UofL Seems Nice & Positive These Days

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

The Greater Clark County Schools board is moving forward with a plan to improve school building infrastructure in the district. [WDRB]

Newly-elected Metro Councilman Pat Mulvihill wants to cap how much an appointed member to the council can spend while in office after his predecessor, Steve Magre, nearly depleted the district’s discretionary accounts this year. [C-J/AKN]

Jim Ramsey is killing it these days. A help-wanted ad posted by the University of Louisville is getting backlash Thursday afternoon because of the requirements listed for the position. [WHAS11]

With his first year as U.S. Senate Majority Leader drawing to a close, Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell said Wednesday that “by any objective standard, we’ve had a year of significant accomplishments.” [H-L]

New information has been released about the slaying of Thomas Grismer at the Red Roof Inn on Preston Highway. [WLKY]

Apparently the deficit hawks flew south for the winter. At least that’s the conclusion that could be drawn from looking at the price tag for the package of bills unveiled early Wednesday morning to keep the government running and extend a bunch of tax breaks, many permanently. [HuffPo]

Are we reliving 2008? Wednesday, city officials met with neighbors and representatives from Swift Pork Company to discuss the odor coming from the Swift plant on Story Avenue. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary unemployment rate for November 2015 was 4.9 percent, remaining unchanged from the revised 4.9 percent rate in October, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet. [Press Release]

Kentucky regulators have affirmed a utility’s plan to build massive landfills near two power plants, saying that option will have the smallest effect on ratepayers. [WFPL]

For years, Jammie Nichols struggled with a drug habit that left the Florida mother reeling from blackouts, seizures, depression and poverty – and a decision to give one of her children up for adoption. [Reuters]

Some Bullitt County residents spent hours Tuesday speaking out against an industrial park that’s been proposed near their neighborhood. [Business First]

A true assessment of Jeffersonville’s financial activity for 2013 could not be determined by a State Board of Accounts audit because of poor bookkeeping, according to a report released late October. Jeffersonville’s leadership is incompetent? Surely not! [News & Tribune]

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This Jackie Green Bike Thing Is Great And Isn’t Getting Enough Press

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Obscure alcohol rules are so dumb. Cold beer won’t be for sale in Indiana’s grocery or convenience stores any time soon. [WDRB]

A longtime advocate for cyclist- and pedestrian-friendly transportation policies rejected a plea agreement Monday in Jefferson District Court on charges of blocking traffic and running a red light while on a bike. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet is moving forward with a $40 million project to widen Preston Highway from two to four lanes in Bullitt County. [WHAS11]

State Sen. Mike Wilson on Monday said he would file legislation in the 2016 General Assembly to allow public charter schools as part of a pilot in Fayette and Jefferson counties. [H-L]

At least Henry County seems to get it. Voters in Henry County have approved the full sale of alcohol across the county. [WLKY]

In a rare senatorial act, full-time Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio joined with a handful of fellow legislators on Friday in an attempt to block local municipalities from undercutting big telecom companies by providing cheap, fast internet service. This is the kind of thing Jamie Comer’s people — like Riggs Lewis — make happen. They work to kill municipal broadband, get rich off TWC, ATT and other providers. You can thank that set of Republican special interests for stifling competition and innovation. [The Intercept]

Metro Gubmint has a nearly $19 million surplus but don’t forget what’s suffered as a result. Metro Animal Services is always — ALWAYS — woefully underfunded. WIC clinics were slashed in a manner that made even Greg Fischer’s allies hate him. Streets are a disaster. Kids are hungry. People are homeless. [WAVE3]

Of course your new governor appointed a birther to his cabinet. Because of course he did. [Page One]

Matt Bevin’s newly appointed commissioner of revenue left his last job, at Lexmark International, after the Lexington-based technology company found a host of accounting errors and declared its internal financial controls to be deficient and in need of remediation. [WFPL]

Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced today that the sixth annual ‘Cram the Cruiser’ food drive netted 123 tons (246,705 lbs) of food for Kentucky families. [Press Release]

An FBI investigation of three University of Louisville officials involves the for-profit company that they operated out of the university. [Business First]

Leave it to mouth-breathers to freak out about the gays in Indiana. Sen. Travis Holdman hoped debate over his LGBT rights bill would weigh questions of religious liberty with the expansion of civil protections. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Murder: It’s Extremely Possible Here!

