Huh? Gang Activity? What Gang Activity?

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad says the amount of violent crime in the city has increased 4.4 percent in comparison with 2015, according to the most recent data. [WDRB]

Here’s a story from a week ago that essentially got ignored. Looking to trim labor costs, Ford Motor Co. is offering hourly workers with at least 8 1/2 years of service a $70,000 lump sum payment to take a voluntary retirement or separation this year. [C-J/AKN]

Seven Counties is continuing its fight against addiction specifically with heroin and opioids. [WHAS11]

The state Senate was minutes away from adjourning Tuesday night when Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer announced that a special visitor wanted to address the chamber — Gov. Matt Bevin. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An urban farm is coming to Louisville’s Hazelwood neighborhood and taking over the former Iroquois housing site. [WLKY]

Republican front-runner Donald Trump said Tuesday he doesn’t plan to honor his pledge to support the party’s nominee for president if it’s not him. [HuffPo]

Seems like only yesterday Jerry Abramson and crew were claiming gangs were not a thing in Possibility Compassionate City. Nothing to see here, move along, puppies and rainbows. [WAVE3]

With homelessness surging and rent prices skyrocketing nationwide, one congresswoman is urging her colleagues to rapidly increase federal funding for affordable housing in hopes of stemming the tide. [ThinkProgress]

Last month, for the first time in about 15 years, Kentucky changed its fish consumption advisories. There are high levels of mercury in most of the commonwealth’s lakes and rivers. But there is a conflict between what state agencies are saying and what they’re doing: On one hand, the state is warning people not to eat large amounts of fish because it contains the toxic chemical. On the other, state agencies are suing the federal government over pollution controls that would keep mercury out of waterways in the first place. [WFPL]

Grassroots Republicans are growing frustrated with their Washington Beltway counterparts, who they think are giving up the fight for the White House. [The Hill]

HOWWWWW much money is KentuckyOne health spending on this ongoing PR campaign? It’s never-ending, apparently. [Business First]

Jim Wathen said two years ago he had an idea to stabilize Floyd County’s fiscal future — sell Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services. That idea didn’t go too far at the time. [News & Tribune]

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Frankfort Just Got Waaaaay Worse

Delores Sisson says the first jump in rent of her subsidized apartment on W. Breckinridge Street happened two years ago – rising from $358 a month in 2014 to $438 a month last year and jumping to $652 a month this year. [WDRB]

Surprise! Greg Fischer and his team are lying about something again. This time that something benefits his wealthy friends and donors but no one has the guts to call him out on it. A little more transparency — something Fischer has never taken seriously — would go a long way. [C-J/AKN]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings. Police responded to a report of a shooting in the 1700 block of Berry Boulevard around 2:30 a.m. Sunday morning. [WHAS11]

As a boxer and humanitarian, Muhammad Ali stood out. So does the bright pink home in Kentucky where he shadowboxed and played pranks on his brother. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another pedestrian killed by a train in Louisville. [WLKY]

These anti-woman efforts aren’t just taking place in Floriduh, they’re also taking places in Kentucky. And Democrats are cheering the restrictionsi along every step of the way. [HuffPo]

See? All kinds of shootings. One person was injured in a shooting on Oak Street on Sunday. [WAVE3]

Reproductive rights advocates are warning that Indiana has become one of the most dangerous states for pregnant women, thanks to the governor’s decision to approve a sweeping new anti-abortion law that combines some of the harshest attacks on reproductive rights into one piece of legislation. [ThinkProgress]

The Louisville Metro Council rejected a bid from Louisville Gas and Electric to establish a natural gas franchise agreement. [WFPL]

We’ve been leading the pack when it comes to revealing information about new scandals. Find out how to keep up. [Page One]

A developer is asking Louisville Metro government and Jefferson County Public Schools for property tax breaks worth $11.3 million over the next 20 years so it can move forward with two apartment projects planned near the intersection of Baxter Avenue and Broadway. [Business First]

A Clark County judge on Friday confirmed the appeal of a candidate challenging the outcome of the recount in the Jeffersonville City Council At-large race. [News & Tribune]

HOW Is JBS Still In The Damn News?!

