How Many Will Be Shot Dead This Week?

LMPD responded to the scene of a shooting at 26th and Chestnut Streets in the Russell neighborhood. Police Chief Steve Conrad says a male in his 20s was shot by an LMPD officer during a narcotics investigation. [WDRB]

A half-dozen faculty members speaking before the University of Louisville Faculty Senate on Wednesday denounced large deferred compensation packages that have been given to the university’s top executives. Several speakers said that while the packages for President James Ramsey, Provost Shirley Willihnganz and Chief of Staff Kathleen Smith might be legal, they are not ethical, given tuition hikes and low pay for faculty. [C-J/AKN]

Protesters were out in force in Louisville Saturday night, echoing a common cry across the country: Black lives matter. [WHAS11]

About 45 minutes before Comer’s remarks began, the latest Bluegrass Poll was released showing the state commissioner of agriculture trailing former Louisville councilman Hal Heiner by 8 points and tied with Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, who lost a primary challenge to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell last spring. Hours before that, Comer’s campaign faced a minor embarrassment when the PageOneKentucky blog revealed that the parents and brother of Holly Harris Von Luehrte, Comer’s former campaign manager, were hosting a fundraiser for Heiner. [H-L]

Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when the car they were riding in was struck by a train in the West Buechel area. [WLKY]

The share of unemployed Americans who receive unemployment insurance benefits has dwindled to its lowest point in decades, thanks in part to benefit cuts in Republican-led states. Just 23.1 percent of unemployed workers received state unemployment benefits at the end of 2014. [HuffPo]

“I heard the shot,” Pamela Vethel recalled. She saw when police pulled up at an apartment building on the corner of 26th Street and Chestnut. She didn’t expect what would happen next, just as two officers entered the stairwell. [WAVE3]

Johnathan Masters admits he’s not exactly the ideal running mate – he’s got a string of charges on his record, and pending court appearances on the calendar — but he is absolutely puzzled by his latest arrest in Kenton County, Kentucky. Apparently, he was told by police on Wednesday he failed to return a library book from 11 years ago. [Umm]

PharMerica Corp., the nation’s second-largest operator of institutional pharmacies, has agreed to settle two federal healthcare fraud lawsuits, one of which accuses the Louisville-based company of taking kickbacks to help expand the misuse of an anti-seizure drug in nursing homes during an 11-year period. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell says there’ll be no vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general until Republicans and Democrats resolve a dispute over a human trafficking bill. [Politico]

Wait for it, wait for it… Claudia Coffey, executive director of the Louisville Apartment Association, said the city’s rental boom is infused by job growth. Couldn’t possibly have anything to do with no one being able to afford to buy. [Business First]

J.P. can see the end of the road to his journey out of homelessness. The 42-year-old Jeffersonville resident lives in a shipping container near some railroad tracks. [News & Tribune]

More Possibility In Chattanooga Than Louisville?

The words don’t always come easy. For Perry Clemons, they sometimes vanish. Clemons is 58-years-old and lives in Clarkson, Kentucky. [WDRB]

As Mayor Greg Fischer joins Metro Council member Angela Lee in calling for a fuller environmental study of the Brownsboro Road site purchased for a new Veterans Affairs Medical Center, plans are in the works to turn about half of the second choice site into a subdivision. [C-J/AKN]

What? Another shooting? Surely not. Not in Possibility City where everything is Compassionate and Transparent. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul takes the first step toward running for president when he asks state party leaders to endorse his idea to create a 2016 presidential caucus in Kentucky. [H-L]Singed by their defeat in the battle over Homeland Security funding, Republicans aren’t about to renew their fight against President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration anytime soon. [Politico]

They’ll run stories like this about animal shelters hundreds of miles away. But couldn’t be bothered to dig in at Metro Animal Services at any point over the past decade. [WLKY]

Louisville doesn’t have the guts to do something like this. Fischer and council will always bend over backwards for lobbyists. [HuffPo]

Lexington has started to shoot its kids just like Louisville! Copycat. We were first. Lexington police told media outlets a 9-year-old boy was taken to UK Hospital after being shot while riding in his parents’ car. [WAVE3]

A factory in Louisville, Kentucky, made chewing tobacco for over a century before folding in 2009. Now the abandoned site is a symbol of how the city is changing: The 24-acre brownfield will soon become one of the largest hubs for local food in the U.S. [Fast Company]

Louisville Metro Police is on track to putting body cameras on some officers this summer. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s proposal to consolidate more than a dozen regulatory offices into an agency that would oversee food safety is drawing the intrigue and ire of some food safety advocates, producers, and experts — some of whom question the feasibility of a move that’s decades in the making. [ThinkProgress]

A U.S. Supreme Court decision about whether patients who get insurance through federally administered exchanges should have their costs subsidized is not expected to have an impact on Kynect, Kentucky’s insurance exchange. [Business First]

At first it looks like some kind of marketing ploy. Six picnic tables, surrounded by a garbage can on a concrete slab in the middle of Same Peden Community Park in New Albany. [News & Tribune]

Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]

You A Pedestrian? Your Days Are Numbered

Walsh Construction won’t be cited after three workers were thrown into the Ohio River as they sought to retrieve a boat that had broken free from the downtown bridge construction site. [WDRB]

A year after two members of Congress asked for an investigation into the appraisal price of the planned Brownsboro Road VA Medical Center site, there has been no response and opponents are launching an 11th-hour appeal to persuade Veterans Affairs officials to pick another site. [C-J/AKN]

