JCPS Is A Ton Of Awful Fun Again

JCPS officials have fired a teacher who was under investigation over accusations she had inappropriate contact with a student. [WDRB]

Former Jefferson County Board of Education member Debbie Wesslund says Adam Edelen’s JCPS audit was a fraud. Mainly because it was selective and manipulative, which everyone already knew. [C-J/AKN]

On June 23 Jefferson County Public Schools fired a bus driver, Melinda Sanders, who dragged a student, 7-year-old Ally Rednour, down a street by her backpack on May 15. [WHAS11]

Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld the nationwide tax credit subsidies to help people buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year and there are dozens of other events happening around the metro area to celebrate Independence Day. [WLKY]

You won’t believe this horrible Fox story about the homeless. Or maybe you will. [MMFA]

She was arrested, along with Louisville’s former Chief Financial Officer Steve Rowland, and charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct. The police report said they were engaged in “disruptive, provocative and intimate behavior.” [WAVE3]

They took a page out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. City workers and police cleared an encampment of homeless people from the west side of Baltimore on Friday morning, provoking a brief traffic-blocking protest and leaving some of the city’s homelessness services organizations chagrined at what they say was a surprise operation. [ThinkProgress]

James Blanton is the new director of the Louisville Free Public Library, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday. He takes over for retiring director Craig Buthod, who announced his resignation in November after 17 years on the job. [WFPL]

There have only been 9 days this year when the police have not killed somebody. Some news outlets put the number as high as 500 dead in the past six months, according to both The Guardian and Killed by the Police.Net. The Washington Post’s own investigation showed nearly 400 dead as of the end of May. [WaPo]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has approved a settlement that reduces the base rate increases sought by Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. [Business First]

It starts with a professional rodeo and ends with a demolition derby. In between there will be a queen pageant, midway rides, interactive activities for children and exhibits to view. And yes, there will be plenty of animals. [News & Tribune]

County Attorney’s Office Sounds Fun

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office has reprimanded a prosecutor and ordered him to go to sensitivity training for making “insensitive and derogatory” comments about the family that owns Hwang’s Martial Arts Academy. [WDRB]

Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer will be called to testify before a Kentucky legislative committee this month over allegations that his office is not physically examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

You might have to dig a little deeper to pay for your college degree as the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is set to vote on a tuition hike Thursday. [WHAS11]

Ahmed Zayat spends big money buying and betting on horses, and brags about how successful he’s been at everything he’s set out to accomplish. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just days into a pilot program for police body cameras, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has gone on the record to address concerns from the public. [WLKY]

The leaders of six of Europe’s largest oil producers are calling for a plan to price planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, citing climate change as “a critical challenge for our world.” [HuffPo]

For the third consecutive year Ford Motor Company says it will shorten the annual summer shutdown at some of its plants in order to meet the demand by consumers for vehicles. [WAVE3]

New York City, Baltimore and other major cities have seen a recent rise in gun violence. The uptick has raised the alarm for many police departments that worry the summer months may make the problem worse. [NPR]

Louisville transportation officials are offering bus passes to young people this summer at a discounted rate. [WFPL]

More than 150 people in southeast Indiana have been diagnosed with HIV, the largest outbreak in state history. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. has completed the sale of its Concentra Inc. subsidiary for $1.06 billion in cash. [Business First]

Section 8 housing voucher system, social security income, food stamps — Kelli Orman wishes she didn’t have to rely on any of these low-income assistance services. [News & Tribune]

Hope Henderson Doesn’t Copy Secrecy

A family is trying to figure out why their dad was stabbed at a Louisville gas station. [WDRB]

A backup power generator at a pumping station could have prevented April’s massive flooding and a big sewage spill at Louisville’s Morris Forman Water Quality Treatment Center, state officials have concluded. [C-J/AKN]

The Phoenix Hill Tavern (PHT) and Jim Porter’s Good Time Emporium closed permanently on Monday, June 1. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics has wrapped up a 10-year, $2.5 million donation from BB&T that will result in a new program on capitalism and funding toward the college’s $65 million renovation. But Gatton officials stepped back from the more controversial aspects of the original 2004 agreement, including a requirement for an Ayn Rand reading room, named for the novelist and free market philosopher. [H-L]

A Louisville park is hosting a night of camping in June as part of a national celebration. [WLKY]

U.S. police have shot and killed 385 people during the first five months of this year, a rate of more than two a day, the Washington Post reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

A minister has a new plan to try to curb crime in West Louisville. [WAVE3]

It’s almost like these folks in Henderson didn’t bother talking to anyone living in the real world in Louisville. [Henderson Gleaner]

A resident must work full-time and earn at least $14.17 an hour to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment in Louisville, according to a recent study from the National Low Income Housing Coalition. [WFPL]

Among African American adults with low education and income levels, the increase in risk of heart disease or stroke associated with living in poverty is largest for women and people under age 50, according to a large new study. [Reuters]

Ford Motor Co. CEO Mark Fields said aluminum-body F-Series Super Duty Trucks will be launched next year and that the design will “wow people.” [Business First]

Parts of South Clarksville could be the next Newport, Ky., or at least a bustling addendum to the Louisville metropolitan area. [News & Tribune]

Glad A Local Will Be Your Governator?

