Be Sure To Handle Sick Bats, Folks

Of course the Health Department has to warn people. Doctors say several Louisville children were potentially exposed to a deadly disease this month after touching an animal known to carry the disease. [WDRB]

During a briefing about the Health Science Center at Thursday’s University of Louisville Board of Trustees meeting, J. David Grissom, a trustee and former banker who is chairman of an investment firm, asked what the university is doing in response to reports that KentuckyOne Health, which manages U of L Hospital, has been cited for a nursing shortage there and received “D” mark on cleanliness and other issues. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Many of us probably don’t think twice about getting a regular haircut, but for the homeless and less fortunate, it can be an unaffordable luxury. [WHAS11]

A former central Kentucky sheriff’s deputy has been convicted on charges that he arrested a man for crimes he didn’t commit. [H-L]

Just in case you were beginning to feel a bit safe out there in the suburbs… [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton made her first appearance with vice presidential pick, Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), hailing him for being extremely qualified for the job and offering a stark contrast to Donald Trump and his VP choice. [HuffPo]

Young adults from West Louisville put on a “Celebration of Life” block party Sunday. The event was put on by Do Ya Part, a group of youths from the West End who want to help those in need while also shedding hope, love and family values on the community, and was held at Cole’s Place on W. Kentucky Street. [WAVE3]

President Obama said in an interview broadcast Sunday that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s comments about NATO show he is unprepared to address issues of foreign policy. [The Hill]

While questions loom about the University of Louisville’s future, its new Board of Trustees met Thursday and took no significant action. [WFPL]

A federal agency sends thousands of letters a year to health providers closing out complaints about HIPAA violations. Though the government could make those letters public, it doesn’t. ProPublica has started to do so. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. just doubled its number of military members. Guess they needed a bit of positive press spin. [Business First]

Divided on a provision that would keep the board from hearing expulsion appeals, New Albany-Floyd County Schools’ board of trustees passed a new policy on suspension and expulsion with a 4-3 vote. [News & Tribune]

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Murder City On Track For Record Year

On Wednesday afternoon, the public learned the identity of Louisville’s latest murder victim, 26-year-old Ashley Spriggs. Her death underscores Louisville’s two-year spike in violent crime. [WDRB]

Matt Bevin said Wednesday that Donald Trump is “absolutely” qualified to serve as president of the United States. [C-J/AKN]

New members of UofL’s Board of Trustees met for the first time Wednesday. Governor Bevin, who hand selected those members, was in attendance and the meeting was also interrupted by a protester. [WHAS11]

If you worry the Creation Museum and its new Noah’s Ark theme park will cause outsiders to think Kentuckians are a bunch of anti-science rubes, at least take comfort in this: Lexington was home to perhaps America’s greatest evolutionary biologist. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city’s latest homicide victim is a young mother, and her killer remains on the loose. [WLKY]

The GOP on Tuesday successfully drafted a platform ― a statement of its core values and principles ― but not before some last-minute drama played out behind the scenes over its refusal to moderate its tone toward lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. [HuffPo]

A 13-year-old boy was shot in the leg Wednesday afternoon by another teenager, according to a Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman. [WAVE3]

A January study published in the journal Health Affairs showed that one year after Medicaid expansion, the number of Kentuckians who reported trouble paying medical bills declined by nearly 13 percentage points. Those skipping prescribed medications because it cost too much decreased by almost 11 points. And people receiving ongoing care for a chronic illness rose by more than 10 points. [Politico]

Dr. Susan Harkema became the face of one of the University of Louisville’s splashiest research successes the moment one of her paralyzed patients wiggled his toe. Her name was in Time Magazine. She was interviewed on “Good Morning America” and CNN. The notoriety brought more funding and patients to U of L with hopes that revolutionary studies would help the paralyzed walk again. But in March, a federal agency took the unusual and drastic move of withdrawing its funding from one of her studies, citing concerns about the validity of the data and unresolved problems with oversight. Meanwhile, the federal Office for Human Research Protections is also conducting its own review, a spokeswoman confirmed. [WFPL]

The violence in Dallas last week is intensifying worries in Cleveland about visitors and protesters taking firearms downtown during the Republican National Convention, where thousands of people plan to demonstrate. [NY Times]

It looks like Kentucky’s health insurance exchange is sticking around — at least for now. [Business First]

Jeffersonville’s ordinance violations bureau is now established by law, following a city council vote Tuesday. Several wheels must be put into motion, however, before code violations can be enforced again. [News & Tribune]

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LOOK! Something Shiny! Everyone Look Away! Get Distracted!