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Another murderous weekend in Compassionate Possibility City! Police are investigating a homicide on Millers Lane in Valley Station. [WDRB]

A fledgling community group focused on issues in Kentucky’s largest school district is soliciting anonymous letters from teachers, parents, students and others about what is going on in Jefferson County Public Schools. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro Police are looking for answers and a suspect after a man’s body was discovered in an alley Saturday evening. [WHAS11]

The chairman of the University of Louisville’s board of trustees says President James Ramsey has the board’s full support during an FBI investigation of top health care executive David Dunn and two other officials. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville police are investigating a deadly shooting in a Shawnee neighborhood. [WLKY]

After two weeks of tense talks, word-wrangling and marathon overnight meetings, diplomats in Paris agreed to a global climate change accord on Saturday evening — a day after the summit’s scheduled conclusion. [HuffPo]

The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Merit Board has become a bit of a talking point for city leaders asking for more diversity in Louisville’s government. [WAVE3]

The fight over LGBT discrimination in Indiana is far from over. Not only are Republicans considering one of the most anti-LGBT bills ever, a new lawsuit is seeking to overturn what limited protections exist in the state. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville has dealt with its own issues with gun violence. Homicides in the city spiked in 2015, and guns were used in many of those murders. But local firearm regulations won’t happen in Louisville, or anywhere else in Kentucky — state law prohibits local government from adopting local gun law. [WFPL]

People with names that suggest they are black are being discriminated against on room sharing site AirBnB, a Harvard study suggests. [BBC]

Back in 1991, Michael Veach was a graduate student at the University of Louisville, working on a master’s degree in history when he heard that an area distiller was looking for help. [Business First]

With no recommended changes, the Jeffersonville City Council approved a salary ordinance during its meeting Monday that gives all elected officials pay increases. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Ramsey Speaks! UofL EVPHA Suspended

Check this out, thanks to a kind source:

From: Cmoffice,Service Account
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2015 4:48 PM
To: Cmoffice,Service Account
Subject: Message from President Ramsey

Colleagues:

By now you may be aware of the investigation being conducted by the University of Louisville Police Department and the U.S. Attorney’s Office. I want to share with each of you the information I am allowed to provide as the investigation proceeds.

By way of background, allegations of potential misconduct were brought to the university’s attention in the summer of 2014. With the full support of the Chairmen and Vice Chairwoman of the Board of Trustees as well as support from the university, the University of Louisville Police Department began an extensive review. Midway through that review, the university determined it would be prudent to seek assistance from the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Federal authorities joined the review earlier this year.

Investigating authorities requested UofL refrain from disclosing this investigation so as not to compromise the investigation’s integrity. This week, those authorities advised the university that they had reached a point where the investigation would not be compromised by the university’s talking to several of the principals involved. This is an ongoing investigation, and I ask that we reserve judgment until the investigators have concluded their work
.
Both senior leaders mentioned in the investigation, Executive Vice President for Health Affairs Dr. David Dunn and Vice President and CIO Dr. Priscilla Hancock, will be on leave from the university, effective immediately. (emphasis ours) Dr. Gregory Postel, Vice Dean of Clinical Affairs at the UofL School of Medicine, will assume the duties as interim Executive Vice President for Health Affairs in addition to his current duties. Harlan Sands, Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration, who currently oversees Information Technology, will assume day-to-day leadership over IT operations.

This is an ongoing investigation, and we must respect the process. I ask each of you to stay focused on doing our very best each day for this great university; our students and our community need that.

Jim

The fun is just beginning.

Another Day, Another Huge UofL Scandal

Indiana-based STAR BioEnergy wants approval to build a multi-million dollar methane plant at 17th and Maple Streets in west Louisville. But some think a plan that’s almost 33 years old could get in the way. [WDRB]

Making for another possible scandal at the University of Louisville, the FBI and university police are investigating whether its top health executive and two other officials misused federal grant money for non-university purposes. [C-J/AKN]

The 16-year-old who was shot Monday afternoon in Louisville’s California neighborhood is recovering. [WHAS11]

Acknowledging “a difference between campaigning and governing,” Republican Gov. Matt Bevin on Tuesday challenged Kentuckians to move past partisan rancor, unite with their neighbors and sacrifice for their communities in a 33-minute inaugural address that he delivered without a prepared speech. After every other speaker but his wife was filled with hatred, homophobia, xenophobia and disconnection from reality, of course. [H-L]

If Ford can support Dare to Care, so can everyone else. [WLKY]

The White House on Tuesday said Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump’s call for the United States to ban Muslims from entering the country disqualified him from becoming president and called on Republicans to reject him immediately. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man convicted of shooting a 12-year-old boy in the back during a neighborhood prank, was pardoned by outgoing Gov. Steve Beshear Monday night, angering the victim’s family. [WAVE3]

Spoiler alert for Matt Bevin: You can’t preach unity while having the state’s most notorious homophobe lead a prayer, while having Dakota Meyer scream about Syrian refugees in an Islamophobic meltdown, while allowing a coal billionaire and his made-up girlfriend in a fur coat to pretend to be everyday people. That is not unity. That is… just plain jacked up. [Page One]

Data released this week shows that Louisville is lagging in its effort to ensure that half the city’s residents have an associate’s degree or higher by 2020. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Turtle Shell) on Tuesday criticized Donald Trump’s proposal to bar Muslims from entering the country, his first outspoken criticism of the GOP presidential front-runner. [The Hill]

Louisville-based Yum! Brands Inc. says its CFO, Patrick Grismer, plans to resign, effective Feb. 19. [Business First]

