A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]

Who Is Worse? Tom Wine Or Jim Ramsey? Possibility City!

Their homes were bombed, lives threatened, and they nearly starved to death. Now the newest Syrian refugee families have found a safe-haven right here in Louisville. [WDRB]

Tom Wine. MLK parade. Shenanigans. Read all about it. [C-J/AKN]

This is what local media has become. An “exclusive” interview in the “crime” section with the kid who crashed a drone in Lexington. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Housing Corp. is looking for volunteers to help count Kentucky’s homeless population. The count will begin at sunrise on Jan. 27 and continue for 24 hours. The point-in-time count is known as the K-Count. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Members of The Stand Up Louisville Coalition began planning a protest in recent days, after learning that Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine would be a grand marshal in the 44th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Motorcade. Now Wine has withdrawn his name from the list of grand marshals. [WLKY]

General Electric Co agreed to sell its appliances business to China’s Qingdao Haier Co Ltd for $5.4 billion in cash, the companies said on Friday. The move comes weeks after GE abandoned a $3.3 billion deal with Sweden’s Electrolux following months of opposition from U.S. antitrust regulators. [HuffPo]

Didn’t this happen just a couple years ago? Late November 2013, maybe? [WAVE3]

The nation’s cities are at the frontlines of a food system that sickens and impoverishes millions of Americans every year. Local communities where people live, shop, work, and receive healthcare bear the brunt of this system’s unhealthy, unjust outcomes, which disproportionately affect communities of color and low-income Americans. The five cities chosen—Oakland, Memphis, Louisville, Baltimore, and Minneapolis—all have populations between 400,000 and 700,000, and in all of them, the percentage of residents living below the federal poverty line is higher than the national average. [Click the Clicky]

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is launching a new program to provide a long-acting, reversible contraceptive arm implant to women in Louisville. [WFPL]

The Obama administration on Friday said it would announce the next steps in its planned overhaul of how the United States manages coal development on federal land, which sources have said includes freezing new leases. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Senate passed a measure Thursday that’s aimed at allowing the state’s bourbon tourism industry to reach its full potential. [Business First]

Even though he won a recount, Jeffersonville City Councilman Steve Webb is challenging the lawfulness of November’s general election, requesting a trial that could result in a special election. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Will Ruin Your Wednesday

Median household income was flat or declined in all but four of Kentucky’s 120 counties in the years following the Great Recession, according to new Census Bureau data. [WDRB]

Kentucky State Reformatory was overcrowded and hazardous for inmates and staff before inmates’ federal lawsuit. [C-J/AKN]

Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. [WHAS11]

John Yarmuth is right – Kentucky Democrats probably won’t have a viable senate candidate to run against Rand Paul. Half his staff is under federal indictment and KDP is handing him a re-election victory. [H-L]

A program that allows Lexington parking ticket recipients to cover their fines with canned goods for the hungry has collected 5 tons of food during the holidays. [WLKY]

The Obama administration on Monday defended its deportation tactics and confirmed it has begun raids on families, despite Democratic candidates and immigrant advocates saying officials could be sending mothers and children to their deaths. [HuffPo]

Twenty-eight bottles of the most sought-after bourbon will be available to the public, after it is released from the court. [WAVE3]

Or will they? Franklin County’s sheriff says the bourbon will be destroyed. [H-L]

Mega road fund cuts were initiated by Matt Bevin and almost no one noticed. But we did. [Page One]

A pair of community groups are hosting a forum next week that aims to discuss the state of race relations in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. manufacturing contracted further in December as lower oil prices undercut spending in the energy sector while construction spending fell in November for the first time in nearly 1-1/2 years, suggesting the economy ended 2015 with less momentum. [Reuters]

Springhurst Health and Rehab is undergoing a $5.2 million expansion project that should be done by mid-2016. [Business First]

Patti Hall saw a need in her Sellersburg community that wasn’t being fulfilled, so about two years ago, she decided to fill it. [News & Tribune]

Everything Is Awful. Go Back To Bed.

