LG&E Set To Screw Environmentally Friendly Folks

Cierra Lewis , 22, died in a house fire early Saturday morning, according to Capt. Salvador Melendez from the Louisville Division of Fire. [WDRB]

Louisville Gas and Electric is seeking to get more money from its customers, but a proposed rate structure could discourage people from investing in solar power or energy efficiency, a Louisville engineer warns. [C-J/AKN]

The family of a man arrested in Bardstown, Ky. claims excessive force was used while officers detained him. That suspect is now in critical condition in a Louisville hospital. [WHAS11]

Bigoted undertones are apparent for foes of a proposed Islamic center in Lexington. Don’t want to make it about religion or ethnicity? Here’s a tip: don’t make it about religion or ethnicity. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “She was burned after her death, almost over 70 percent of her body. So not only did they take her from me in life, they took her from me in death and I couldn’t even mourn my beautiful baby,” she said, adding through tears, “I had to have a closed casket.” [WLKY]

For the first time, more than half of U.S. public school students live in low-income households, according to a new analysis from the Southern Education Foundation. [HuffPo]

Police haven’t said who fired the shots that killed 16-month-old Ne’Riah Miller and wounded her mother Cierra Twyman last August. But newly released information, and a review of evidence obtained from prosecutors earlier, points the finger at a fifth man, whom police hadn’t named a suspect until this past Tuesday: 28-year-old Duwan Mason Jr. [WAVE3]

This is a big deal. [Press Release]

Dominique Frierson has wanted to get out of Beecher Terrace since he moved into the Russell neighborhood housing project in 2003. [WFPL]

Greg Bourke and Michael DeLeon have lived together for 32 years and were married in Canada more than a decade ago, but back home in Kentucky, something is missing. [Reuters]

If it wasn’t for Mary Ellen Wiederwohl, the city of Louisville very likely might have a different mayor in office, according to Mayor Greg Fischer. [Business First]

His family lives off Spring Street, he works off East Main Street, and he’s a proponent of two-way streets. John Smith believes people in his situation — downtown residents, business owners and employees of those establishments — should be given the top priority when it comes to public feedback about planner Jeff Speck’s street study. [News & Tribune]

Wealthy Local Folks Should Help Hungry Kids

Wealth and perceived power got Greg Fischer’s son out of a serious drug charge. But you expected nothing less. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District will go ahead with an investigation against one of its board members and its former chairman, even though the ethics complaint filed against them was withdrawn by the board member who filed it. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s gasoline tax, which fell by 4.3 cents a gallon Jan. 1, is now expected to drop by another 5.1 cents on April 1 unless legislators change state law. [WHAS11]

Lexington and other cities will not have to enact their own ordinances for ride-sharing companies such as Lyft and Uber now that the state has enacted its own regulations, city attorneys told the Urban County Council on Tuesday. [H-L]

A program that provides snacks and nutritious meals to children during months schools aren’t in session is looking for sponsors. [WLKY]

The American health care system may finally be catching up to the rest of the 21st-century economy, in which convenience is not only expected, but demanded — and massive retailers are driving the change. [HuffPo]

Police surround another Louisville school. Tuesday they came with armored trucks and weapons to a locked down Stuart Middle School, after someone called in a report of a shooting at the school. After sweeping the school twice, police determined it was a hoax. [WAVE3]

A bid to reduce racial and economic segregation in Portland public schools was postponed on Tuesday when a group of protesters stormed a school board meeting and demanded more time to learn about the planned policy changes. The proposed change would limit transfers between schools, which white and affluent families have disproportionately used to remove their children from low-performing schools. [Reuters]

This year’s tax season will be full of questions for people who signed up for Kynect, Kentucky’s health insurance exchange, and those who are uninsured. For the first time, people will have to indicate on their tax form if they had health insurance on their tax return. [WFPL]

Mickie “Red” Roquemore was a charming, “great guy” who was well liked and didn’t cause problems at a homeless shelter where he often stayed in the past. Last year, he even secured housing with the help of an agency. But the Pontiac, Detroit resident was found dead on New Year’s Day on a porch where he had recently been sleeping apparently due to temperatures dipping down to 15 degrees overnight. [Think Progress]

In November, Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, released its legislative wish list for the 2015 short session of the Kentucky General Assembly. [Business First]

Traffic, noise and safety concerns raised by Johnson County communities and other cities along a 106-mile rail line were dismissed in a federal review, but those local leaders are making a second attempt to be heard. [News & Tribune]

Hopefully Not Another Downtown Disappointment

Everyone hopes it comes to fruition but we’re already hearing from doubtful powerbrokers. An Omni hotel set for downtown will climb higher into the city skyline than initially planned, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said Tuesday in outlining terms of a deal finalized last month. [WDRB]

