Death Murder Death Murder Death

Authorities have released the name of a woman who was found murdered near Churchill Downs. [WDRB]

Immigration and criminal defense lawyer Daniel Alvarez has gained the endorsement of Citizens for Better Judges in the highly contested Jefferson District Court race. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating a stabbing that happened in the 5100 block of Crafty Drive located in the Lynnview neighborhood. [WHAS11]

New ribbon advertising boards have been installed around the second tier of Rupp Arena, the first part of a two-year, $15 million technology upgrade for Lexington’s most recognized landmark. [H-L]

This got a lot less buzz than we expected. Particularly in light of the double-dipping. Louisville has a new chief of community building. Mayor Greg Fischer named Yvette Gentry to lead the department. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School personnel action document reveals 30 of the districts bus drivers and substitute bus drivers resigned, retired or were terminated from early August to the middle of September. [WAVE3]

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee is upset he was quoted in a television ad for Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. Duncan – who is from Inez, Ky., and now heads the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity – told WYMT his comments were taken out of context. “The comments that I made were as the chief executive officer of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. It had nothing to do with the Republican National Committee,” Duncan said Tuesday night in a phone interview. [WYMT]

Home repairs can be a frightful burden for Louisville residents who live in poverty or on fixed incomes. [WFPL]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

An empty elementary school in downtown Jeffersonville will soon be torn down to make way for a 93-room upper mid-scale hotel. [Business First]

Telling stories of epidemics and disasters through the eyes of those who lived — and died — in them, “Stories Behind the Stones: Disease, Disasters and the Downtrodden” offered tours of Fairview Cemetery over the weekend. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! JCPS Wants To Spend More $

Attorney General Jack Conway’s office has ruled that Gov. Steve Beshear’s office violated the state law that requires racial balance on the University of Louisville’s board of trustees when he removed its only African American. [C-J/AKN]

Shepherdsville’s mayor, accused in a sex scandal, is refusing to take a plea deal. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is hoping to push through a new contract to make greater use of the public relations firm that has been handling the district’s media issues. [More C-J/AKN]

A homeless woman who spent her nights in Central Park is now getting a permanent home. Metro Councilman David James met the woman earlier this year and said she left a powerful impact on his life. [WHAS11]

Freedom of religion isn’t reason enough to deny any American their constitutional rights, President Barack Obama said Sunday as he addressed members of the LGBT community, one of his major sources of political and financial support. [H-L]

Five schools in Louisville are being honored by the U.S. Department of Education. St. Gabriel, St. Mary Academy, St. Albert, St. Margaret Mary and Christian Academy were the Louisville schools honored Tuesday. [WLKY]

The U.S. plans to increase the number of refugees it takes from 70,000 to 100,000 over the next two years. New York, Los Angeles and 16 other cities have urged President Barack Obama to accept even more refugees from Syria. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Government has reached an agreement to settle the final pending claim related to the June 1, 2009 train accident at the Louisville Zoo, according to a news released issued by the office of Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell. [WAVE3]

Just in case you were wondering why Hillview has gone bankrupt? Andy Beshear was involved, apparently. [CN|Toot]

Mary Campbell steps over a pile of old bricks and squeezes into a hallway heaped with the remnants of a long life — burnt out lamps, discarded boxes, busted chairs. [WFPL]

The nation’s largest mortgage lenders are violating the terms of a punitive 2012 settlement that was meant to prevent unfair and unnecessary foreclosures that destroyed communities and pushed working families from their homes. [Politico]

Looking for the next American Pharoah? The place to be is at the annual Keeneland September Yearling Sale in Lexington, Kentucky, which ended this weekend. More than 2,700 yearlings were sold at this year’s Thoroughbred yearling auction, which is a cornerstone of the $39 billion horse industry. [Business First]

The empty Rose Hill Elementary School in downtown Jeffersonville will be torn down soon, and in its place will rise a 93-room upper-mid scale hotel. [News & Tribune]

UofL’s Leadership Is Still The Worst

Everyone pray to the Flying Spaghetti Monster that someone with no ties to Greg Fischer runs this program so it stays on track and comes to fruition. Google Fiber announced it was considering bringing its high speed internet service to Louisville earlier this month and now the company is hiring managers for the project. [WDRB]

It looks like Louisville may go another year without a monitoring program for airborne toxic chemicals, as city and state officials keep looking at each other as the future funding source. [C-J/AKN]

