressional elections on Tuesday in their drive to control the U.S. Senate and dramatically tip the balance of power away from President Barack Obama and his Democrats. [Reuters]

The tire company off Dixie Highway where a fire raged Monday hasn’t been in compliance with Kentucky’s tire storage laws since June 6. And in an unfortunate coincidence, state inspectors arrived at the site this morning for a follow-up inspection just as the fire started. [WFPL]

Verizon and AT&T have been quietly tracking the Internet activity of more than 100 million cellular customers with what critics have dubbed “supercookies” — markers so powerful that it’s difficult for even savvy users to escape them. [WaPo]

Papa John’s International predicts that 2014 will end better than the Louisville-based pizza chain had originally anticipated. [Business First]

Indiana’s riverboat casinos would be allowed to move to on-land sites and the state’s horse track casinos could have live dealers run table games under recommendations from a legislative committee. [News & Tribune]

YAY! It’s Katie King Coronation Day, Louisville!

We’re obviously joking.

The former owner of a mastiff is facing animal cruelty charges after the dog’s four-pound tumor went untreated for months. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency next week will begin a second round of air sampling at eight homes near the long-closed Lees Lane hazardous waste landfill, after discovering 13 homes with elevated levels of toxic vapors in crawl spaces. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It is one school board race where the candidates have name and face recognition. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s U.S. Senate election could be a close race, but the battle for the airwaves has already been won. [H-L]

The Simpsons came to life in Louisville yesterday. A shelter-in-place has been ordered for a one square mile area around fire that broke out near Dixie Highway. [WLKY]

You’ll like this story, dog people. [HuffPo]

As they gathered for a reflection ceremony Sunday, friends and family of Ryan Kinnion said they are still looking for answers in his death more than a month after he was found by the side of River Road. [WAVE3]

Democratic Senate hopeful Alison Lundergan Grimes’ campaign appears to have shelled out $17,000 to shuttle Hillary Clinton into Kentucky to attend a rally last month. [Politico]

More than six months after Kentucky lawmakers passed legislation allowing limited trials for cannabidiol epilepsy treatments, doctors have not been able to begin them. [WFPL]

Sen. Rand Paul seems to be dealing with an internal battle over how to approach quarantines in the U.S. for people who may have been exposed to Ebola. [TPM]

A project to redevelop three buildings along the fabled section of West Main Street known as Whiskey Row should begin in mid-2015 and will take about 18 months to complete. [Business First]

Four seats have competition for the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s board of trustees this election with nine candidates in the race, four of whom are incumbents. [News & Tribune]

Katie & Jim King Once Again Buying A Judgeship

What? A wealthy group funded in part by David Jones, Jr’s family is trying to choke JCPS and force neighborhood and charter schools? Surely not. Surely this Hal Heiner-tied group isn’t trying to further segregate our school system on both racial and economic fronts. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools continues to struggle hiring teachers who are demographically similar to its student population, despite the district’s efforts to recruit more minority teachers from a wider variety of schools, Chief Operations Officer Mike Raisor said Monday. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! When you drive the streets of Clark County, you can’t go far without seeing signs for the Sheriff’s race. [WHAS11]

Campaigns and independent groups just spent millions of dollars to convince Kentucky voters that everyone running for Congress this fall is a villain hoping to inflict grievous harm on hard-working families. [John Cheves]

The American Foundation hosted the “Out of the Darkness Community Walk” Saturday to spread suicide prevention awareness. [WLKY]

America has been through a roller coaster ride of job creation and job loss over the last 15 years. But sometimes it can be difficult to really grasp just how wild that ride has been. [HuffPo]

If you’ve been downtown lately you’ve probably noticed it isn’t very quiet. The music of development is in the air. Currently, seven hotel projects, ranging from family affordable to luxury, are in the works. [WAVE3]

In Kentucky Mitch McConnell leads Alison Lundergan Grimes 50/42, with Libertarian David Patterson getting 3%. [PPP Polls]

Katie King and Daddy’s Money are once again a topic of conversation because they don’t know when to quit. In the final weeks of her judicial race, Jefferson County District Judge Katie King has once again loaned her campaign an influx of cash. [WFPL]

In Kentucky, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leads Democrat Alison Grimes by nine points among likely voters, 50 percent to 41 percent. [NBC News]

Twenty-one tenants in Westport Village are suing the shopping center’s owner, Camelot Acquisition LLC. [Business First]

After the official slate of candidates for Clark County came out, Mike Kane, Clarksville Community Schools board member, though he was running unopposed. But a surprise challenger came in after a mistake at the license branch was noticed. [News & Tribune]

Yarmuth To Push Council On Minimum Wage

Louisville police have started a new search for a company to outfit officers with body cameras, slowing down an effort already behind the department’s self-imposed schedule. [WDRB]

To get a feel for just how bitter the contract dispute is between the Metropolitan Sewer District and one of its two unions, Laborers International Union of North America Local 576, just read a letter a union organizer tells me me LIUNA delivered to the board. [C-J/AKN]

Indiana alcohol sales will be legal for an extra hour on Sunday morning with the end of daylight saving time. [WHAS11]

“We’ve had people come from all over America to help us ditch Mitch,” said Bill Londrigan, president of Kentucky’s AFL-CIO. Asking for a show of hands from those who had traveled from out of state, Londrigan encouraged those whose hands shot up to say where they were from, and shouts of Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey rang out from the crowd. [H-L]

Two LMPD officers are on administrative duties after a man police say fired at those officers was killed. [WLKY]

