Death Murder Death Murder Death

Authorities have released the name of a woman who was found murdered near Churchill Downs. [WDRB]

Immigration and criminal defense lawyer Daniel Alvarez has gained the endorsement of Citizens for Better Judges in the highly contested Jefferson District Court race. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating a stabbing that happened in the 5100 block of Crafty Drive located in the Lynnview neighborhood. [WHAS11]

New ribbon advertising boards have been installed around the second tier of Rupp Arena, the first part of a two-year, $15 million technology upgrade for Lexington’s most recognized landmark. [H-L]

This got a lot less buzz than we expected. Particularly in light of the double-dipping. Louisville has a new chief of community building. Mayor Greg Fischer named Yvette Gentry to lead the department. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School personnel action document reveals 30 of the districts bus drivers and substitute bus drivers resigned, retired or were terminated from early August to the middle of September. [WAVE3]

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee is upset he was quoted in a television ad for Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. Duncan – who is from Inez, Ky., and now heads the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity – told WYMT his comments were taken out of context. “The comments that I made were as the chief executive officer of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. It had nothing to do with the Republican National Committee,” Duncan said Tuesday night in a phone interview. [WYMT]

Home repairs can be a frightful burden for Louisville residents who live in poverty or on fixed incomes. [WFPL]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

An empty elementary school in downtown Jeffersonville will soon be torn down to make way for a 93-room upper mid-scale hotel. [Business First]

Telling stories of epidemics and disasters through the eyes of those who lived — and died — in them, “Stories Behind the Stones: Disease, Disasters and the Downtrodden” offered tours of Fairview Cemetery over the weekend. [News & Tribune]

Some Schools Treat Kids Like Criminals

This… just…. what? “All Lives Matter”? Every backward white bigot in the city is gonna be pounding their chest on this one because they don’t understand the purpose of the Black Lives Matter movement. A Central High School student is on a mission to promote peace in Louisville and spread the message that ‘All Lives Matter.’ [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is looking for outside help as the search to fill some of its top-level positions drags on. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville police are investigating a homicide in the Hallmark neighborhood that’s just north of Shivley. [WHAS11]

The state has issued a recreational advisory warning people to avoid contact with water in a large swath of the Ohio River because of potentially harmful algae. [H-L]

Staff reorganization of Neighborhood Place Centers across Louisville that was set to get underway in October is put on hold. [WLKY]

Remember when this crap was attempted in Louisville? A community in Alabama is on the verge of banning saggy pants — and one lawmaker said it’s because God doesn’t like the look. [HuffPo]

Students who attend New Albany/Floyd County schools will now be drug tested if the school decides there is individualized reasonable suspicion a student is participating in drug or alcohol use. [WAVE3]

Politicians are suddenly eager to disown failed policies on American prisons, but they have failed to reckon with the history. [The Atlantic]

Louisville is on the verge of joining a select few cities boasting a coveted technology service. Google Fiber representatives will spend the next several months exploring the feasibility of installing ultra-fast fiber Internet connectivity in the city. [WFPL]

President Obama on Saturday abandoned his two-year effort to have the government create a system that explicitly rates the quality of the nation’s colleges and universities, a plan that was bitterly opposed by presidents at many of those institutions. [NY Times]

More than 80 percent of construction companies are having a hard time finding qualified workers, according to a survey of 1,386 companies by Associated General Contractors of America. [Business First]

A project that will continue the transformation of the former Value City Furniture property in Clarksville is nearly complete, and it now has a name. [News & Tribune]

Fighting Over Grass As Folks Go Hungry

Some say growing grass on abandoned properties in Louisville is a growing problem. [WDRB]

Jack Conway went to western Louisville on Saturday and promised that he would appoint African Americans to the University of Louisville’s board of trustees if he were elected governor. [C-J/AKN]

The oil bust has been largely a supply-driven phenomenon. Unlike the last time that oil prices were this low — during the 2008-2009 financial crisis — this past year’s price collapse has not been because of destruction in demand, but due to too much supply. [WHAS11]

While standardbreds took to the track outside during Red Mile’s regular meet Saturday night, fans of casino gaming took their seats inside for the historic track’s first night of slots-style wagering. [H-L]

Who knew this was a thing? A crowd favorite returned to the Ohio River along Waterfront Park Saturday. A team from Waggener High School was one of 30 teams competing in the Annual Dragon Boat Festival. [WLKY]

Kamilah Brock says the New York City police sent her to a mental hospital for a hellish eight days, where she was forcefully injected with powerful drugs, essentially because they couldn’t believe a black woman owned a BMW. [HuffPo]

With the stroke of a paintbrush, a west Louisville man is transforming shoes. Dinero Andretti creates custom artwork for any shoe and any customer. Some customers have requested specific designs for causes. [WAVE3]

