Miss The Goober Debate? Don’t Worry

As winter approaches, there’s good news for Louisville Gas and Electric customers. If approved by the Kentucky Public Service Commission, the utility’s residential natural gas customers can expect to see a decrease of nearly 15 percent on an average heating bill. [WDRB]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Well, that sounds more fun than prostitutes. University of Louisville police said a person was hurt in a small explosion in the Shumaker Research Building. [WHAS11]

Guess we should be glad we’re not dealing with what Lexington is dealing with. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Community services and volunteers came together to cater to Louisville’s homeless community. [WLKY]

The Affordable Care Act’s chief aim is to extend coverage to people without health insurance. One of the 2010 law’s primary means to achieve that goal is expanding Medicaid eligibility to more people near the poverty level. But a crucial court ruling in 2012 granted states the power to reject the Medicaid expansion. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky School for the Blind has been a part of the community since 1842. Its mission is provide comprehensive education services to all Kentucky students who are blind and visually impaired. But three mothers say that is not happening.

If the prevailing judgment about the 2015 gubernatorial race is that no one is excited about it, then Tuesday evening’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway probably didn’t set any fires under prospective voters. [Ronnie Ellis]

What the hell is wrong with all these backward-ass gun nuts these days? We love us some guns but come on, people, enough with the bigotry. Louisville Metro Police officials say they are monitoring developments in the days leading up to a rally planned for this weekend outside the Islamic Center on River Road. [WFPL]

Leading theologians from the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) are making news this week for again speaking out against ex-gay therapy, also known as reparative or conversion therapy. But what these theologians have been saying at the annual Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC) conference about how to respond to LGBT people belies the supposed progress of rejecting these harmful, ineffective treatments. [ThinkProgress]

The University of Louisville men’s basketball team is highly decorated: Multiple Final Four appearances and three national titles, the most recent in 2013. [Business First]

If you’re pleased with the city’s progress over the last four years, Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore thinks he’s the obvious pick for Jeffersonville mayor come Nov. 3. [News & Tribune]

Sexytime To Bring Down UofL Finally?

So it’s not Robert Felner or the myriad other swindlers who bring the University of Louisville to its knees, it’s prostitution? Commonwealth’s Attorney Thomas Wine says his office is in consultation with the University of Louisville Police Department and the Louisville Metro Police Department Crimes Against Children Unit regarding the possible criminal violations revealed in her book. [WDRB]

Thank goodness there’s at least one education reporter in town who won’t spin and obfuscate regarding test scores. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City and your elite leaders don’t bat an eyelash. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal shooting in the 400 block of Marret Avenue. [WHAS11]

Ty Handy has been appointed as president of Jefferson Community and Technical College in Louisville effective Jan. 1, Kentucky Community and Technical College System President Jay Box announced. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Protesters rallied Monday outside the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. [WLKY]

Last week, the Taliban began the process of retaking Afghanistan, starting with the northern city of Kunduz. [HuffPo]

The former stripper whose sex-for-money claims rocked the University of Louisville basketball program last week said she tried to contact the NCAA before publishing her book, according to a report. [WAVE3]

The National Rifle Association and other anti-gun-control groups are formidable, but political trends may be loosening their grip on lawmakers. [ProPublica]

The ethereal glow that radiates from thousands of freshly carved pumpkins is coming back to Iroquois Park this week. [WFPL]

The tell-all book claiming that a former University of Louisville staffer hired escorts for players and recruits is topping charts. [WKYT]

People will never stop trying to ruin bourbon, apparently. [Business First]

U.S. District Court magistrate recommended this week to certify the civil suit against former Clark County Circuit No. 2 Judge Jerry Jacobi and other former court officials as a class action lawsuit that could represent more than 60 former participants in the county’s drug court program. [News & Tribune]

UofL Had Another Horrible News Week

Hillerich & Bradsby Co. is asking a judge to resolve a dispute over the value of more than 2,000 shares that were returned by stockholders who opposed the sale of the Louisville Slugger brand. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville Foundation voted Thursday to decline booster J.D. Nichols’ offer to use part of his $10 million gift pledged to the school to pay off past bonuses for President James Ramsey and other top administrators. [C-J/AKN]

The West Louisville Minister’s Coalition is demanding an answer from Attorney General Jack Conway about whether or not Governor Steve Beshear acted legally when he did not appoint an African American to the University of Louisville board. [WHAS11]

In his address to Congress, Pope Francis praised the American Thomas Merton as “a source of spiritual inspiration and a guide for many people.” [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Louisville is partnering with a popular app to help drivers avoid traffic. [WLKY]

Americans like to think of our country as a nation of immigrants and a nation of religions, but repeatedly we have failed to live up to our ideals, banishing fellow citizens from the American family because of their ethnicities or religious commitments. [HuffPo]

You dial those three numbers, 311, to report problems to Louisville Metro Government. But how often is the city picking up the phone? Records show thousands of calls for service go unanswered every month. [WAVE3]

When Kentucky Republicans last agreed to conduct a caucus to choose their presidential preference some said it would draw more candidates than just favorite son, Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. [Ronnie Ellis]

Josh White doesn’t like the look of Louisville these days. “It looks gritty,” he said. “I don’t want it to look gritty.” [WFPL]

Growth in the U.S. manufacturing sector showed no month-over-month change during September, staying at August’s sluggish pace which was the weakest in almost two years, according to an industry report released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital in St. Matthews has opened a new pediatric emergency department. [Business First]

