Flood Gates Opened Against Norton

They may only stand a couple feet off the ground, have four legs and wet noses, but their lives might save the life of a veteran. [WDRB]

A man says in a lawsuit that Norton Healthcare lost a piece of his brain. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering just how terrible Donna Hargens’ communication skills are? Just check out this latest mess. A Louisville neighborhood remains shaken following a horrific accident Friday evening involving a young elementary student and her school bus. [WHAS11]

One wants to abolish the state office he is trying to win. Another started her own business at age 9. Four have state legislative experience, and two are Louisville businessmen. [H-L]

Police are investigating a fatal crash at Dr. W.J. Hodge and Magazine streets early Sunday morning. [WLKY]

If Flint, Michigan can run a pig for mayor, surely Louisville can run something similar. [HuffPo]

FEMA will soon open a second office in Jefferson County to help those recovering from spring flooding. [WAVE3]

American Pharoah is the king of the nation’s horse races this month: in a driving rain, the Kentucky Derby winner took home top prize at the Preakness Stakes Saturday. [NPR]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

For thousands of years, religious people have gathered together in houses of worship to sing songs, celebrate sacred rituals, and lift up prayers to God(s) on high. And on July 1, a new religious group in Indiana intends to do just that — but with a lot more emphasis on the “high” part. [ThinkProgress]

Expect to see Norton Healthcare Inc. and the University of Louisville back in court on June 10. That’s as a long-running legal dispute between the two organizations continues to play out. [Business First]

Former Indiana state schools Superintendent Tony Bennett won’t face any criminal charges after an investigation into whether he misused state resources for his 2012 re-election campaign. [News & Tribune]

Here’s another Louisville/Kentucky movie to get excited about. [Variety]



Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]

Friday Was An Arena News Dump Day

A Bullitt County official has been taken off the job over accusations that he made racist and sexist remarks, as well as claims that he mistreated employees, and the animals he was supposed to care for. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority that operates the KFC Yum! Center doesn’t have to fork over $7.5 million to the Kentucky State Fair Board to compensate it for business the board lost at Freedom Hall after the new downtown arena opened in 2010. Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s office released a letter Friday expressing what it termed an informal opinion that the arena authority isn’t obligated to pay that sum. [C-J/AKN]

Police are conducting a death investigation in the Parkland neighborhood after a body was found in a vehicle early Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

State officials approved at or near maximum tuition increases at four state universities Friday amid a heated GOP primary for governor where the candidates have lamented the escalating cost of college. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Mother Nature was smiling as perfect weather allowed hundreds of thousands lined both sides of the Ohio River for Thunder Over Louisville 2015. [WLKY]

An HIV outbreak in southeastern Indiana related to abuse of intravenous prescription drugs has jumped by 24 cases in the past week, an increase attributed to offering more testing resources, state health officials said on Friday. [HuffPo]

All across the country the use of body cameras continues to be a hot topic. In Louisville it will be more than just a conversation, it will be a pilot project beginning in June. [WAVE3]

California resident Gerilynn Aflleje was horrified when her 4-year-old Siberian Husky mix was killed by a local animal shelter over $180 in fees that she couldn’t afford. [CNN Money]

In its first 10 days, more than 40 people used a new needle exchange program in the Southern Indiana county struggling with an HIV crisis linked to intravenous drug use. [WFPL]

On Friday, Steve Beshear appointed Debbie King to replace her husband on the Arena Authority. Which… well… you thought Jim was secretive? Wait til you meet Debbie. Though, she’s super-nice and not even we dislike her. [Press Release]

Hardin County-based Boundary Oak Distillery plans to expand in Radcliff. [Business First]

It was the only invocation spoken aloud, as New Albany resident Melanie Adams offered a prayer during the public comments portion of Thursday’s city council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Needle Exchanges Are A Big No-Brainer

The Hertz Investment Group, a California company that owns office buildings around the country, pocketed $14.25 million this month when it sold the Starks building in downtown Louisville, according to a deed filed Friday with the Jefferson County Clerk’s office. [WDRB]