That’s right — Greg Fischer loves keeping the worst of the worst on staff. When asked if Steve Rowland would continue to be a key member of his administration following his Friday arrest, Mayor Greg Fischer said “I certainly hope so.” [C-J/AKN]

One of the Louisville Zoo’s beloved polar bears is celebrating a birthday. [WHAS11]

Muhammad Ali is home after being hospitalized with a severe urinary tract infection. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The bitter cold has local homeless shelters gearing up for an influx of visitors. Crews are out this week trying to help who they can as even colder weather moves into the area. [WLKY]

Democrats and Social Security advocates are accusing House Republicans of launching a sneak attack on disability insurance on the very first day of the new Congress. [HuffPo]

After a video captured a raid inside of Louisville business the owner met with the Alcohol Beverage Control Board for a hearing about what they claim happened that night. [WAVE3]

Winter is not typically the busy season for Kuttawa (kuh-TAH-wah), a little vacation town on the north bank of Lake Barkley in far western Kentucky. But after the tragic plane crash on January 2 that left four dead and one miraculous survivor, Kuttawa exploded into high season, with as many reporters in town as vacationers renting pontoon boats on Fourth of July weekend. [Jim Higdon/The Daily Beast]

If you notice your memory isn’t what it used to be, you may be one of thousands of Kentuckians in the early stages of cognitive decline that could lead to Alzheimer’s. [WFPL]

Six Americans die from alcohol poisoning daily on average, and mortality rates are highest among middle-aged men, federal health authorities reported on Tuesday. [NY Times]

West Buechel Mayor Rick Richards announced at a special council meeting Tuesday that State Auditor Adam Edelen will examine the city’s books. [Business First]

Floyd County will end 2014 with a balance of $40,000, but it took some financial wheeling and dealing to get all accounts into the black. [News & Tribune]

No Poverty? Thousands Can’t Pay Their LG&E Bill

Louisville Metro Council elected leadership Monday night and there’s a few familiar faces in the leadership positions. [WDRB]

The local paper finally did a story about the minimum wage increase and this is what they came up with. [C-J/AKN]

Should everyone be skeptical about the new hotel plans? [More C-J/AKN]

Mayor Rick Richards pleaded guilty to drug trafficking but says that he is still innocent. [WHAS11]

Kentucky taxpayers will fork over about $3.56 million to pay for the 2015 General Assembly, which begins at noon Tuesday. Most of the money will go for legislative compensation. [H-L]

An investigation is underway into a garage fire near the Bullitt-Jefferson County line. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell are warily looking for areas of agreement as they begin a new chapter in a relationship that is likely to remain frosty but businesslike. [HuffPo]

Monday’s cold temperatures left some parents wondering if it was too cold for students, especially bus riders, to go to school. [WAVE3]

The cost of US war-making in the 13 years since the September 11 terrorist attacks reached a whopping $1.6 trillion in 2014, according to a recent report by the Congressional Research Service (CRS). [Mother Jones]

Thousands of Jefferson County residents in jeopardy of having their heat cut off during the winter months will soon be allowed to apply for the Low-Income Heating Assistance Program. [WFPL]

Representative Phil Moffett, R-Louisville (32nd District) announced Monday his intention to file a bill for the 2015 session of Kentucky’s General Assembly that if passed would direct all counties that currently do not have an operating jail to consolidate their local jailer’s office with the county sheriff’s office. The proposal is the first bill filed by the newly elected House Republican. [Press Release]

Cunningham’s Restaurant on South Fourth Street closed Sunday night, but its owner is now saying that it’s not gone for good. [Business First]

A donation drive in December yielded much-needed supplies and even some cash for the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter. [News & Tribune]

Another Gun Death, Pedestrians Hit, Possibility City Prepares For A Happy New Year!

Another day, another instance of pedestrians being hit by a car. Two people were hit by a car on Dixie Highway near Pendleton Road at approximately 3:30 Tuesday afternoon. [WDRB]

In an ongoing legal battle, Norton Healthcare has struck back at Kosair Charities, which in a suit last May alleged that Norton misused contributions to enhance its bottom line and “line the pockets” of its executives. [C-J/AKN]

The annual program that helps prevent disconnection from utility services for low income residents of Louisville begins Monday, January 12. [WHAS11]

A federal prosecutor is seeking a much longer prison sentence for Morgan County Judge-Executive Tim Conley than the term called for under advisory sentencing guidelines. Here’s hoping he gets it! [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another fun shooting death in Possibility City. [WLKY]

Don’t tell Greg Fischer… Here’s proof that it’s possible for a burger joint to both pay its workers well and still make money. [HuffPo]