WTF is going on with WDRB? Has literally everyone there turned into some magnet for racist panic? They’re really running stories about Marc Murphy’s cartoon? Jesus H, Louisville, get it together. The entire city is not some awful trailer park filled with Klansmen. This shit has to end at some point. [WDRB]

Fans entering the KFC Yum! Center will experience additional security measures at events beginning January 14. And people are freaking out. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer’s right – the local media hyped the Mall St. Matthews crap up. [WHAS11]

The electric bill at Lacey Griffey’s neat Harlan County home, with its yellow siding and silk-flower arrangements decorating the living room, was $582.07 in January 2013. [H-L]

More people are using their furnace as temperatures drop, leaving room for more cases of carbon monoxide poisoning. [WLKY]

If you missed it this week, there was a whole lot of Jim Gooch hilarity. [Page One]

A skyrocketing homicide rate, a budget surplus of more than $18 million, and the prospect of growing business: those are some of Louisville’s highlights in 2015. [WAVE3]

When officers take the lives of those they are sworn to protect and serve, they undermine their own legitimacy. [The Atlantic]

Registration is now open for Louisville’s Kilowatt Crackdown, a contest to reward for energy efficiency improvements in the city’s buildings. [WFPL]

And if you missed it in Louisville? Everybody is losing their damn mind over some misbehaving kids at a shopping mall. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Hepatitis C, which can damage the liver and cause cancer, affects more than 3 million people in the U.S., and new medications that have come on the market in the past few years will cure the virus in most patients. But a study has found that Medicaid in Kentucky, Indiana and more than 30 other states restrict who receive the pricey drugs. [Business First]

Some Indiana police agencies say their fight against methamphetamine production would be helped by a proposed state law change to require a doctor’s prescription for a common cold medicine that is used to make the illegal drug. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Louisville Already Cringing Over Bevin

Louisville Metro Police say they’ve arrested two drug traffickers in southwest Louisville. [WDRB]

A coalition of social justice organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky and the Fairness Campaign, on Tuesday called on the Cordish Cos. to end dress codes at 4th Street Live! and acknowledge past racial profiling there. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Judge Denise Clayton says there is a better understanding of the racial makeup of Jefferson County jury pools although it’s impossible to know exactly the diversity of jury summons. [WHAS11]

Homeless two-parent families in Fayette County will soon have more housing options thanks to a new program designed to address a gap in Lexington’s homeless shelter system. [H-L]

The largest beer and wine wholesaler in Indiana is asking a state appeals court to find a law unconstitutional that prohibits beer wholesalers from seeking a permit to also distribute liquor. [WLKY]

With all the roadblocks thrown up by the Supreme Court, should school systems still try to pursue diversity? One district in North Carolina said yes and, as a new study shows, reaped solid rewards for the kids. [HuffPo]

When is it okay to go inside a stranger’s house and gawk at their furnishings and decorations? During the Old Louisville Holiday Home Tour, that’s when. [WAVE3]

Republican Gov.-elect Matt Bevin Tuesday named the head of a Louisville accounting firm as his budget director and said John Chilton will have much work to “get Kentucky’s financial crisis resolved.” [Ronnie Ellis]

A decision on whether pork processor JBS Swift can continue to use a Butchertown parking lot for truck staging has been pushed back once again. [WFPL]

As soon as Donald Trump announced that he’d gained the endorsement of 100 black ministers from across the country, there were skeptics. [NPR]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. says it will create 2,000 jobs and invest $1.3 billion in its Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville. [Business First]

State Rep. Ed Clere, R-New Albany, has been removed as chairman of the Indiana House of Representatives Public Health Committee. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

JCPS-LMPD Mess Blown Outta Proportion

Time Warner constantly sucks and constantly gets to take more of your money with little to no competition. [WDRB]

PEE ALERT! Louisville has a top-25 basketball team with a high ceiling, but the Cardinals aren’t ranked yet this season because of ongoing investigations into a book making major allegations against the program, coach Rick Pitino said. [C-J/AKN]

