Violence & Poverty In Compassionate City? Surely That’s Not Our Reality

Violence and poverty took center stage at a west Louisville forum on Wednesday. [WDRB]

A war between two rival gangs has left several wounded and dead this summer, including a 14-year-old and 21-year-old whose funerals are Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Thursday, August 18 started as a normal day on the job for Metro Parks and Recreation workers’ Ricky Duncan and Bryan Haynes.
“Clean up the park, pick up paper, deliver picnic tables, clean grills,” said Duncan.

The University of Kentucky violated the state’s Open Records Act by refusing to disclose documents the Herald-Leader requested concerning a Hazard cardiology practice that UK once owned, the attorney general’s office has ruled. [John Cheves]

Blaine Hudson may be a big deal for some but don’t forget that he allowed – literally – most of what Robert Felner did to occur. He knew it was happening and enabled the shenanigans. [WLKY]

Donald Trump paid the IRS a $2,500 penalty this year, an official at Trump’s company said, after it was revealed that Trump’s charitable foundation had violated tax laws by giving a political contribution to a campaign group connected to Florida’s attorney general. [WaPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Interim University of Louisville President Dr. Neville Pinto sounded off Wednesday over letters from donors threatening to withhold millions of dollars in donations. [WAVE3]

Three federal prisons in California and others nationwide appear to be falling short in preparing inmates for safe release into society, investigators are warning. [McClatchy]

Work is beginning in earnest to develop a plan to take Louisville into the next two decades. [WFPL]

Donnie Gaddis picked the wrong county to sell 15 oxycodone pills to an undercover officer. If Mr. Gaddis had been caught 20 miles to the east, in Cincinnati, he would have received a maximum of six months in prison, court records show. In San Francisco or Brooklyn, he would probably have received drug treatment or probation, lawyers say. [NY Times]

The 11-day Kentucky State Fair attracted an attendance of 564,937 for its 112th outing, held at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville. That’s down slightly from the recorded 2015 attendance of 601,672. [Business First]

Democratic candidate Shelli Yoder, running for the Ninth Congressional District, released the last five years of her tax returns, and she is calling on her opponent, Trey Hollingsworth, to do the same. [News & Tribune]

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LMPD Looks For Answers, Needs Your Help

Do people really believe the folks responsible for one of the biggest Metro Animal Services scandals in history – those now running Louisville Forward – can solve this city’s problems? That’s a terrifying prospect. [WDRB]

Student-run newspapers can be great experiences, giving students a taste of what they’ll face if they continue with a journalism career. They learn to chase important stories and dig for the facts. They learn to take on powerful institutions and hold officials accountable. [C-J/AKN]

The city of Louisville is calling on residents for ideas to improve the health of the city. [WHAS11]

Oh, look, Valarie Honeycutt Spears noticed that there were more than 200 testing violations in Kentucky schools. She’s failed to investigate anything in Montgomery County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Detectives with the cold case unit at the Louisville Metro Police Department hope the anniversary of a Louisville man’s death will prompt someone to come forward. [WLKY]

Religious freedom is a valid defense for a Michigan business owner who fired a trans woman after she asked to dress in accordance with her gender identity, a federal judge ruled Thursday. [HuffPo]

Are you excited about all the new apartments downtown no one will be able to afford? [WAVE3]

Middle- and lower-income children don’t visit eye doctors as often as wealthier kids, and as a result, thousands of them may have undiagnosed sight-threatening conditions, U.S. researchers say. [Reuters]

Matt Bevin has asked the Kentucky Court of Appeals to overturn an order that blocked his overhaul of the University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [WFPL]

Surprise! Fraternity atmosphere can (especially in Frankfart) make state capitols hotbeds of sexual harassment. [USA Today]

Remember that big warehouse fire at Appliance Park last year? GE Appliances has a new plan for the site. [Business First]

Health officials in Clark County are taking a different path toward a yearlong plan for a county needle exchange. [News & Tribune]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Your Governor’s Gonna Choke Medicaid

One in four Kentuckiana counties lost residents over the last five years, according to federal data that show outlying areas are the biggest winners and losers of regional population change. [WDRB]

Isn’t it fun watching Kentucky’s half-literate governator claim “God” has sanctioned his extreme Medicaid cuts? That’s what Jesus would do – choke even more out of the working poor, deny access to dental and vision, claim it’s helping them. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! Twenty-four hours have passed since caution tape and Louisville Metro Police squad cars blocked off Louis Coleman Drive near Young Avenue after three men were discovered inside a Park DuValle home. [WHAS11]