Three pedestrians in the Kentuckiana area were struck in three separate accidents within two hours Friday night. Nothing to see here, move along, Possibility City, compassion, transparency. [WHAS11]

The state Senate voted Friday to limit Kentucky’s debt, and the Senate president later said the chamber will search for another way to strengthen the state’s teacher pension system instead of the House-approved plan to borrow $3.3 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A local reporter was indicted for leaving the scene of a deadly crash. Police said Jeff Woods, a WHAS sports reporter, was driving a station vehicle when he hit a woman in downtown Louisville in January. [WLKY]

There’s good news and bad news for both parties, in a Pew Research poll out Thursday: Republicans are seen as extreme and intolerant but more trusted to handle international issues, while Democrats’ position as the party of the middle class doesn’t translate into an edge on the economy. [HuffPo]

Remember Debbie Fox? She’s the woman who half-assed everything so badly at Metro Animal Services that everyone threatened to resign unless Fischer moved her ASAP. Now she’s making mega bucks handling an agency that’s far more important. [WAVE3]

Indiana could be the first US state to introduce baby boxes – anonymous drop-off points designed to prevent the deaths of abandoned infants. [BBC]

Young people living in Louisville’s westernmost neighborhoods have less opportunities for physical, social and cognitive development than in other parts of the metropolitan area, according to findings of a recent study by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. [WFPL]

More jails are replacing face-to-face visits with video, passing the costs on to inmates. [Mother Jones]

Hillerich & Bradsby Co., maker of Louisville Slugger baseball bats, may be up for sale. [Business First]

The New Albany-Floyd County Public Library is looking for a new director. [News & Tribune]

Thought All Was Piggies & Rainbows At Swift?

You can thank David Jones for most of this mess. If you missed it, he was losing his marbles during Monday evening’s meeting, claiming no one but the board had any say so in whether Hargens got a sweet contract renewal. Little has changed since the days of Daeschner and Berman. Remember those shysters? Only now it’s not just us — Toni can smell b.s. a mile away (with the exception of Terry Holliday b.s.). [Toni Konz]

The fines keep stacking up the JBS Swift slaughterhouse and meat packing plant in Louisville’s Butchertown neighborhood. [C-J/AKN]

They are not police officers just yet, but you can already see the tension as new Louisville Metro Police recruits are put into potentially life-threatening situations such as a mock break-in at a business. [WHAS11]

Republican candidate for governor Matt Bevin said he would undo the expansion of the state’s Medicaid system, a move that would take away health insurance from nearly 400,000 people. [H-L]

Another day, another… wait for it… Four people were transported after an accident involving a JCPS bus. [WLKY]

The bill to rein in PETA’s killing at their headquarters in Virginia passed the House of Delegates in a landslide 95-2 vote. Shelters will now be required by definition to make efforts to adopt out animals, instead of summarily killing them. [HuffPo]

The Metro Air Pollution Control District has levied $48,000 in fines against JBS Swift, but says the company can settle the fines for less if they take certain steps. [WAVE3]

Cockfighting lover Matt Bevin says he has a seven point economic plan for Kentucky, which means nothing. Check out the looks of his 700 kids’ faces. Not even they take him seriously. [CN|Toots]

Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, will visit Louisville next month at the end of a U.S. tour. [WFPL]

Several Republican governors who are nervous about a Supreme Court ruling are asking Congress for help — even if it puts them at odds with their own party. [The Hill]

By now, you probably have heard that the 40-story National City Tower in downtown Louisville has changed owners. [Business First]

What are the most pressing needs in Clark and Floyd counties? [News & Tribune]

Do You Want Greg Fischer To Raise Your Taxes?

Plans will move ahead to close the New Albany Pillsbury plant, despite efforts by the mayor and city council to keep the company — and its 400 jobs — from leaving the city, a union representative says. [WDRB]

Carolyn Miller Cooper, executive director of the city’s Human Relations Commission, struggled to sleep Monday night. [C-J/AKN]

On a chilly night in downtown Louisville rainbow colors warmed the night sky as the lights of the Big 4 Bridge officially turned on. [WHAS11]

Requesting help to avoid a “costly and time-consuming legal challenge,” U.S. Sen. Rand Paul is asking members of the Republican Party of Kentucky’s central committee to create a presidential caucus in 2016. [H-L]

A Louisville man is behind bars in connection with a string of home burglaries. [WLKY]

Of course Rand Paul is appearing in a crazy ass anti-gay documentary. The only thing that’s surprising is that it’s not a pro-Jim Crow documentary. [HuffPo]

Police say an inmate escaped from Metro Corrections after taking the place of another inmate at the office for the home incarceration program. [WAVE3]

Louis Brandeis was wrong. The lawyer and Supreme Court justice famously declared that sunlight is the best disinfectant, and we have unquestioningly embraced that advice ever since. [ProPublica]

As an anti-smoking rally descended on the Capitol rotunda on Wednesday, a bill that would ban smoking in public places across Kentucky is still waiting to be heard on the state House floor. [WFPL]

If you missed it yesterday, a Circuit Court judge entered the most remarkable eff you Order of Recusal we’ve ever seen. And it was in the Joshua Powell case in Montgomery County! [Page One]

A new ranking of public universities was a mixed bag for the University of Louisville, which scored high in admissions and has shown growth in diversity, costs and advancement but is still struggling with prestige nationally. [Business First]

Television and radio stations were approved for each of Greater Clark County Schools’ high schools at Tuesday night’s board meeting, with funding to get figured out next month. [News & Tribune]

Do you really want to trust GREG FISCHER to raise your taxes? Of course you don’t. [Ronnie Ellis]