Family members of five people who died when a boat capsized on the Ohio River say in federal court documents that the placement and condition of a construction barge caused the tragedy. [WHAS11]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

She’s old enough for that? Jennifer Lawrence is the latest Louisville native to be honored by the Greater Louisville Pride Foundation’s Louisville Hometown Heroes series. [WLKY]

Daniel Suddeath has been hired as editor of the Glasgow Daily Times, effective Tuesday, Sept. 29. Suddeath, a staff writer for the News and Tribune in Southern Indiana for the past seven years, also served as editor for Southern Indiana Business Source magazine during that time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Neighbors who say there has been an increase in crime in their area are frustrated and now they are taking action by starting a neighborhood watch. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called homelessness an “emergency” in the city and proposed spending $100 million to provide permanent housing and shelters for the city’s 26,000 indigent. [Reuters]

State Auditor Adam Edelen says he’s looking into the financial management of the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the university’s $1.1 billion endowment, and the university’s board of trustees as part of an ongoing investigation. [WFPL]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

It looks like another expansion is on the way at Ford Motor Co.’s Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The city’s mayoral candidates did not hold back during Thursday night’s League of Women Voters debate, answering moderated questions and sending accusations the other’s way. [News & Tribune]

UofL Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves. In Other Words? Told Ya So Years Ago, Nothing Has Changed

Who could have known, over the past eight years, that there’s a morale problem with faculty and staff at the University of Louisville??? Vicious and disrespectful: that’s how some faculty and staff describe the work environment at the University of Louisville. [WDRB]

African Americans living in Kentucky saw their average yearly incomes drop by more than 11 percent in one year, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released this week. The poverty rate also rose for black Kentuckians at a rate four times more than the rest of the state from 2013 to 2014. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 has learned, through MetroSafe, there is a shooting in the 3800 block of Vermont Avenue, in the Shawnee area. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Metro police said a 66-year-old man found dead last week was slain. Police said Michael Davis was killed sometime last Monday. [WLKY]

Seventy-three law enforcement agencies across the country will receive $20 million in federal grants to help them purchase and implement the use of body cameras, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance announced Monday. [HuffPo]

Crowds rallied together Sunday near the corner of 17th and Broadway with concerns of a new biodigester planned for the West Louisville neighborhood that would deal with methane gas. [WAVE3]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan touted two Louisville educational institutions Thursday during a stop in the city. [WFPL]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services is updating and expanding its surgical facilities in a $2.4 million project. [Business First]

Shane Corbin said his role as Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning director has been an exciting one. [News & Tribune]

Everything’s All Puppies & Rainbows

The head of the Federal Railroad Administration is urging railroads to be more forthcoming about the health of bridges that carry trains. [WDRB]

We forgot about this story during the TERLIT TWEETIN hullabaloo. Calling the decision “naïve” and “clumsy,” Metro Council members ripped a previously undisclosed plan by Mayor Greg Fischer’s office to reorganize how the city operates Neighborhood Place locations — a plan the city formed without input from other center partners, including state government and Jefferson County Public Schools. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s Independent candidate for governor is gaining name recognition for his performance during the Bluegrass Debate. [WHAS11]

Every fall, bourbon lovers make a pilgrimage to Kentucky for two things: the Kentucky Bourbon Festival, which runs through Sunday in Bardstown, and the fall bourbon releases. [H-L]

The owners of the troubled Economy Inn motel on Bardstown Road which has been the subject of numerous complaints about crime and drugs, is notified about the possible suspension of the hotel’s permit. [WLKY]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) are calling for a ban on the ability of employers to check the credit history of their employees, saying that the practice is a form of discrimination unfairly targets people who have suffered as a result of the 2008 financial crisis. [HuffPo]

Oldham County won’t be holding a special election September 29 to decide whether to allow sales of packaged alcohol. [WAVE3]

You can’t have a government that has spent decades waging various forms of war against predominantly Muslim countries – bombing 7 of them in the last six years alone – and then act surprised when a Muslim 14-year-old triggers vindictive fear and persecution because he makes a clock for school. That’s no more surprising than watching carrots sprout after you plant carrot seeds in fertile ground and then carefully water them. It’s natural and inevitable, not surprising or at all difficult to understand. [The Intercept]

The number of Kentuckians receiving tax credits through the federal health care law to reduce the cost of insurance is among the lowest in the country. And a state official says that shows Kentucky’s health insurance exchange is working the way it’s supposed to. [WFPL]

