The UofL Scandals Just Won’t Quit

A third recent appointee to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees has a business connection to the university’s nonprofit foundation. [WDRB]

As Southern Indiana schools’ student population becomes increasingly diverse, its pool of teachers remains overwhelmingly white. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In a room full of people–Denita Wright made her opinion very clear. From the moment she stepped through the door at the California Neighborhood Community Center, she passed out signs that read, “We don’t want it.” [WHAS11]

The best part of this – or maybe the most terrifying – is that Republicans in Frankfort have worked hard to fight needle exchanges that prevent this sort of thing. Kentucky saw a dramatic increase in the rate of hepatitis C infections among women ages 15-44 in recent years, according to a new federal report that offers further evidence of growing problems in the state from intravenous drug use. [H-L]

University of Louisville trustees have postponed a meeting to decide the status of school President James Ramsey. [WLKY]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

Now that a Court has determined Metro government has the right to remove the monument, the Commission on Public Art must recommend where and why. [WAVE3]

Kevin Green’s lawyers were pleading with the governor for mercy. It was spring 2008, and Mr. Green, a 31-year-old who had shot and killed a grocery owner, was on Virginia’s death row. His woes, his lawyers said, dated to childhood; he was born with his umbilical cord wrapped around his neck, repeated three years of elementary school and never learned to tie his shoes. [NY Times]

A new board to develop strategies for agricultural water use in Kentucky is closer to its first meeting. [WFPL]

After a lengthy debate and a deal between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Democratic Party’s rules committee voted to created a “unity commission” that would dramatically limit the role of convention “superdelegates,” binding roughly two-thirds of them to the results of state primaries and caucuses. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Republic Bancorp Inc. announced second-quarter net income of $8.3 million and a diluted earnings per common share of $0.40, which was a 2 percent increase compared to the company’s second quarter in 2015. [Business First]

Clark County voters may be using new machines for the November election, but clerk Susan Popp said this won’t change the way voting happens on their end. [News & Tribune]

Don’t Go To The Hospital Or Else

Police in Floyd County, Indiana are investigating a home invasion that took place on Wednesday morning. [WDRB]

What’s your risk of avoidable hospital death? Thousands of lives could be saved if more hospitals were as safe as those that received an A grade in a recent round of grading by a watchdog group that found no top scorers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Cole’s Place in the Parkland neighborhood is no stranger to crime, finding itself as the site of shooting scenes in the late night hours. [WHAS11]

Curiosity finally got the best of me. I had to drive up I-75 and see Noah’s Ark. I found the ark to be an impressive piece of woodcraft, which made me feel better about paying $40 to see it. (It cost an additional $10 to park in the 4,000-space parking lot, which was only a fraction full.) [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Crews were called to the scene of a house fire Wednesday near Taylor Boulevard, in the Iroquois neighborhood. [WLKY]

The last year has shined a harsh light on two distressing realities of American life. Mass shootings are becoming more common. And more Americans are killing themselves. These disturbing trends share something in common, obvious in the first case and less so in the second: guns. [WaPo]

LMPD reviewed its use of force policies this past April and said the department is not only meeting national standards, but is exceeding them. [WAVE3]

Last week, two lawmakers introduced a bill to put new limits on what debt collectors can take from debtors’ paychecks and bank accounts. It is the first legislation to address the issue in decades and follows a series of ProPublica stories about the widespread practice of garnishment. [ProPublica]

When the bullets hit Shenitrea Vaughn’s stomach, they burned like hot rocks. The shooter, she suspects, had come to her home for a robbery. [WFPL]

Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy (D) and Ohio Congresswoman Marcia Fudge (D) introduced a bill this week that aims to help public schools become more racially diverse by providing grants for school districts to create voluntary school desegregation plans. [ThinkProgress]

After decades as a television mainstay in Louisville, journalist Jean West is taking a new government job. [Business First]

Jeffersonville High School Principal Julie Straight said training educators for an active shooter situation wasn’t even on the table before 1999. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Racists Are Still Fired Up

The tension between police and African Americans seemed to reach a boiling point two years ago with the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. [WDRB]

After bouncing from one temporary job to another for years, after filing for bankruptcy, after losing the mobile home he’d bought on credit with his wife, Bryan Reeves couldn’t help but dream big when Ford announced plans in December to hire 2,000 autoworkers. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Guess the FOP and UofL have decided to coordinate their media offensive. [WHAS11]