With full bellies, Jeffersonville residents got a taste for their city candidates’ views Tuesday night during the Jeffersonville Fraternal Order of Police No. 100’s Meet the Candidates Steak Dinner. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Still Loves Shooting People

Saturday was a big day for Louisville’s gay community. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police have recorded 77 suicides this year, a 30 percent jump compared to this time a year ago and one more than the city totaled all of last year. The suicide total also far exceeds the city’s homicide total this year, which stood at 53 as of Sept. 17. Officials at the state and city level, however, admit Louisville’s suicide count could be higher given that the police do not investigate all deaths that turn out to be ruled suicides. [C-J/AKN]

One of the three teens accused of violently beating a Louisville homeless man in June says they did it as a game. [WHAS11]

One year ago, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway met with a group of out-of-state trial lawyers who urged him to pursue litigation against the oil industry over a now-disused gasoline additive — methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE — found to contaminate groundwater. [John Cheves]

Louisville police are investigating after a man was shot early Saturday morning. [WLKY]

Nearly 1,000 people showed up at the Islamic Center of Louisville, Kentucky, on Friday to paint over anti-Muslim graffiti that appeared Wednesday night, according to a center director. [HuffPo]

Bleachers were packed at Western High School’s home football game Friday evening, hours after an anonymous active shooter threat. [WAVE3]

Republican candidate for governor Matt Bevin is up on the air with his first television ad of the general election following weeks of ads by his Democratic opponent Jack Conway and those on his behalf by the Republican Governor’s Association. Don’t look for any surprises. The ad relies on trusted Republican strategy of tying any Democratic opponent to President Barack Obama, who is deeply unpopular in Kentucky. [Ronnie Ellis]

Somi Babar huddled Thursday morning with a group of mothers, peering at the white exterior walls of the Louisville Islamic Center. [WFPL]

Federal Reserve policymakers appeared deeply divided on Saturday over how seriously problems in the world economy will effect the U.S., a fracture that may be difficult for Fed Chair Janet Yellen to mend as she guides the central bank’s debate over whether to hike interest rates. [Reuters]

Oh, that won’t be terrible at all. A new television show that connects Louisville-area entrepreneurs with local financial backers has named initial members of its panel. [Business First]

A company that operates dozens of nursing homes across Indiana — including three in Clark County — fired its top executive Friday, three days after federal agents searched his home and the company’s headquarters. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Went Crazy w/Guns

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini told stock analysts on a conference call Monday that the “very capable” leaders of Humana’s Medicare-driven government business will remain in place following Aetna’s planned $37 billion purchase of Humana. [WDRB]

The Rev. Cynthia Campbell of Louisville’s Highland Presbyterian Church says she looks forward to performing its first same-sex marriage now that Kentucky’s ban on gay marriage has been lifted. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Mayor will be celebrating a big milestone at the LG and E Cane Run plant. The conversion from coal fired to natural gas is complete. [WHAS11]

Don’t underestimate the power of a miniature horse. Though small — about 2½ feet tall — miniature horses demonstrated their strength, athleticism and finesse Friday at the Mid-America Miniature Horse Club Mini Julep Cup by jumping, pulling carriages and posing. [H-L]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings, you know the drill, Possibility City, Compassionate City, blah blah empty words blah. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Seriously, eight people shot and three of them dead in a single weekend. Meanwhile, Greg Fischer plays pat-a-cake with historic preservation, promotes events that only the elite can attend, only addresses something that matters when called out by the media. [WAVE3]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival energy usage will be offset entirely with green power for the first time this year. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Community Ventures Corp. broke ground last week on its planned business incubator called Chef Space in the Russell neighborhood — but what hasn’t been reported yet is that the incubator is just the start. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey believes keeping the city’s police vehicle fleet updated will save taxpayers maintenance expenses required to keep older cruisers in service. [News & Tribune]

Flood Gates Opened Against Norton

They may only stand a couple feet off the ground, have four legs and wet noses, but their lives might save the life of a veteran. [WDRB]

A man says in a lawsuit that Norton Healthcare lost a piece of his brain. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering just how terrible Donna Hargens’ communication skills are? Just check out this latest mess. A Louisville neighborhood remains shaken following a horrific accident Friday evening involving a young elementary student and her school bus. [WHAS11]

One wants to abolish the state office he is trying to win. Another started her own business at age 9. Four have state legislative experience, and two are Louisville businessmen. [H-L]

Police are investigating a fatal crash at Dr. W.J. Hodge and Magazine streets early Sunday morning. [WLKY]

If Flint, Michigan can run a pig for mayor, surely Louisville can run something similar. [HuffPo]

FEMA will soon open a second office in Jefferson County to help those recovering from spring flooding. [WAVE3]

American Pharoah is the king of the nation’s horse races this month: in a driving rain, the Kentucky Derby winner took home top prize at the Preakness Stakes Saturday. [NPR]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

For thousands of years, religious people have gathered together in houses of worship to sing songs, celebrate sacred rituals, and lift up prayers to God(s) on high. And on July 1, a new religious group in Indiana intends to do just that — but with a lot more emphasis on the “high” part. [ThinkProgress]

Expect to see Norton Healthcare Inc. and the University of Louisville back in court on June 10. That’s as a long-running legal dispute between the two organizations continues to play out. [Business First]

Former Indiana state schools Superintendent Tony Bennett won’t face any criminal charges after an investigation into whether he misused state resources for his 2012 re-election campaign. [News & Tribune]

Here’s another Louisville/Kentucky movie to get excited about. [Variety]

Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]