Portland neighbors say they’re drowning in water bills that are twice the normal cost. The problems on one block uncovered a bigger issue for Louisville Water Company customers. [WDRB]

Which David Jones crony will get the job this time? Weeks after Superintendent Donna Hargens informed Helene Kramer that her contract was not being renewed, Jefferson County Public Schools has posted the position for its chief communications and community relations officer. [C-J/AKN]

Firefighters, police and Animal Control entered a home in the 2200 block of Beargrass Avenue just off Bardstown Road after hearing from multiple neighbors Tuesday. Neighbors were concerned after finding pet abandonment notices on the door, overgrown weeds in the yard and hearing constant barking inside the home. [WHAS11]

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five greater Clark County schools may close as part of a plan the superintendent believes will help the district. [WLKY]

A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives wants to stop poor people from buying junk food with food stamps. [HuffPo]

Some people are just the absolute worst. [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering what really happened to Jamie Comer in the gubernatorial primary? It’s much more simple than he would have you believe. [Page One]

Once again, Louisville has ranked poorly on the annual ranking of city park systems from a national group. [WFPL]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

Too many tables and too little kitchen space — that’s been a pain point for Big Four Burgers & Beer in Jeffersonville since it opened in December 2013. [Business First]

Samuel pointed to tattoos on his forearms and chest to count how many times he’s been incarcerated in Clark County jail. [News & Tribune]

Oldham Co. Should Embrace The Booze

There are only a few places in all of Oldham County where people can buy packaged alcohol like wine or a case of beer. But with more petitions going out this week, there’s a possibility that may soon change. [WDRB]

Downtown leaders tried to calm some jittery nerves Friday by predicting their hard work should minimize any loss of business from the impending two-year closure of the Kentucky International Convention Center. [C-J/AKN]

Watching Donna Hargens mangle this bus incident was almost as terrifying as hearing about a child being dragged. [WHAS11]

A Lawrence County school bus full of students on their way to school started on fire Friday, authorities said. [H-L]

Kentucky recently became one of the first states to let pharmacists dispense without prescription a drug that can reverse a heroin overdose. [WLKY]

Lorca Henley of Bowling Green, Ohio, said her family’s dinners on different nights this week included taco salads, tuna casserole with mashed potatoes, spaghetti with meat sauce and hamburgers they fried on the stove because they were out of propane. [HuffPo]

The mother of the girl dragged by a Jefferson County Public Schools bus said Sunday night that her daughter had been discharged from Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WAVE3]

This is not bourbon and the story will likely cause you to pop a vein. [NPR]

Apryll Buege spent much of her youth in the foster care system. She said she got in some trouble, made some mistakes, but soon realized she needed to pull her life together. [WFPL]

Duke Energy Corp. pleaded guilty Thursday to criminal pollution charges and agreed to $102 million in federal penalties stemming from a February 2014 spill of coal ash waste. [The Hill]

A record crowd turned out to see American Pharoah capture the second jewel of the Triple Crown at Saturday’s Preakness Stakes. [Business First]

Former Democratic congressman Baron Hill plans to join Indiana’s U.S. Senate race to replace retiring Republican Dan Coats. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Loves Cutting TARC Routes

TARC is asking for the public’s opinion about possibly cutting service on three of its busiest routes. [WDRB]

Clarksville Community Schools — which Superintendent Kimberly Knott called “the neediest school district in Southern Indiana” — stands to lose more than $500,000 under Indiana’s new budget, which was signed last week by Gov. Mike Pence and introduces changes to the school funding formula. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway is suing Marathon Petroleum Corp. over high gas prices. The 2015 gubernatorial candidate filed the complaint Tuesday with the United States District Court for the Western District of Kentucky – one week ahead of the state’s primary election. [WHAS11]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. Judicial corruption is a big deal in the rest of the state. [H-L]

Following a heated public meeting, the Floyd County Council is holding off on a decision to cut half of the county’s animal control budget. [WLKY]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

People are freaking out because police found marijuana growing at the scene of a shooting. [WAVE3]

Jerry Abramson sends emails to the White House staff. [White House]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Indianapolis-based American Senior Communities LLC plans to build a new facility in Louisville. [Business First]

To downtown Jeffersonville resident McNeil Wynn, TARC is vital in his everyday commute to Louisville. [News & Tribune]