Inclusivity is powerful. Much more than being just the opposite of exclusivity, it’s a distinct way of looking at the world. Its power has been revealed to me over and over in the internet business, in political campaigns, and from living in my adopted hometown of Louisville, Kentucky. [Matthew Barzun]

Seniors in Jefferson County Public Schools would graduate over a three-day period at the end of May, according to a proposal that will be up for school board approval on Tuesday, March 22. [WDRB]

Louisville Gas and Electric Company warned Mayor Greg Fischer on Monday it will stop collecting a 2 percent fee used to fund public safety and other community initiatives if a new franchise agreement cannot be reached by the end of March. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! JBS Swift plant’s plan to begin killing pigs using CO2, rather than the current method of electrocution, called for a public meeting Wednesday night. [WHAS11]

John Sanders’ room on the second floor of St. James Place is comfortable yet cramped. There is no storage space for his pots and utensils in the small kitchenette on one side of his room. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A woman was rushed to University Hospital after a shooting Wednesday night in southwest Louisville. [WLKY]

In an effort to curb America’s deadly opioid crisis, federal health officials are urging doctors to largely avoid prescribing highly addictive painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin when treating patients for chronic pain. [HuffPo]

Critics say it’s a destruction of civil rights. Supporters say it’s part of Kentucky’s constitution. Tuesday, Kentucky’s Senate has passed a bill allowing businesses to refuse service to people based on their religious beliefs in certain situation. [WAVE3]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A call this week for fiber Internet service providers to begin applying for franchise status marks the next step in Louisville’s quest to become a gigabit city. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell spoke to Donald Trump on Tuesday and recommended that the business mogul condemn violence at his rallies. [Politico]

The state of Florida has already given Humana Inc. the OK to merge with its Connecticut-based competitor, Aetna Inc. But some doctors groups aren’t so sure. [Business First]

The first phase of a project to install security cameras along Riverside Drive in Clarksville is completed and the town is ready for phase two. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Outrage Reaching Fever Pitch

Some Jefferson County Public Schools board members are raising questions about the district potentially misusing Every 1 Reads funds. Surprise! David Jones doesn’t think it’s a big deal because $420,000 to him is like $420 to you. And Allison Martin blaming someone else? No surprise there. [WDRB]

No amount of positive spin stories like these getting shopped around by people like Mark Hebert will improve UofL’s scandal-ridden mess of a leadership debacle. The University of Louisville produced 10 Fulbright scholars this school year — the same number as Stanford — and ranking it among the 42 highest universities in the United States. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Flashing red and blue lights and police choppers were all creating quite a scene at the Big Four Bridge on Saturday. [WHAS11]

An affidavit filed in federal court says the shooting of a U.S. postal worker in Louisville was the result of a drug deal. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Residents on both sides of the gun debate showed up at a committee meeting Tuesday to voice their opinion on whether guns should be allowed inside Town Hall. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell draws a fine line between their nefarious calls for delay and his wise calls for delay. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian struck on the streets of Compassionate City. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s troubled public pension funds are fighting a bill requiring them to disclose performance fees paid to outside asset managers and use more transparent methods when selecting those managers. [Reuters]

The attorney hired to represent Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky in a lawsuit over abortion services says he’ll ask a judge to dismiss the case. [WFPL]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

We at Louisville Business First often report about programs to encourage entrepreneurs in the area, and now those efforts are gaining broader attention. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman gave a shout-out to Louisville’s startup community in his Feb. 17 column. [Business First]

There was only one winner Thursday night at the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s Teacher of the Year recognition dinner. [News & Tribune]

Pedestrian Deaths, Shootings And JCPS Bus Crashes Are All The Rage In Compassionate City

No one thinks the Omni Hotel will live up to all the Fischer-pushed hype. Not even the people surrounding Fischer. [WDRB]

It’s now painfully clear that A Kentucky Newspaper’s education reporter will regurgitate whatever JCPS tells her without question. We had high hopes for her. Shame on us. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The students over at Bellarmine University are on a rescue mission. [WHAS11]

Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced Friday afternoon that he is retiring after 34 years with the agency. [H-L]

Another day, another JCPS bus crash. A Jefferson County Public Schools bus driver was injured Tuesday morning in a crash on Bardstown Road at Little Springs Boulevard, just south of the Gene Snyder Freeway. [WLKY]

The same crap is happening in Kentucky but the KDP is sitting on its hands. In South Dakota, Governor Dennis Daugaard is right this moment mulling over a bill sent to his desk by the legislature that would bar transgender students — kids often facing bullying and discrimination — from using bathrooms or locker rooms that correspond with their gender identity. [HuffPo]

Six months ago, Tracy Blue was waxing poetic about “Modern Louisville,” a new magazine geared to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communities, the fourth print venture that her husband, University of Louisville trustee Jonathan Blue launched with her listed as publisher. [WAVE3]

Over a lifetime following government and politics as a spectator and for many years as a reporter, I’ve reached some conclusions. Campaigns matter. They tell us things about candidates and usually, though not always, what sort of office-holders they’ll likely be. Visions and philosophies are shared and promises made. Campaigns often reveal how the candidate operates under pressure as well as insights into character. [Ronnie Ellis]