The Medicaid revamp proposed by Gov. Matt Bevin last week is built on a belief that providing health care to low-income people somehow robs them of their dignity. Also, that 20 percent of Kentuckians lacked health insurance only a few years ago, not because they couldn’t afford it, but because they were disengaged or didn’t understand deductibles. On that dubious base, Bevin wants to replace a fairly straightforward system with a red-tape tangle of penalties, incentives, premiums and cutbacks in coverage, including some proposals that the federal government already has rejected in other states. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian accident in Compassionate Possibility City. Police are on the scene after a pedestrian was hit on Dixie Highway at Rockford Lane. [WLKY]

Donald Trump appeared to shift his position on a blanket ban on all Muslims entering the United States, saying on Saturday he wouldn’t be bothered if a Muslim from Scotland or Great Britain entered, according to reporters from CBS and CNN. [HuffPo]

If it’s not a shooting, a pedestrian death, a stabbing or a child dying in a hot car, it’s a drowning. A child who was found in a pond in the Buechel area died at Kosair Children’s Hospital on Sunday night. [WAVE3]

Lives are on the line: the smearing of LGBT individuals by right-wing extremists is more than disturbing – it’s dangerous. [Salon]

The Louisville Metro Council on Thursday unanimously approved the city’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year. [WFPL]

Hawaii’s governor signed a bill making it the first state to place its residents who own firearms in a federal criminal record database and monitor them for possible wrongdoing anywhere in the country, his office said. [Reuters]

More than a decade ago, the Louisville International Airport began a cooperative advertising program to help carriers offset some of their expenses if they launched new service here. [Business First]

The number of people getting probation instead of jail time is growing quickly under new sentencing rules, but communities that oversee probation programs say they don’t have enough money to handle the influx. [News & Tribune]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Really Gonna Miss All This Compassion

Gov. Matt Bevin must first fill two open seats on the University of Louisville Board of Trustees before the board can take up a proposed vote of “no confidence” in the leadership of President James Ramsey, according to the terms of a settlement reached last month in a lawsuit challenging the board’s lack of minority representation. [WDRB]

A new survey of Louisville roads released Tuesday by Metro Public Works shows a slight improvement in the city’s overall road conditions, but more than one-third of major thoroughfares are still so deteriorated that they require “immediate attention,” including rehabilitative work. [C-J/AKN]

Compassionate City just can’t stop killing its people. [WHAS11]

That line of pear trees in the Palomar neighborhood in south Lexington is gorgeous, fluffy and decked out like clouds descended to suburban earth. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Additional charges could be filed after a University of Louisville student was shot and killed during a triple shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WLKY]

A new report nearly doubles previous predictions for sea level rise if global emissions continue unabated, portending a doomsday scenario for many of the world’s coastal cities. [HuffPo]

According to the city of New Albany, preliminary work to prepare for the final planned section of the city’s portion of the Ohio River Greenway project has begun. [WAVE3]

In these first years of the 21st century, we may be witnessing a new world being born inside the hollowed-out shell of the American system. [Bill Moyers]

In the United States, we like to think that our success is determined only by how hard we work. But in reality, some of it’s just luck. And some of that luck has to do with things we can’t control: Our race. Our gender. Our sexual orientation. What language we grow up speaking. [WFPL]

Shandra Woworuntu arrived in the US hoping to start a new career in the hotel industry. Instead, she found she had been trafficked into a world of prostitution and sexual slavery, forced drug-taking and violence. It was months before she was able to turn the tables on her persecutors. Some readers may find her account of the ordeal upsetting. [BBC]

When you buy a car, the salesman makes a commission. The same’s often true when you buy insurance from an agent — unless they’re selling you a health plan from Louisville insurance giant Humana Inc. or one of the other major insurers who have decided not to pay them. [Business First]

Michael Shepard headed to his campus food court this week looking for students hungry for political action. He came away unsatisfied. [News & Tribune]

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Thank You For The Fun In 2015

Yes, we’ve cut back quite a bit here to focus on Page One but we still get around to covering Louisville-centric material once in a while. As much as I’d love to fold this site into P1KY as a ‘section’ of sorts (have tried to since 2009), you folks keep coming back.

