Freak Out: Your Water’s Prolly Poison

Louisville Metro Animal Services remains the worst place on earth and no one seems keen on improving the situation. Even Kelly Downard turned cowardly and gave up. Louisville firefighters were called to Louisville Metro Animal Services just after 10:30 Friday night, early reports indicated no animals were harmed. [WDRB]

This is fascinating coming from the newspaper that asked its arts reporter to prove her position mattered. Arts leaders and advocates are hearing reports that the state budget Gov. Matt Bevin is planning to reveal on Tuesday would eliminate the Kentucky Arts Council, which has a budget of $3.3 million. [C-J/AKN]

Many schools have already scheduled make-up days to recover the days lost during this week’s snow closings. [WHAS11]

Is anyone surprised? A year after state officials created a nationally recognized public-private partnership to build America’s best statewide broadband network, opponents are trying to kill it. Some telecom and cable companies that now provide Internet service around the state, along with several right-wing advocacy groups, are pushing legislators and Gov. Matt Bevin to rethink the project, called KentuckyWired. [H-L]

Even though LMAS is a disaster, you should still pitch in to help. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) really doesn’t like idea that President Barack Obama could use executive power to make more corporations disclose campaign spending. [HuffPo]

This is important news you can use. Mr. Peabody will ride almost anything. He loves to ride a bike. And on Thursday, he rode a sled in Louisville’s Seneca Park. [WAVE3]

Water authorities across the US are systematically distorting water tests to downplay the amount of lead in samples, risking a dangerous spread of the toxic water crisis that has gripped Flint, documents seen by the Guardian show. [The Guardian]

Isn’t it fun how Jim Ramsey continues to make excuses for all of his scandals? He’s still defending Robert Felner when he thinks there aren’t reporters around. [WFPL]

A ProPublica analysis of political fundraising shows conservative House Republicans have less and less in common with their party’s leaders, whose donors sometimes more closely resemble those of Democrats. [ProPublica]

How much do you pay for your Medicare Advantage premium? That number could go up for seniors enrolled on a plan from Louisville-based insurer Humana Inc. or Connecticut’s Aetna Inc., if the merger of those two companies goes through. [Business First]

Before he became judge, Brad Jacobs thought he knew the prevalence of Clark County’s substance abuse problem as one of the county’s busiest criminal attorneys. [News & Tribune]

All This Snow Makes Day Drinking OK

WDRB is apparently still freaking out over kids misbehaving on school buses. [WDRB]

Brown-Forman Corporation has received an initial go-ahead from city regulators to start major work on its Old Forester Distillery and visitors experience project at 117-119 W. Main St. [C-J/AKN]

We’d tell you what WHAS11 was freaking out about but their website was down all day. And their crotchety old twitter people have us blocked, unlike every other media outlet in town, because they probably can’t take jokes. Even WDRB knows how to take a joke. Eric Flack can take a joke. Can you imagine? It’s the most hilarious thing since A Kentucky Newspaper started blocking our websites due to criticism of its atrocious Felner coverage. [Deep WHAS11 Funtimes]

Preliminary estimates from a consulting firm hired by the city show the cost will be $175 to $200 million to build a fiber-optic network to increase sluggish Internet speeds and expand Internet access in Fayette County. [H-L]

SNOOOOOOOOOWWWWWPOOOOOOCALYYYYYYYYYPSEEEEEEEEE! [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), still disappointed at being left off the main stage at last week’s GOP presidential debate, expressed disapproval of polling criteria during a campaign stop at a barbershop on Monday afternoon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police confirmed Wednesday that remains found in Oldham County were those of a UPS pilot missing since May. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder of what Julie Raque Adams has been doing to poor women in Kentucky. While she flits about Frankfort talking about how great she is for wealthy, Republican women? Poor people are suffering as a direct consequense of her imposing her antiquated religious beliefs on the Commonwealth. [Page One]

Police departments across Kentucky began outfitting officers with body cameras last year, but don’t expect state troopers to join their ranks anytime soon. [WFPL]

For years there have been calls for more transparency in Kentucky’s retirement systems, especially the system for lawmakers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republic Bancorp Inc. CEO Steve Trager has just gained control of an additional 671,808 shares of the bank-holding company’s stock, according to a Jan. 8 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. [Business First]

Cheaper cigarettes are the lure for people in Illinois who cross the Wabash River to visit the Smoker Friendly tobacco outlets in Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Been To The Falls? No? JUST GO!

