Compassionate City: MURDER DEATH

A mission of the Hope by Hope organization is to let kids know that somebody loves them. [WDRB]

Metro planners have scheduled same-day, zoning-related public hearings for two major developments, one for Louisville’s second Costco store on Bardstown Road at the former Showcase Cinemas site and the other to allow a makeover of The 800 Apartments just south of downtown. [C-J/AKN]

Restaurant managers near Whiskey Row said having the street shut down all week was tough on business. [WHAS11]

The Davies household is like any other with small children and working parents at 5:30 p.m. — 10-month-old Caroline scoots across the floor; Kate, almost 3, looks frantically for her baby doll while their parents deal with dinner-making, dog-walking and bedtime-starting. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! THEY STILL DON’T REALIZE THEY’RE HOGGING YOUR DATA! It’s estimated that more than 20,000 children in Louisville have a parent in jail. [WLKY]

Police departments across the country that have spent years boasting about plummeting crime numbers are now scrambling to confront something many agencies have not seen in decades: more bloodshed. [HuffPo]

Five homicides in a five-day period earlier this week continues a violent 2015 in Louisville, and the increase in the city’s homicide rate is part of trend in major U.S. cities. [WAVE3]

The civil suit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky on behalf of four Rowan County couples, two same-gender couples and two opposite-gender couples, against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and the county will be heard for a preliminary injunction hearing on Monday, July 13 at noon in U.S. District Court in Ashland. [The Morehead News]

Kentucky’s electricity generation landscape will look drastically different in the next five years, as coal-fired power plants retire or convert to natural gas. [WFPL]

The result of this is an incessantly repeating argument where a Black person says “Racism still exists. It is real,” and a white person argues “You’re wrong, I’m not racist at all. I don’t even see any racism.” [Click the Clicky]

Hilliard Lyons will provide training to its advisers in a series of six-month training modules taught by faculty of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. [Business First]

The town’s planning and zoning department finally got the go-ahead at Monday’s town council meeting to begin work on the first comprehensive plan update Clarksville has implemented in 23 years. [News & Tribune]

All Of The Most Compassionate Deaths

Even before a pontoon boat struck a barge on the Ohio River on July 4, killing five people in Louisville, Kentucky was on pace to have the most boating-related deaths since 2010, federal and state data show. [WDRB]

Lawyers for the Sierra Club and LG&E on Thursday argued for two hours over the meaning the word “occasional” in a federal court hearing stemming from a pollution lawsuit filed last year involving the Mill Creek power plant. [C-J/AKN]

The NAACP is calling out the governor for his decision to not reappoint the only African-American of UofL’s Board of Trustees. Raoul Cunningham said this makes the first time in 45 years that there is not an African-American on the 17-member board. [WHAS11]

If this is the worst thing Kentucky Democrats can come up with, they probably ought to just hand over the governor’s mansion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! One week after flames tore through a building in Old Louisville, more information on the investigation has been released. [WLKY]

Kim Davis is officially a national embarrassment. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School teacher has been fired following an investigation into a inappropriate relationship with a student. [WAVE3]

Heroin use in the US has surged in the past decade as experts say people using opioid painkillers are increasingly turning to heroin as a cheaper high. [BBC]

Health officials, confronted with a shocking increase in heroin abuse, are developing a clearer picture of who is becoming addicted to this drug and why. The results may surprise you. [WFPL]

There’s reason to celebrate declines in deaths from colon cancer in the United States — unless you live in three areas that are still lagging behind, a new report finds. Hint: This is bad news for Kentucky. [CBS News]

Kentucky’s Innovation Center, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, announced that it is in the process of transforming a rundown nightclub spot at 252 E. Market St. into a new home for Code Louisville, a code training program operated by KentuckianaWorks, and a new coding boot camp run by The Learning House Inc., an education technology provider. [Business First]

This is a thing you should do in Indiana. On Saturday, July 11, the Georgetown Twin Drive-In Theater is opening its gates to four-legged family members, allowing dogs on a leash to attend for a $2 admission fee. [News & Tribune]

How’d The Gays Ruin Your Life???

An attorney whose job in Jefferson County Public Schools’ central office was eliminated has been hired as a teacher at Central High School and will earn $84,000 – double the salary of a starting educator — despite not yet having teaching credentials. [WDRB]

Since becoming Chief of Police in 2012, serving the community where I first began as a young patrol officer in Western Louisville in 1980, I have strived to create a police force that is engaged and involved in the city; one that reflects the very people we serve. [C-J/AKN]

The thing no one wants to talk about: the highly-paid lobbyist behind all of this. [WHAS11]

With his campaign deep in debt, Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin is trying to make new friends among Kentucky’s well-heeled donor class. At a private reception in Lexington Monday night, Bevin joined Republican presidential candidate and Florida U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, the Philadelphia 76ers’ Nerlens Noel and some of the state’s top political donors at an event organized by Lexington power couple Kelly Knight and Joe Craft. [H-L]

The gays totally ruined your life again this week. [WLKY]

If you want to silence a black person’s pain, ask for forgiveness. We’re accustomed to our screams being hushed in the wake of tragedy. We’re accustomed to our grief being shoved aside in the rush to find mercy for those who have trespassed against us. [HuffPo]

