The Weekend: Just A Shooting Spree

Louisville Metro Police spokesperson Carey Klain says a total of four people were shot during two separate weekend incidents. Nothing to see here, move along. [WDRB]

Here are some changes in Jefferson County schools that students and parents should know before classes start up again. [C-J/AKN]

Three lucky Louisville birds saw a new beginning Friday, July 24. The Raptor Rehabilitation of Kentucky Inc., or RROKI, released three Peregrine Falcons at Hayes Kennedy Park after months of rehabilitation. [WHAS11]

A bunch of fat, racist, white guys played dress-up on Friday and showed their true colors. Kentucky’s state government should not turn its back on Confederate symbols, including the “stars and bars” battle flag and Jefferson Davis, speakers told more than a hundred people at a “Southern pride” rally outside the Capitol Friday. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! If you love stories about shootings that your elected leadership is desperate to ignore, here’s another. [WLKY]

Americans’ views of Sen. Bernie Sanders have grown more favorable as they continue to learn more about him, according to a new Gallup poll. [HuffPo]

Where is Blue? Can’t he buy this, tear it down and pave things over for a parking lot? Could operate a shuttle service to the new Costco. [WAVE3]

Despite widespread belief to the contrary, no federal law explicitly protects LGBT people from discrimination. Thursday marks the introduction of The Equality Act, a comprehensive bill that would, if passed, add “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the protections that already exist based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. But it also would do more than that. [ThinkProgress]

The idea of converting downtown Louisville’s one-way streets to two-ways has support from business proponents, but motor vehicles aren’t the only way to get around the city. [WFPL]

The H-2 visa program invites foreign workers to do some of the most menial labor in America. Then it leaves them at the mercy of their employers. Thousands of these workers have been abused — deprived of their fair pay, imprisoned, starved, beaten, raped, and threatened with deportation if they dare complain. And the government says it can do little to help. [BuzzFeed]

Louisville-based Almost Family Inc. (NYSE: AFAM) announced plans to purchase Jacksonville, Fla.-based Ingenios Health Co. Ingenios provides in-home clinical assessments for Medicare Advantage, Medicaid and others in seven states and in Washington D.C. [Business First]

One candidate has been tabbed and another will soon be selected to fill vacated positions in upcoming New Albany City Council races. [News & Tribune]

Seeing “Cordish” Is Like Seeing A Big Car Crash On The Side Of The Road

Because the company doesn’t investigate, it just covers things up and pays people off. However, Smith refused to explain how the company investigated the allegations on their own. “I will not go into that,” Smith said when he was asked how the company does it’s own investigations. [WDRB]

Dismayed by allegations of racial discrimination at 4th Street Live, activists denounced the entertainment district and its developer on Wednesday, suggesting that the developer has some civil rights groups in its pocket. [C-J/AKN]

The person police said is behind a threatening note left at the Louisville Jewish Community Center is now behind bars. [WHAS11]

Brown-Forman CEO Paul Varga said Wednesday that the company aspires to grow Woodford Reserve, Old Forester, the Herradura tequila family and other major labels into billion-dollar brands. [H-L]

Property owners near GE Appliance Park have until Saturday, Aug. 1 to submit claims for cleanup costs related to April’s six-alarm fire. [WLKY]

It’s a whole new day for Republican presidential contenders making their second bid for the White House. Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is making serious efforts to woo black voters, and is becoming one of the fiercest critics of real estate mogul Donald Trump. Meanwhile former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, known for his stringent opposition to same-sex marriage, is softening his rhetoric about gay people. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? A dog left inside a car in the hot sun died from heat exhaustion, leading to the arrest of an Oldham County woman. [WAVE3]

Though most states are slowing their emissions, the report shows eight states moving in the opposite direction, each seeing an increase in its emissions rate between 2008 and 2015. They include Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Idaho and Alaska. [Climate Central]

Barry Barker would rather not talk about some buses in TARC’s fleet. They’re buses like the one Metro Councilman Tom Owen rode into downtown early Tuesday morning. That bus stalled and had to be banged, slammed and shoved by the driver to get running again, Owen said. [WFPL]

Even as immigration remains a hot topic in the U.S. presidential campaign, the number of people emigrating from Mexico to the United States, legally and illegally, has dropped sharply in recent years, research published Wednesday shows. [Reuters]

U.S. News & World Report released its annual Best Hospitals List Tuesday, which ranks hospitals on medical specialties such as cancer, cardiology, orthopedics and so on. [Business First]

The state will pay $124,500 to end a lawsuit brought by a man who wasn’t provided with a sign language interpreter during his mother’s criminal hearings in 2010 and 2011. In March, the U.S. District Court Southern District of Indiana in New Albany found in favor of Steven Prakel after he claimed courts and judges in Dearborn County failed to hire an interpreter during his mother’s hearings related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated and driving on a suspended license charges. [News & Tribune]

PEE ALERT: Fischer Hired Private A P.I.