During Obama’s first five years as president, the Justice Department and the U.S. military brought seven criminal prosecutions for national security leaks — more than twice as many as all previous presidents put together. [Yahoo]

The candidates for Floyd County Sheriff are criticizing each other for lacking the experience necessary for the job. [WAVE3]

His Democratic opponent argues Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell supports tax breaks that encourage businesses to ship jobs overseas. But that message won’t get much support at Campbellsville Apparel, a textile company which supplies materials for federal government contracts and which employs a lot of folks who once worked at Fruit of the Loom — a company which moved jobs from Kentucky to Mexico. [Ronnie Ellis]

With her back turned, Jo Ann Smith couldn’t see if the approaching bus was the one she was waiting for. Her bus would come from the west, but standing at the corner of Fifth Street and Broadway, she positioned herself to the east because on Monday the blustery wind was full of leaves. She didn’t want a face full of fall foliage. [WFPL]

On Thursday afternoon, Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3) will testify before the Louisville Metro Council’s Labor and Economic Development Committee. Yarmuth will discuss the proposed ordinance to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour in Louisville. [Press Release]

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis has named a new leader for its Louisville branch. [Business First]

The poverty rate in Southern Indiana increased by nearly 60 percent from 2000 to 2010 after decreasing by 12 percent in the 1990s, according to a study by an Indiana University Southeast research team. [News & Tribune]

Maybe Clark Co’s Sheriff Really Was A Disaster?

LMPD homicide detectives had their hands full Saturday with two unrelated homicide investigations and no arrests. [WDRB]

Hot-button topics like charter schools, education funding and student testing will all be on the table Monday as the Jefferson County Board of Education tries to wrangle out a list of priorities for the upcoming legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

Local detectives told not to investigate drug cases. That’s what detectives from the Clark County sheriff’s department say the previous sheriff told them. [WHAS11]

A bi-state board overseeing the construction of new Ohio River bridges linking Kentucky and Indiana has restarted its search for a company to handle tolling on those bridges amid concerns about a possible conflict of interest in that search. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro Police Department released the results of its traffic stop analysis, which looked at the roles race and gender play in traffic stops in the city. [WLKY]

Think white privilege doesn’t exist in America? Consider just how much the color of a child’s skin changes his or her odds of escaping poverty later in life. [HuffPo]

The Louisville chapter of the NAACP celebrated the 100th anniversary of its founding at the Brown and Williamson Club Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell plans to counter the influx of Democratic spending aimed at defeating him by writing a big personal check. [Politico]

Metro Councilwoman Attica Scott said there needs to be an honest conversation about racial bias when it comes to police in Louisville. “With a police force that’s 85 percent white we cannot act like there is no racial bias, at all, that’s just not realistic,” she told WFPL on Friday. [WFPL]

Alison Lundergan Grimes, who says Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell’s 30 years in Washington are too many, told a group of about 70 supporters here Friday, “We’re going to go fight for term limits in Washington, D.C.” [Ronnie Ellis]

Michter’s is building a visitors center and small distillery in the more than 120-year-old Fort Nelson Building at 801 W. Main St. [Business First]

No harm, no foul. The Clark County Board of Elections voted unanimously Thursday to dismiss complaints filed against Independent sheriff candidate Mac Spainhour. [News & Tribune]

Corrupt Politicians Occasionally Held Accountable

Ignore for a moment the reality that WDRB seems to have a serious problem with giving proper credit. Even their competitor stations properly source where they’re stealing stories. Let’s focus on Greg Fischer claiming those photographs were taken a decade ago. Yet another lie from Greg Fischer. [WDRB]

A Jefferson County teacher has been named Kentucky’s “Teacher of the Year.” [More WDRB]

Seems like only yesterday Michael Macfarlane’s campaign manager was telling us that John Yarmuth was toast. Interesting how that worked out. [C-J/AKN]

Glad to have a teevee station give credit where it’s due. Despite them trying to make the story about us, of course (calling/texting/trying to get us to do interviews). [WHAS11]

Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes is accusing Mitch McConnell of trying to take the right to vote away from black people. While at the same time treating the first black president as the devil. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Greg Fischer lied about the current Animal Services mess not having an impact on staff changes. Donald Robinson was forced to resign and there’s a damn criminal investigation going on. Absurd. [WLKY]

America has been doing income taxes wrong for more than 50 years. [HuffPo]

Two candidates vying for an open seat on Louisville’s Metro Council vowed to run a positive campaign in a district focused on traffic and taxes. [WAVE3]

Sure, Grimes’ refusal to say that she voted for the president, and her hollow explanation about upholding the Principles of Privacy at the Ballot Box, isn’t as important in the scheme of things as Mitch McConnell’s inability to articulate anything resembling a coherent Obamacare position. But it was pathetic. And also damaging to her reelection prospects in a way that few mentioned at the time: It’s a kick in the teeth to black voters, some of whom will be wondering, Why exactly should we support her candidacy, aside from the fact that she’s not Mitch McConnell? [Salon]

A pattern of urban neglect—vacant houses, a lack of access to to services—has the potential to spoil Louisville’s Smoketown neighborhood, according to a report released Tuesday. [WFPL]

That’s right — W. Keith Hall got indicted by a federal grand jury this week! [Page One]

The latest project from Hillbilly Tea owner Karter Louis will open Sunday, Oct. 26, in the Highlands. [Business First]

Floyd County is considering a move that could save up to $100,000 annually from the general fund. [News & Tribune]