It was not icy roads but a strong odor that people in Southern Indiana were complaining about on Monday morning. Most people say it smelled like propane or natural gas but emergency officials don’t think it’s anything that hazardous. [WDRB]

Standing in front of dozens of Jefferson County Public Schools principals, the district’s chief business officer acknowledged that JCPS has done a “horrible job of communicating” its proposed budget changes that could cut hundreds of thousands of dollars from some schools’ budgets. [C-J/AKN]

An exhibit featuring family photographs of Anne Frank has opened at Louisville Free Public Library and continues through Feb. 27. [WHAS11]

Virginia Kraft Payson’s conviction has won more battles than any list of her achievements can do justice to, whether it documenting outdoor exploits as a journalist for Sports Illustrated or crafting bloodlines as one of Thoroughbred racing’s most noted owner/breeders. [H-L]

Two years ago, WLKY did a story on T.J. Floyd — a young boy who suffers with what’s called an invisible injury. [WLKY]

Solar is the energy employer of the future — or at least that’s how the numbers look today. A new report on the state of the solar industry out Tuesday from the nonprofit Solar Foundation shows that the number of jobs in the United States in the solar industry outpaced those in the oil and gas industries for the first time ever. [HuffPo]

Parents and principals showed up at Monday’s board meeting to express concern for budget allocations that aim to make Jefferson County Public Schools a more equitable school system by shifting funding between schools. [WAVE3]

The EPA’s own advisory board says the agency needs to clarify its findings on fracking. [ThinkProgress]

Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee joined the field for the Kentucky Republican presidential caucus before the Thursday deadline, bringing the total of candidates to 11. [WFPL]

Of course Matt Bevin is the butt of national jokes. Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has notified U.S. authorities that he plans to dismantle the state’s health insurance exchange created under the Obama Administration’s Affordable Care Act. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Crossdock Development is at it again in Jeffersonvile’s River Ridge Commerce Center. [Business First]

Holly Kelley and her family were among the first to experience the new interactive exhibits in the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at its reopening Friday. [News & Tribune]

Breathe. The Air Might Not Kill You.

Former Jefferson County Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Matt Conway was charged with felony assault Wednesday night after allegedly attacking his wife, according to a police report. Remember when his brother was covering up his police investigation(s)? [WDRB]

Everything is so corrupt in West Buechel that they’ve started some kind of watchdog organization. [C-J/AKN]

Just what Louisville needs – another stadium/arena. [WHAS11]

The red steel shipping container was once used to transport toothbrushes and bras. By May, it and another container will be transformed into a one bedroom, one-bathroom, 640-square-foot home that will be part of a new live-work community on York Street spearheaded by the North Limestone Community Development Corp. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A team of physicians, surgeons and nurses are creating an advanced heart failure program at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

When Donald Trump first watched his new TV ad that began airing this week, he said, “Play it again. I love the feel of it.” I, too, had to play it again, not because I too loved the feel, but out of amazement that this is what the front runner for the Republican nomination had chosen to put in his first TV ad of the campaign. [HuffPo]

A man is charged with wanton endangerment after setting himself on fire in the parking lot of a busy downtown convenience store. Maybe instead of jailing this man, Possumbilly City could get him some help? [WAVE3]

The FBI now tracks animal abuse like it tracks homicides. It was more than 10 years ago that Mary Lou Randour realized she couldn’t answer what should have been a simple question: Was cruelty against animals on the rise or in decline? [WaPo]

About a dozen people filed into a Jeffersontown gun shop shortly after noon on Tuesday, just after President Barack Obama wrapped up a live address outlining details of his executive actions designed to bolster gun control and curb gun violence. [WFPL]

Time Warner Cable said late Wednesday that hackers may have stolen up to 320,000 customers’ email passwords. [The Hill]

Craig Richard, the former CEO of Greater Louisville Inc. who left the chamber of commerce in 2014 to become CEO of Invest Atlanta, will resign from his position Jan. 18, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed announced Wednesday. Part of a pattern. These folks leave after screwing up in Louisville and eventually get figured out, forced resignations occur, blah blah blah. [Business First]

Nonprofits looking to do some good for youth in Clark and Floyd counties have a chance to bolster their budgets with grants from the Community Foundation of Southern Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Council’s Following Frankfort Off A Cliff

The principal at a top performing JCPS school is concerned about losing teachers. [WDRB]

In a stunning move, Democrat David Tandy said Tuesday he will not seek a fourth term and will forgo a bid to serve a second consecutive term as Metro Council president. Most political observers were the opposite of stunned. Tandy’s been attacked the past year by the Stumbo Democrats – the anti-progressives who learned how to play dirty at the hands of David Yates, Stumbo’s former deputy. On top of that, Tandy has a history of running from fights. Reference: Cordish, everything Abramson ever tried, nearly everything the corrupt Jim King pushed. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Compassionate City. Nothing’s new in 2016. [WHAS11]

Mitch McConnell says a Republican takeover of the statehouse is inevitable. He’s right. But it’ll only last a few years. [H-L]

Making an already difficult system worse. TARC will be adjusting service on seven bus routes beginning Jan. 31. Most of the service changes involve minor adjustments to pick-up times in response to traffic conditions and delays. [WLKY]

Of course Indiana bigots want to fine transgendered individuals for using the “wrong” restroom. [HuffPo]

There’s a new rally cry to help prevent juveniles from getting into trouble late at night. Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad has been asking for a curfew law that is easier for officers to enforce for nearly two years. Now, Louisville Metro Council Members are asking questions. [WAVE3]

A foreclosure case involving Land of Tomorrow Productions LLC, the company that owns the Funtown Mountain property in Cave City, is moving forward, according to action taken during Barren Circuit Court on Monday morning. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Just what Louisville needs, another Greg Fischer protege! [WFPL]

An emotional US President Barack Obama has unveiled new restrictions on gun purchases, saying the “constant excuses for inaction” have to stop. [BBC]

Just a few days before Christmas, the Oldham Chamber and Economic Development named a new leader it believes can march the county toward new heights. [Business First]

Clark County is soon to undergo an inventory and assessment of signs in the county, to comply with federal regulations. [News & Tribune]

Quick, Freak Out Over Unruly Kids!

