Deadly Weekend In Compassionate City

One person is dead following a shooting at a park in southwest Jefferson county. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer unveiled his budget plan Thursday, devoting $2.5 million toward the Affordable Housing Trust Fund, which has been woefully underfunded since its inception eight years ago. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! With shootings continuing to rise in the area, Kentucky’s lieutenant governor is reaching out in efforts to help tackle the problem. [WHAS11]

Kentucky officials say unemployment rates fell in 83 of the state’s counties between April 2015 and April 2016. Jobless rates rose in 33 counties and stayed the same in four. [H-L & Press Release]

Maybe E-town is the worst. Police have arrested an Elizabethtown man on a felony charge that he struck his adult son in the head with a claw hammer. [WLKY]

The presidential campaign of Donald Trump has largely been a policy-free, fact-free, detail-free event, based on emotion (especially fear), pandering to shallow slogans (“Make America Great”), and the aggressive personal and ad hominem abuse of his Republican and Democratic opponents. [HuffPo]

Two people, a male and a female, were shot early Sunday morning near the University of Louisville campus. [WAVE3]

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says Edward Snowden performed a “public service” by triggering a debate over surveillance techniques, but still must pay a penalty for illegally leaking a trove of classified intelligence documents. [CNN]

Louisville is now officially in ozone season, the several months every year when pollution and meteorological factors contribute to unhealthy ozone levels in the area. [WFPL]

The Federal Reserve should raise interest rates “in the coming months” if the economy picks up as expected and jobs continue to be generated, U.S. central bank chief Janet Yellen said on Friday, bolstering the case for a rate increase in June or July. [Reuters]

Kentucky State Fair Board chairman Mark Lynn has appointed a search committee to find a replacement for Clifford “Rip” Rippetoe, the former fair board president and CEO, who recently departed to take a job in San Diego. [Business First]

For kids in Floyd County this summer, there will be such a thing as free lunch. Starting June 6, children under the age of 18 and adults enrolled in a state-approved education program for the mentally or physically disabled can get lunch and a snack at no charge. [News & Tribune]

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Fun Weekend Of Compassionate Shootings

Police are investigating a shooting that happened overnight near U of L’s campus. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools has agreed to pay $1.75 million to the family of a 16-year-old disabled boy who suffered two fractured legs —a life-threatening injury — after he was physically restrained by a teaching assistant. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The public is beginning tours of Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home. [WHAS11]

Hotel and motel stays in Fayette County will cost more this fall. On Thursday, the Urban County Council voted unanimously to increase the Fayette County hotel and motel tax by 2.5 percentage points to pay for a nearly $250 million overhaul and expansion of the Lexington Convention Center. That means hotel taxes will rise to 9.5 percent. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating the death of a woman in south Louisville. [WLKY]

The United States has killed the leader of the Afghan Taliban in an air strike in a remote border area just inside Pakistan, Afghanistan said on Sunday, in an attack likely to dash any immediate prospect for peace talks. [HuffPo]

Two people were shot early Sunday morning near the University of Louisville campus. [WAVE3]

Your risk of getting killed by a car goes up with every mile per hour. [ProPublica]

The Portland Investment Initiative, an organization founded by developer Gill Holland with the goal of purchasing and renovating real estate in the West Louisville neighborhood, has closed on two new properties. [WFPL]

Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, promised on Thursday to roll back some of America’s most ambitious environmental policies, actions that he said would revive the ailing U.S. oil and coal industries and bolster national security. [Reuters]

Two Louisville small businesses will receive more than $100,000 in loans that will aid in the advancement of two aging buildings. [Business First]

When Betty Watkins envisions what Charlestown might look like in five or 10 years, what she hopes for seems simple enough. [News & Tribune]

Racist Republicans Are Really Butthurt

University of Louisville President James Ramsey received total compensation of $2.8 million from the school’s nonprofit foundation in 2014, while the university’s former provost Shirley Willihnganz received $1.1 million and Ramsey’s chief of staff, Kathleen Smith, received $859,181. [WDRB]

The second-graders in Sarah Bowling’s class at Dunn Elementary were on a mathematical scavenger hunt. Students cradling clipboards moved around the room matching groupings of things and learning the concept that three groups of five things total the same as five groups of three things. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! There is no fallout, just a bunch of racists calling for the death of Ricky Jones. [WHAS11]

As more coal companies file for bankruptcy, it’s increasingly likely that taxpayers will be stuck with the very high costs of preventing abandoned mines from becoming environmental disasters. [H-L]

Norfolk Southern is pursuing criminal charges against an Ohio man for disrupting rail service. [WLKY]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) went all in on Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.), the head of the Democratic National Committee, on Saturday, saying he supports a primary challenger in her re-election bid for her House seat and would remove her from the DNC if elected president. [HuffPo]

The decision came after a Brown School Student Based Decision Making (SBDM) Council meeting on Tuesday night. [WAVE3]

Most shootings with four deaths or injuries are invisible outside their communities. And most of the lives they scar are black. [NY Times]

