Homeless Kids? What Homeless Kids? Surely Not

Here’s your annual Greg Fischer Pee Alert: Citing his progress in making Louisville a globally-regarded city for caring and compassion, a coalition of international organizations has honored Mayor Greg Fischer with a City Leadership award for compassion. [Lane Report PR Regurgitation]

Nakiya Crawford hasn’t seen her father in more than a year. Crawford Confessed, “I don’t talk about it much.” [WDRB]

On a bus trip with 18 western Louisville residents to see how sustainable power plants turn waste into energy, Keith S. Hackett, assistant director of the Metro Department of Public Works, wondered aloud how much tax money could be saved. [C-J/AKN]

For one east Louisville family, early mornings are about getting in the yard and enjoying quiet time. Recently, the family experienced a big scare during their morning routine. [WHAS11]

A Superintendent Screening Committee will be formed to help the Fayette County school board select a new leader for the district. Under state law, the committee must include one parent, who will be elected by the presidents of the PTA or parent organization at all of the district schools. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Once again all eyes are on Ferguson as the nation waits for the grand jury’s decision on whether to indict Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson for firing the shots that killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. [WLKY]

The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation’s high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence. [HuffPo]

The possibility of a labor strike looms after tempers rose during a Metropolitan Sewer District Board meeting. [WAVE3]

In Mitch McConnell’s world, it doesn’t matter who works in his Hill office, who left for K Street or who runs his campaign, almost everyone calls the Kentucky Republican “Boss.” [Politico]

Kentucky’s community college system offers little accountability in its presidential search. [WFPL]

After saying “no” last April, the Kentucky Court of Appeals said Friday that it now will hear oral arguments on two lawsuits that threaten the financial stability of most of the state’s public libraries, including Rowan. [The Morehead News]

The KFC Yum! Center will be at the heart of March Madness in 2016. [Business First]

A national watchdog organization for issues pertaining to church and state separation sent a letter to New Albany regarding Saturday’s 46th Annual Mayor’s Community Prayer Breakfast. [News & Tribune]

Of Course Jim King Opposes A Basic Living Wage

Jerry Abramson is abandoning the insignificant and obscure office to which he was elected — lieutenant governor of Kentucky – for an even more insignificant and obscure office in the White House — deputy assistant to the president and director of intergovernmental affairs. [WDRB]

Residents near Louisville International Airport who don’t qualify for free home insulation work to help protect against air traffic noise could get help from proposed state legislation that would offer up to $3 million annually in tax credits for self-bought insulation. [C-J/AKN]

City leaders are asking the public to weigh in on a complete revamp of a stretch of Dixie Highway. [WHAS11]

These scores aren’t that great for Jefferson County Public Schools… [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another big part of honoring our veterans is taking care of their medical needs, which is why the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is building a new medical center in Louisville. [WLKY]

Kentucky Baptists on Tuesday chose to sever ties with a Louisville church that is open to performing same-sex marriages. [HuffPo]

A wave of business owners, including a well-known restaurateur, presented dire scenarios about a proposed minimum wage hike to Louisville Metro Council on Monday. [WAVE3]

If you’re some kind of jackass like Ted Cruz, you probably need help understanding net neutrality. [The Oatmeal]

Some motorists—namely, people who don’t have a mobile phone or credit card—are being excluded from a new pilot parking program in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

Republicans like Brett Guthrie pocket mountains of telecom cash and are fighting against an open, honest internet. [Gizmodo]

Louisville-based Humana Inc. has agreed to buy $500 million in its stock from Goldman, Sachs & Co. [Business First]

The Tiger Baby Playtime attraction in Charlestown was often a sold-out fundraiser event this summer with patrons paying $25 to play with tiger cubs. For $20 more in cash, they could pose for a photo with one in their arms. What visitors may not have know was that some grown tigers outside the tent were lounging in cages inspectors have deemed inadequate to prevent escape, that Stark pleaded guilty to selling an endangered animal and that he’s boasted he’ll never shut down — no matter what the law says. [News & Tribune]

4th St. Opens Up, Tries To Swallow Everyone

People who live near Liberty Tire Recycling are firing back after massive flames broke out at the facility earlier this week. The lawsuit claims Liberty Tire was negligent and should compensate those affected by the fire. [WDRB]

After Metro Council President Jim King asked for assistance in clarifying to what extent a council member must go to determine possible conflicts of interest, the council voted on Thursday to update the ethics ordinance. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s not every day we are taking $7 million in aid and support to schools, but this is the chance of a lifetime for students and teachers looking to soar. [WHAS11]

Cello, a female German Shepherd, is in a Louisville veterinary hospital, fighting to recover from a gunshot wound to her head and other serious injuries while authorities in Eastern Kentucky search for the person who attacked her. [H-L]

LMPD hosted a community event to educate the public on being proactive in the face of rising crime. [WLKY]