You either love the schadenfreude of the occasional Metro Animal Services scandal or get a kick out of seeing how long it’ll take us to snuff this joint out. Doesn’t matter why – just glad you continue to keep TVV bookmarked.

So let’s take a look at some of the most-trafficked stories of the year. Our work this year didn’t result in new laws to hold Greg Fischer’s people accountable (like in 2014!) but that doesn’t mean we didn’t hold some feet to the fire.

In no particular order:

Thank you again for always checking in. And for constantly visiting Page One.

Here’s to 2016!

P.S. This is the final time we’ll consistently beg. Throw us some crumbs?

Another Reason To Think Swift Is Gross

If Greg Fischer’s involved in discussing the future of the South End, you know it’s doomed. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority ended its total ban on firearms and agreed Monday to give promoters and booking agents of events at the KFC Yum! Center the right to decide whether ticketed visitors can carry firearms into the downtown arena. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you need another reason to distrust Greg Fischer and his people to protect anything. Quite a fascinating trip down memory lane. [WHAS11]

Veterans and active duty military personnel are invited to visit the Kentucky Derby Museum and Churchill Downs free of charge on Wednesday in honor of Veterans Day. [H-L]

A case of tuberculosis at the JBS Swift processing plant is being investigated by the health department. [WLKY]

Oh, nowwwwww we know why Anne Northup is five Old Fashioneds deep in Marco Rubio’s world. Gay panic beams are on high, henny. [HuffPo]

The UAW says Ford’s investment in U.S. plants of $9 billion will create or keep about 8,500 jobs over the next four years. [WAVE3]

In December 1988, Jörg Winger was a West German Army radio operator eavesdropping on Soviet military channels when he overheard a startling message: The Russians wished him Merry Christmas by name. “That was the moment where we realized that we had moles on the base,” he recalled. [NY Times]

PEE ALERT! Former U.S. Rep. Anne Northup has endorsed Marco Rubio for president and will lead his efforts in Kentucky’s first ever presidential caucus in March. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear another challenge to the Affordable Care Act, this time to decide whether religiously affiliated organizations such as universities, hospitals and charities can be free from playing any role in providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Yum Brands Inc. again is getting negative press for its food-supplier practices. This Washington Post story from today identifies Yum — which owns the KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut brands — as the last major fast food company not to embrace higher-quality food sourcing that takes animal welfare into account. [Business First]

An ordinance to give $75,000 to a local organization aimed at eliminated homelessness advanced at Thursday night’s New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Bad News For UofL Continues To Flow

When Kentucky and Indiana start charging drivers to cross the Ohio River next year, a cadre of behind-the-scenes workers will oversee toll transactions on three bridges. It’s estimated that more than 110,000 vehicles will use those spans each day. [WDRB]

A “major progress announcement” in regard to the Downtown Crossing portion of the Ohio River Bridges Project is scheduled to be made by Gov. Steve Beshear and other top officials Monday morning. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Plans are proceeding to build in Mercer County the largest solar-powered generating facility in Kentucky. Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities announced Friday that they have secured a contract for engineering, procurement and construction of the facility, and that construction is expected to begin in November. [H-L]

Oh, wait! Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Black men from around the nation are gathering on the National Mall to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March and call for policing reforms and changes in black communities. [HuffPo]

It’s the latest unfavorable national headline for the University of Louisville. This one reads, “Louisville created and continues to nurture dangerous culture for women,” and it tops a story that was posted on Sports Illustrated’s website Friday. [WAVE3]

Back in 1990, as the debate over climate change was heating up, a dissident shareholder petitioned the board of Exxon, one of the world’s largest oil companies, imploring it to develop a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from its production plants and facilities. The board’s response: Exxon had studied the science of global warming and concluded it was too murky to warrant action. The company’s “examination of the issue supports the conclusions that the facts today and the projection of future effects are very unclear.” [LA Times]

In what alternate universe does Louisville have a transportation plan that doesn’t suck? [WFPL]

The color of debt: how collection suits squeeze black neighborhoods. [ProPublica]

Louisville, meet your new integration overlord. His name is Rick Jelinek, and he’s been selected by Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. to help it integrate Louisville-based health insurer Humana Inc. into its business. [Business First]

Clarksville is moving forward with the next phase of its comprehensive plan, with the Planning Commission now working toward writing up the formal plan based on input gathered at five recent public meetings. [News & Tribune]