The Cordish Companies, the company that manages 4th Street Live!, is under fire after the release of a new report that outlines widespread allegations of discrimination. [WDRB]

Now Greg Fischer has hired a private investigator? HAHAHA. His scandals just won’t go away. The man can’t hire anyone who isn’t dirtier than Jerry Abramson’s housing director. [C-J/AKN]

Citing his innovative approach, vision and leadership in managing and maintaining park facilities and programming, Mayor Greg Fischer today named Seve Ghose as the new director of Metro Parks and Recreation. Prediction on how long it takes for this guy’s scandal to surface? [WHAS11]

The only reason not allow the demonstration is because they know it harms their case when people see it’s just slot machines by a different name. Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate denied a motion by The Family Foundation to require racetracks to provide an in-court demonstration of historical wagering, or instant racing. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The number of heroin cases flooding Louisville’s courts has surged from 190 in 2011 to more than 1,500 in 2014. [WLKY]

One of the nation’s most recognizable names in climate science, Dr. James Hansen, released a new paper this week warning that even 2 degrees Celsius of global warming may be “highly dangerous” for humanity. [HuffPo]

A university board with no black members is unacceptable, say two African American leaders. They are asking Kentucky’s Attorney General to get involved on the makeup of University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [WAVE3]

President Obama is enjoying a winning streak lately, with the Supreme Court reaffirming his signature health care law and Iran agreeing to curbs on its nuclear program. But one longstanding goal continues to bedevil him: closing the wartime prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. [NY Times]

Members of the Justice Resource Center and the West Louisville Minister’s Coalition want Attorney General Jack Conway to weigh in on whether Gov. Steve Beshear broke state law when he did not appoint a single African-American to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees. The groups sent a letter to Conway Tuesday. [WFPL]

Hillary Clinton trails three top Republican presidential candidates in matchups in three key swing states — Iowa, Colorado and Virginia — a new Quinnipiac poll finds. [The Hill]

In February, Louisville-based Almost Family Inc. announced plans to purchase Buffalo, N.Y.-based WillCare HealthCare. It looks like that transaction will be closing soon. [Business First]

After a failed referendum in May, a consultant may give the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp. the advantage next time around. [News & Tribune]

Plans, Commissions, Studies, Buzzwords

Jefferson County Public School bus drivers vote Tuesday on a contract that offers more money for working troublesome routes. [WDRB]

Here’s yet another “plan” from Greg Fischer. Because we all know a plan from Washington that provides zero funding and only hype will solve this city’s murder problem. Fortunately, most people in Louisville see this for what it is. [C-J/AKN]

As stats continue to roll in like Thunder Over Louisville, it looks like event in its 26th year is proving to be a successful one. [WHAS11]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

Another day, another murder. Police remained at the scene of a shooting in the 2500 block of Duncan Street in Portland more than 12 hours after it was reported. [WLKY]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

Another train death? A pedestrian died after being hit by a train in Pleasure Ridge Park Monday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

If you plan on dining out Wednesday, there’s a chance a portion of your final bill will help fund patient services at The Healing Place, a drug and alcohol recovery shelter in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

Food delivery service might be one of the latest trends to pick up in Louisville. Takeout Taxi has been a staple in Louisville for more than 15 years and works with 102 restaurants in the area. And of course, some restaurants have their own delivery drivers. But it seems that in the last year, more food delivery services have come to Louisville. [Business First]

Residents of Clark and Floyd counties will soon get a taste of what the ongoing Ohio River Greenway Project could become — and it’s much more than a system of multi-use pathways and river views. [News & Tribune]

The Weekend: Killing Time In Louisville

Just a reminder that these things continue to happen in Possibility City. [WDRB]

For so long, he searched for the word. To describe what he felt but dare not say aloud. To rationalize the thoughts that consumed his days. To understand why being Jennifer, despite his most fervent attempts, just didn’t feel right. [C-J/AKN]

And then this. A woman was rushed to the hospital after a shooting in the Parkland neighborhood on July 20. [WHAS11]

The power washer was spraying away another year’s worth of grime this week as residents of Fancy Farm prepared for the annual picnic at St. Jerome’s Parish, where Kentucky’s politicos flock on the first Saturday of August each year. [H-L]

But don’t worry! A theme park is adding a new roller coaster. Everything is fine. [WLKY]

The transition to a renewable economy may be a painful one, particularly in this era of aversion to active government. [HuffPo]

The start of a two day celebration for the 25th anniversary of the Signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act kicked off on Sunday in Shawnee Park. [WAVE3]

Just like in Kentucky, where it’s good for the Beshear Family’s wealthy donors and not so great for everyone else. The global economy is improving. Just don’t tell many of the people who live and work in it. [CBS News]

Following last month’s landmark Supreme Court ruling allowing gay marriage in Kentucky, Louisville’s tourism agency has ramped-up its outreach to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. [WFPL]

Japan’s Mitsubishi corporation is making a big apology. It’s not for any recall or defect in its products, which include automobiles, but for its use of American prisoners of war as forced labor during World War II. [NPR]

Dallas-based Omni Hotels & Resorts likely has a few interesting weeks ahead. [Business First]

A community literacy project using retired newspaper racks will kick-off Saturday in New Albany at the annual Monarch Celebration. [News & Tribune]