During their working years, women tend to earn less than men, and when they retire, they’re more likely to live in poverty. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In light of the officer-involved shootings that have taken place in the last few days, a rally was held in west Louisville with speakers calling for change. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton reaffirmed her support on Saturday for creating a “public option” within Obamacare and allowing people to enroll in Medicare at age 55. [HuffPo]

Check out all the racist comments on this one… that is, if they haven’t been deleted by now. Hundreds of protesters for Black Lives Matter rallied and shut down part of Broadway on Sunday evening. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama pledged on Saturday to seek ways to calm racial tensions and reduce divisions between police and minorities during his final months in office, but he warned that easy access to guns nationwide exacerbated the problem. [Reuters]

There’s an unexpected item decorating the desk of Kentucky Science Center Executive Director Joanna Haas: a box of wooden blocks. [WFPL]

The Democratic Party endorsed a “reasoned pathway to future legalization” of marijuana and called for the drug to be downgraded in the Controlled Substances Act, in a tense and unexpected victory for supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders. [WaPo]

Shares of Louisville-based Humana Inc. are down nearly 10 percent today because of antitrust concerns related to its pending acquisition by Aetna Inc. [Business First]

The Clarksville Community Board of School Trustees approved Adrienne Goldman as Clarksville High School principal at a special meeting July 8. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City Returned To Murder

It was a long, tumultuous school year for hundreds of JCPS bus drivers as they dealt with disruptive and abusive student behavior, often while trying to monitor traffic signals and navigate around pedestrians and other vehicles. [WDRB]

When it comes to hospital safety, Kentucky ranks worse than most other states, and no hospital in the Louisville area earned an “A” from a nonprofit group that recently evaluated scores of health-care institutions nationwide. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The woman killed in an early morning shooting has been identified. [WHAS11]

Celebrity chef and renowned restaurateur Bobby Flay has finalized a deal with WinStar Farm to acquire a minority interest in Grade I winner and Belmont Stakes entrant Creator. [H-L]

Two people were taken to University Hospital after a shooting at a White Castle. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali is remembered for his influence inside and outside of the boxing ring and for standing up for his principles in the face of fierce backlash. [HuffPo]

A cop got shot and suddenly the community cared about gun violence. Never mind the hundreds of other shootings. [WAVE3]

It is impossible to realize fully the significance of a time or events as one lives them. It’s only in looking back from a distance of time and perspective that you might be able to understand. [Ronnie Ellis]

Thousands of people crowded the streets of Louisville on Friday to pay their final respects to boxing legend Muhammad Ali. He died last week at age 74. [WFPL]

In the 1830s, the civilized world began to close debtors’ prisons, recognizing them as barbaric and also silly: The one way to ensure that citizens cannot repay debts is to lock them up. In the 21st century, the United States has reinstated a broad system of debtors’ prisons, in effect making it a crime to be poor. [NY Times]

Louisville has made another step toward bringing Google Fiber here. The Louisville Metro Council unanimously passed an ordinance Thursday that grants Google Fiber’s Kentucky affiliate a franchise for public right-of-way access to install communications infrastructure. [Business First]

For the first time since the 1970s, Clarksville selected a town manager to lead the town during a time of growth and redevelopment. Kevin Baity is expected to start work by the end of the month. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Loves A Good Pedestrian Accident

A young child is in critical condition after being hit by a vehicle in west Louisville. [WDRB]

The Memorial Day weekend wasn’t the deadliest on record by any stretch, but three deaths in unrelated incidents and a shooting near University of Louisville that left a college student seriously injured still made for a tragic holiday. The slayings increased Louisville’s 2016 homicides total to 47. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s a story about a pedestrian accident in J-town. [WHAS11]

The U.S Department of Labor has funded a grant worth $3.4 million to help retrain out-of-work coal miners in Kentucky. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting at Lincoln and Colorado avenues. [WLKY]

As the nation once again honors American war dead on Memorial Day, instead of spouting the usual nationalistic platitudes that that U.S. soldiers fought to keep the country “safe and free,” perhaps we should analyze whether that is really true. [HuffPo]

If you’re going to run hyped up stories about suicide attempts, the least you could do is include resources for those in need. [WAVE]

The Federal Reserve should raise interest rates “in the coming months” if the economy picks up as expected and jobs continue to be generated, U.S. central bank chief Janet Yellen said on Friday, bolstering the case for a rate increase in June or July. [Reuters]

