History Ignored In Compassionate Land

Two years ago the University of Louisville, Metro Council, Mayor’s Office and the Downtown Development Corporation unveiled some historic markers downtown.

The markers, designed by renowned sculptor Ed Hamilton, were to be placed at sites denoting locations of sit-ins on 4th Street.

Here’s a look back at the event:


CLICK FOR ORIGINAL EVENT INVITATION

Here we are in 2015.

Discarded to make way for what is presumed to be an Embassy Suites parking lot:


FROM FACEBOOK

We reached out to Greg Fischer’s folks last night to find out what’s going on. You know we’re not going to sugar-coat anything, so here’s the deal: they lied, had no idea what was going on, claimed they’d received no communication on the matter.

But here’s the deal. This issue has been quietly bubbling up over the past few days and several elected officials have received emails and telephone calls about the destruction of history. People like David Tandy, Tom Owen, other council members and Greg Fischer.

Here’s a taste of the messages they’re receiving:

I am deeply disturbed that the marker commemorating the civil rights era sit-ins on Fourth Street sits with some trash leaning against a building. These markers were initiated by the late Dr. J Blaine Hudson and designed by Ed Hamilton. Reportedly this is to make way for a parking lot for the Embassy Suites hotel. For a long time now there have been complaints of routine racial profiling and discrimination against African Americans on Fourth Street Live. This development adds insult to injury and is unacceptable. This is shameful and I would like to know how you will address this outrage.

Claiming there’s nothing to see here, move along, just business as usual? Seems fitting. Particularly in light of the non-stop discrimination and racial profiling going on at 4th Street Live.

Maybe someone will finally stand up to the Fischer steamroller and force his team to think before acting. Maybe someone like Christy Brown will finally chastise Fischer publicly instead of behind closed doors. Maybe David Tandy, who is in part responsible for the Cordish mess, will have the sense to say something profound?

Possibility City. Compassionate City. Buzzwords.

Pretty sad. It’ll be whitewashed in 3, 2…

Glad A Local Will Be Your Governator?

Portland neighbors say they’re drowning in water bills that are twice the normal cost. The problems on one block uncovered a bigger issue for Louisville Water Company customers. [WDRB]

Which David Jones crony will get the job this time? Weeks after Superintendent Donna Hargens informed Helene Kramer that her contract was not being renewed, Jefferson County Public Schools has posted the position for its chief communications and community relations officer. [C-J/AKN]

Firefighters, police and Animal Control entered a home in the 2200 block of Beargrass Avenue just off Bardstown Road after hearing from multiple neighbors Tuesday. Neighbors were concerned after finding pet abandonment notices on the door, overgrown weeds in the yard and hearing constant barking inside the home. [WHAS11]

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five greater Clark County schools may close as part of a plan the superintendent believes will help the district. [WLKY]

A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives wants to stop poor people from buying junk food with food stamps. [HuffPo]

Some people are just the absolute worst. [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering what really happened to Jamie Comer in the gubernatorial primary? It’s much more simple than he would have you believe. [Page One]

Once again, Louisville has ranked poorly on the annual ranking of city park systems from a national group. [WFPL]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

Too many tables and too little kitchen space — that’s been a pain point for Big Four Burgers & Beer in Jeffersonville since it opened in December 2013. [Business First]

Samuel pointed to tattoos on his forearms and chest to count how many times he’s been incarcerated in Clark County jail. [News & Tribune]

Tolling Secrecy Is SOP In Possibility City

If you missed it last night, Jamie Comer’s career officially ended. [Page One from C-J/AKN]

A Louisville lawmaker has asked Attorney General Jack Conway to decide if the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet followed public records law when it refused to release a study on easing bridge tolls on low-income drivers. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro police are investigating separate fatal shootings from Saturday, both involving men in their 20s. [C-J/AKN]

The HIV public awareness campaign, You Are Not Alone, is now being expanded to include messages aimed at reaching travelers and truck drivers along Interstate-65 between Louisville and Indianapolis. The messages encourage drivers to know their HIV status and to protect themselves by avoiding risky sexual behavior. [WHAS11]

Blake Johnson, 16, who identifies as gay, said when he attended last year’s Pride Prom, an annual event for high school students, “I was surrounded by people like me.” [H-L]

Three people have been arrested and charged in connection with a homicide on Derby night. [WLKY]

Famously animal-loving Jon Stewart is said to have bought a farm in New Jersey, for purposes of giving home to rescued farm animals. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? [WAVE3]