There was no sign of brown liquor President Barack Obama’s Friday lunch meeting with bipartisan political leaders, but the bourbon industry is using renewed attention to press its own lobbying interests. At the top of that list is the issue of the tax treatment of the whiskey that’s aging in barrels in warehouses. [Roll Call]

A spokesman for the Metropolitan Sewer District says they have no record of the abandoned 90-inch pipe that collapsed Friday, opening a hole that swallowed one of the rear tires of a trolley. [WAVE3]

“I would enjoy having some Kentucky bourbon,” President Obama said on Wednesday. [TDB]

The Kentucky couples challenging the state’s same-sex marriage ban will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to consider their case, an attorney for the plaintiffs said on Friday. [WFPL]

A teacher at St. Margaret Mary Catholic School in Louisville, Kentucky, who recently returned from a medical mission trip to Africa has resigned rather than submitting to a paid 21-day leave and producing a doctor’s note that says she is in good health. The school’s request was a reaction to “strong parent concerns” about Susan Sherman exposing students to Ebola — though she was in Kenya, which is separated from the Ebola outbreak by at least five countries. [NY Mag]

It was a grim picture painted by Bellarmine University economics and finance professors at a discussion they hosted last night about the state and future of the national economy. [Business First]

Now is the time to have community conversations about addressing homelessness in Southern Indiana, says Melissa Fry, director of the Applied Research and Education Center at Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]

Some Links To Make You Angry This Morning

The bourbon boom was on display Saturday as people gathered in Louisville to taste and learn about different bourbons. [WDRB]

This is what the local “news”paper calls a profile of Greg Fischer. [C-J/AKN]

Your local newspaper doesn’t have the guts to stand up to its dull golden boy. [C-J/AKN]

One hundred years old and still going strong, the Belle of Louisville marked her official 100th birthday Saturday with a packed cruise and fireworks. [WHAS11]

Wait for it, wait for it… Six Flags Over Jesus is hosting an Ebola freakout. Dr. Kent Brantly, the physician who contracted Ebola in June while working in Liberia, is scheduled to speak at a missions health conference Nov. 6 to 8 at Southeast Christian Church in Louisville. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Friday, October 24th you can show your inner monster at an event benefiting an organization dedicated to helping abused animals. [WLKY]

Both Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes and Mitch McConnell are lying about health care. Because that’s what you do when you’re a first-rate shyster. [HuffPo]

Why the hell is this Tumbleweed situation being fought out on teevee? There are actual, real things happening in Louisville and this is the hype “news” folks are focused on? [WAVE3]

This is what happens when Democrats try to out-Republican the Republicans. Democratic strength in Kentucky is ebbing fast, according to a new Gallup poll, and that could mean more trouble for Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes. [McClatchy & Gallup]

Eddie Moore Jr. knows it takes more than talk to influence young people into making decisions that set them up for success. [WFPL]

If these buttcramps were serious, they’d be funding a needle exchange. With Kentucky Senate President Robert Stivers in Northern Kentucky, Republican senate leaders gathered Thursday morning to slam House Democrats and drum up support for a bill to curb heroin abuse. [Cincinnasti.com]

Spoiler Alert: Jim King isn’t looking for a compromise, he’s looking to make himself appear to have leadership qualities. [Business First]

Independent candidate for Clark County sheriff Mac Spainhour will appear before the county board of elections next week to answer a complaint that he violated statutory reporting requirements and failed to include required disclaimers in advertisements. [News & Tribune]

If Louisville’s PubTrans Is Good, What’s Bad?

For decades, it’s been an oasis of agricultural land at the intersection of Interstate 64 and the Watterson Expressway. But the family trusts that control Oxmoor Farm appear to be reviving long-delayed plans to develop what is perhaps the most desirable acreage in Louisville. [WDRB]

Didn’t we ridicule this back before it kicked off? Over pounding music, the local reality TV show “Deadbeat” promises that “those who don’t pay up will be locked up.” [C-J/AKN]

If you don’t hate the gays, the close cases at the Southern Baptist Compound don’t want to play Barbies with you. [WHAS11]

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes declined Wednesday to say whether she will pull a television ad that three left-leaning, pro-immigration reform groups condemned Tuesday as “offensive” and “hurtful.” [Sam Youngman]

This riverboat thing is apparently a big deal. So say all the teevee people. [WLKY]

People are changing Earth so much, warming and polluting it, that many scientists are turning to a new way to describe the time we live in. They’re calling it the Anthropocene — the age of humans. [HuffPo]

Grimes implies that she’s barred from saying who she voted for, and the Constitution includes no prohibition on that. [WAVE3]

Many thousands of Americans who lost their homes in the housing bust, but have since begun to rebuild their finances, are suddenly facing a new foreclosure nightmare: debt collectors are chasing them down for the money they still owe by freezing their bank accounts, garnishing their wages and seizing their assets. [Reuters]

