Why Is Bullitt County Still So Awful?

Kentucky State Police are now investigating the Bullitt County Animal Shelter.Shelter employee Delsie Williams says Kentucky State Police came to her Mt. Washington home on Monday afternoon with a search warrant. She says they took her cell phone, hard drive, laptops, desktop computers and other items. Her attorney tells WDRB he’s still trying to figure out the reason. [WDRB]

The city’s codes and regulations department hit Louisville metro government with a “public nuisance” violation for a piece of property it owns. In a Jan. 23 notice, a city inspector found the historic Colonial Garden sites in south Louisville had “several rotten structural beams” and that “all exterior surfaces need to be put into good repair.” [C-J/AKN]

A fundraiser will take place Wednesday at Spinelli’s Pizzeria in Downtown Louisville for an employee who was stabbed while delivering pizza to Norton Hospital. [WHAS11]

Kentucky has taken steps to prohibit electioneering on public property within 100 feet of polling places for the May 19 primary election. [H-L]

Visitation will be held Thursday for U.S. District Judge John Heyburn. [WLKY]

Food stamp recipients are more likely to be obese than the general population, according to new research from the federal government. [HuffPo]

The childhood home of Muhammad Ali will be restored, it’s new owner promises. George Bochetto, an attorney from Philadelphia, has bought half of the home and now shares ownership with real estate investor, Jared Weiss, of Las Vegas. [WAVE3]

Last year’s bid to undo Obama’s immigration actions deemed a failure, time to move on to other priorities. [Politico]

The Jefferson County Board of Education is seeking residents’ input on the shaping of the district’s five-year strategic plan. [WFPL]

Parents worry about a child getting a concussion in the heat of competition, but they also need to be thinking about what happens during practices, a study finds. High school and college football players are more likely to suffer a concussion during practices than in a game, according a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. [NPR]

Back in September, Sweden-based AB Electrolux announced plans to acquire GE Appliances, a Louisville-based division of General Electric Co., for $3.3 billion. At the time, officials with both companies speculated that the transaction would close in 2015, after making its way through the regulatory process. [Business First]

With eyes on the six months ahead, Mayor Mike Moore and City Councilman Dennis Julius are poised to battle for the mayor’s seat in November. [News & Tribune]

It’s Oaks Day So You’re Already Tanked

Here’s your weekly oh snap moment… WAVE 3 anchor Dawne Gee has filed a lawsuit against Baptist Health Louisville over alleged “negligent” treatment she received last May. [WDRB]

If GLI supports the JCPS shakeup, you can bet it’s an absolute disaster. [C-J/AKN]

The post-position draw happened at Churchill Downs on April 29. The Kentucky Derby will happen on May 2. [WHAS11]

Get a glimpse backside as Kentucky Derby contenders work out and clean up. [H-L]

The body of a man missing since February has been found in a truck along Southern Parkway. [WLKY]

Feds pay for drug fraud: 92 percent of foster care, poor kids prescribed antipsychotics get them for unaccepted uses. [HuffPo]

During any other week twenty flights would make a busy day for Atlantic Aviation. However, the Thursday through Saturday of Derby week redefines wingtip-to wingtip. [WAVE3]

For a moment last year, it looked as if the Obama administration was moving toward a history-making end to the federal death penalty. [NY Times]

The Louisville Metro Council, Mayor Greg Fischer and MSD officials announced a plan this week for possibly creating a home buyout program for houses in the area that have been consistently flooded-out during the past several years. Right now, there are a slew of homeowners in flood-prone areas with flood damage they can’t repair even though they have flood insurance. [WFPL]

Looks like Jerry Abramson’s been meddling in Vermont and it didn’t go so swell. [Rutland Herald & VPR]

The University of Louisville’s entrepreneurial ecosystem just got a boost in funding and status. U of L has received a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to commercialize research. [Business First]

As Scott County enters its second month of emergency health provisions, its HIV outbreak is sounding alarms across the country for areas at risk of a similar epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Dan Johnson Got More Egg On His Face

Louisville Metro Council’s public safety committee voted Tuesday to send the implementation of a local needle exchange program to a full council vote. [WDRB]

The Transit Authority of River City plans to cut bus service on several key routes, effective Aug. 16, to save about $1.2 million next fiscal year. [C-J/AKN]

One week before their stories will be shared on the floor of the Supreme Court, half a dozen same-sex couples from Kentucky and their attorneys met to celebrate progress to this point, and what could be a historic decision that changes how marriage is recognized in America. [WHAS11]

