Let’s All Freak Out Over Google Fiber!

Officials at U of L say they are going to make medical care for transgendered persons a priority. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools wants to extend its contract to keep its $190/hour spokeswoman. Way to go, Louisville, for screwing things up again. [C-J/AKN]

Bardstown Police issued a short release Thursday morning saying that one of their officers has been suspended. [WHAS11]

Boy, is this guy in for a real treat. David A. Byerman, who has served two terms as Nevada’s Senate secretary, is the choice of a search committee to be director of the Kentucky Legislative Research Commission. [H-L]

This kind of fluff is why people apparently still turn to this website for Louisville Metro Animal Services news and not the teevee folks. [WLKY]

The 16 NFL stadiums that will host NFL games this weekend have cost taxpayers nearly $3 billion, a new analysis found. [HuffPo]

Family members are desperately searching for answers after a driver hit and killed their loved one and severely injured another woman in Valley Station over Labor Day weekend. [WAVE3]

Maybe this means Louisville is going to get some sweet, sweet GOOGLE FIBER sometime soon. [Click the Clicky]

Mary Cooksey had a tough time getting a pizza delivered to Kingston Park apartments. “They said they won’t come in Kingston,” she said. [WFPL]

Federal immigration officials are issuing far fewer detainer requests, also known as immigration holds, to state and local law enforcement agencies seeking immigrants who are in this country illegally. At the same time, the requests that are issued don’t appear to be targeting serious, or convicted, criminals. [NPR]

If you have driven down Third or Fourth streets south of Broadway lately, you might have noticed a pile of concrete and dirt on Spalding University’s campus. [Business First]

The New Albany police union won portions of its arbitration case against the city, but both sides labeled the decision as essentially a split. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City’s Back To Shooting Everyone

The future of a Louisville YMCA branch is in jeopardy as traffic at the Berrytown location continues to be low despite numerous efforts to boost attendance. [WDRB]

The more attention news directors give this troubled kid, the worse he gets. It’s almost worse than the way Louisville media folks try to eat each other alive out in fits of jealousy and bitterness. [C-J/AKN]

Two men accused in a Louisville bar attack say they were offered money to carry out the crime. [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ordered Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to appear in his courtroom Thursday and explain why she should not be held in contempt of court, according to Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins. All of her deputy clerks are supposed to join her, Watkins said. [H-L]

Police are investigating two shootings and are not yet saying if the two incidents are related. [WLKY]

All across the country, Americans are finding that the prices of the prescription drugs they need are soaring. Tragically, doctors tell us that many of their patients can no longer afford their medicine. As a result, some get sicker. Others die. [HuffPo]

A new festival is set to highlight a multitude of talented artists from Louisville and across Kentucky. The Golden Culture Art and Music Festival is making history as it brings attention to an often over-looked local music subculture: hip-hop. [WAVE3]

Homeschooling has been legal throughout the United States for about 25 years, but regulations vary dramatically by state. Only two states require background checks for parents who choose to homeschool, and just ten require parents to have a high school degree. [ProPublica]

Kentucky lags behind national averages for ACT college-readiness benchmarks in core subjects, with the biggest deficit in math. [WFPL]

As many as 6.9 million Americans haven’t made payments on their student loans in nearly a year, which is up 6 percent from last year, according to data released last week by the U.S. Department of Education. A 2013 Federal Reserve Bank of New York report shows that the delinquency rate may actually be higher than people think because half of student loans are in forbearance, deferment or grace periods. [Think Progress]

By the time Tom Jurich, vice president and director of athletics for the University of Louisville, addressed the media at a news conference this morning, word had spread that U of L planned a $55 million expansion of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [Business First]

In the small Parke County town of Rockville, population 2,591, police officers are donning new body cameras before they head out on patrol. [News & Tribune]

Russell’s A Start And A Big Step Forward

The number of people being shot in Louisville is on the rise, according to Louisville Metro Police. [WDRB]

Imagine a solar city in a leading coal state. Increasingly, advocates and some public officials are doing just that in Louisville, as the price of using the sun to keep the lights on continues to fall. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out about what James Procell, of UofL’s music lie-berry, discovered. [WHAS11]

