Hide That Medicare Bit Behind Fire Coverage

General Electric Co. will no longer provide supplemental Medicare plans to about 130,000 former hourly workers and their spouses across the country — the latest in a series of moves aimed at cutting the company’s expenses for retiree benefits. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board on Monday made final a rate increase of 5.5 percent, starting Aug. 1, and approved the salary and compensation package for its incoming executive director. [C-J/AKN]

The Downtown Development Review Overlay committee, or DDRO, voted on Wednesday, July 29, to approve the Omni design plan. [WHAS11]

Humana Inc. on Wednesday reported second-quarter earnings of $431 million. [H-L]

Nearly four months after the fire at GE’s Appliance Park, fire officials release the results from the investigation into what went wrong. GE disputes the findings. Maj. Henry Ott said the company is ‘”cherry picking” facts to protect its interests. [WLKY]

After the Republican Party took a drubbing at the polls on Election Day 2012, RNC Chairman Reince Priebus ordered an autopsy. The party, the coroner’s report found a few months later, had alienated women and minorities and came off as plutocratic. [HuffPo]

After several tense exchanges between Kentucky’s candidates for governor, Republican Matt Bevin during a media interview accused a WAVE 3 News reporter of working for his rival. [WAVE3]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Tuesday named Gabriel Fritz to be the new director of the Office of Housing and Community Development, an appointment that comes as the city prioritizes its affordable housing needs. Here’s hoping he isn’t scandal-ridden. [WFPL]

There weren’t many substantive insights drawn from Monday’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway before a Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Business Summit crowd. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro Council is planning to hold two public hearings on the creation of special taxing districts to give financial help to two projects. [Business First]

The city has the discretion to release the full disciplinary record of fired New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook and is not required to provide the documents by law, Indiana Public Access Counselor Luke Britt stated in an advisory opinion issued Monday at the request of the News and Tribune. [News & Tribune]

Yeah, That Was Totally Just A Glitch

The Louisville Water Company failed to read one of the meters at the KFC Yum! Center for four years, letting about $100,000 in water and sewer charges go uncollected, arena officials said. [WDRB]

An event is planned at the University of Louisville on July 20 to mark the 1969 lunar moon landing by the Apollo 11 astronauts. [C-J/AKN]

Executives at Floyd Memorial Hospital say they plan to hire a consultant to consider options for securing the survival of the 236-bed facility in New Albany. [WHAS11]

Considering Republicans’ condemnation of Beshear for implementing the Affordable Care Act by executive order, the suggestion that he wield his pen again on this issue was more laughably hypocritical than the Rowan County clerk’s explanation of her intolerant beliefs. [H-L]

It floods enough that people should know better to drive into water, right? Rescue crews were called to Louisville’s Lake Forest community twice Tuesday morning to help two drivers whose cars were submerged in floodwaters. [WLKY]

It was September of their sophomore year at Tufts University in 2012 when John Kelly went to a party and saw someone who had sexually assaulted them only two weeks earlier. [HuffPo]

If you’ve headed into downtown Louisville lately, you have probably noticed a big difference on the Ohio River Bridges Project as some major progress is being made. [WAVE3]

Two Richmond residents had their bags packed and were ready to get married June 26 regardless of Kentucky law. However, the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision meant they could celebrate at home with their family instead of traveling to Chicago that night, they said. [Richmond Register]

When Roger Collins first started coming around the Baxter Community Center, the kids really didn’t talk to him. [WFPL]

U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning heard testimony today in the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky’s lawsuit against Rowan County and Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to issue marriage licenses to any eligible couple, in an attempt to keep same-gender couples from obtaining them. [ACLU-KY]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees’ compensation committee voted unanimously Monday to give university president James Ramsey a pay raise of 6 percent and a 25 percent annual bonus — though a consultant’s study found that Ramsey is already paid much more than his peers. [Business First]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services interim CEO Dr. Dan Eichenberger said he is seeking out the help of a consultant to map out the future of the hospital. [News & Tribune]

Greg Fischer Is Now A Fancy Engineer

Really, Preservation Louisville? A petition? Please. Fascinating that Greg Fischer now thinks he’s an engineer, though. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens informed employees Wednesday of a significant shake-up that includes outsourcing the legal department, creating a new top-tier district job and replacing the district’s human resources director. [C-J/AKN]

Shelbyville really wants to get in on Louisville’s murder spree. [WHAS11]

Wondering just how stupid the Republican candidates for governor will get before it’s all over? All four of Kentucky’s Republican candidates for governor said Tuesday night they do not agree that global warming is manmade, disputing the science that insists it is and declaring that protecting coal jobs is the higher priority. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA LIMITS! This was all the hype yesterday. [WLKY]

New rules limiting smog may be “controversial,” but they are among the administration’s top priorities, according to Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy. [HuffPo]

Residents of Louisville’s West End who pushed Metro Council to create rules for boarding houses are now waiting for Mayor Greg Fischer’s administration to follow through. [WAVE3]