Hidden in the haze of the petrochemical plants and beyond the seemingly endless traffic jams, a Texas city has grown so large that it is poised to pass Chicago as the third biggest in the United States in the next decade. [Reuters]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is looking into concerns that deliberate and systemic bias pollute the process of allocating funds associated with the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, as more than $300,000 allocated for the program this year went unused. [WFPL]

Governor Steve Beshear announced today that U.S. Deputy Secretary of Transportation Victor Mendez, a champion for the nation’s vital transportation infrastructure, will visit Louisville next week to speak to an automotive conference and to view progress on the downtown Ohio River bridge project. [Press Release]

Louisvillians are practically salivating for a major-league sports team to support. [Business First]

Most employee positions or big purchases, with an exception for public safety, will not yet be approved for next year’s budget, but the Jeffersonville City Council is still discussing what’s to come during its annual budget workshops. [News & Tribune]

The Fun Shootings Move To Old Louisville

Louisville Metro Police have a new way for the public to file complaints against it’s officers. [WDRB]

For thousands of people in Jefferson County, the public school system was desegregated 40 years ago simply to fulfill a court order. But for supporters, it was a remedy to inequalities between poor, predominantly black schools in the city of Louisville — where some teachers even had to check out a pair of scissors to use for a couple of hours because there weren’t enough to go around — and the mostly white and wealthy schools in Jefferson County. [C-J/AKN]

A local preservation group has filed to make the old Louisville Water Company building a historic landmark, WHAS has learned. [WHAS11]

If an industry can’t function without the backup of casino-style gambling, maybe it’s time to move on? Horse track operators and breeders are concerned the good times might be trotting to a close as some states move to rein in a lucrative subsidy that’s helped prop up their long suffering-industry. [H-L]

One person was injured in a shooting early Wednesday morning in Old Louisville. The shooting happened shortly before 3 a.m. in the 300 block of East St. Catherine Street. [WLKY]

Sorry, folks, please stop asking, not interested in writing about Kim Davis. A link is about all you’re gonna get. George Steele, mayor of Grayson, said the national spotlight here has been an economic boost to the small town he governs, however, he realizes some residents wish the attention would be directed elsewhere. [Ashland Independent]

If you aren’t on board with this plan, something is wrong with you. Louisville’s Russell neighborhood is about to get connected. [WAVE3]

According to a new report from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, racial bias can affect the likelihood of people pulling the trigger of a gun—even if shooters don’t realize they were biased to begin with. Researchers found that, in studies conducted over the past decade, participants were more likely to shoot targets depicting black people than those depicting white people. [Mother Jones]

The cauldron of Kentucky politics was dramatically exposed this week for the whole world to see. [WFPL]

On Thursday, the U.S. Department of Education issued a progress report for those seeking student debt relief who say they were defrauded by their for-profit colleges, but for many former students, the process may drag out for a long time. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville’s largest auto dealership has been sold for an undisclosed amount. We’re mentioning this again because it’s an opportunity to tell you that Jim Bruggers has jokes and you should try to find them on the Twitter. [Business First]

As part of an ongoing effort to raise awareness of human sex trafficking across the state, Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller visited the Clark County Youth Shelter & Family Services facility in Jeffersonville on Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Russell’s A Start And A Big Step Forward

The number of people being shot in Louisville is on the rise, according to Louisville Metro Police. [WDRB]

Imagine a solar city in a leading coal state. Increasingly, advocates and some public officials are doing just that in Louisville, as the price of using the sun to keep the lights on continues to fall. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out about what James Procell, of UofL’s music lie-berry, discovered. [WHAS11]

Sometimes the best ideas really do come while enjoying a glass of bourbon. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands of zombies took over the Highlands on Saturday night, but it’s what some of the undead left behind that has neighbors upset. [WLKY]

Louisville is the 4th-most segregated city in America (or the metro area is), apparently, and no one wants to talk about it. When are we going to talk about it? Or are we always just going to hold feel-good events and talk about puppies and rainbows on the teevee instead of trying to improve life for people living in the West End? [HuffPo]

We often hear the stories of homicide victims, but the stories of people who actually survive violent attacks often are left untold. [WAVE3]

The phrase “police militarization” conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. [NPR]

In about a month, Metropolitan Sewer District officials will wrap up a short-term program aimed at buying out homeowners whose houses flood frequently. [WFPL]

The national campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, runs through Labor Day weekend and is aimed at reducing deaths and injuries caused by motorists driving drunk or impaired by drugs. During the 2014 Labor Day holiday, there were six alcohol-related highway deaths on Kentucky roadways. Statewide, law enforcement officers arrested 55 people for DUI during that same time period. The 2015 Labor Day enforcement period begins at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept.4 and extends through Monday, Sept. 7 at 11:59 p.m. [Press Release]