“I am offended. … I am deeply offended that they would be victimized by an individual and express some kind of fear of all black men,” he said. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another Jefferson County Public Schools bus crash. [WHAS11]

Venturing into the epicenter of Kentucky’s fight against heroin addiction, national drug czar Michael Botticelli on Thursday touted needle-exchange programs as effective grassroots initiatives to combat the spread of infectious disease and to steer heroin users into treatment. [H-L]

A new plea deal could mean former Clark County Sheriff Danny Rodden will avoid imprisonment. [WLKY]

When Rand Paul announced his candidacy for president last week, he declared his plans to help America “take our country back.” Singer-songwriter Jill Sobule has an important question for the 2016 contender: “What the fuck do you mean?” [HuffPo]

Louisville is becoming known for pedestrian deaths and school bus accidents. Looks like Indiana/I-65 are gonna become known for bus crashes. [WAVE3]

The Commonwealth of Kentucky has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) seeking competitive proposals from Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) to coordinate the healthcare services provided to more than 1.1 million Kentuckians who have met eligibility requirements and are enrolled in either traditional Medicaid or Medicaid expansion. The current contracts with Anthem, Aetna (Coventry Cares), Humana (CareSource), Passport and Wellcare are set to expire on June 30, 2015. The new contracts will take effect July 1, 2015. [Press Release]

Louisville Metro Council members want to start a needle exchange program in the city. [WFPL]

Look what the Kentucky Baptist Convention bigots are up to these days. Promoting their bigoted Sunrise Children’s Services scam. [Ashland Independent]

Louisville is No. 46 on a list of the most literate cities, according to a recent report that measures literacy based on the number of local bookstores, residents’ educational levels, access to Internet and library resources, and newspaper circulation. [Business First]

It’s “civic prayer” versus the Lord’s Prayer, as the New Albany City Council will be presented with dueling resolutions that call for changes to the moment of reflection at the start of each meeting. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Gets Back To Being Murdery

Louisville Metro Police are investigating two separate homicides. [WDRB]

All hell broke loose in Louisville last week. Track excavators were rolled into General Electric’s Appliance Park Saturday to clear a path for firefighters to reach two stubborn pockets of flames that continued burning inside the wreckage of Building 6. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police’s Traffic Unit is investigating a fatal accident that left an 8-year-old girl dead Saturday evening. [WHAS11]

Health officials in Indiana on Saturday began a needle-exchange program Saturday in a county where an HIV outbreak among intravenous drug users has grown to nearly 90 cases. [H-L]

It’s been one year since a Louisville man was found murdered on the doorstep of his Rubel Avenue home. Friday night, his family pleaded for anyone with information to step forward. [WLKY]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz are among 57 Republicans in Congress who are calling on the Supreme Court to uphold state bans on same-sex marriage. [HuffPo]

With flash floods causing havoc across the metro and canceling classes for Jefferson County students, graduation dates have shifted along with the last day of school. [WAVE3]

PEE ALERT! PEE ALERT! Social conservatives are doubling down on their push for state-based religious freedom laws, lashing out at businesses that have vigorously opposed the measures and accusing Democrats of trampling Christians’ civil rights. [Politico]

Shantasia Durr was first institutionalization at age 5. She spent much of her youth in social services, living in more than a dozen places until she graduated high school last year. [WFPL]

At the Tin Roof, a live music joint near Lucas Oil Stadium, where the NCAA’s Final Four basketball tournament concludes Monday, bar manager Brittany Strohmeyer eyed a group of out-of-town fans. Do they view Indiana as she sees it, warm and hospitable? Or do they think her state is run by bigots? [WaPo]

The Starks Building has been sold, according to a source close to the deal. [Business First]

The handling of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act by the Statehouse and Gov. Mike Pence gave Indiana a “black eye,” and it’s important for people who oppose the law to speak up, New Albany City Councilman John Gonder said of his resolution calling for the legislation to be repealed. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Streets Have Always Been Pothole City

