JCPS Is A Ton Of Awful Fun Again

JCPS officials have fired a teacher who was under investigation over accusations she had inappropriate contact with a student. [WDRB]

Former Jefferson County Board of Education member Debbie Wesslund says Adam Edelen’s JCPS audit was a fraud. Mainly because it was selective and manipulative, which everyone already knew. [C-J/AKN]

On June 23 Jefferson County Public Schools fired a bus driver, Melinda Sanders, who dragged a student, 7-year-old Ally Rednour, down a street by her backpack on May 15. [WHAS11]

Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld the nationwide tax credit subsidies to help people buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year and there are dozens of other events happening around the metro area to celebrate Independence Day. [WLKY]

You won’t believe this horrible Fox story about the homeless. Or maybe you will. [MMFA]

She was arrested, along with Louisville’s former Chief Financial Officer Steve Rowland, and charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct. The police report said they were engaged in “disruptive, provocative and intimate behavior.” [WAVE3]

They took a page out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. City workers and police cleared an encampment of homeless people from the west side of Baltimore on Friday morning, provoking a brief traffic-blocking protest and leaving some of the city’s homelessness services organizations chagrined at what they say was a surprise operation. [ThinkProgress]

James Blanton is the new director of the Louisville Free Public Library, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday. He takes over for retiring director Craig Buthod, who announced his resignation in November after 17 years on the job. [WFPL]

There have only been 9 days this year when the police have not killed somebody. Some news outlets put the number as high as 500 dead in the past six months, according to both The Guardian and Killed by the Police.Net. The Washington Post’s own investigation showed nearly 400 dead as of the end of May. [WaPo]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has approved a settlement that reduces the base rate increases sought by Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. [Business First]

It starts with a professional rodeo and ends with a demolition derby. In between there will be a queen pageant, midway rides, interactive activities for children and exhibits to view. And yes, there will be plenty of animals. [News & Tribune]

Let The Minimum Wage Freakout Begin

A Louisville Metro Council member is asking the mayor to take action concerning the Economy Inn on Bardstown Road. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Clerk Bobbie Holsclaw is turning over to Louisville Metro Government more than $2.46 million as surplus from fees she collected during her fourth, four-year term than ran through 2014. [C-J/AKN]

A Jefferson County Circuit judge has upheld an ordinance raising the city’s minimum wage to $9 an hour over the next three years. [WHAS11]

Redefining marriage for the nation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed one another. The 5-4 decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges reverses a Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that upheld state bans of same-sex marriage in Kentucky, Ohio, Michigan and Tennessee. Lower courts in all four states had struck down the bans as unconstitutional. [H-L]

Union workers at Appliance Park are getting ready to vote on a new contract. [WLKY]

Paleontologists in South Africa have announced the name for a new dinosaur species, but they didn’t have to do any digging to find the creature’s bones. [HuffPo]

A young woman was killed after a hit-and-run at 26th Street and Broadway, and the 19-year-old’s family members said they are begging for answers and justice. [WAVE3]

North Carolina and Tennessee are the latest states to side with telecoms, which have long lobbied against allowing cities to become Internet providers. [ProPublica]

Twelve years after first meeting and almost four years after being engaged, Tadd Roberts and Benjamin Moore on Friday became the first same-sex couple to be legally married in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. President Barack Obama said on Friday that for too long Americans have been “blind” to the “unique mayhem” caused by gun violence in this country. [Reuters]

Emptier words have never been spoken. Wiederwohl stresses the importance of transparency in public sector. [Business First]

Fired by the New Albany Merit Commission for conduct unbecoming an officer, Laura Schook is claiming two of the board members who voted to terminate her are serving illegally based on city ordinance. [News & Tribune]

But We Can’t Come Up With WIC Funds

Aetna Inc., the second-largest U.S. health insurer by market value, is closing in on an acquisition of Humana Inc. and could reach a deal as early as this weekend, several people with knowledge of the matter said. [Bloomberg]

A man is found dead in the middle of the street in a quiet Fern Creek neighborhood. [WDRB]

But we can’t afford WIC programs… Louisville waterfront officials have cobbled together just over $500,000 that will go for major enhancements around the Big Four Bridge on the Kentucky shore. [C-J/AKN]

People are freaking out about the sighting of a bear. [WHAS11]

The U.S. Supreme Court could issue a decision on Kentucky’s same-sex marriage ban as soon as Thursday, but Kentucky officials are staying mum on what, if any, preparations they’ve made if the justices vote to allow gay marriage. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Everybody is freaking out about some clouds. [WLKY]

A former Baltimore police sergeant took to Twitter Wednesday to air a stunning list of acts he said he participated in and witnessed during his 11 years on the city’s force. [HuffPo]

The giant hole in the ground where a couple of old buildings used to stand on Third Street makes it clear: Nothing is getting in the way of the new $300 million Omni Hotel project, not even the historic Louisville Water Company building. [WAVE3]

Racehorses are continuing to get quicker, a study of winning times spanning 165 years of racing indicates. [BBC]

Halfway into its first year, Louisville city officials and residents say a plastic bag ban for yard waste has been met with a surprisingly positive reception. [WFPL]

More Americans are renting — and paying more — as homeownership falls. [NY Times]

