NEVER FORGET! Julie Tam’s Blue Glove

Not since Julie Tam’s blue glove freakout a decade ago has a story so dumb been produced in Louisville. [WDRB]

It sure is fun watching Debby Yetter ignore the reality that Nancy Rodriguez misreported and/or ignored shenanigans in the Felner Scandal until she had egg all over her face. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Record breaking numbers for the Kentuckiana Pride Parade as thousands of people walked down Main Street in downtown Louisville. [WHAS11]

Jim. Ramsey. Schadenfreude. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man arrested in Florida, accused of shooting a Louisville police officer, made his first court appearance. [WLKY]

Apple will not contribute funds or other resources for the Republican National Convention due to presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump’s prejudiced remarks, Politico reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

World Refugee Day is Monday, but Louisville celebrated in a creative way Saturday night. [WAVE3]

In the days following the slayings of 49 people at a gay nightclub, members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community pulled together in prayer vigils and benefit drag shows and basked in a broad showing of support many said they had never experienced. [Reuters]

University of Louisville’s president and its entire governing board are out. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama on Thursday demanded that lawmakers put politics aside and move forward on the longstanding impasse over gun legislation in the wake of the latest tragedy. [Politico]

We’re fans of both Craig Greenburg and Emily Bingham but let’s get something straight. They’re only able to speak their minds on the UofL mess because they can afford to speak their minds. Maybe things would change for the better at UofL if the powerful were ever people who aren’t mega-wealthy. [Business First]

It looks as though new speed limits are on the horizon soon for Clarksville, although the details haven’t been ironed out yet. [News & Tribune]

Finally, An End To A Terrible Week

A spokeswoman for insurance giant Humana says the company is increasing security after receiving a report of graffiti found inside a restroom. [WDRB]

This is what lobbyists can get you. Norton Healthcare has secured city agreement to issue up to $725 million in tax-exempt bonds, with much of the proceeds targeted for helping to pay for a long list of capital projects. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell, author of Breaking Cardinal Rules, has now added her name to a lawsuit against some UofL students who claimed their degrees were diminished by her claims. [WHAS11]

Growing abuse of the powerful painkiller fentanyl drove the number of overdose deaths in Kentucky to a new record high in 2015, according to a report released Tuesday. [H-L]

Officials with MSD, LG&E and the Louisville Water Company announced the date for the 27th annual Ohio River sweep — June 18. [WLKY]

John McCain is responsible for the Orlando massacre because he has long pushed homophobic policies. [HuffPo]

Indiana State Police are asking for the public’s help in solving two homicide cases. On May 11, the bodies of Sarah Ipock, 30, and an unidentified male were pulled from the Ohio River by separate barge crews. [WAVE3]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

It seems unlikely that Louisville Metro Council members will approve a large sewer rate increase after a contentious budget hearing Wednesday. [WFPL]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. plans to build a four-story nursing home in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

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All The Kudos To Greg Fischer

Louisville Metro Police are responding to a report of a shooting in the Middletown area. [WDRB]

A Louisville Metro Police officer is in stable condition after he was shot late Saturday night in the Russell neighborhood after a foot chase with a Louisville man, police said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This was the most insane story of the week locally, right? [WHAS11]

The publisher and author of escort Katina Powell’s book alleging that former Louisville men’s basketball staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers for sex parties at the Cardinals’ dormitory have countersued Louisville students, saying they attempted to “extort” a monetary settlement in their action alleging Powell and the book devalued their education. [H-L]

Metro United Way and the Center for Women and Families announced a partnership for 211 to expand its services in Louisville. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton’s first speech since she won a majority of pledged delegates in the Democratic presidential race included remarks about how abortion relates to other issues. That’s groundbreaking for a presidential candidate. [HuffPo]

Mayor Greg Fischer is calling on Louisville and southern Indiana residents to join him in marching in the Kentuckiana Pride Parade on Friday as a show of compassion and unity. [WAVE3]

Muhammad Ali was extolled on Friday as a boxer of incomparable grace, a magnetic entertainer and a man of conviction who gave a voice to the oppressed, as a two-day celebration of “The Greatest” came to a rousing end in his Kentucky hometown. [Reuters]