Sometimes the best ideas really do come while enjoying a glass of bourbon. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands of zombies took over the Highlands on Saturday night, but it’s what some of the undead left behind that has neighbors upset. [WLKY]

Louisville is the 4th-most segregated city in America (or the metro area is), apparently, and no one wants to talk about it. When are we going to talk about it? Or are we always just going to hold feel-good events and talk about puppies and rainbows on the teevee instead of trying to improve life for people living in the West End? [HuffPo]

We often hear the stories of homicide victims, but the stories of people who actually survive violent attacks often are left untold. [WAVE3]

The phrase “police militarization” conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. [NPR]

In about a month, Metropolitan Sewer District officials will wrap up a short-term program aimed at buying out homeowners whose houses flood frequently. [WFPL]

The national campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, runs through Labor Day weekend and is aimed at reducing deaths and injuries caused by motorists driving drunk or impaired by drugs. During the 2014 Labor Day holiday, there were six alcohol-related highway deaths on Kentucky roadways. Statewide, law enforcement officers arrested 55 people for DUI during that same time period. The 2015 Labor Day enforcement period begins at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept.4 and extends through Monday, Sept. 7 at 11:59 p.m. [Press Release]

Revitalizing Russell — once a bustling economic center in West Louisville — has been a hot topic for some community leaders for years. But the buzz seems to be increasing lately as several projects have committed substantial investment to the neighborhood. [Business First]

Jeffersonville Parks Authority President Ed Zastawny says he wants the public to know the city only had an issue maintaining the 10th Street medians once the Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission stopped taking care of them early last year. [News & Tribune]

Can We Just All Focus On The West End? Just For Once? Please?

Oldham County voters may soon decide whether to expand alcohol sales. The Oldham County Chamber of Commerce says it now has enough signatures to ask for a special election. [WDRB]

Members of Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, have scheduled a series of meetings with Jefferson County legislators in early September to discuss business-related issues as well as legislation expected to come up during the 2016 General Assembly convening in January. [C-J/AKN]

On a stage set to celebrate the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 52nd annual Country Ham Breakfast & Auction concluded Thursday morning, Aug. 27, with a show-stealing $400,000 bid for the Kentucky State Fair’s Grand Champion Ham. [WHAS11]

Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Arrests were made Thursday morning at the annual ham breakfast at the Kentucky State Fair. [WLKY]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

The goal to bring 43 new homes to the Russell neighborhood started a decade ago, and Thursday, Mayor Greg Fischer announced a plan to make good on that promise. [WAVE3]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

Jim Wathen has been selling military merchandise at the Kentucky State Fair for nearly a decade. By noon on a recent weekday, he had already restocked a rack of Confederate flags. He said the 3-by-3-inch Confederate flag, his top seller, is a piece of military history. [WFPL]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

A study released Wednesday shows that congested roads are costing the typical Louisville metro area driver more than 40 hours in delays annually and almost $1,050 in lost time and burned fuel. [Business First]

Former New Albany Police Department Officer Laura Schook is proceeding with a federal case against the city as well as an appeal of the decision to fire her in May, and she’s doing so without an attorney. [News & Tribune]

Just Flipping Give Cahoots The Boot

Wednesday is the first day of school for approximately 4,000 early childhood education students in JCPS — but 1,100 have not turned in the required immunization forms and will not be allowed to attend class. [WDRB]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

The Civilian New Albany Traffic Supervisor has resigned amid an investigation into the supervisor’s implementation and execution of duties, according to New Albany Police Chief Todd Bailey. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

An effort to revitalize west Louisville is gearing up. Many people consider Broadway and Ninth Street the dividing line between downtown and west Louisville. [WLKY]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

We brought you the video after a large fight broke out recently in the busy bar area of Bardstown Road. Business owners said after the closings of Jim Porters, Phoenix Hill and several bars downtown, much more traffic headed to the Highlands. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Foiled in state court, a Jefferson County Public Schools teacher filed a federal court suit Monday claiming the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System illegally raised teachers’ share of pension contributions to shore up a retirement plan that is only half-funded. They sure have shopped this story around an awful lot. [WFPL]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