On a rainy Friday afternoon, about a half-dozen people stay dry inside the storied Phoenix Hill Tavern on Baxter Avenue. [WFPL]

Uhhh… [ThinkProgress]

Three descendants of Brown-Forman Corp. founder George Garvin Brown have been elected the company’s board of directors, and three other descendants will leave the board. [Business First]

By upgrading its lights in city hall, Jeffersonville expects to save $12,000 this year. The energy and cost savings are part of Duke Energy’s Smart Saver Incentive Program, which rewards businesses that replace equipment with higher-efficiency products by lowering the costs of purchasing new equipment. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Ting not your thing? Want to be on the AT&T network with unlimited talk and text and cheap data? Join Cricket and you’ll get a $25 referral credit, $50 port-in credit and another $50 if you’re leaving T-Mobile. [Cricket]

Gun Nuts Visited Murder City This Weekend

Louisville Metro Police are investigating a double homicide in the 4000 block of River Park Drive, near South 40th Street. [WDRB]

It’s a prime example of infill – using land in already developed areas for new homes. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! And not far away from the Expo Center, dozens gathered to pray for victims of gun violence. [WHAS11]

Donald Trump brought his brand of feel-good fascism back to Louisville to receive an endorsement from National Rifle Association leaders and to speak to its national convention. [Tom Eblen]

Police were called to the scene of a shooting near Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

Exaggerator took advantage of sloppy conditions and a “dream trip” to win the 141st running of the Preakness Stakes by 3-1/2 lengths in Baltimore on Saturday, ending Kentucky Derby winner Nyquist’s bid for the Triple Crown. And two horses died because of course they did. [HuffPo]

Many people gathered around the city Saturday at different events promoting unity and safety. [WAVE3]

A new study by the Pew Research Center spurred a rash of headlines last week about “the dying middle class.” But the word “dying” might be more appropriate if we were watching the regrettable-but-inevitable effects of natural forces at work. We’re not. We’re seeing the fruits of deliberate action – and sometimes of deliberate inaction – at the highest levels of power. The great American middle was never large enough, even at its height. It always excluded too many people – sometimes, shamefully, merely for their skin color. And now, instead of growing and becoming more inclusive, it’s fading away instead. [Bill Moyers]

Exaggerator has taken home the second gem in horse racing’s triple crown. The colt won a mud-filled Preakness Stakes on Saturday, handing rival Nyquist the first loss of his career and effectively ending his shot at a triple crown. [WFPL]

A powerful array of the Republican Party’s largest financial backers remains deeply resistant to Donald J. Trump’s presidential candidacy, forming a wall of opposition that could make it exceedingly difficult for him to meet his goal of raising $1 billion before the November election. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville is expanding its Enterprise CarShare program to downtown, offering the service for the public at its Health Sciences center. [Business First]

The Floyd County Commissioners voted 3-0 to fund LifeSpring Health System and Rauch, Inc. from the tax levy instead of the general fund. But minutes after taking that vote Tuesday, they reversed it, voting 2-1 to keep the two out of the levy. [News & Tribune]

At Least There’s Good Bourbon News

Check out the spin/excuses from Jack Conway’s former spokesperson. A meeting held Wednesday was supposed to address the JCPS code of conduct. However, JCPS and the Metro Public Safety Committee saw the clock run out on a conversation many are waiting to have. [WDRB]

Louisville’s Coalition for the Homeless announced Monday that the overall number of homeless people in the city has dropped for the third year in a row — but those numbers don’t change local agencies’ disappointment in the federal government’s decision to cut their funds by 11 percent this year. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky bourbon production hit a nearly 50-year high last year. [WHAS11]

The Republican leader in the Senate says most candidates for president have released their tax documents as presumptive GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump insists he’ll wait until after an IRS audit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Ten years ago a 2-year-old Louisville girl was shot multiple times and her mother was killed. [WLKY]

More than 7 million previously uninsured Americans gained health coverage in 2015, the second full year of the Obamacare coverage expansion, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

While JCPS tries to provide social and emotional support for students in the form of Student Response Teams, Positive Behavior Coaches and other resources, Metro Council members voiced their concern that it is not enough. [WAVE3]

Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump said it would take another 9/11 to wake up border security — and predicted refugees would plan the next attack. [The Hill]

Faculty and staff within the Jefferson County Public Schools system continue to call out district administration for potential changes to teacher salary structure and the student code of conduct. [WFPL]

Interviews with dozens of women who have worked for Donald Trump or interacted with him socially reveal a pattern of often unsettling personal behavior by the Republican presidential candidate, The New York Times reported on Saturday. [Reuters]

Kroger isn’t just in the beginning stages of grocery delivery, it’s been testing refining things in Lexington and other markets so it can be rolled out ASAP. [Business First]

Anesthesiologist Jaime Guerrero, who had a practice in Jeffersonville, was sentenced to 100 months in prison Thursday by United States District Judge Greg N. Stevens, and according to the terms of a prior plea agreement, agreed to forfeit his license to practice medicine and real property owned by Guerrero Real Estate Investments, LLC. [News & Tribune]