After an abrupt change in leadership for Jeffersonville Police, the new chief appointed is making history and says he is ready to take charge. [WDRB]

Jeffersonville Police Chief Chris Grimm was ousted from the position Monday by Mayor Mike Moore, who attributed the demotion only to a “new direction in the police department,” according to a news release. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky State Auditor Adam Edelen has described the financial practices of the city of West Buechel as “astounding and highly irregular. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has ruled in favor of a newspaper seeking police records. [H-L]

A JCPS teacher accused of sex crimes with a child wants his trial delayed. [WLKY]

The tide has turned for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender couples seeking to be married in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A). [HuffPo]

Metro government has gotten more than 1,000 reports of potholes in the past three days as winter quickly gave way to warmer weather. [WAVE3]

But none of the top candidates in this field gets within 10 points of Hillary Clinton in a series of hypothetical general election matchups. Rand Paul comes closest, with 43% saying they’d be more likely to back him while 54% choose Clinton. [CNN]

A week after announcing the receipt of $6.3 million from the foundations of businessmen “Papa” John Schnatter and Charles Koch, the University of Louisville has released the underlying seven-year agreements. Rebecca Peek, a U of L senior and member of the Student Labor Action Project, said she was ashamed of the school’s agreement. [WFPL]

The U.S. government is preparing to roll back a widely criticized approach to public health, in which the “lost pleasure” people might suffer if they quit smoking or chose to eat healthier foods was used to reduce the projected benefits of new regulations, government officials told Reuters. [Reuters]

This time next year, the new Speed Art Museum will be open for business. [Business First]

Former Jeffersonville City Councilman John Perkins’ name is back on the ballot for the May primary election, following a circuit court’s decision. [News & Tribune]

LG&E Set To Screw Environmentally Friendly Folks

Cierra Lewis , 22, died in a house fire early Saturday morning, according to Capt. Salvador Melendez from the Louisville Division of Fire. [WDRB]

Louisville Gas and Electric is seeking to get more money from its customers, but a proposed rate structure could discourage people from investing in solar power or energy efficiency, a Louisville engineer warns. [C-J/AKN]

The family of a man arrested in Bardstown, Ky. claims excessive force was used while officers detained him. That suspect is now in critical condition in a Louisville hospital. [WHAS11]

Bigoted undertones are apparent for foes of a proposed Islamic center in Lexington. Don’t want to make it about religion or ethnicity? Here’s a tip: don’t make it about religion or ethnicity. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “She was burned after her death, almost over 70 percent of her body. So not only did they take her from me in life, they took her from me in death and I couldn’t even mourn my beautiful baby,” she said, adding through tears, “I had to have a closed casket.” [WLKY]

For the first time, more than half of U.S. public school students live in low-income households, according to a new analysis from the Southern Education Foundation. [HuffPo]

Police haven’t said who fired the shots that killed 16-month-old Ne’Riah Miller and wounded her mother Cierra Twyman last August. But newly released information, and a review of evidence obtained from prosecutors earlier, points the finger at a fifth man, whom police hadn’t named a suspect until this past Tuesday: 28-year-old Duwan Mason Jr. [WAVE3]

This is a big deal. [Press Release]

Dominique Frierson has wanted to get out of Beecher Terrace since he moved into the Russell neighborhood housing project in 2003. [WFPL]

Greg Bourke and Michael DeLeon have lived together for 32 years and were married in Canada more than a decade ago, but back home in Kentucky, something is missing. [Reuters]

If it wasn’t for Mary Ellen Wiederwohl, the city of Louisville very likely might have a different mayor in office, according to Mayor Greg Fischer. [Business First]

His family lives off Spring Street, he works off East Main Street, and he’s a proponent of two-way streets. John Smith believes people in his situation — downtown residents, business owners and employees of those establishments — should be given the top priority when it comes to public feedback about planner Jeff Speck’s street study. [News & Tribune]