“It’s a lot of fun,” House Speaker Greg Stumbo said of the four-way GOP primary. Gov. Steve Beshear added: “They’re having a good time it looks like among the four of them going back and forth.” [CN|Toot]

Here’s your political duh moment. Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul’s efforts to appeal to minority voters hit a rough patch over the past week. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left intact New Jersey’s ban on counseling intended to change the sexual orientation of gay children. [Reuters]

Fresh off a record attendance at the Kentucky Derby on Saturday, a new report has found that the state’s tourism industry continues to grow. [Business First]

Questions surrounding the legality of a signage campaign against the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s referendum may end with a complaint filed with the state Election Division. [News & Tribune]

Friday Was An Arena News Dump Day

A Bullitt County official has been taken off the job over accusations that he made racist and sexist remarks, as well as claims that he mistreated employees, and the animals he was supposed to care for. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority that operates the KFC Yum! Center doesn’t have to fork over $7.5 million to the Kentucky State Fair Board to compensate it for business the board lost at Freedom Hall after the new downtown arena opened in 2010. Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s office released a letter Friday expressing what it termed an informal opinion that the arena authority isn’t obligated to pay that sum. [C-J/AKN]

Police are conducting a death investigation in the Parkland neighborhood after a body was found in a vehicle early Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

State officials approved at or near maximum tuition increases at four state universities Friday amid a heated GOP primary for governor where the candidates have lamented the escalating cost of college. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Mother Nature was smiling as perfect weather allowed hundreds of thousands lined both sides of the Ohio River for Thunder Over Louisville 2015. [WLKY]

An HIV outbreak in southeastern Indiana related to abuse of intravenous prescription drugs has jumped by 24 cases in the past week, an increase attributed to offering more testing resources, state health officials said on Friday. [HuffPo]

All across the country the use of body cameras continues to be a hot topic. In Louisville it will be more than just a conversation, it will be a pilot project beginning in June. [WAVE3]

California resident Gerilynn Aflleje was horrified when her 4-year-old Siberian Husky mix was killed by a local animal shelter over $180 in fees that she couldn’t afford. [CNN Money]

In its first 10 days, more than 40 people used a new needle exchange program in the Southern Indiana county struggling with an HIV crisis linked to intravenous drug use. [WFPL]

On Friday, Steve Beshear appointed Debbie King to replace her husband on the Arena Authority. Which… well… you thought Jim was secretive? Wait til you meet Debbie. Though, she’s super-nice and not even we dislike her. [Press Release]

Hardin County-based Boundary Oak Distillery plans to expand in Radcliff. [Business First]

It was the only invocation spoken aloud, as New Albany resident Melanie Adams offered a prayer during the public comments portion of Thursday’s city council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Needle Exchanges Are A Big No-Brainer

The Hertz Investment Group, a California company that owns office buildings around the country, pocketed $14.25 million this month when it sold the Starks building in downtown Louisville, according to a deed filed Friday with the Jefferson County Clerk’s office. [WDRB]

“I am offended. … I am deeply offended that they would be victimized by an individual and express some kind of fear of all black men,” he said. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another Jefferson County Public Schools bus crash. [WHAS11]

Venturing into the epicenter of Kentucky’s fight against heroin addiction, national drug czar Michael Botticelli on Thursday touted needle-exchange programs as effective grassroots initiatives to combat the spread of infectious disease and to steer heroin users into treatment. [H-L]

A new plea deal could mean former Clark County Sheriff Danny Rodden will avoid imprisonment. [WLKY]

When Rand Paul announced his candidacy for president last week, he declared his plans to help America “take our country back.” Singer-songwriter Jill Sobule has an important question for the 2016 contender: “What the fuck do you mean?” [HuffPo]

Louisville is becoming known for pedestrian deaths and school bus accidents. Looks like Indiana/I-65 are gonna become known for bus crashes. [WAVE3]

The Commonwealth of Kentucky has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) seeking competitive proposals from Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) to coordinate the healthcare services provided to more than 1.1 million Kentuckians who have met eligibility requirements and are enrolled in either traditional Medicaid or Medicaid expansion. The current contracts with Anthem, Aetna (Coventry Cares), Humana (CareSource), Passport and Wellcare are set to expire on June 30, 2015. The new contracts will take effect July 1, 2015. [Press Release]

Louisville Metro Council members want to start a needle exchange program in the city. [WFPL]

