Another Reason To Think Swift Is Gross

If Greg Fischer’s involved in discussing the future of the South End, you know it’s doomed. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority ended its total ban on firearms and agreed Monday to give promoters and booking agents of events at the KFC Yum! Center the right to decide whether ticketed visitors can carry firearms into the downtown arena. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you need another reason to distrust Greg Fischer and his people to protect anything. Quite a fascinating trip down memory lane. [WHAS11]

Veterans and active duty military personnel are invited to visit the Kentucky Derby Museum and Churchill Downs free of charge on Wednesday in honor of Veterans Day. [H-L]

A case of tuberculosis at the JBS Swift processing plant is being investigated by the health department. [WLKY]

Oh, nowwwwww we know why Anne Northup is five Old Fashioneds deep in Marco Rubio’s world. Gay panic beams are on high, henny. [HuffPo]

The UAW says Ford’s investment in U.S. plants of $9 billion will create or keep about 8,500 jobs over the next four years. [WAVE3]

In December 1988, Jörg Winger was a West German Army radio operator eavesdropping on Soviet military channels when he overheard a startling message: The Russians wished him Merry Christmas by name. “That was the moment where we realized that we had moles on the base,” he recalled. [NY Times]

PEE ALERT! Former U.S. Rep. Anne Northup has endorsed Marco Rubio for president and will lead his efforts in Kentucky’s first ever presidential caucus in March. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear another challenge to the Affordable Care Act, this time to decide whether religiously affiliated organizations such as universities, hospitals and charities can be free from playing any role in providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Yum Brands Inc. again is getting negative press for its food-supplier practices. This Washington Post story from today identifies Yum — which owns the KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut brands — as the last major fast food company not to embrace higher-quality food sourcing that takes animal welfare into account. [Business First]

An ordinance to give $75,000 to a local organization aimed at eliminated homelessness advanced at Thursday night’s New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Bad News For UofL Continues To Flow

When Kentucky and Indiana start charging drivers to cross the Ohio River next year, a cadre of behind-the-scenes workers will oversee toll transactions on three bridges. It’s estimated that more than 110,000 vehicles will use those spans each day. [WDRB]

A “major progress announcement” in regard to the Downtown Crossing portion of the Ohio River Bridges Project is scheduled to be made by Gov. Steve Beshear and other top officials Monday morning. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Plans are proceeding to build in Mercer County the largest solar-powered generating facility in Kentucky. Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities announced Friday that they have secured a contract for engineering, procurement and construction of the facility, and that construction is expected to begin in November. [H-L]

Oh, wait! Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Black men from around the nation are gathering on the National Mall to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March and call for policing reforms and changes in black communities. [HuffPo]

It’s the latest unfavorable national headline for the University of Louisville. This one reads, “Louisville created and continues to nurture dangerous culture for women,” and it tops a story that was posted on Sports Illustrated’s website Friday. [WAVE3]

Back in 1990, as the debate over climate change was heating up, a dissident shareholder petitioned the board of Exxon, one of the world’s largest oil companies, imploring it to develop a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from its production plants and facilities. The board’s response: Exxon had studied the science of global warming and concluded it was too murky to warrant action. The company’s “examination of the issue supports the conclusions that the facts today and the projection of future effects are very unclear.” [LA Times]

In what alternate universe does Louisville have a transportation plan that doesn’t suck? [WFPL]

The color of debt: how collection suits squeeze black neighborhoods. [ProPublica]

Louisville, meet your new integration overlord. His name is Rick Jelinek, and he’s been selected by Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. to help it integrate Louisville-based health insurer Humana Inc. into its business. [Business First]

Clarksville is moving forward with the next phase of its comprehensive plan, with the Planning Commission now working toward writing up the formal plan based on input gathered at five recent public meetings. [News & Tribune]

Hilarious/Terrifying Tip We Received…

Remember Donald Robinson?

One of the architects of the Sadie scandal at Metro Animal Services? The guy who ultimately got a promotion to work for Develop Louisville?

A tipster tells us he’s received ANOTHER PROMOTION!

He’ll allegedly be serving as an Assistant Director in Codes & Regulations.

What’s next? Giving Margaret Brosko the job Sadiqa Reynolds is leaving behind?

Possumbilly City.