A whistleblower who threw the New Albany Police Department into turmoil has been fired. [WAVE3]

In many ways, Kentucky, a poor state with a starkly unhealthy populace, has become a symbol of the Affordable Care Act’s potential. [NY Times]

The health department in Washington, D.C., has an interest in implementing many of the approaches to public health found in Louisville, said Dr. LaQuandra Nesbitt, Louisville’s public health director. [WFPL]

Gun related deaths of U.S. law enforcement officers rose by 56 percent in 2014 compared to the previous year, with about one-third of officers killed in an ambush, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

C.T. “Skip” Miller, executive director of the Louisville International Airport, said airports nationwide are adjusting to a “new era” as airlines dwindle in number and try to stabilize their finances. [Business First]

A policewoman who accused fellow officers of lying about their time records, and her superiors of retaliating against her for reporting the allegations, may face disciplinary charges. [News & Tribune]

People Thought Minimum Wage Hike Would Occur?

Sure, raising the minimum wage is the right thing to do in this country. But was anyone really naïve enough to believe that this current Metro Council would be able to pull something like that off? They can’t even handle a simple Metro Animal Services investigation. [WDRB]

Everyone is freaking out about this… The Metropolitan Sewer District board Monday rejected a contract offer by a union that represents about 150 of its workers and said a key provision was illegal under state law. [C-J/AKN]

Clarksville Town Council members discussed adding the position of town manager in a session Monday evening. [WHAS11]

Following the example of Louisville and Nashville, Lexington will soon start a program to help get longtime homeless people off the streets. Earlier this month, the Urban County Council approved a three-year, $750,000 contract for the Hope Center, a homeless shelter in Lexington, to provide housing and case management to 20 people. [H-L]

Clark County’s prosecutor will seek the death penalty against a man who confessed to killing his ex-girlfriend in Jeffersonville. [WLKY]

In a rare show of defiance of the National Rifle Association, the Senate on Monday confirmed Dr. Vivek Murthy to serve as surgeon general of the United States. Murthy’s nomination had been stalled for nearly a year due to comments he made in support of stricter gun laws. [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun Jefferson County Public Schools bus accident. [WAVE3]

Incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has hired a federal budget expert to join his leadership staff as a policy adviser next year. Jon Burks, who currently works as the House Budget Committee’s policy director, will be responsible for budget and appropriations issues in McConnell’s office. [The Hill]

A tribunal is expected to decide by the end of this week the fate of a Jefferson County Public Schools principal fired in October for “conduct unbecoming of a teacher.” [WFPL]

Despite warnings about abuse, Medicare covered more prescriptions for potent controlled substances in 2012 than it did in 2011. The program’s top prescribers often have faced disciplinary action or criminal charges related to their medical practices. [ProPublica]

The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating Porter Bancorp Inc., parent company of PBI Bank, for possible violations of federal law related to false bank entries and banking and securities fraud. [Business First]

A severance benefit written into a schools superintendent’s contract extension could take the spotlight at a public hearing Wednesday. [News & Tribune]

Maybe The CWF Could’ve Informed Everybody

The Center for Women and Families is falling well short of its goal to collect $30,000 in gift cards for the holiday season, according to a news release. [WDRB]

Is this the beginning of Zipcar taking over Louisville? Cross your fingers. [C-J/AKN]

Ready to be terrified? Hundreds of elves flooded the Galt House Tuesday morning–trying to break a world record. [WHAS11]

One of the arguments often made against government involvement in health care is that it impedes the action of the marketplace which, if left unfettered, could solve all our problems. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. [WLKY]

The United Nations children’s agency UNICEF declared 2014 a devastating year for children on Monday with as many as 15 million caught in conflicts in Central African Republic, Iraq, South Sudan, Syria, Ukraine and the Palestinian territories. [HuffPo]

Charlestown Mayor Bob Hall’s controversial proposal to tear down hundreds of homes in favor of a large development failed to win city council approval Monday. [WAVE3]

The GOP is refocusing its attention on the courts as it searches for any way to weaken President Obama’s signature healthcare law while he continues to wield a veto pen. [The Hill]

Indiana state Sen. Michael Crider wants federal investigators to provide the public with an update on its investigation of a troubled exotic animal refuge in Charlestown, Ind. [WFPL]

Last week we got an actually good employment report — arguably the first truly good report in a long time. The U.S. economy added well over 300,000 jobs; wages, which have been stagnant for far too long, picked up a bit. [NY Times]

Rain and cooler weather over the summer has led to a bountiful, healthy crop of Christmas trees in Indiana, and that has the state’s tree farmers celebrating. [Business First]

For the second time in just more than two years, the city has taken legal action against a New Albany dump truck business. [News & Tribune]