American household incomes lost ground last year and the poverty rate ticked up, a sign the U.S. economic expansion had yet to lead to gains for many Americans five years after the 2007-2009 recession. [Reuters]

Some Louisville workers haven’t seen their pay grow fast enough to keep up with the national inflation rate during the last five years, an analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show. [Business First]

It looks like it will be another month before the Floyd County Council decides whether or not to cut $28,000 from Floyd County Circuit Court probation and another $34,707 from Floyd Superior Court probation. [News & Tribune]

Fighting Over Grass As Folks Go Hungry

Some say growing grass on abandoned properties in Louisville is a growing problem. [WDRB]

Jack Conway went to western Louisville on Saturday and promised that he would appoint African Americans to the University of Louisville’s board of trustees if he were elected governor. [C-J/AKN]

The oil bust has been largely a supply-driven phenomenon. Unlike the last time that oil prices were this low — during the 2008-2009 financial crisis — this past year’s price collapse has not been because of destruction in demand, but due to too much supply. [WHAS11]

While standardbreds took to the track outside during Red Mile’s regular meet Saturday night, fans of casino gaming took their seats inside for the historic track’s first night of slots-style wagering. [H-L]

Who knew this was a thing? A crowd favorite returned to the Ohio River along Waterfront Park Saturday. A team from Waggener High School was one of 30 teams competing in the Annual Dragon Boat Festival. [WLKY]

Kamilah Brock says the New York City police sent her to a mental hospital for a hellish eight days, where she was forcefully injected with powerful drugs, essentially because they couldn’t believe a black woman owned a BMW. [HuffPo]

With the stroke of a paintbrush, a west Louisville man is transforming shoes. Dinero Andretti creates custom artwork for any shoe and any customer. Some customers have requested specific designs for causes. [WAVE3]

Hidden in the haze of the petrochemical plants and beyond the seemingly endless traffic jams, a Texas city has grown so large that it is poised to pass Chicago as the third biggest in the United States in the next decade. [Reuters]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is looking into concerns that deliberate and systemic bias pollute the process of allocating funds associated with the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, as more than $300,000 allocated for the program this year went unused. [WFPL]

Governor Steve Beshear announced today that U.S. Deputy Secretary of Transportation Victor Mendez, a champion for the nation’s vital transportation infrastructure, will visit Louisville next week to speak to an automotive conference and to view progress on the downtown Ohio River bridge project. [Press Release]

Louisvillians are practically salivating for a major-league sports team to support. [Business First]

Most employee positions or big purchases, with an exception for public safety, will not yet be approved for next year’s budget, but the Jeffersonville City Council is still discussing what’s to come during its annual budget workshops. [News & Tribune]

A Week Without Murders Would Be Great

Louisville Metro Police say they are investigating after the body of a 50-year-old woman was found inside a garbage can Friday afternoon. [WDRB]

Representatives with Heaven Hill distillery are reaching out to Louisville activists opposed to bringing a methane plant to the California neighborhood. [C-J/AKN]

A West Buechel man charged with animal cruelty after police say he allowed his dog to freeze to death. [WHAS11]

A new brand ambassador is quietly making his mark at Woodford Reserve. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police arrested a man Tuesday in connection with a shooting on East Caldwell Street earlier this month. [WLKY]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A huge array of ice age fossils, including the bones of mammoths, turtles and horses, were uncovered at a Southern California construction site this summer. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro police are conducting a death investigation after a 50-year-old woman was found dead in West Louisville, but neighbors said they don’t believe her death was an accident. [WAVE3]

Dawn Johnson and her domestic partner, Mohamed Diallo, used to live in a shabby Bronx apartment, supported by his job as a mechanic. The building owner allowed the apartment to go weeks without running water and more than a year without heat. [NY Times]

Louisville housing advocates are concerned that the city is being shortchanged in the state’s distribution of federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, which are used to build or rehabilitate affordable rental housing. [WFPL]

As Congress gets back to work this week, it’s facing a nearly unprecedented number of deadlines and political dramas. [WaPo]

The leadership of the Louisville-based Independent Pilots Association, which represents pilots flying for Louisville-based UPS Airlines, has called on its members to authorize a strike against the company. [Business First]

Clark County Commissioners overstepped their authority by ordering landfill funds be used to foot a raise for Highway Superintendent Jim Ross, who said later he felt pressured not to reveal what he knew in order to keep his job. [News & Tribune]