UofL Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves. In Other Words? Told Ya So Years Ago, Nothing Has Changed

Who could have known, over the past eight years, that there’s a morale problem with faculty and staff at the University of Louisville??? Vicious and disrespectful: that’s how some faculty and staff describe the work environment at the University of Louisville. [WDRB]

African Americans living in Kentucky saw their average yearly incomes drop by more than 11 percent in one year, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released this week. The poverty rate also rose for black Kentuckians at a rate four times more than the rest of the state from 2013 to 2014. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 has learned, through MetroSafe, there is a shooting in the 3800 block of Vermont Avenue, in the Shawnee area. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Metro police said a 66-year-old man found dead last week was slain. Police said Michael Davis was killed sometime last Monday. [WLKY]

Seventy-three law enforcement agencies across the country will receive $20 million in federal grants to help them purchase and implement the use of body cameras, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance announced Monday. [HuffPo]

Crowds rallied together Sunday near the corner of 17th and Broadway with concerns of a new biodigester planned for the West Louisville neighborhood that would deal with methane gas. [WAVE3]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan touted two Louisville educational institutions Thursday during a stop in the city. [WFPL]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services is updating and expanding its surgical facilities in a $2.4 million project. [Business First]

Shane Corbin said his role as Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning director has been an exciting one. [News & Tribune]

Everything’s All Puppies & Rainbows

The head of the Federal Railroad Administration is urging railroads to be more forthcoming about the health of bridges that carry trains. [WDRB]

We forgot about this story during the TERLIT TWEETIN hullabaloo. Calling the decision “naïve” and “clumsy,” Metro Council members ripped a previously undisclosed plan by Mayor Greg Fischer’s office to reorganize how the city operates Neighborhood Place locations — a plan the city formed without input from other center partners, including state government and Jefferson County Public Schools. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s Independent candidate for governor is gaining name recognition for his performance during the Bluegrass Debate. [WHAS11]

Every fall, bourbon lovers make a pilgrimage to Kentucky for two things: the Kentucky Bourbon Festival, which runs through Sunday in Bardstown, and the fall bourbon releases. [H-L]

The owners of the troubled Economy Inn motel on Bardstown Road which has been the subject of numerous complaints about crime and drugs, is notified about the possible suspension of the hotel’s permit. [WLKY]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) are calling for a ban on the ability of employers to check the credit history of their employees, saying that the practice is a form of discrimination unfairly targets people who have suffered as a result of the 2008 financial crisis. [HuffPo]

Oldham County won’t be holding a special election September 29 to decide whether to allow sales of packaged alcohol. [WAVE3]

You can’t have a government that has spent decades waging various forms of war against predominantly Muslim countries – bombing 7 of them in the last six years alone – and then act surprised when a Muslim 14-year-old triggers vindictive fear and persecution because he makes a clock for school. That’s no more surprising than watching carrots sprout after you plant carrot seeds in fertile ground and then carefully water them. It’s natural and inevitable, not surprising or at all difficult to understand. [The Intercept]

The number of Kentuckians receiving tax credits through the federal health care law to reduce the cost of insurance is among the lowest in the country. And a state official says that shows Kentucky’s health insurance exchange is working the way it’s supposed to. [WFPL]

American household incomes lost ground last year and the poverty rate ticked up, a sign the U.S. economic expansion had yet to lead to gains for many Americans five years after the 2007-2009 recession. [Reuters]

Some Louisville workers haven’t seen their pay grow fast enough to keep up with the national inflation rate during the last five years, an analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show. [Business First]

It looks like it will be another month before the Floyd County Council decides whether or not to cut $28,000 from Floyd County Circuit Court probation and another $34,707 from Floyd Superior Court probation. [News & Tribune]

Fighting Over Grass As Folks Go Hungry

Some say growing grass on abandoned properties in Louisville is a growing problem. [WDRB]

Jack Conway went to western Louisville on Saturday and promised that he would appoint African Americans to the University of Louisville’s board of trustees if he were elected governor. [C-J/AKN]

The oil bust has been largely a supply-driven phenomenon. Unlike the last time that oil prices were this low — during the 2008-2009 financial crisis — this past year’s price collapse has not been because of destruction in demand, but due to too much supply. [WHAS11]

While standardbreds took to the track outside during Red Mile’s regular meet Saturday night, fans of casino gaming took their seats inside for the historic track’s first night of slots-style wagering. [H-L]