Names, birth dates, addresses and Social Security numbers may have been exposed after hackers gained access to classified Clarksville Town Court records Tuesday, a judge says. [Business First]

Less than 48 hours after nine black men and women were murdered inside a house of worship, prayers of encouragement, forgiveness and mercy were offered in the midst of a church that provided slaves safe passage during the Civil War. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Clowns Panic Over Needles

Why not work to educate the man? Maybe try to get him and people tossing about veiled threats and racist dog whistles to realize that crap isn’t okay? [WDRB]

One week into the opening of Louisville’s syringe exchange, health officials doled out 1,352 clean syringes to drug users and collected just 189. So get with the program, small town Kentucky! [C-J/AKN]

There is new information on a deadly night of crime sprees leading up to a Canadian tourist’s murder on Derby day. [WHAS11]

For Rand Paul, the rubber is meeting the road. In the wake of last week’s racist shootings in Charleston, S.C., the Republican Party has been torn on the issue of whether the Confederate flag should continue to fly on the grounds of the state Capitol in Columbia. [H-L]

Don’t worry, everything is puppies and rainbows with JCPS’ Donna Hargens! [WLKY]

After getting the cold shoulder, U.S. health insurer Anthem Inc. said it’s raising its offer to buy smaller rival Cigna Corp. for about $47 billion, including cash and stock. [HuffPo]

LMPD Chief Conrad promises real changes. We’ll believe it when we see it. [WAVE3]

Leave it to backwater Republicans to complain about Louisville’s needle exchange. [WKYT]

On any given night, as many as 300 people in Southern Indiana are sleeping in shelters, cars or on the street, according to a street count earlier this year. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a Los Angeles ordinance that lets police view hotel guest registries without a warrant violates the privacy rights of business owners, taking away what the city called a vital tool to fight prostitution and other crimes. [Reuters]

Greater Louisville Inc. said the 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly produced some definitive wins, but it also said that the state legislature missed key opportunities to move the state forward and help it become more business-friendly. [Business First]

After about two months on the job, new Jeffersonville Police Department Chief Kenny Kavanaugh says additional officers are needed to meet the demand of law enforcement within the city. [News & Tribune]

Crime, Murder, More FOP Shenanigans

Rapper Master P made a special stop while he was in Louisville this weekend. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police officers and area youths held a frank conversation following a recent police shooting at a forum in the California Community Center on Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

A news release that Congressman John Yarmuth “will announce his intentions for the 2016 campaign” on Monday triggered a buzz among Kentucky Democrats this weekend speculating whether he will seek a sixth term in the U.S. House and, if not, who might step up to replace him. [WHAS11]

The Metropolitan Sewer District quietly paid a $228,000 fine earlier this year for illegal sewage discharges as part of its ongoing program to curb overflows into local waterways. [H-L]

Two pedestrians were hit by a car late Friday night in Louisville, police said. [WLKY]

A substantial share of America’s youth remains economically disconnected, even as the economy continues to recover. [HuffPo]

People in the South End have been freaking out over the cancellation of this festival. [WAVE3]

Community members have both a constitutional right and a responsibility to question authority. They have a right to understand the policies employed by police, the parameters for deciding when deadly force is appropriate, and the training received on de-escalation techniques. It is unjust to equate the upholding of these rights as “anti-law enforcement” or “race baiting.” [ACLU]

Under certain scenarios, a large percentage of Americans could subsist on a diet made up of mostly local food, according to a new study. [WFPL]

The Confederate flag was adopted to represent a short-lived rebellion to extend and protect white supremacy and black slavery. [Vox]

Discover Financial Services said it plans to lay off 460 workers as it closes its mortgage origination business to focus on its profitable direct banking products, where the company sees greater growth opportunities. [Business First]

Some residents asked New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey Thursday to apologize for remarks he made earlier this month that they felt were offensive to gays and transgender individuals. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Finally Kicks Ass, Takes Names

Read part of the statement from the mayor & police chief:

Mr. Mutchler, in separate phone calls with both of us prior to his news conference, said he was seeking to clarify his position, strike a constructive tone, and emphasize that no person of good will should feel threatened in our city. After listening to his press conference remarks, we remain concerned that Mr. Mutchler, with the leadership position he holds, does not understand the impact of the tone of his remarks and original letter.

The threatening tone is not representative of the vast majority of our officers or our citizens — and many have told us that they have a significantly differently (sic) view than Mr. Mutchler. His words do absolutely nothing to help build community-police relations and undermine the noble and difficult work our police do every day, from keeping us safe and secure in our homes to protecting our First Amendment right to speak our minds.

Almost unprecedented for Fischer to take such a strong position.

Good on him.

Go Read This From The C-J Right Now

Click this link to go to the Courier-Journal right now.

Read that editorial.

Knowing that our own words are often misinterpreted or misunderstood, we read and re-read his comments. We tried walking a mile in the shoes of an obviously frustrated FOP president. But those shoes kept getting mired in one of the key byproducts of the backside at Churchill Downs.

MAGICAL!

Wow.

The editorial crew essentially said “horse shit” and it’s stirring an urge to re-subscribe.

UPDATE

Also go read this from Phillip Bailey.