Look what the Kentucky Baptist Convention bigots are up to these days. Promoting their bigoted Sunrise Children’s Services scam. [Ashland Independent]

Louisville is No. 46 on a list of the most literate cities, according to a recent report that measures literacy based on the number of local bookstores, residents’ educational levels, access to Internet and library resources, and newspaper circulation. [Business First]

It’s “civic prayer” versus the Lord’s Prayer, as the New Albany City Council will be presented with dueling resolutions that call for changes to the moment of reflection at the start of each meeting. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is In The National Spotlight Again

It has been 10 years since the exterior of Louisville’s U.S. Marine Hospital in the Portland neighborhood was restored, but the inside remains unfinished. [WDRB]

Violent crime in Louisville was up about 10 percent in 2014, breaking a downward trend the city had seen since 2012, police data shows. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out… President Barack Obama will be coming to Louisville April 2. [WHAS11]

“I’m going to move on my casino bill and ask for hearings on it during the interim. It’s part of my personal agenda,” Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said after the 2015 session ended. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Fifteen people have been charged as the result of a major securities fraud investigation conducted by the Indiana Securities Commission and announced Monday by Floyd County prosecutor Keith Henderson. [WLKY]

A new Virginia law may put PETA’s high-kill animal shelter out of the euthanasia business. [HuffPo]

Police are investigating a homicide after a man was found shot to death in a car. [WAVE3]

Ever since a court forced them to integrate in the 1970s, the city of Louisville and surrounding Jefferson County have tried to maintain diverse schools. [The Atlantic]

The Louisville Metropolitan Service Area’s population has increased by 2.8 percent since 2010, according to U.S. Census data released Thursday. “Most of the growth is happening on the periphery,” he said. “If you were in, what we call, the city, you’re not seeing any change at all.” [WFPL]

Democrats are apparently seething over this one. A Louisville woman has been appointed to serve on the newly created National Women’s History Museum Commission. Bridget Bush, a lawyer, was appointed by Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell. [WLEX18]

$2.1 billion. That’s how much revenue Louisville-based Humana Inc. garnered from provider services — that is, services provided by doctors or other health care professionals —in 2014, according to its latest financial statement. [Business First]

“Get your bearings, Marine.” It’s the only phrase that can steady Cpl. Jerry Rochefort when he is on the verge of a psychogenic seizure, borne from the military service that causes his episodes. [News & Tribune]

Bonus: Another day, another JCPS school bus accident. [More WLKY]

Crisis In Southern Indiana Highlights Importance Of Needle Exchanges

Officials are now calling the HIV outbreak in southern Indiana an epidemic. [WDRB]

Are you excited for the beginning of the Kentucky Derby Festival? Get ready. It’s almost here. [C-J/AKN]

The area’s first organized walk to end discrimination and bullying took place Wednesday evening at Louisville’s Big Four Bridge. [WHAS11]

Members of the NAACP in Lexington are raising questions about how Fayette County Public Schools distributes money to individual schools and about the district’s minority hiring rates. [H-L]

Sounds like these kids need to be in charge of UofL’s actual finances. Maybe they could stop the unbelievable swindling of tens of millions of dollars right under Jim Ramsey’s knowing nose. Some business students from the University of Louisville are participating next month in the national level of a global financial analysis competition. [WLKY]

Gary Fury was working at a Simonton Windows factory in West Virginia in July 2012 when a large two-window unit slipped to the floor. [ProPublica]

It’s not the picture of Louisville many people want to see – garbage and litter lining the interstates and expressways into town. [WAVE3]

Kentucky is apparently the 8th-worst state for retirement. Which shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. [Bankrate]

Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District Board has voted to change the way the agency disposes of surplus property. The board voted unanimously to adopt the modifications to MSD’s policies on Monday. [WFPL]

The Early Childhood Profiles, produced by the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics (KCEWS), are compiled to help community leaders, Community Early Childhood Councils and school districts with data to assist in developing local strategies for helping every child in their community arrive at kindergarten ready to do kindergarten work. [Click the Clicky]

A $30 million upscale student housing complex is slated to open by fall 2016 at the northwest corner of South Floyd Street and East Brandeis Avenue near the University of Louisville. [Business First]

Donors are still being sought, but statewide, community foundations have reached the halfway point in a funding drive to match a Lilly Endowment Inc. grant worth up to $66 million. [News & Tribune]

Ford Motor Co said on Wednesday it is recalling more than 220,000 vehicles in North America for potential issues with door handles, vacuum pump relays and sensors. [Reuters]