A woman who was shot by a Jefferson County constable in a Walmart parking lot has agreed to settle her lawsuit against the county government. The county will pay $75,000 in damages to Pedro and Tammie Ortiz on behalf of Constable David Whitlock, who shot Tammie Ortiz in November 2011. That brings the cost of the shooting for Jefferson County taxpayers to six figures, since the county has already paid more than $37,000 to Whitlock’s attorneys. [WFPL]

Rousing tributes have been paid to boxing legend Muhammad Ali at a memorial service in his home city of Louisville, Kentucky. [BBC]

A Louisville-based package-design company is expanding internationally. [Business First]

In the hopes of taking advantage of expected growth, the City of Charlestown could create a redevelopment authority board that would be able to borrow money and get to work. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City With A Bullet

The mother of two sons killed Sunday in the Shawnee neighborhood told WDRB the man who killed them preyed on them and was hoping to recruit them in his gang. [WDRB]

A lack of front door intercoms, a door propped open, overgrown shrubbery – these are some of the most common security vulnerabilities in schools, according to a Saturday panel about school safety during the National Rifle Association’s annual meeting in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

A judge has ended a restraining order that barred the city of Louisville from removing a 120-year-old monument to Confederate soldiers that sits near the University of Louisville. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s state universities are grappling with nearly a decade of budget cuts, about $170 million in all. Over the next two years, they’ll have to cut another 4.5 percent. As the schools prepare their biennial budgets, which have to be ready in June, they are announcing exactly how they will address deficits caused by decreased state support and increased costs for pensions and health care. Nationally, Kentucky is losing ground against other states, which are starting to reinvest in higher education. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Are we still pretending that other law enforcement officers there don’t know what happened? Okay. [WLKY]

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R) and officials in 10 additional states have filed a lawsuit against the Obama administration after it told schools and colleges to allow transgender students to use the bathroom that matches their gender identity to comply with existing civil rights laws. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Urban League, located at 1535 West Broadway, hosted a community conversation Tuesday night [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering about what’s going on in Frankfort? Let’s just say it’s a hot mess of a sex scandal involving legislators and law enforcement officers. [Page One]

A Louisville Catholic school will be the site of a new air pollution experiment, as researchers at the University of Louisville study whether trees and greenery can reduce pollution from a nearby roadway. [WFPL]

Most shootings with four deaths or injuries are invisible outside their communities. And most of the lives they scar are black. [NY Times]

Louisville Central Community Centers Inc. has named Kevin Fields Sr. president and chief operating officer. [Business First]

After reviewing some of the issues at each of the three campuses, some of the details of the demographic study and a survey to rank school needs, Doug Reiter chimed in with what he and others think it’ll take for West Clark Community Schools to get residents to vote in favor of the referendum. [News & Tribune]

Everyone Finally Realizes Hargens Sucks

The school day started with another loud show of support for Jefferson County Public Schools teachers and other employees. [WDRB]

As many legal experts had expected, a lawsuit has been dismissed in which University of Louisville students claimed Katina Powell’s book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” diminished the value of their education. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Yet another murder here in Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky will lose $12.6 million next year thanks to a 4.5 percent cut in state funding. At the same time, student financial aid and scholarships will increase by more than $20 million, and fixed costs for things such as utilities and employee health insurance are on the rise. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An improvement plan for the Greater Clark County Schools is stopped by the state. [WLKY]

Goudy’ll be in Louisville for the upcoming NRA funtimes. Remember the House Select Committee on Benghazi? The ninth official probe into what really happened in the Sept. 11, 2012, attacks on the U.S. consulate in eastern Libya? [HuffPo]

Sheronda Morris couldn’t help but identify when she saw the video of a 14-year-old girl being carried to safety after suffering a non-life threatening gunshot wound at the Pegasus Parade on May 5. [WAVE3]

By seizing the Republican presidential nomination for Donald J. Trump on Tuesday night, he and his millions of supporters completed what had seemed unimaginable: a hostile takeover of one of America’s two major political parties. [NY Times]

The long-awaited state audit of the University of Louisville and its separate, nonprofit foundation is delayed. [WFPL]

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, the presidency of George W. Bush changed instantly. In a new collection of never-before-seen photographs from that day, the president can be seen responding to the worst terrorist attack in United States history — an event that would redefine his time in office and propel the nation into two wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. [PBS]

Two big drug companies will pay Kentucky almost $4.8 million. [Business First]

The November slate of six candidates for the Clark County Council At-large race is set with Democrats advancing two incumbents and a current Republican council member losing in the primary. [News & Tribune]

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Nothing Is Puppies & Rainbows Today!