Mall St. Matthews on Shelbyville Road was shut down Saturday night after police say they had to respond to several disturbances involving teens. [WDRB]

Calls from customers who said they were shoved or knocked down during a Saturday night disturbance at the Mall St. Matthews started filtering into the St. Matthews Police Department early Sunday morning, while officers continued to investigate what exactly caused up to 2,000 people – mostly juveniles – to start fights that forced the mall to close early. [C-J/AKN]

Basically, teenagers are the worst. Also, RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! On Sunday police and security presence was heightened at Mall St. Matthews after it was shut down early Saturday night. Police responded to multiple disturbances involving thousands of young people. [WHAS11]

America’s newest family of Syrian refugees flew in late at night, and Sarhan Aldobai, 36, looked down from the plane at the distant lights of his new home. His wife was nursing their baby in the next seat. His five other children had fallen asleep. Sarhan took out the small world map he had carried since leaving Syria in 2012 and tried to trace the plane’s path. [H-L]

This can’t be hyped up enough and you should definitely go. A museum at a southern Indiana state park is about to reopen after undergoing a $6 million facelift over the past year. [WLKY]

Leaders of the church-based Sanctuary Movement vowed on Friday to offer their places of worship as refuge for immigrants facing deportation under an Obama administration crackdown on Central American families who entered the United States illegally. [HuffPo]

Forty minutes of scanner traffic explains why more than four dozen law officers from three neighboring departments descended on Mall St. Matthews Saturday night amid unfounded rumors of looting and gunfire. [WAVE3]

Canadian gaming company Amaya Inc has been ordered by a Kentucky court to pay $870 million in penalties to cover alleged losses by the state’s residents who played real-money poker on PokerStars’ website between 2006 and 2011. [Reuters]

The drug epidemic and absent-minded motorists are driving up the number of motor vehicle thefts in Louisville, police say. [WFPL]

The Republican Party is divided over whether to attack the science of climate change when opposing liberal policies. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s award-winning advertising campaign for Kynect, the state health insurance exchange, has ended. [Business First]

The Floyd County Council is planning on balancing the 2015 general fund budget Tuesday. The amount the council members will have to find or take from other accounts to make that happen is still under debate. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

No, Voting Machines Are Not To Blame

Can you imagine if there were accountability like this for Jim Ramsey and the University of Louisville? Of course you can’t, don’t even try. [WDRB]

Surely no one is surprised that Greg Fischer and his crew tried to pull the wool over the eyes of everyone in the West End. [C-J/AKN]

Indiana’s first statewide program that pays for addiction and mental health treatment for convicted felons sent to community corrections instead of jail or prison is now underway. [WHAS11]

In case you thought the Republican Party of Kentucky was going to actually accomplish something? It no longer has a full-time chairman. A wealthy figurehead does not a functioning party make. Mac Brown is the next chairman of the Republican Party of Kentucky. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police say a 16-year-old boy stabbed his father in the chest Monday morning at a home on Saint Claire Drive. [WLKY]

When it comes to accreditors, the private organizations paid by colleges to help them maintain access to nearly $150 billion annually in federal student aid, the U.S. Department of Education seems to think sunlight is the best disinfectant. [HuffPo]

Of course John Boel is back to fearmongering. Leave it to him to try to crap all over needle exchanges. [WAVE3]

From last week but more relevant today. Just a reminder – the people screaming about alleged voting machine rigging have no clue what they’re talking about. They’re the folks who get everything they know about politics from MSNBC and have no concept of what goes on in Kentucky. [Page One]

Kentucky’s next state auditor, Danville Republican Rep. Mike Harmon, said he’s not sure if he’ll continue the investigation of the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees and its relationship with the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the school’s $1.1 billion endowment. [WFPL]

Three major companies, citing the under-representation of minorities in science and technology fields, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold affirmative action in university admissions in a closely watched case to be argued next month. [Reuters]

Almost Family Inc. has acquired Home Care by Black Stone, a Kenwood, Ohio-based nursing services provider, for $40 million. [Business First]

Community members are invited to help shape the future of their town by attending the “Envision South Clarksville” workshop for the South Clarksville Redevelopment Plan starting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10, at Ohio Falls United Methodist Church, 917 S. Virginia Ave., Clarksville. [News & Tribune]