Nine people were indicted Tuesday on charges of spiriting away what Kentucky authorities say was more bourbon whiskey than one person could drink in a lifetime. But, uh, we could definitely drink that in a lifetime. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A former Louisville Metro Police Department school resource officer accused of putting a student in a chokehold until he passed out has been indicted on some charges in the case. [WLKY]

You don’t have to stop recording police when they’re out and about in public. [HuffPo]

A controversial proposal to merge Louisville’s city and suburban fire departments is likely dead after its only sponsor took his name off the legislation. Way to go, Dan Johnston, you’re a shining star of intelligence these days. [WAVE3]

Detroit just had the single largest tax foreclosure in American history. As many as 100,000 of the city’s residents — about a seventh of the total number — are now on track for what many are calling an eviction “conveyer belt.” [Mother Jones]

The local health department in the Southern Indiana community battling an HIV outbreak has handed out thousands of needles to residents since an exchange program went into effect April 4. [WFPL]

You don’t understand the world you live in if you haven’t read Eric Lipton’s three-part series in the New York Times on the staggering “explosion” of relentless, grimy lobbying of state attorneys general. Lipton just won a Pulitzer Prize for his work, and it’s truly deserved: it’s a masterpiece of investigative reporting, built on diligent use of open records laws by Lipton and Times researchers. [The Intercept]

First Savings Bank might consolidate some of its operations and move its headquarters from Clarksville to Jeffersonville. [Business First]

To Austin High School Principal Sherman Smith, it’s just bullying on a bigger stage. [News & Tribune]

Willow Grande Just Needs To Quit It

You can thank Greg Fischer for this horrible national press. [Click the Clicky]

Kelly Downard says LG&E is misleading the public. “I’m going to outline a consistent record of misrepresentation of facts by Louisville Gas and Electric,” Downard said. “In some cases, there can be no other interpretation of statements by LG&E than the intention to mislead the public, to mislead you, and the flagrant and intentional violation of laws of the Constitution of the Commonwealth.” [WDRB]

Yet another legal challenge has been filed against the embattled Willow Grande condominium tower, this one seeking to overturn a city planning agency’s recent approval of zoning concessions for the proposed Cherokee Triangle project. [C-J/AKN]

A Jefferson County Public Schools Resource Officer and LMPD officer Jonathan Hardin, 31, was indicted April 21 in a case involving a physical confrontation with a student. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Utilities’ customers will pay more for their monthly electric bill while Louisville Electric & Gas customers will pay more for their gas bills according to a settlement reached Tuesday concerning the companies’ rate requests. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! No arrests have been made a year after the slayings of a Nelson County teacher and her teenage daughter. [WLKY]

Luisa Cintron, 25, is sitting up as straight as she can, perched on the edge of the neatly made bed that doubles as a couch inside her dimly lit apartment. She is wearing a sweater and slacks, talking about the government program that she says changed her life, and trying — without much success — not to get distracted by the 4-year-old talking loudly about Batman in the next room. [HuffPo]

Students began a sit-in Monday afternoon outside the office of University of Louisville President James Ramsey over the school’s contract with a popular apparel manufacturer. [WAVE3]

President Obama’s approval ratings have reached their highest mark in almost two years, according to a new poll from CNN/ORC. [The Hill]

Louisville Metro Council members looking into the controversial handling of an injured dog last year by Metro Animal Services said on Monday that the agency still hasn’t turned over all the requested emails and information. [WFPL]

As Earth Day approaches, a new survey shows overwhelming support from Kentuckians for environmental education, but room for improvement in residents’ environmental literacy. The Survey of Kentuckians’ Environmental Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors from the Kentucky Environmental Education Council (KECC) reveals that while 96 percent of Kentuckians believed that environmental education should be taught in schools, some basic information, such as the primary source of water pollution in Kentucky, was unknown by the majority of survey respondents, according to KEEC Executive Director Elizabeth Schmitz. [Press Release]

KentuckyOne Health Inc., operator of Jewish Hospital, University of Louisville and other facilities, is dropping its plans for a $55 million inpatient facility in Bullitt County. [Business First]

The field was narrowed down to the best 21 certified and 23 classified employees from Greater Clark County Schools, with one chosen to represent each school and building in the district as a Champion for Children. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City: Come For The Bourbon & Secrecy, Stay For The Shootings

Louisville loves a good shooting — especially if it involves a police officer. [WDRB]

Oh, look, Martha read something on The ‘Ville Voice and wrote about it again. [C-J/AKN]

If they have to ruin perfectly good bourbon with mint and sugar, at least it’s for charity. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s mayor is spending money to save buildings from the 1960s and Louisville has Greg Fischer. [H-L]

See? Another fun shooting in Possibility City! Police are investigating a shooting that sent two people to the hospital on Monday evening. [WLKY]