U.S. Senate candidate and Republican Eric Holcomb expected to have a lot to think about Monday night following an idea-generating workshop hosted in Jeffersonville. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

JCPS-LMPD Mess Blown Outta Proportion

Time Warner constantly sucks and constantly gets to take more of your money with little to no competition. [WDRB]

PEE ALERT! Louisville has a top-25 basketball team with a high ceiling, but the Cardinals aren’t ranked yet this season because of ongoing investigations into a book making major allegations against the program, coach Rick Pitino said. [C-J/AKN]

Supporters of Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens met with Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine on Monday afternoon, Nov. 30, urging him to withdraw his request to remove Stevens from criminal court cases. [WHAS11]

Before Gov. Steve Beshear leaves office and Gov.-elect Matt Bevin can reconstitute the racing commission, the regulatory body will take up some key business on Tuesday: a request for a gambling parlor at Turfway Park in Florence and Keeneland’s plan to open a quarter horse track and gambling parlor in Corbin. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department chief is reminding Jefferson County Public Schools exactly what officers can and cannot do when it comes to safety and security at schools. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama spoke out on Planned Parenthood following what appears to be a politically motivated shooting at one of the health care provider’s clinics in Colorado last week that left three people dead and nine others injured. [HuffPo]

After more than three months of meetings with local officials and community leaders, Clark County’s health officer, Dr. Kevin Burke, is gearing up to formally petition the state to set up the exchange program. [WAVE3]

One of the most prominent stains on the reputation of the much-mythologized Reagan administration was its response, or lack of response, to the AIDS crisis as it began to ravage American cities in the early and mid-1980s. President Reagan famously (though, not famously enough) didn’t himself publicly mention AIDS until 1985, when more than 5,000 people, most of them gay men, had already been killed by the disease. Filmmaker Scott Calonico’s new documentary short, When AIDS Was Funny, exclusively debuting on VF.com, shows how the Reagan administration reacted to the mounting problem in chilling fashion. Not even Reagan’s appointed mouthpiece, notorious press secretary Larry Speakes, had much to say about the crisis beyond derisive laughter. [Vanity Fair]

The future of Louisville’s bicycling infrastructure will be the topic of discussion at a pair of public meetings set for this week. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday said the United States has power to do more to prevent gun homicides like last week’s shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Hillsdale Furniture LLC has based its distribution operations in Bullitt County since 2008, but those services are returning home. [Business First]

Officials are looking at ways to make the Clark County Government Building more secure. [News & Tribune]

Another Sword Attack! It’s Been A Bit

Possibility City! Picture it: A city — the most compassionate city ever — two downtown bridges. Both named after assassinated presidents. Makes sense and sends the message that it’s possible here… possible to be murdered. [Deep Bridge Thoughts]

Police say a suspect tried to assault a man with a sword on Thanksgiving night — but the victim also had a weapon. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has authorized engineering work on two underground basins to hold a combination of rain and raw sewage during wet weather. [C-J/AKN]

An attorney fighting the release of the book, Breaking Cardinal Rules, is working to find out how many copies were sold in Kentucky. [WHAS11]

When Gloria Maldonado was still at Bryan Station High School, she remembers college reps coming to talk about the University of Kentucky. The first in her family to plan to go to college, “I didn’t even know what an alumni was,” she recalled. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Protesters from the Black Lives Matter movement are camped out in front of the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office in Louisville. [WLKY]

World leaders are meeting in Paris this month in what amounts to a last-ditch effort to avert the worst ravages of climate change. Climatologists now say that the best case scenario — assuming immediate and dramatic emissions curbs — is that planetary surface temperatures will increase by at least 2 degrees Celsius in the coming decades. [HuffPo]

Saturday night, as Louisville added another murder to its yearly total, more than 50 people gathered in the Russell neighborhood to hold a vigil for peace. [WAVE3]

Governor Steve Beshear [yesterday] presented a ceremonial check representing $1.5 million in federal funding for a project to improve conditions in downtown Louisville for pedestrians and people with disabilities, among others. [Press Release]

A group of 13 protesters on Monday attempted to occupy Jefferson County Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine’s office at Sixth and Liberty streets in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

“We’re not gonna take it anymore,” a crowd of thousands sang as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump entered a South Carolina convention center on Tuesday night as a 1980s heavy metal song by the band Twisted Sister blared from speakers. The billionaire real-estate developer’s packed rallies have been among the liveliest events in the long build-up to the November 2016 U.S. presidential election. But they are increasingly becoming known for their undercurrent of aggression, which escalated into a physical altercation over the weekend when white Trump supporters attacked a black protester at his rally, to the candidate’s approval. [Reuters]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. says labor costs will increase by 1.5 percent annually during the next four years as a result of a new labor agreement with the United Auto Workers union. [Business First]

Animal control services were immediately restored to Floyd County on Friday, but neither the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Control Authority, the city nor the county are closer to resolving disagreements on funding. [News & Tribune]