Supporters of Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens met with Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine on Monday afternoon, Nov. 30, urging him to withdraw his request to remove Stevens from criminal court cases. [WHAS11]

Before Gov. Steve Beshear leaves office and Gov.-elect Matt Bevin can reconstitute the racing commission, the regulatory body will take up some key business on Tuesday: a request for a gambling parlor at Turfway Park in Florence and Keeneland’s plan to open a quarter horse track and gambling parlor in Corbin. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department chief is reminding Jefferson County Public Schools exactly what officers can and cannot do when it comes to safety and security at schools. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama spoke out on Planned Parenthood following what appears to be a politically motivated shooting at one of the health care provider’s clinics in Colorado last week that left three people dead and nine others injured. [HuffPo]

After more than three months of meetings with local officials and community leaders, Clark County’s health officer, Dr. Kevin Burke, is gearing up to formally petition the state to set up the exchange program. [WAVE3]

One of the most prominent stains on the reputation of the much-mythologized Reagan administration was its response, or lack of response, to the AIDS crisis as it began to ravage American cities in the early and mid-1980s. President Reagan famously (though, not famously enough) didn’t himself publicly mention AIDS until 1985, when more than 5,000 people, most of them gay men, had already been killed by the disease. Filmmaker Scott Calonico’s new documentary short, When AIDS Was Funny, exclusively debuting on VF.com, shows how the Reagan administration reacted to the mounting problem in chilling fashion. Not even Reagan’s appointed mouthpiece, notorious press secretary Larry Speakes, had much to say about the crisis beyond derisive laughter. [Vanity Fair]

The future of Louisville’s bicycling infrastructure will be the topic of discussion at a pair of public meetings set for this week. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday said the United States has power to do more to prevent gun homicides like last week’s shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Hillsdale Furniture LLC has based its distribution operations in Bullitt County since 2008, but those services are returning home. [Business First]

Officials are looking at ways to make the Clark County Government Building more secure. [News & Tribune]

Fun Fischer Tax Hikes & Horrible Bigots

There’s a new statue on Louisville’s Museum Row. [WDRB]

Just what Louisville’s working poor need! Once they lose access to health care, they can pay more taxes for the crap that Greg Fischer and his rich daddy want to build and/or destroy. [C-J/AKN]

Bourbon has become such a big tourism draw that the Louisville Filson Historical Society celebrates the day prohibition was repealed more than 80 years ago. [WHAS11]

The water tower in Lebanon is about to get a new mural that should make it very popular on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. The tower will be graced by a bottle of bourbon, making it look like the world’s largest Maker’s Mark pour. The city’s 135-foot water tower will be getting a mural by internationally recognized muralist Eric Henn, who will paint it to look like the neck of a gigantic bottle, complete with signature red wax, is pouring bourbon straight down. [H-L]

The Muhammad Ali Center marked a milestone this week — 10 years in Louisville. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama is accusing Republicans who oppose allowing Syrian refugees into the U.S. of being scared of widows and orphans. He says the political posturing “needs to stop.” [HuffPo]

This story will cause area bigots to lose their minds. [WAVE3]

U.S. consumer prices increased in October after two straight months of declines as the cost of healthcare and other services rose, evidence of firming inflation that further supports views that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates next month. [Reuters]

Amid city efforts to develop a system for reusing elements of historical buildings, stakeholders and city officials met Monday to discuss potential uses for preserved parts of the old Board of Trade building. [WFPL]

Poverty does not treat men and women equally, especially in old age. Women 65 years old and older who are living in poverty outnumber men in those circumstances by more than 2 to 1. And these women are likely to face the greatest deprivation as they become older and more frail. [NPR]

Ford Motor Co.’s 9,000 UAW members have voted to reject a new contract that would have set working conditions and raises through the next four years. [Business First]

Indiana bigots are apparently just like Kentucky bigots. Two Syrian refugee families who had been approved to be moved to the United States and were scheduled to arrive in Indianapolis on Thursday have been officially told they are not welcome. [News & Tribune]