NYE Dept Of Awful Update Stuff

Louisville International Airport is filling four out of five available airplane seats, the highest rate since at least 2007. [WDRB]

We can’t keep track of all the UofL scandals these days! Two former University of Louisville biosafety employees who lost their jobs last year following federal investigations of biological safety practices have filed a federal lawsuit against the university, claiming repeated violations of health and safety regulations and an attempted cover-up by university officials. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Get a grip, Julie Raque Adams, and quit it with the fear mongering. It’s like you want to lose your state senate seat. [WHAS11]

Kentucky child welfare officials place too many children with mental health problems in institutions for too long when they could be better served by relatives or foster families, according to a leading child advocacy group. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The family of a teenager charged with murder in the death of another teen said they want the truth to come out. [WLKY]

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Leave it to Louisville teevee folks to continue the Mall St. Matthews freak out. [WAVE3]

When officers take the lives of those they are sworn to protect and serve, they undermine their own legitimacy. [The Atlantic]

A prominent member of Louisville’s Board of Zoning Adjustment and Planning Commission has resigned his positions. [WFPL]

Open data has contributed to dramatic improvements in a wide array of fields over the past few decades, affecting how we look at astronomy, genetics, climate change, sports and more. But until recently, crime has gone without the open analysis prevalent in other fields because crime data has been closely held by law enforcement agencies and has usually only been released in bulk at monthly, quarterly or annual intervals. [FiveThirtyEight]

When most of the assets of the Sam Swope Auto Group were sold to a Florida company earlier this year, the purchase price was not disclosed. But now we at least know the price of the bulk of the real estate involved. [Business First]

Counties in Southern Indiana are working on securing a grant that would help strengthen partnerships between local manufacturing industries and their workforces. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Quick, Freak Out Over Unruly Kids!

Mall St. Matthews on Shelbyville Road was shut down Saturday night after police say they had to respond to several disturbances involving teens. [WDRB]

Calls from customers who said they were shoved or knocked down during a Saturday night disturbance at the Mall St. Matthews started filtering into the St. Matthews Police Department early Sunday morning, while officers continued to investigate what exactly caused up to 2,000 people – mostly juveniles – to start fights that forced the mall to close early. [C-J/AKN]

Basically, teenagers are the worst. Also, RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! On Sunday police and security presence was heightened at Mall St. Matthews after it was shut down early Saturday night. Police responded to multiple disturbances involving thousands of young people. [WHAS11]

America’s newest family of Syrian refugees flew in late at night, and Sarhan Aldobai, 36, looked down from the plane at the distant lights of his new home. His wife was nursing their baby in the next seat. His five other children had fallen asleep. Sarhan took out the small world map he had carried since leaving Syria in 2012 and tried to trace the plane’s path. [H-L]

This can’t be hyped up enough and you should definitely go. A museum at a southern Indiana state park is about to reopen after undergoing a $6 million facelift over the past year. [WLKY]

Leaders of the church-based Sanctuary Movement vowed on Friday to offer their places of worship as refuge for immigrants facing deportation under an Obama administration crackdown on Central American families who entered the United States illegally. [HuffPo]

Forty minutes of scanner traffic explains why more than four dozen law officers from three neighboring departments descended on Mall St. Matthews Saturday night amid unfounded rumors of looting and gunfire. [WAVE3]

Canadian gaming company Amaya Inc has been ordered by a Kentucky court to pay $870 million in penalties to cover alleged losses by the state’s residents who played real-money poker on PokerStars’ website between 2006 and 2011. [Reuters]

The drug epidemic and absent-minded motorists are driving up the number of motor vehicle thefts in Louisville, police say. [WFPL]

The Republican Party is divided over whether to attack the science of climate change when opposing liberal policies. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s award-winning advertising campaign for Kynect, the state health insurance exchange, has ended. [Business First]

The Floyd County Council is planning on balancing the 2015 general fund budget Tuesday. The amount the council members will have to find or take from other accounts to make that happen is still under debate. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Surprise! More Bad UofL & JCPS News

A lawsuit against “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell may never see the light of day. [WDRB]

Greg Fischer made two key additions to his administration Wednesday in areas dealing with Louisville’s public safety and public assistance. The mayor announced Rashaad Abdur-Rahman will be the new director of the Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods office and Eric Friedlander will serve as acting director of the Community Services department. [C-J/AKN]

Data from Jefferson County Public Schools shows that a new grading scale appears to have increased the number of students getting A grades in classes. [WHAS11]