Louisville workers using public transit have “better than average” accessibility to their jobs compared to other large metropolitan areas, according to a researcher involved in a recent study. [WFPL]

Louisville’s disaster of a mayor spends his days lying on the radio. The man will be called on something, his claims will be debunked and then he’ll show up on the radio the next day spewing what he knows is false. [The ‘Ville Voice]

A committee of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has ordered Churchill Downs and Kentucky Downs to hold mediated discussions in their dispute over September racing dates for next year. [Business First]

Basically, everybody in Southern Indiana thinks they’re gonna get the Ebola. Two patients in the United States with confirmed cases of Ebola hemorrhagic fever were both hundreds of miles away from the region, but health officials in Clark and Floyd counties said they’re still taking measures to prepare locally. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Domestic Violence Death

Really? Selling the ingredients for sizzurp? [WDRB]

A woman shot Thursday by her husband in an apparent murder suicide became the 10th victim killed in a domestic assault incident inside city limits this year. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Baptists will vote later this year on whether to sever ties with a Louisville member church that says it is open to performing gay marriages. [WHAS11]

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters Friday that he voted for Richard Nixon, the only president to resign from office, as he continued to criticize his Democratic opponent for refusing to say if she voted for President Barack Obama. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! If Amy Shir couldn’t do it, she probably can’t. In one state House of Representatives race, a Democratic newcomer is challenging a Republican incumbent who has served for 22 years. [WLKY]

Kentucky Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes on Thursday repeatedly dodged inquiries as to whether she voted for President Barack Obama, who remains extremely unpopular in the Bluegrass State. [HuffPo]

Bardstown’s police chief said the murder of Officer Jason Ellis was an “I-told-you-so moment” that led to Nelson County’s inclusion in a national drug-fighting program. [WAVE3]

Former U.S. Labor Secretary Elaine L. Chao will visit Bellarmine University to discuss her perspectives on business and politics on Wednesday, October 22, at 7 p.m. [Press Release]

All kinds of crazy things are floating around in the Ohio River. [WFPL]

Sen. Rand Paul met with Ferguson, Mo., community leaders Friday. Civil unrest there came to a boil after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer. [The Hill]

The University of Louisville now has its roadmap in place for fiscal 2015. The board of trustees approved president James Ramsey’s 2015 strategic goals for the university at its board meeting Thursday afternoon. [Business First]

Work on the east-end crossing of the Ohio River Bridges Project will cause lane closures and restrictions on Ind. 62 and Ind. 265 next week. [News & Tribune]

GLI: Working Hard To Keep Everybody Down

Jefferson County Public Schools has hired a new team to help its most vulnerable students. [WDRB]

Of course GLI opposes a living wage for workers in Louisville. Remember, these are people put in charge by Greg Fischer. Arguing that increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 locally would hurt local businesses and possibly result in job loss, Louisville’s chamber of commerce announced its opposition to a proposed increase on Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian gets hit in Possibility City. MetroSafe tells us that a pedestrian has been hit by a vehicle near the intersection of S. Hancock Street and E. Kentucky Street in Louisville. [WHAS11]

The American Heart Association has awarded $1.26 million in grants to the University of Kentucky for cardiovascular research. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Time is running out for crews to finish construction on the Big Four Station in Jeffersonville(sic). [WLKY]

Large churches in the South tend to pay their senior pastors the highest salaries, a new survey finds. That’s right, poorer states have the highest-paid megachurch pastors. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville is spending $300,000 on new police officers and patrols after a series of crimes left students and parents on edge. [WAVE3]

Whenever someone mentions a General Electrics appliance the first thing that comes to mind is 30 Rock‘s Jack Donaghy and the pocket microwave, “The Funcooker.” Of course neither of those things really have anything to do with Electrolux’s deal to buy the GE appliance business, but it’s never the wrong time to reminisce about Liz Lemon and the gang. [Consumerist]

Two Jefferson County Public Schools are getting some help in the fight against childhood obesity. [WFPL]

More carbon dioxide was emitted into our atmosphere between 2012 and 2013 than in any other year since 1984, putting humans on the fast track toward irreversible global warming. [Think Progress]

Jim Mims was one of the people who has allegedly gone after women working in Metro Government, giving them hard times, silencing and discriminating against them. The most recent is a woman who had an injury and, with physician requests, asked Mims to allow her to work from home until recovered – something Metro does not infrequently. Her labor rep even recommended it. Mims wouldn’t have it, started pushing her out, claiming her work needed to be done in-house. When she was gone, he outsourced her (union) job to a grunt who is not in-house. What’s he get as a reward? A sweet promotion. Just like Margaret Brosko of LMAS. [Business First]

Jeffersonville asks for plaintiff to put up $24 million bond in suit over ‘gateway’ property. Jeffersonville’s city attorney submitted two pleadings in response to a resident filing suit against the city Monday. [News & Tribune]