Revitalizing Russell — once a bustling economic center in West Louisville — has been a hot topic for some community leaders for years. But the buzz seems to be increasing lately as several projects have committed substantial investment to the neighborhood. [Business First]

Jeffersonville Parks Authority President Ed Zastawny says he wants the public to know the city only had an issue maintaining the 10th Street medians once the Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission stopped taking care of them early last year. [News & Tribune]

Your Good Morning Grass & Jay Walking

You may have noticed some grass around Louisville standing taller than people. Lots of people complained about the eyesore and even called it a hazard, so we asked the city what is taking so long to get it cut. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Council members ripped into Mayor Greg Fischer’s office on Tuesday afternoon about the lack of prompt grass cutting at city parks and medians along major thoroughfares. [C-J/AKN]

There are around 1,000 school bus drivers carrying tens of thousands of Jefferson County Public School students during the school year. Officials say sometimes an office mistake can happen. [WHAS11]

In the early 1880s, James M. Bond walked from Barbourville to Berea, leading a young steer that he sold to pay for tuition. Bond, who was born into slavery, graduated from Berea and later from Oberlin College with a divinity degree. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! And it’s Metro Council, not City Council. [WLKY]

A year ago, after 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, police responded to even peaceful daytime protests in the St. Louis suburb by deploying attack dogs and tactical vehicles, pointing sniper rifles at peaceful protesters, arresting people for simply standing still on public sidewalks, flooding demonstrators with tear gas — often without warning — and shooting them with bean bags, wooden pellets and balls filled with pepper spray. [HuffPo]

Louisville is one of the states with the highest number of pedestrian related crashes in the country, according to Louisville Metro Police Department Sgt. Ruby Ellison. [WAVE3]

The phone rings just as Katrina Fingerson and Latoya McClary are about to leave to start their shift at the Goddard Riverside Community Center. [ThinkProgress]

General Electric said Monday it is unveiling a new top-load washing machine design that will mark the biggest new product launch in its laundry division in two decades. [WFPL]

The poor are treated like human ATM machines, and our politicians are actively encouraging their exploitation. In the 1960s, the Lyndon Johnson administration launched an official War on Poverty. Needless to say, poverty has emerged victorious. [Salon]

An old distillery in Kentucky soon will start spirits production again. In May 2014, Peristyle LLC announced plans to restore and reopen the historic Old Taylor Distillery in Woodford County. Work has been taking place at the facility since. [Business First]

An ordinance adopting an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration from the Clark County health officer was formally passed Thursday evening at a county commissioners meeting. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

No Puppies & Rainbows This Morning

The Clark County Sheriff suspended the county jail’s work program after investigators uncovered a plan to deliver drugs and cell phones to inmates involved. [WDRB]

Upset over plans to build methane plants in residential neighborhoods, the Coalition for Sustainable West Louisville announced Tuesday that it is calling for a boycott of suppliers of the planned food hub on 30th Street. [C-J/AKN]

This is worth reviewing again. The Century Foundation released a report that puts Louisville as the tenth worst city in the US for concentrated black poverty. [WHAS11]

Let’s all just bite our tongues and allow our eyes to roll back in our heads. Democratic state Treasurer Todd Hollenbach was the odd man out of statewide elections this year, unable to seek re-election because of term limits while some of the biggest names in Kentucky politics are campaigning for governor and attorney general. But the 55-year-old hopes to stay in public office as he filed Tuesday to run for district judge in the 30th judicial district of Jefferson County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WLKY]

An ambitious pilot program to help former chronically homeless people in Utah has proven to be successful despite some legal challenges. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. Maybe Emperor Fischer can appoint someone just as incompetent as Sadiqa Reynolds to figure this out. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, whose campaign is struggling with deep fundraising and organizational problems, has fixated on throwing grenades at GOP frontrunner Donald Trump, hardly the strategy of a thriving campaign. [Politico]

A new, more rigorous version of the GED test has led to a dramatic drop in the number of Kentuckians receiving a high school equivalency diploma. Final numbers from the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education show there were 1,663 GED diplomas awarded in the 2015 fiscal year. That’s down from 7,083 — a 77 percent decline — in 2014, and a drop of 81 percent in 2013, the last full year the old version of the test was used. [WFPL]

Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin and the state House GOP caucus are calling for de-funding of Planned Parenthood in Kentucky. But Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear and his health secretary say the Republicans don’t understand how federally funded family planning and women’s health services work. [Richmond Register]

A new Securities and Exchange Commission filing shows that Humana Inc. started pursuing a partner in October, and Aetna Inc. wasn’t the first to be involved. [Business First]

While some city leaders touted the health of New Albany’s tax-increment financing districts Tuesday, State Rep. Ed Clere warned spending TIF dollars on projects such as an aquatic center could leave taxpayers “swimming in debt.” [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]