Glad to see there’s nothing important left to worry about. The University of Kentucky has sometimes been criticized for being a campus of independent units, with academic, athletics and health care divisions operating more separately than together. On a symbolic level, UK officials have decided that will no longer be the case. [H-L]

What the hell is this story about the guy killed in the Highlands? What? No, really, what the hell is that story? [WLKY]

The “Seinfeld” writer who coined “Festivus” wants Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) to stop tweeting about his beloved secular holiday. [HuffPo]

A JCPS bus driver was assaulted and robbed by students. The incident, according to the bus union president, happened on Friday at the Detrick Nichols compound off Taylor Blvd. [WAVE3]

While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky business groups are backing legislation that would expand expungements of some felony convictions. [WFPL]

The recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino have put pressure on local authorities to show they’re ready for that kind of violence. Some jurisdictions, such as Los Angeles, are stepping up exercises and terrorism simulations. [NPR]

With truckers in high demand, the online marketplace seeks to connect drivers with carriers that need something hauled. [Business First]

Some of Indiana’s grocery stores and liquor stores say a change in state law that allows alcohol sales on Christmas Day for the first time in decades won’t affect them because their stores are closed on that holiday. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Another Week of Messy UofL Scandals

As a cold snap reaches Kentuckiana this weekend one group is doing its best to keep the area’s homeless warm. [WDRB]

It’s almost like Jim Ramsey is being purposefully more terrible than usual in order to set Jerry Abramson up to take over. Ramsey is making Abramson look less terrible. [C-J/AKN]

According to Chief Rick Sanders, police found a 35-year-old man unconscious and unresponsive at the Red Carpet Inn on Hurstbourne Parkway. Jeffersontown officers who had received and been trained on how to use Naloxone were able to inject the man and get him to the hospital, saving his life. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s chief justice has denied a motion to remove a judge from all criminal cases but referred the case to a state disciplinary commission. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It has been a year and a half since a mother found her son killed and no one has been held accountable. [WLKY]

While the vast majority of Americans now have access to the Internet and mobile devices, regional and economic disparities persist for wired broadband access in the largest 100 American cities. [HuffPo]

The Center for Women and Families, a local non-profit organization that helps victims of domestic violence and abuse, needs help for the holidays with its Holiday Gift Card Drive. [WAVE3]

ICYMI: Matt Bevin took false equivalency to new levels this weekend when he used the sad situation in Johnson County to try to justify his special brand of Islamophobia. Unity and respect? Not so much. Empty words. [Page One]

The new head of the state’s Energy and Environment Cabinet, Charles Snavely, has been on the job for a little more than a week. It’s also been about that long since he served as an official on the state’s coal association governing board. [WFPL]

New calculations show that our already sizeable water footprint is 18% bigger than we thought. [BBC]

The University of Louisville and Norton Healthcare Inc. have reached a settlement agreement in their dispute surrounding Kosair Children’s Hospital. [Business First]

If the opening of the Big Four Bridge in Jeffersonville proved one thing, it’s that people want to get outdoors and exercise. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

This Jackie Green Bike Thing Is Great And Isn’t Getting Enough Press

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Obscure alcohol rules are so dumb. Cold beer won’t be for sale in Indiana’s grocery or convenience stores any time soon. [WDRB]

A longtime advocate for cyclist- and pedestrian-friendly transportation policies rejected a plea agreement Monday in Jefferson District Court on charges of blocking traffic and running a red light while on a bike. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet is moving forward with a $40 million project to widen Preston Highway from two to four lanes in Bullitt County. [WHAS11]

State Sen. Mike Wilson on Monday said he would file legislation in the 2016 General Assembly to allow public charter schools as part of a pilot in Fayette and Jefferson counties. [H-L]

At least Henry County seems to get it. Voters in Henry County have approved the full sale of alcohol across the county. [WLKY]

In a rare senatorial act, full-time Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio joined with a handful of fellow legislators on Friday in an attempt to block local municipalities from undercutting big telecom companies by providing cheap, fast internet service. This is the kind of thing Jamie Comer’s people — like Riggs Lewis — make happen. They work to kill municipal broadband, get rich off TWC, ATT and other providers. You can thank that set of Republican special interests for stifling competition and innovation. [The Intercept]

Metro Gubmint has a nearly $19 million surplus but don’t forget what’s suffered as a result. Metro Animal Services is always — ALWAYS — woefully underfunded. WIC clinics were slashed in a manner that made even Greg Fischer’s allies hate him. Streets are a disaster. Kids are hungry. People are homeless. [WAVE3]