Hope Henderson Doesn’t Copy Secrecy

A family is trying to figure out why their dad was stabbed at a Louisville gas station. [WDRB]

A backup power generator at a pumping station could have prevented April’s massive flooding and a big sewage spill at Louisville’s Morris Forman Water Quality Treatment Center, state officials have concluded. [C-J/AKN]

The Phoenix Hill Tavern (PHT) and Jim Porter’s Good Time Emporium closed permanently on Monday, June 1. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics has wrapped up a 10-year, $2.5 million donation from BB&T that will result in a new program on capitalism and funding toward the college’s $65 million renovation. But Gatton officials stepped back from the more controversial aspects of the original 2004 agreement, including a requirement for an Ayn Rand reading room, named for the novelist and free market philosopher. [H-L]

A Louisville park is hosting a night of camping in June as part of a national celebration. [WLKY]

U.S. police have shot and killed 385 people during the first five months of this year, a rate of more than two a day, the Washington Post reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

A minister has a new plan to try to curb crime in West Louisville. [WAVE3]

It’s almost like these folks in Henderson didn’t bother talking to anyone living in the real world in Louisville. [Henderson Gleaner]

A resident must work full-time and earn at least $14.17 an hour to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment in Louisville, according to a recent study from the National Low Income Housing Coalition. [WFPL]

Among African American adults with low education and income levels, the increase in risk of heart disease or stroke associated with living in poverty is largest for women and people under age 50, according to a large new study. [Reuters]

Ford Motor Co. CEO Mark Fields said aluminum-body F-Series Super Duty Trucks will be launched next year and that the design will “wow people.” [Business First]

Parts of South Clarksville could be the next Newport, Ky., or at least a bustling addendum to the Louisville metropolitan area. [News & Tribune]

History Ignored In Compassionate Land

Two years ago the University of Louisville, Metro Council, Mayor’s Office and the Downtown Development Corporation unveiled some historic markers downtown.

The markers, designed by renowned sculptor Ed Hamilton, were to be placed at sites denoting locations of sit-ins on 4th Street.

Here’s a look back at the event:


Here we are in 2015.

Discarded to make way for what is presumed to be an Embassy Suites parking lot:


We reached out to Greg Fischer’s folks last night to find out what’s going on. You know we’re not going to sugar-coat anything, so here’s the deal: they lied, had no idea what was going on, claimed they’d received no communication on the matter.

But here’s the deal. This issue has been quietly bubbling up over the past few days and several elected officials have received emails and telephone calls about the destruction of history. People like David Tandy, Tom Owen, other council members and Greg Fischer.

Here’s a taste of the messages they’re receiving:

I am deeply disturbed that the marker commemorating the civil rights era sit-ins on Fourth Street sits with some trash leaning against a building. These markers were initiated by the late Dr. J Blaine Hudson and designed by Ed Hamilton. Reportedly this is to make way for a parking lot for the Embassy Suites hotel. For a long time now there have been complaints of routine racial profiling and discrimination against African Americans on Fourth Street Live. This development adds insult to injury and is unacceptable. This is shameful and I would like to know how you will address this outrage.

Claiming there’s nothing to see here, move along, just business as usual? Seems fitting. Particularly in light of the non-stop discrimination and racial profiling going on at 4th Street Live.

Maybe someone will finally stand up to the Fischer steamroller and force his team to think before acting. Maybe someone like Christy Brown will finally chastise Fischer publicly instead of behind closed doors. Maybe David Tandy, who is in part responsible for the Cordish mess, will have the sense to say something profound?

Possibility City. Compassionate City. Buzzwords.

Pretty sad. It’ll be whitewashed in 3, 2…

It’s Downtown Demolition Update Time!

This weekend Greg Fischer took a wrecking ball to some historic buildings downtown that resulted in a major backlash.

His crew have claimed an asbestos danger had to be taken care of prior to demolition.

But guess who can’t/won’t provide documentation when asked about it.

If the documentation exists? They should pony up. If not? It’s time for fines.

Related: How on earth does the city pull together an emergency demolition crew overnight and on a weekend like that? There’s lots of speculation that the demolition was planned long before the wrecking ball rolled in. When previous instances of Fischer secrecy are considered, it’s tough not to wonder.