Who knew this was a thing? A crowd favorite returned to the Ohio River along Waterfront Park Saturday. A team from Waggener High School was one of 30 teams competing in the Annual Dragon Boat Festival. [WLKY]

Kamilah Brock says the New York City police sent her to a mental hospital for a hellish eight days, where she was forcefully injected with powerful drugs, essentially because they couldn’t believe a black woman owned a BMW. [HuffPo]

With the stroke of a paintbrush, a west Louisville man is transforming shoes. Dinero Andretti creates custom artwork for any shoe and any customer. Some customers have requested specific designs for causes. [WAVE3]

Hidden in the haze of the petrochemical plants and beyond the seemingly endless traffic jams, a Texas city has grown so large that it is poised to pass Chicago as the third biggest in the United States in the next decade. [Reuters]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is looking into concerns that deliberate and systemic bias pollute the process of allocating funds associated with the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, as more than $300,000 allocated for the program this year went unused. [WFPL]

Governor Steve Beshear announced today that U.S. Deputy Secretary of Transportation Victor Mendez, a champion for the nation’s vital transportation infrastructure, will visit Louisville next week to speak to an automotive conference and to view progress on the downtown Ohio River bridge project. [Press Release]

Louisvillians are practically salivating for a major-league sports team to support. [Business First]

Most employee positions or big purchases, with an exception for public safety, will not yet be approved for next year’s budget, but the Jeffersonville City Council is still discussing what’s to come during its annual budget workshops. [News & Tribune]

A Week Without Murders Would Be Great

Louisville Metro Police say they are investigating after the body of a 50-year-old woman was found inside a garbage can Friday afternoon. [WDRB]

Representatives with Heaven Hill distillery are reaching out to Louisville activists opposed to bringing a methane plant to the California neighborhood. [C-J/AKN]

A West Buechel man charged with animal cruelty after police say he allowed his dog to freeze to death. [WHAS11]

A new brand ambassador is quietly making his mark at Woodford Reserve. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police arrested a man Tuesday in connection with a shooting on East Caldwell Street earlier this month. [WLKY]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A huge array of ice age fossils, including the bones of mammoths, turtles and horses, were uncovered at a Southern California construction site this summer. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro police are conducting a death investigation after a 50-year-old woman was found dead in West Louisville, but neighbors said they don’t believe her death was an accident. [WAVE3]

Dawn Johnson and her domestic partner, Mohamed Diallo, used to live in a shabby Bronx apartment, supported by his job as a mechanic. The building owner allowed the apartment to go weeks without running water and more than a year without heat. [NY Times]

Louisville housing advocates are concerned that the city is being shortchanged in the state’s distribution of federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, which are used to build or rehabilitate affordable rental housing. [WFPL]

As Congress gets back to work this week, it’s facing a nearly unprecedented number of deadlines and political dramas. [WaPo]

The leadership of the Louisville-based Independent Pilots Association, which represents pilots flying for Louisville-based UPS Airlines, has called on its members to authorize a strike against the company. [Business First]

Clark County Commissioners overstepped their authority by ordering landfill funds be used to foot a raise for Highway Superintendent Jim Ross, who said later he felt pressured not to reveal what he knew in order to keep his job. [News & Tribune]

The Swift Plant Is Still Beyond Disgusting

Officials with the Kentucky State Fair say attendance numbers for this year increased from 2014. [WDRB]

The West End Wal-Mart Supercenter is inching forward by filing a new landscaping plan, but a company spokesman said the retailer is waiting for settlement of a lawsuit against its proposed suburban-style design. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a gaping hole in Jeffersonville and we’re apparently not talking about that city’s mayor. [WHAS11]

About two weeks ago, as the golfers were finishing their rounds at Bardstown Country Club, Jack Conway stood in a clubhouse dining room and saw the end of summer approaching and with it, an end to some of the issues that threatened to derail his Democratic campaign for governor. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville is preparing to welcome the region’s largest international festival for the 13th year. [WLKY]

If you’re a working-age person without a job, a disability or a kid, then soon you’re not going to have access to food stamps, either. In another sign of eroding sympathy for the jobless amid a tepid economic recovery, states are restricting benefits for the unencumbered unemployed. [HuffPo]

It’s always inspirational when a child has a dream and is able to turn that dream into a reality. That’s what Rachel Ritchie from Vine Grove, KY is doing. [WAVE3]

No one will be surprised to learn that the campaign to build a national movement against gentrification is being waged out of an office in Brooklyn, New York. [The Atlantic]