JCTC is sending layoff notices to about 40 more people. This round of cuts impacts students in the classroom, with professor and instructor jobs eliminated. [WDRB]

As Churchill Downs nears the end of $18 million in renovations to a number of its premium seating and lounge areas, the Central Avenue track offered a glimpse inside them Tuesday to local media. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! Fun fact: People are terrible. [WHAS11]

Want to watch Steve Beshear melt down for finally being held accountable? Here’s your chance. Matt Bevin’s politics may be deplorable and he may have the intelligence of a pool of hog poop but he couldn’t in his wildest teabagger dreams come close to touching the level of corruption that controlled Beshear’s Administrat. [H-L]

Seeeeeee? People are terrible! Raping people in cemeteries. Wow. [WLKY]

Laura Bush detailed the exact moment she learned about the 9/11 terrorist attacks during an intimate conversation with her daughter. [HuffPo]

At least WAVE isn’t over-hyping this like WDRB. Have Jefferson County Public Schools gone overboard by trying to hold on to teachers by raising their pay? [WAVE3]

Former U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres has credited faith groups for helping to advance the Paris Climate Agreement by supporting “holistic, equitable, but above all, ambitious climate action.” [ThinkProgress]

The way Daphne Patton remembers it, it was more money than she’d ever seen. It was 1990, and the Kentucky Supreme Court had declared the state’s school funding system unconstitutional. Within a year, a lot more money started flowing to the poorest school districts, a 50 to 60 percent increase in their budgets. [WFPL]

Investigators probing the mysterious execution-style killings of eight family members in rural Ohio last week have found evidence of illegal cockfighting and marijuana cultivation on their property, state officials said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Someone’s trying to build a bunch of huts around Louisville. But these aren’t your typical huts — they’re Google Fiber huts, and this could be a sign that the city has taken a huge leap forward in the process of getting the coveted gigabit internet service. [Business First]

Two Indiana counties are seeking permission from the state to begin or continue needle exchange programs in an effort to slow the spread of hepatitis C and HIV among narcotic drug users. [News & Tribune]

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It’s Totally Groundhog Day At The Jail

The city of Jeffersontown and its police department are changing the approach to fighting crime, trying to make fewer arrests to deal with a growing heroin problem. [WDRB]

Maria Diaz’s heart pounded as she lay hidden beneath a pile of clothes, diapers and food in the trunk of a Chevy Suburban that slowed at a Texas highway checkpoint. [C-J/AKN]

The Louisville Metro Department of Corrections said jail conditions are becoming crowded as the inmate population is trading above 2,000, daily bookings are above historical numbers and the scheduled movement of state felons from jail to prison has slowed down. [WHAS11]

HEAD-DESK. Kentucky education and drug control officials are working with a pharmaceutical company that is offering two free doses of Narcan nasal spray for the emergency treatment of heroin and opioid overdose to every high school in the United States. For now, Fayette County Public School officials are declining the offer. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Basically, Louisville is going to melt because it is so dang hot. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama revealed on Saturday that his children helped him understand why embracing civil unions was not the same as endorsing marriage equality.” [HuffPo]

Yes, murders happen in the East End. There’s all kinds of violence outside of the West End. You just rarely hear about it. [WAVE3]

Ever wonder what kind of educational corruption there is outside Compassionate City? Dig in to the latest incoherent rant that a corrupt former superintendent submitted as his appeal to keep his certification. It’ll blow your mind. [Page One]

A large percentage of Louisville’s Census tracts are high-risk for exposure to lead. That’s according to a new map compiled by Vox and the Washington State Department of Health. [WFPL]

Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders said in an interview broadcast Friday that he would wait to see what Hillary Clinton includes in her platform before deciding how actively to campaign for her in the fall if she is the party’s nominee. [WaPo]

During the introduction of ESPN broadcaster Kenny Mayne as the keynote speaker of the Kentucky Derby Festival’s They’re Off! Luncheon Friday at The Galt House Hotel, a montage of clips from Mayne’s humorous spoofs and stories for the sports network played on a large screen for visitors. [Business First]

This year’s Clark County Commissioners race has three Republican candidates angling for the District 1 seat in the primary election. [News & Tribune]

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