There will be more court-appointed attorneys available to represent poor people in court under Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget. [WFPL]

We started getting some clarity in the Republican and Democratic races Saturday night. Hillary Clinton squeaked out a win in Nevada — but did so in a way that suggests she has, despite Bernie Sanders’s strength, maintained her national advantage. Marco Rubio’s strong showing in South Carolina helped push Jeb Bush out of the race, giving Mr. Rubio a chance to unify the mainstream of the Republican Party and bring about a true three-way race. [NY Times]

A more than $6.2 million expansion could be coming to a senior living facility in southeast Louisville. [Business First]

For more than 14 years, foster parents William Yowell and Lizzette Steed-Yowell have opened their New Albany home to children whose lives have been turned upside down by neglect or abuse. The couple stresses the importance of providing a safe home for children in need, but there’s another ingredient they say is even more impactful: Open hearts. [News & Tribune]

There Are Now Daily Scandals At UofL

We hear this racial tension stems from a small number of bigoted white people who obviously come from horribly backward families. But the University of Louisville didn’t send out an email or issue a statement until AFTER the media and members of the local legal community started poking around. [WDRB]

More than one-fourth of Louisville roads are considered in poor condition or worse and it will cost about $110 million to fully rehabilitate those thousands of miles, according to a Metro Public Works report provided to Mayor Greg Fischer last year. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! According to WHAS11’s news partner The Courier Journal, a University of Louisville trustee is requesting personal records from Charlie Strong, a former U of L football coach, in connection with his divorce proceedings. [WHAS11]

Spending and programs at Kentucky’s 15 Area Development Districts would face more scrutiny and financial reporting under a bill filed Friday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Apparently, everybody is freaking out because a car smashed into a pizza joint on Bardstown Road. [WLKY]

If shame is the only real tool that President Barack Obama has to force the U.S. Senate to consider a Supreme Court nomination in his final year, let the shames begin. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) declared over the weekend — within hours of the news that Justice Antonin Scalia had died — that the Senate should not even hold hearings on a replacement. [HuffPo]

A discussion on the Louisville downtown civil rights demonstrations was held Sunday in honor of Black History month. [WAVE3]

Churchill Downs Racetrack [yester]today announced a multi-year agreement with Fanatics, the largest retailer of officially licensed sports merchandise, to exclusively operate both online and on-site retail for the Kentucky Derby race weekend, starting with the 2016 event. [Press Release]

A surplus spending plan backed by Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is being held up in a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

In 1992, Bill Clinton ran for president promising to “end welfare as we know it.” In 2016, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders should promise to bring welfare back. [NY Magazine]

Three former local Kroger Co. employees have filed a class-action lawsuit against the Cincinnati-based supermarket giant, claiming it failed to pay them for overtime work. [Business First]

Clark County is gearing up for the 2016 primary election by fine-tuning some of the processes for getting out absentee ballots and deciding how many total ballots will be needed. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

ZIKA IS COMING OH NO GET SCARED

Kentucky and Indiana officials have missed self-imposed goals for finalizing details that will govern RiverLink, the toll network on three Ohio River bridges set to start this year. [WDRB]

Remember that Jefferson County Public Schools story we covered that everyone else ignored? The Office of the Attorney General said JCPS broke the law. Who could have known??? [C-J/AKN]

An employee with the Kentucky Juvenile Justice center tells WHAS 11 that Commissioner Bob Hayter is no longer with the department. [WHAS11]

Any business person knows that when costs are rising faster than revenue, you should raise revenue and not just cut costs. [Tom Eblen]

OH GOD WE’RE ALL GONNA GET THE ZIKA! [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton is concerned for the future of women’s reproductive rights. [HuffPo]

Kentucky’s new Governor Matt Bevin nixed a request to restore the $420,000 per year contribution in his bare-bones FY 2017 and 2018 budget proposal. [WAVE3]

President Obama will release his final budget proposal on Tuesday, in which he’ll call for $11 billion in funding over the next decade to address homelessness among families. [ThinkProgress]

Way to go go, Metro Council, for leading the way to suck town. A Louisville Metro Council committee is considering a multi-year effort aimed at reworking the city’s 800-page land development code, but one of the big issues before it — affordable housing — will not be examined until at least this spring. [WFPL]

The billionaire former mayor of New York, Michael Bloomberg, has confirmed he is considering running as an independent candidate for the US presidency. [BBC]

The Louisville division of Computershare Inc. is looking to hire lots of new employees in a variety of roles. [Business First]

Jeffersonville High School freshman Johnathan Woodward laughed at the prospect of becoming a firefighter one day, but admitted he was imagining what it would be like. [News & Tribune]