The former director of Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District says she believes Metro government should be regulating diesel pollution from a lot owned by pork producer JBS Swift. Lauren Anderson said this week she thinks there’s a valid legal argument to be made for the regulation, but her former agency disagrees. [WFPL]

Tolls sure are going to be awesome for Louisville. The Chicago Skyway is a key conduit for drivers in the Chicago area looking for a weekend getaway. But on this Labor Day weekend, trips to Lake Michigan might be a lot messier than usual. [ThinkProgress]

Appears BF has turned into a publication about whatever whim Jonathan Blue and his relatives decide to play with in a given week. [Business First]

Indiana University Southeast was recognized as one of the country’s safest campuses on a national website. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! Hargens Is Bad At Something

Two people have been shot in the Shawnee neighborhood Sunday a little after 7 p.m. [WDRB]

The subject of both praise and controversy, Louisville Metro Police’s VIPER Unit is set to fold into a new mobile division that will continue VIPER’s data-driven approach to targeting violent crime in the city, officials announced Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Here comes the Louisville media to report on this man’s downfall. Locals love blood, gore, suffering and sadness. News directors should be ashamed. Or maybe just straight up kicked to the curb. [WHAS11]

Going to school saved James Mouser’s life in early April. Mouser, then a senior at Northpoint Academy in Pike County, cut his hand while at school on a Friday. Unable to see a doctor because he has no car, he lanced his own hand over the weekend after it became infected. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s a story about those shootings Louisville loves so much. [WLKY]

Kim Davis: dumb as hell. A county clerk in Kentucky who petitioned the Supreme Court to allow her to refuse to wed LGBT couples unknowingly married a trans man and a pansexual woman, the couple says. [HuffPo]

In a closer look at the issue of behavior and discipline in the classroom, the Jefferson County Teachers Association tells us JCPS is not doing enough to deal with the issue. The teacher’s union comes to that conclusion after recently conducting a survey this summer. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama on Saturday defended his decision to allow Royal Dutch Shell to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean under what he said were rigorous standards, fending off criticism by environmental groups. [Reuters]

Residents are invited to provide comment on a proposed bike lane installation on Sixth Street that would stretch from River Road to Zane Street. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Board of Education has chosen two finalists in its search for a new state education commissioner. It’ll be someone the opposite of great and, sadly, you know I’m right. [WKYT]

Why the hell are news directors continually reporting on the downfall of people when they’re clearly vulnerable and need assistance instead of hype? It’s not just BF. It’s every outlet in town. [Business First]

Although Southern Indiana Animal Rescue has operated for 10 years, the Clark County Board of Zoning Appeals decided Wednesday to place restrictions on it. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Some Fun(?) Educational Roundup Things

Eastern High School staff physically and verbally harassed a football player over accusations of smoking marijuana, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday. [WDRB]

Amid growing protests claiming the building of a methane plant in western Louisville continues a legacy of environmental racism, Mayor Greg Fischer says the Fort Wayne, Ind.-based company behind the project will spend the next two months listening to community concerns before seeking construction approval. [C-J/AKN]

The Highlands Neighborhood Association is encouraging Councilmen David Tandy and Tom Owen to permanently revoke the license of Cahoots which is located on Bardstown Road. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Board of Education voted Tuesday to move five candidates forward in the search for the next state education commissioner. The candidates, who have not been named, are in-state and out-of-state educators. However, the board did not preclude adding finalists when it meets Friday in Lexington, before the start of second-round interviews. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Crews are quickly restoring Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home, with big plans for it to attract visitors from around the world. [WLKY]

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a dire report about the state of the planet: July 2015 was the earth’s warmest month on record, dating back to 1880. [HuffPo]

With its largest-ever incoming class starting school Monday, Spalding University celebrated the growth by rebranding and renaming its new Kentucky College of Art and Design. [WAVE3]

Applications for U.S. home mortgages edged up last week as interest rates declined, an industry group said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

A neighborhood group is hoping concerns about public health and the environment will factor into a city board’s decision to grant a conditional use permit to pork producer JBS Swift. [WFPL]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

Students at Mount Tabor Elementary in New Albany can now use a finger scanning system from Horizon Software to pay for school meals, but some parents are worried about the new technology. [Business First]

Community Montessori High School senior Nick Vaughn narrowly lost in the May New Albany City Council District 6 Republican Party primary. He had a plan to start a work program to benefit disadvantaged residents, and though it won’t be implemented yet in a governmental platform, Vaughn has launched a nonprofit aimed at ushering low-income families out of poverty. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]