U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Katie Higgins’ dream as a little girl was to follow in her family’s footsteps and become a pilot. Her dream came true in 2011, when she received her wings. But last weekend, she flew even higher when she became the first female pilot with the prestigious Blue Angels. [HuffPo]

They said “Hooker Hotel” in the headline, so that’s pretty much all you need to know. Though, if they can bulldoze historic downtown properties, the least the city could do is bulldoze this joint. [WAVE3]

What, you thought merely the handful of wingnut extremists in the presidential race was enough? [The Hill]

A bad break-up about a year ago put Jewel Owens in a situation she’d never been before. [WFPL]

A mega company’s bid to change the product and flow direction of an existing natural gas pipeline is drawing the attention and concern of citizens and environmental groups across Kentucky. [The Morehead News]

Investigators say that the cost of replacing GE Appliances’ building that was destroyed by fire could reach $400 million, and they say that the fire destroyed $60 million worth of parts. [Business First]

Mayor Bob Hall says concerns about the scope of a steering committee aimed at improving the Pleasant Ridge neighborhood have given him pause in accepting an invitation to the board. [News & Tribune]

About Having Compassion For The Homeless…

The Jefferson County Board of Education is being asked by its teachers union to hold off extending the contract of Superintendent Donna Hargens to allow time for “stakeholder involvement.” [WDRB]

The animal-rights group PETA is continuing its push for federal regulators to take action against Tim Stark, a Charlestown man who has run the nonprofit organization Wildlife in Need on his property since 1999. [C-J/AKN]

Cracked and dripping ceilings – buckets litter every room. This is how Patrick Christner and Megan Tate have been spending their week post President’s Day snowstorm. [WHAS11]

Last fall, Pike County school board chairman Charles Johnson made a motion for the district to set what’s known as a “compensating” tax rate, which means property taxes would be adjusted to produce the same revenue as the year before. [H-L]

The parents of a toddler who was accidentally killed hope to build a community park in his honor. [WLKY]

The World Food Program is confronting its worst challenge since World War II in trying to tackle five top-level humanitarian crises at the same time, the head of the U.N. agency said Friday. [HuffPo]

A group of firefighters is hoping to spark a movement and inspire warm acts of kindness in the recent cold temperatures. [WAVE3]

When the season’s first cold snap hit in November, Kenneth Winfield arrived at Louisville’s St. John Center for Homeless Men — his hands icy cold after sleeping outdoors. [USA Today]

All eyes are on Kentucky’s state senators to see if they’ll move on the House’s proposed statewide smoking ban. [WFPL]

It was a short week for the Kentucky General Assembly, which canceled three days of meetings because of a severe winter storm. But while the House decided to forgo its scheduled Thursday and Friday meetings, the Senate was in session those two days. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Kentucky Retail Federation, Kentucky Restaurant Association and Louisville-based company Packaging Unlimited have filed a lawsuit that seeks to prevent Louisville from hiking its minimum wage. [Business First]

After weeks of debate and discussion, the Floyd County Election Board got exactly what it wanted. [News & Tribune]

Suck At Your Job? Get Rewarded At JCPS

The Jefferson County Board of Education is looking to extend Superintendent Donna Hargens’ contract by four years. Louisville’s wealthy electeds always reward those who bumble along. [WDRB]

A jury has awarded nearly $5 million to a courier for a Louisville law firm who suffered a traumatic brain injury when he was hit by a TARC bus. [C-J/AKN]

There was no woe on Louisville’s amazing Walnut Street in the 1950’s and early 60’s. [WHAS11]

Ann Parrish remembers trying to wrangle and bundle her two toddlers during last winter’s cold snap so they could get on a bus to find another place to stay. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian hit by a vehicle in Possibility City. [WLKY]

James Risen reiterated on Tuesday a warning about the White House that he delivered nearly one year ago. [HuffPo]

From digging out driveways to checking on area seniors Good Samaritans have been out and about performing good deeds despite the cold. [WAVE3]

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week, offering fresh evidence that the labor market was gathering steam. [Reuters]

It was about noon on Wednesday and Kenneth Williams hadn’t eaten breakfast. In fact, he hasn’t eaten since Tuesday afternoon–a peanut butter sandwich. [WFPL]

Google is warning that the government’s quiet plan to expand the FBI’s authority to remotely access computer files amounts to a “monumental” constitutional concern. [National Journal]

A Missouri real-estate developer is planning to build one of the largest industrial buildings in Jefferson County on land that it’s buying near Louisville International Airport. [Business First]

More students at Greater Clark County Schools are starting to take advantage of the state’s 21st Century Scholars program, and administrators hope to get more seventh- and eighth-graders to sign up early. [News & Tribune]