Of course your new governor appointed a birther to his cabinet. Because of course he did. [Page One]

Matt Bevin’s newly appointed commissioner of revenue left his last job, at Lexmark International, after the Lexington-based technology company found a host of accounting errors and declared its internal financial controls to be deficient and in need of remediation. [WFPL]

Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced today that the sixth annual ‘Cram the Cruiser’ food drive netted 123 tons (246,705 lbs) of food for Kentucky families. [Press Release]

An FBI investigation of three University of Louisville officials involves the for-profit company that they operated out of the university. [Business First]

Leave it to mouth-breathers to freak out about the gays in Indiana. Sen. Travis Holdman hoped debate over his LGBT rights bill would weigh questions of religious liberty with the expansion of civil protections. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

New Albany Schools Have Come A Long Way

The New Albany Floyd County School board has added “sexual orientation” to its non-discrimination policy. [WDRB]

A University of Louisville study of asthma, older adults and indoor air quality is revealing a mix of potentially dangerous chemicals inside participants’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

The footage is hard to watch. “No mother ever wants to see anything like that and my daughter was clearly trying to get away from her and it hurt. It hurt a lot,” parent Valerie Gholston said. [WHAS11]

Top level administrators are being hired at the University of Kentucky at more than twice the rate of full-time faculty, according to UK employee statistics. [H-L]

Just hours after two people are arrested and brought in for questioning about a Tuesday night killing, the victim’s girlfriend hopes justice will be served. [WLKY]

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday there was “no data” to support the notion that the national debate over the use of force by police has made the country less safe, an idea that has sometimes been referred to as the “Ferguson effect.” [HuffPo]

Oh, right, that’s totally going to solve all of their problems. Just a few weeks after hosting a Halloween Party, a troubled motel on Bardstown Road is inviting the neighborhood over for another holiday event. [WAVE3]

Tell us more, Matt Bevin, about how great refugees have it and about how easy it is for them to find safety. LGBT refugees from across the Middle East flock to Turkey, escaping Islamist militias, sexual assault, and death threats. But what they find there leaves many in despair. [BuzzFeed]

With uncertainty about the future of his signature health initiative, Gov. Steve Beshear is touting the outcomes of Kentucky’s efforts to improve the well-being of residents. [WFPL]

More than half a dozen state governors have come out against President Obama’s plans to relocate several thousand Syrian refugees within the United States. Some have pledged to actively resist settlement of these refugees. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R), for example, signed a letter to Obama that begins “as governor of Texas, I write to inform you that the State of Texas will not accept any refugees from Syria in the wake of the deadly terrorist attack in Paris.” Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) issued an executive order instructing all “departments, budget units, agencies, offices, entities, and officers of the executive branch of the State of Louisiana” to “utilize all lawful means to prevent the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the State of Louisiana while this Order is in effect.” The problem for Jindal, Abbott and the other governors opposed to admitting refugees, however, is that there is no lawful means that permits a state government to dictate immigration policy to the president in this way. [ThinkProgress]

Surprise! UofL put Deborah Dietzler on leave. [Business First]

Residents within West Clark Community Schools’ boundaries won’t just vote for a president this time next year, but also a referendum project for the district. [News & Tribune]

UofL Continues Series Of Hot Garbage Fires

In the span of less than two hours Wednesday afternoon, the University of Louisville announced that its Board of Trustees executive committee would have a closed-door meeting Thursday morning — then said the committee would not meet after all. [WDRB]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering why your neighbor is snowed into hype about compassion? It’s because media outlets run crap like this, unchecked, as if it’s gospel. Mayor Greg Fischer is celebrating Louisville’s status as a compassionate city. [WHAS11]

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Maybe Louisville should try the same thing? The Lexington Parking Authority is giving people the opportunity to pay off parking tickets with food. [WLKY]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

The name of a man who was shot and killed Tuesday night in a Dixie Highway Taco Bell parking lot during dinner time has been released. [WAVE3]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Matthew Barzun, the American ambassador to the Court of St. James’s, stood before a buzzing, boisterous audience of several hundred teenagers in a poor borough on the southern edge of greater London and asked them what frustrated or concerned them the most about the United States. [NY Times]

Just wait til we start talking about affairs and sex scandals at LWC… Louisville Water Co. president and CEO Jim Brammell announced Wednesday that he will retire from the position, effective Jan. 1. [Business First]

While tentative tolling rates for the Ohio River Bridges Project have been set for almost two years, some details have yet to be finalized. For some, those details could make all the difference. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]