Two hour-long dramas about the world of Kentucky bourbon may be coming to TV soon. [Business First]

Twelve added employee positions — mostly in the public safety sector — are major components of Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore’s proposed 2016 budget. [News & Tribune]

Your Good Morning Grass & Jay Walking

You may have noticed some grass around Louisville standing taller than people. Lots of people complained about the eyesore and even called it a hazard, so we asked the city what is taking so long to get it cut. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Council members ripped into Mayor Greg Fischer’s office on Tuesday afternoon about the lack of prompt grass cutting at city parks and medians along major thoroughfares. [C-J/AKN]

There are around 1,000 school bus drivers carrying tens of thousands of Jefferson County Public School students during the school year. Officials say sometimes an office mistake can happen. [WHAS11]

In the early 1880s, James M. Bond walked from Barbourville to Berea, leading a young steer that he sold to pay for tuition. Bond, who was born into slavery, graduated from Berea and later from Oberlin College with a divinity degree. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! And it’s Metro Council, not City Council. [WLKY]

A year ago, after 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, police responded to even peaceful daytime protests in the St. Louis suburb by deploying attack dogs and tactical vehicles, pointing sniper rifles at peaceful protesters, arresting people for simply standing still on public sidewalks, flooding demonstrators with tear gas — often without warning — and shooting them with bean bags, wooden pellets and balls filled with pepper spray. [HuffPo]

Louisville is one of the states with the highest number of pedestrian related crashes in the country, according to Louisville Metro Police Department Sgt. Ruby Ellison. [WAVE3]

The phone rings just as Katrina Fingerson and Latoya McClary are about to leave to start their shift at the Goddard Riverside Community Center. [ThinkProgress]

General Electric said Monday it is unveiling a new top-load washing machine design that will mark the biggest new product launch in its laundry division in two decades. [WFPL]

The poor are treated like human ATM machines, and our politicians are actively encouraging their exploitation. In the 1960s, the Lyndon Johnson administration launched an official War on Poverty. Needless to say, poverty has emerged victorious. [Salon]

An old distillery in Kentucky soon will start spirits production again. In May 2014, Peristyle LLC announced plans to restore and reopen the historic Old Taylor Distillery in Woodford County. Work has been taking place at the facility since. [Business First]

An ordinance adopting an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration from the Clark County health officer was formally passed Thursday evening at a county commissioners meeting. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

At Least Louisville Has Fine Bourbon

Louisville is obsessed with killing its people. Everything is puppies and rainbows, though. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville has been named one of the most LGBTQ-friendly campuses in the South by Campus Pride Index. [C-J/AKN]

This weekend marked the annual Newburg Community Days. For more than 50 years, the Newburg community began a tradition of a homecoming weekend in August to celebrate unity, pride and welcome back former residents. [WHAS11]

Everybody freaked out about the minimum wage again this weekend. [H-L]

At least he wasn’t shot? Metro police are investigating after a man was stabbed Sunday night. It occurred in the 1800 block of Frankfort Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WLKY]

A St. Louis County policeman who boasted of how he spent his “annual Michael Brown bonus” has prompted an investigation by the department. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Possibility City doesn’t take public transportation seriously. [WAVE3]

Less than a month after one of the University of Cincinnati’s police officers shot and killed an unarmed driver who was not a student during a traffic stop, the school said on Friday it would resume off-campus patrols. [Reuters]

Responding to backlash over his leadership changes at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear says he will appoint Prospect cattle breeder Jack Ragsdale as chairman emeritus of the committee he led for 41 years. [WFPL]

American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern has long portrayed her organization as a beacon of openness, once declaring “we made a commitment that we want to lead the effort in transparency.” But when the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, opened an inquiry last year into the Red Cross’ disaster work, McGovern tried to get it killed behind the scenes. [ProPublica]

Bourbon Women, a Louisville-based women’s group that’s focused on bourbon culture, will host its second annual “sip-osium” Friday, Aug. 21, through Sunday, Aug. 23. [Business First]

A representative for the recently formed Clarksville GOP filed a complaint Thursday regarding event permit requirements not being enforced by the town’s Planning and Zoning Department. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]