Privately run Medicare plans, fresh off a lobbying victory that reversed proposed budget cuts, face new scrutiny from government investigators and whistleblowers who allege that plans have overcharged the government for years. [NPR]

The Kentucky Bourbon Trail would officially begin in downtown Louisville under a planned $1.4-million expansion of the Frazier History Museum, the museum and the Kentucky Distillers’ Association announced Thursday. [WFPL]

After Edward Snowden, the government said its controversial surveillance programs had stopped a terrorist – David Coleman Headley. In “American Terrorist,” ProPublica and PBS “Frontline” show why the claim is largely untrue. [ProPublica]

Looking to attend something that won’t matter? Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, will host a discussion next month that will explore the future of Jefferson County Public Schools a year after a state audit report was released. [Business First]

Incumbent Charlestown At-Large City Councilman Dan James is facing opposition from fellow Democrat and Clark County Sheriff’s Office deputy Scott Johns in the May primary election. [News & Tribune]

Gen Con Should Just Move To Louisville

It’s just another day for UPS driver Mark Casey. He has 60 miles to drive, and 125 deliveries to make. [WDRB]

One deal to restore Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home appears dead, but a Philadelphia attorney says he wants to buy the site and convert it to a museum honoring the three-time Louisville heavyweight boxing champion and humanitarian. [C-J/AKN]

Way to go, JCPS, you’ve done it again. There is new information about the 5-year-old girl left alone on a JCPS school bus for hours on March 11. [WHAS11]

Told ya Jamie Comer is in one of the biggest CYA moves in the history of gubernatorial primary politics in Kentucky. HUGE MEGA PEE ALERT! Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer’s claim that Kentucky had lost 50,000 jobs had disappeared from his campaign website. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Three weeks after he was shot in a West Louisville neighborhood, 13-year-old Tay Reed returned to school. [WLKY]

The number of uninsured U.S. residents fell by more than 11 million since President Barack Obama signed the health care overhaul five years ago, according to a pair of reports Tuesday from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

A(sic) inmate who had been placed into the Home Incarceration Program is charged with escape after he walked out of the Hall of Justice and tried to leave. [WAVE3]

Thirty-one stats(sic) have water supplies dipping below normal. Droughts have formally been declared in 22 of them. How we use water has never been more important, especially in the American Southwest, where drought conditions are the most severe in a generation — and could last another 1,000 years. [ProPublica]

Louisville’s shrinking tree canopy has finally been quantified. Jefferson County is losing trees at a rate of about 54,000 a year, according to a comprehensive assessment of the county’s trees scheduled to be released later this morning. [WFPL]

A major gaming convention, Gen Con, threatened on Tuesday to move its annual event out of Indiana if Gov. Mike Pence signs into law a controversial bill that would allow private businesses to deny service to homosexuals on religious grounds. [Reuters]

The First Link Supermarket at 431 E. Liberty St. in downtown Louisville has been for sale for awhile now, but the agent representing the store’s owner said he would prefer to lease the space after the death of his father and business partner last month. [Business First]

Another step in approving the new radio and television stations at Greater Clark County Schools’ high schools was approved at this week’s board meeting. [News & Tribune]

LMPD’s WASP Problem Is Front & Center

The building formerly occupied by the restaurant Taco Punk in the NuLu neighborhood has a new owner. [WDRB]

Three teachers from duPont Manual High are challenging longtime Jefferson County Teachers Association leader Brent McKim in the union’s presidential election, saying they want to see the union push harder to fix the state’s woefully underfunded teacher pension system. [C-J/AKN]

Students at Brooklawn School will soon be getting their hands dirty all part of the learning process. [WHAS11]

Five barrels seized last week from behind a shed in Franklin County do contain Wild Turkey bourbon, according to a statement from Gruppo Campari, the distillery’s parent. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city apparently can’t get enough of this story. A 73-year-old Louisville woman was found dead in an old septic tank Tuesday night. [WLKY]

These bills, it turns out, are essentially efforts to undermine Wall Street reform and Obamacare while greenlighting pollution. [HuffPo]

Oh, looky, LMPD has begun its revisionist history tour with its religious pretty boy who fancies himself an actor. [WAVE3]

When a four-year-old comes home from Pre-K proudly announcing that she spent her “choice time” playing on the computer, what’s a parent to do? [NPR]

Louisville Gas and Electric is still on track to open the company’s natural gas-fired power plant in Louisville in May, as it retires the current Cane Run coal power plant. The new power plant won’t produce coal ash, but 60 years worth of old ash will remain on site. [WFPL]

Several battleground states are planning ballot measures that could force presidential contenders to take firm stances on marijuana legalization. [The Hill]

Clifton’s Pizza Co. has been a Louisville and Frankfort Avenue institution for more than two decades and will celebrate its 25th anniversary this weekend. [Business First]

An appeal hearing over the New Albany Police Merit Commission’s decision to fire Officer Laura Schook has been continued at her request. [News & Tribune]