Surekha Kulkarni immigrated to America from India and has made it her life goal to empower other women, especially refugees. [WDRB]

Surprise! Racial profiling is still a problem in Compassionate Possibility City! An analysis of 2014 vehicle stops by Louisville Metro police officers has found again that black drivers are searched twice as often as whites. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Hate to be the bearer of bad news… but… uh… no one really believes she’s coming home safely, right? [WHAS11]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is wrestling with an unenviable, arguably impossible task this election year: protecting Senate Republicans from the political upheaval caused by Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy. [H-L]

Mayor Greg Fischer is inviting the city to a new lunchtime event in downtown Louisville. [WLKY]

A graphic video shows a Baton Rouge police officer shooting and killing Alton Sterling, a 37-year-old black man who was selling CDs in front of a convenience store early Tuesday morning. [HuffPo]

It’s a call police get more than they would like – reports of people firing guns in their backyards, especially on holiday weekends. [WAVE3]

If you missed it, Jamie Comer and his crew are under investigation by the Office of the Attorney General. [Page One]

During a sweltering summer afternoon, Metro workers are on their hands and knees spreading green goop that smells like a brand new rubber eraser on parts of Louisville’s bike lanes. [WFPL]

At a time when Democrats and Republicans in Congress can’t agree on just about anything, there is one issue that unites them: the urgent need for criminal justice reform. [ProPublica]

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear will file a fresh lawsuit that challenges Gov. Matt Bevin’s actions to disband and recreate the University of Louisville board of trustees. [Business First]

These are the arguments going down in Southern Indiana. Who is responsible for maintaining the Sellersburg Pool is a matter of disagreement among town officials. [News & Tribune]

UofL Dumpster Fire Is Still Smoldering

Your sewer bill is about to go up again, but not as much as the Metropolitan Sewer District wanted. [WDRB]

Rebuffed by the Louisville Metro Council for a 20 percent rate boost to pay for a backlog of major maintenance, the Metropolitan Sewer District on Monday will ask its board to charge its customers 6.9 percent more. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Neighbors are upset over tree removal at Bowman Field. [WHAS11]

Four children sat cross-legged as their teacher flipped through a numbers book. When the page turned, they raced to yell the next number first — “six,” “seven” and then, “nine!” [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s tough to take Adam Edelen seriously because he wanted to be on the Foundation board. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s policy agenda would quickly push the national debt to its highest level in history, according to a new report. [HuffPo]

The Jefferson County Public School Board of Education has met on multiple occasions to discuss the evaluation of Superintendent Dr. Donna Hargens. [WAVE3]

U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew on Monday called on the Senate to take immediate action this week to address Puerto Rico’s $70 billion debt crisis before the critical July 1 deadline for the island territory’s next debt payments. [Reuters]

The Louisville Metro Council will spend the next two weeks on summer break. When the 26-member legislative body returns to City Hall, they’ll likely focus on establishing a natural gas franchise agreement with Louisville Gas and Electric. That will set parameters the utility provider must abide by to use the public rights of way for natural gas transmission. [WFPL]

A short-handed Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas law that tightens abortion clinic requirements in a way that critics say unduly restricts women’s access. [McClatchy DC]

Now that GE Appliances has been acquired by Qingdao Haier, several executive moves are taking place. [Business First]

It’s been a difficult few weeks for Erik Brewer, a former truck driver who recently became homeless before his van was totaled in a crash on Interstate 74 in western Indiana last month. [News & Tribune]

NEVER FORGET! Julie Tam’s Blue Glove

Not since Julie Tam’s blue glove freakout a decade ago has a story so dumb been produced in Louisville. [WDRB]

It sure is fun watching Debby Yetter ignore the reality that Nancy Rodriguez misreported and/or ignored shenanigans in the Felner Scandal until she had egg all over her face. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Record breaking numbers for the Kentuckiana Pride Parade as thousands of people walked down Main Street in downtown Louisville. [WHAS11]

Jim. Ramsey. Schadenfreude. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man arrested in Florida, accused of shooting a Louisville police officer, made his first court appearance. [WLKY]