Is the Portland renaissance real? An assessment of progress. [WFPL]

Courtrooms across the nation are using computer programs to predict who will be a future criminal. The programs help inform decisions on everything from bail to sentencing. They are meant to make the criminal justice system fairer — and to weed out human biases. [ProPublica]

Wait, this came as a surprise to people? Some folks must live in an alternate universe. [Business First]

Shelters across the state are losing government money due to a massive policy shift that emphasizes permanent housing for the homeless. [News & Tribune]

At Least There’s Good Bourbon News

Check out the spin/excuses from Jack Conway’s former spokesperson. A meeting held Wednesday was supposed to address the JCPS code of conduct. However, JCPS and the Metro Public Safety Committee saw the clock run out on a conversation many are waiting to have. [WDRB]

Louisville’s Coalition for the Homeless announced Monday that the overall number of homeless people in the city has dropped for the third year in a row — but those numbers don’t change local agencies’ disappointment in the federal government’s decision to cut their funds by 11 percent this year. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky bourbon production hit a nearly 50-year high last year. [WHAS11]

The Republican leader in the Senate says most candidates for president have released their tax documents as presumptive GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump insists he’ll wait until after an IRS audit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Ten years ago a 2-year-old Louisville girl was shot multiple times and her mother was killed. [WLKY]

More than 7 million previously uninsured Americans gained health coverage in 2015, the second full year of the Obamacare coverage expansion, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

While JCPS tries to provide social and emotional support for students in the form of Student Response Teams, Positive Behavior Coaches and other resources, Metro Council members voiced their concern that it is not enough. [WAVE3]

Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump said it would take another 9/11 to wake up border security — and predicted refugees would plan the next attack. [The Hill]

Faculty and staff within the Jefferson County Public Schools system continue to call out district administration for potential changes to teacher salary structure and the student code of conduct. [WFPL]

Interviews with dozens of women who have worked for Donald Trump or interacted with him socially reveal a pattern of often unsettling personal behavior by the Republican presidential candidate, The New York Times reported on Saturday. [Reuters]

Kroger isn’t just in the beginning stages of grocery delivery, it’s been testing refining things in Lexington and other markets so it can be rolled out ASAP. [Business First]

Anesthesiologist Jaime Guerrero, who had a practice in Jeffersonville, was sentenced to 100 months in prison Thursday by United States District Judge Greg N. Stevens, and according to the terms of a prior plea agreement, agreed to forfeit his license to practice medicine and real property owned by Guerrero Real Estate Investments, LLC. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is What Louisville Deserves After Decades Of Dumb Abramson Cheerleading And Sitting In Denial

Can you imagine if education reporters focused on the root of problems instead of reporting on scandals after the fact? Maybe they could start with not writing fluff once in a while… like when an education commissioner is being ousted and one particular education reporter fell for his spin. [WDRB]

Louisville’s most vulnerable populations face a big hit this summer after local homeless agencies and service providers announced Monday morning that they will have to make up for an 11 percent cut in federal funding. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Surprise! Everybody is getting shot left and right. [WHAS11]

Kentucky transportation officials have started an online service for people to renew their license plates. [H-L]

Another day, another shooting in Compassionate City. Everything is puppies and rainbows. Don’t worry. There’s no crime in Cherokee Triangle, nothing ever happens in St. Matthews. One person is taken to the hospital after a shooting Saturday in the Shawnee neighborhood. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama says his economic legacy is a lot better than he gets credit for. “I actually compare our economic performance to how, historically, countries that have wrenching financial crises perform,” he told The New York Times recently. “By that measure, we probably managed this better than any large economy on Earth in modern history.” [HuffPo]

The Metro Council primary offers a broad field to replace three veterans who did not seek reelection. [WAVE3]

Nearly half a century after the saga of “Mountain Jane Doe” began, local authorities in the small mining town of Harlan, Kentucky, say they are one step closer to identifying the murder victim first recovered from a remote trail outside of town in 1969. [Reveal]

The upcoming primary elections will likely be the deciding vote for a handful of Louisville Metro Council races. [WFPL]

Hillary Clinton is nearing the end of a long Democratic primary that will almost certainly leave her as the party’s presidential nominee. [The Hill]

How long til Fischer gives everything to Cordish again? You know it’s only a matter of time. [Business First]

The Clark County Election Board officially ruled on the 130 provisional ballots cast in the primary election Friday, with totals not changing any races. [News & Tribune]