About 30 same-sex couples have completed the paperwork for a marriage license through the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office in the three business days since the United States Supreme Court declared same-sex marriage bans a violation of equal protections guaranteed through the Constitution’s 14th Amendment. [WAVE3]

The U.S. sued to block Electrolux AB’s $3.3 billion proposed takeover of General Electric Co.’s appliance business. [Bloomberg]

Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, a high-profile group riddled in the past year by tensions over President James Ramsey’s management style and sharing of information. [WFPL]

Data from Kentucky’s 446 public water systems shows they consistently produce excellent quality water and are nearly always in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water requirements, according to the Kentucky annual Drinking Water Report. The report summarizes the compliance data and status of public water system compliance monitoring results. [Energy & Environment Cabinet]

The parent company of The Courier-Journal and WHAS-TV split on Monday to form two new publicly traded companies: TEGNA Inc. and Gannett Co. Inc. [Business First]

Harrison County Council became the second county to sign a resolution in support of a regional development initiative Monday night, exactly two weeks after Clark County Council denied the same resolution to join formal discussions. [News & Tribune]

But We Can’t Come Up With WIC Funds

Aetna Inc., the second-largest U.S. health insurer by market value, is closing in on an acquisition of Humana Inc. and could reach a deal as early as this weekend, several people with knowledge of the matter said. [Bloomberg]

A man is found dead in the middle of the street in a quiet Fern Creek neighborhood. [WDRB]

But we can’t afford WIC programs… Louisville waterfront officials have cobbled together just over $500,000 that will go for major enhancements around the Big Four Bridge on the Kentucky shore. [C-J/AKN]

People are freaking out about the sighting of a bear. [WHAS11]

The U.S. Supreme Court could issue a decision on Kentucky’s same-sex marriage ban as soon as Thursday, but Kentucky officials are staying mum on what, if any, preparations they’ve made if the justices vote to allow gay marriage. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Everybody is freaking out about some clouds. [WLKY]

A former Baltimore police sergeant took to Twitter Wednesday to air a stunning list of acts he said he participated in and witnessed during his 11 years on the city’s force. [HuffPo]

The giant hole in the ground where a couple of old buildings used to stand on Third Street makes it clear: Nothing is getting in the way of the new $300 million Omni Hotel project, not even the historic Louisville Water Company building. [WAVE3]

Racehorses are continuing to get quicker, a study of winning times spanning 165 years of racing indicates. [BBC]

Halfway into its first year, Louisville city officials and residents say a plastic bag ban for yard waste has been met with a surprisingly positive reception. [WFPL]

More Americans are renting — and paying more — as homeownership falls. [NY Times]

Names, birth dates, addresses and Social Security numbers may have been exposed after hackers gained access to classified Clarksville Town Court records Tuesday, a judge says. [Business First]

Less than 48 hours after nine black men and women were murdered inside a house of worship, prayers of encouragement, forgiveness and mercy were offered in the midst of a church that provided slaves safe passage during the Civil War. [News & Tribune]

Even Bill Lamb Calls Letter Absurd

Conservative Bill Lamb is causing racist white peoples’ heads to explode. When Bill Lamb is on the same side as Attica Scott when it comes to the FOP’s threatening letter? All hell is gonna break loose. [WDRB]

A joint interim Kentucky legislative committee called Wednesday for updating the rules governing property tax assessments while questioning Jefferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer about whether his office is examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

efferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer appeared Wednesday morning before a legislative panel at Kentucky’s Capitol to explain and defend his office’s valuation practices. [WHAS11]

Pope Francis’ call for urgent action to combat climate change isn’t having much influence on members of Congress from the coal state of Kentucky, who are working this week to block the centerpiece of the president’s agenda to limit the greenhouse gases that are warming the planet. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Council’s budget committee voted to add more than $5 million for road repairs. [WLKY]

Those who believe slavery was not a central point of conflict in the Civil War may wish to peruse the South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi and Texas declarations of secession. Those documents all explicitly cite threats to slavery as reasons for secession. Mississippi’s declaration goes so far as to say that “a blow at slavery is a blow at commerce and civilization.” [HuffPo]

Critics are questioning lawmakers jumping on the anti-confederate bandwagon and the president of the NAACP Kentucky State Conference and Louisville Chapter Raoul Cunningham said he’s just fine with that. [WAVE3]

The old gay Louisville. A writer returns to the city where he was raised—and exiled—to find what was lost when gay life entered the mainstream. [TNR]

The Louisville Metro Tree Commission holds its final meeting this evening and is expected to vote on a draft ordinance that could create a new tree commission and new city policies for tree management. [WFPL]

An overwhelming majority of Americans say they believe protests against unfair government treatment make the United States a better country. Unless, that is, the protesters are black. [WaPo]

For Tim Gramig, a longtime broker Louisville’s commercial real estate market, opportunity has knocked twice this year. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan failed to sign an ordinance calling for certain financial information be provided to the New Albany City Council at the last meeting of each month. In response, the council voted unanimously Thursday to again approve the measure, and thus overrode the pocket veto of Gahan. A pocket veto occurs when an executive takes no action on a bill as opposed to an outright veto of the measure. [News & Tribune]