Apple will not contribute funds or other resources for the Republican National Convention due to presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump’s prejudiced remarks, Politico reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

World Refugee Day is Monday, but Louisville celebrated in a creative way Saturday night. [WAVE3]

In the days following the slayings of 49 people at a gay nightclub, members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community pulled together in prayer vigils and benefit drag shows and basked in a broad showing of support many said they had never experienced. [Reuters]

University of Louisville’s president and its entire governing board are out. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama on Thursday demanded that lawmakers put politics aside and move forward on the longstanding impasse over gun legislation in the wake of the latest tragedy. [Politico]

We’re fans of both Craig Greenburg and Emily Bingham but let’s get something straight. They’re only able to speak their minds on the UofL mess because they can afford to speak their minds. Maybe things would change for the better at UofL if the powerful were ever people who aren’t mega-wealthy. [Business First]

It looks as though new speed limits are on the horizon soon for Clarksville, although the details haven’t been ironed out yet. [News & Tribune]

Finally, An End To A Terrible Week

A spokeswoman for insurance giant Humana says the company is increasing security after receiving a report of graffiti found inside a restroom. [WDRB]

This is what lobbyists can get you. Norton Healthcare has secured city agreement to issue up to $725 million in tax-exempt bonds, with much of the proceeds targeted for helping to pay for a long list of capital projects. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell, author of Breaking Cardinal Rules, has now added her name to a lawsuit against some UofL students who claimed their degrees were diminished by her claims. [WHAS11]

Growing abuse of the powerful painkiller fentanyl drove the number of overdose deaths in Kentucky to a new record high in 2015, according to a report released Tuesday. [H-L]

Officials with MSD, LG&E and the Louisville Water Company announced the date for the 27th annual Ohio River sweep — June 18. [WLKY]

John McCain is responsible for the Orlando massacre because he has long pushed homophobic policies. [HuffPo]

Indiana State Police are asking for the public’s help in solving two homicide cases. On May 11, the bodies of Sarah Ipock, 30, and an unidentified male were pulled from the Ohio River by separate barge crews. [WAVE3]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

It seems unlikely that Louisville Metro Council members will approve a large sewer rate increase after a contentious budget hearing Wednesday. [WFPL]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. plans to build a four-story nursing home in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

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All The Kudos To Greg Fischer

Louisville Metro Police are responding to a report of a shooting in the Middletown area. [WDRB]

A Louisville Metro Police officer is in stable condition after he was shot late Saturday night in the Russell neighborhood after a foot chase with a Louisville man, police said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This was the most insane story of the week locally, right? [WHAS11]

The publisher and author of escort Katina Powell’s book alleging that former Louisville men’s basketball staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers for sex parties at the Cardinals’ dormitory have countersued Louisville students, saying they attempted to “extort” a monetary settlement in their action alleging Powell and the book devalued their education. [H-L]

Metro United Way and the Center for Women and Families announced a partnership for 211 to expand its services in Louisville. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton’s first speech since she won a majority of pledged delegates in the Democratic presidential race included remarks about how abortion relates to other issues. That’s groundbreaking for a presidential candidate. [HuffPo]

Mayor Greg Fischer is calling on Louisville and southern Indiana residents to join him in marching in the Kentuckiana Pride Parade on Friday as a show of compassion and unity. [WAVE3]

Muhammad Ali was extolled on Friday as a boxer of incomparable grace, a magnetic entertainer and a man of conviction who gave a voice to the oppressed, as a two-day celebration of “The Greatest” came to a rousing end in his Kentucky hometown. [Reuters]

A woman who was shot by a Jefferson County constable in a Walmart parking lot has agreed to settle her lawsuit against the county government. The county will pay $75,000 in damages to Pedro and Tammie Ortiz on behalf of Constable David Whitlock, who shot Tammie Ortiz in November 2011. That brings the cost of the shooting for Jefferson County taxpayers to six figures, since the county has already paid more than $37,000 to Whitlock’s attorneys. [WFPL]

Rousing tributes have been paid to boxing legend Muhammad Ali at a memorial service in his home city of Louisville, Kentucky. [BBC]

A Louisville-based package-design company is expanding internationally. [Business First]

In the hopes of taking advantage of expected growth, the City of Charlestown could create a redevelopment authority board that would be able to borrow money and get to work. [News & Tribune]