Compassionate Cities Don’t Kill Like This

200 trees? Try 200,000. Then we can start talking about the tree canopy here in Possibility City. [WDRB]

A bipartisan pair of Louisville council members want to restrict Mayor Greg Fischer’s office from making any changes to the city’s portion of the Neighborhood Place partnership without Metro Council approval. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating the murder of a man found at the intersection of 20th and Chestnut streets. [WHAS11]

More than 100 former Jefferson County Public Schools students who dropped out are now re-enrolled in classes. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway after two people were found dead Monday afternoon inside a home in southeastern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Will body cameras be a tool for police reform? Only if bad policy doesn’t get in the way. [HuffPo]

Eight people have been wounded by gunfire in the Greater Louisville area since Friday afternoon. Four of them died. It is in this background that Louisville Councilwoman Mary C. Woolridge will introduce the new Commander of the Louisville Metro Police Department Second Division to the community.

The Shell Farms & Greenhouses is an expansive 1,000-acre property in Garrard County, 37 miles south of Lexington, Kentucky. The five-generation family farm is operated by 31-year-old Giles Shell and his 60-year-old father, Gary. The two are whizzes at making ornamental flowers flourish, and like most farmers in the area, the family has grown tobacco for years. [Newsweek]

The author of the bestselling book on people’s relationship with water will be among the speakers Monday during the IdeaFestival Water event. [WFPL]

On the evening of April 29th last year, in the southern Minnesota town of Waseca, a woman was doing the dishes when she looked out her kitchen window and saw a young man walking through her back yard. [New Yorker]

Sarah Davasher-Wisdom has been promoted to senior vice president of public affairs and strategy at Greater Louisville Inc. [Business First]

Throughout all three debates this election season, Jeffersonville mayoral candidates Mike Moore and Dennis Julius challenged the accuracy of some of each others’ statements, asking audience members to look it up for themselves. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Era: Nothing But Scandals & Sex

What this means is Mark Hebert (haha, just kidding/trying to get a rise out of Hebert) is prolly spilling the hooker tea. A former University of Louisville basketball player has given investigators a version of events that indicates strippers were in the players’ dorm on at least one occasion, a source close to the investigation told WDRB News. [WDRB]

You already knew Donna Hargens is as bad as the previous two heads of JCPS. None of this will come as a surprise to you, as it apparently does to education reporters. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, please, no one is shocked someone with integrity jumped ship from JCPS. [WHAS11]

Aww, lookit, Jimbo Ramsey has another sex scandal on his hands. And this one will probably cost him more than Robert Felner and the rest of the bunch combined. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Council’s Intergovernmental Affairs Committee received an update on the city’s Needle Exchange Program. So far, after almost four months, the program has had more than 800 participants, and more than 300 of them have come back more than once. [WLKY]

If you want to stop violence against people, stop violence against animals. [HuffPo]

A vegetable garden along Southwestern Parkway in the Shawnee neighborhood is sowing more than seeds. [WAVE3]

Some prominent Northern Kentucky Republicans have told the Enquirer they support Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. The bitterness among many Republicans against the tea party, which has challenged many in leadership recent years, might catch up to Republican candidate Matt Bevin, often seen as an outsider candidate who has heavy tea party support. []

21st Century Parks is scheduled to open the third of four parks next week. The quartet will eventually make up the Parklands of Floyds Fork — a donor-supported public park system near I-265 in eastern Jefferson County. [WFPL]

The lack of accurate information about police-involved shootings is roiling the nation’s law enforcement community, leaving officials unable to say whether high-profile killings are isolated events or part of an alarming trend, FBI Director James B. Comey said Wednesday. [WaPo]

Louisville’s Republic Bancorp Inc. has expanded its reach in Florida with the $32.3 million purchase of St. Petersburg, Fla.-based Cornerstone Community Bank. [Business First]

If you’ve ever seen an elderly person or a child in need and couldn’t resist lending a helping hand, then you might know how Jeffersonville police officer Amber Tharp feels every moment of every day. [News & Tribune]

The UofL Prostitution Scandal Rages On

There was a time, I now can admit, when I was really good at writing book reports on books I had not read. This is not the time for that. In evaluating the allegations soon to be brought forth in detail by a woman who says she was hired by former University of Louisville director of basketball operations Andre McGee to provide sexual services for men’s basketball recruits and players from 2010 to 2014, we can look at the smoke, we haven’t yet seen the fire. But it smells like something is burning. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday tightened the nation’s smog standard by nearly 7 percent, choosing a number that puts the Louisville area on the bubble for continued compliance. [C-J/AKN]

The Jeffersontown Police Chief spoke out Saturday and said gun violence in his town will not be tolerated. Sounds like Rick Sanders is back to pounding his chest? [WHAS11]

Dick Pitino may not read the new sexytime book but you know he’ll be listening to the audiobook! [H-L]

Things nearly turned deadly Thursday night in Jeffersontown as a father tried to buy a cellphone for his daughter. [WLKY]

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is stepping down in December after 7 years in the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Louisville has long been referred to as the River City, mainly due to its history as a flatboat and steamboat port carrying people and goods to and from the heartland from the city’s conception. But a big part of riverboat history that you may not know about lies right across the mighty Ohio River in Jeffersonville, Indiana. [WAVE3]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul said Saturday that his home state of Kentucky needs a governor willing to stand up to the federal government he aspires to lead from the White House. [ABC News]

Here’s hoping Greg Fischer doesn’t ruin Louisville’s chances at Google Fiber. Hopefully Google will rely on people like Ambassador Matthew Barzun and others. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer will join the city’s chief innovation officer, Ted Smith, on Monday to talk Google Fiber. [WFPL]

One Vatican official said there was “a sense of regret” that the pope had ever seen Kim Davis, a Kentucky county clerk who went to jail in September for refusing to honor a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and issue same-sex marriage licenses. [Reuters]

More than 360 local charities received donations Thursday as part of the Community Foundation of Louisville Inc.’s annual Give Local Louisville campaign. [Business First]

Several issues were brought to the stage, but Tuesday’s New Albany mayoral debate was bookended by who was missing from the discussion. [News & Tribune]

Closing Bars At 2:00 A.M. Is Just Silly

Sometimes what’s not your fault becomes your problem. “If they’re going to make these decisions, then they need to be held responsible for them, and not us,” said Wes Stafford, a Hillview resident. “They’re going to cover their tail by passing it off to us. We don’t like that.” [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer is asking community leaders to take a tour of Heaven Hill’s distillery in western Louisville next month to educate them about the organic waste material that will be used at a proposed methane plant. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police investigating a person’s death after a shooting in Old Louisville Sunday evening. [WHAS11]

When visitors descend on Lexington in late October for the Breeders’ Cup, they will be here primarily for the finest Thoroughbreds in the world. But they should stick around after the races to see what else the commonwealth has to offer. And there’s plenty. [H-L]

There will be no layoffs at Neighborhood Place Centers across Louisville. The Community Services Program provides assistance to low-income families. At a special meeting of the Metro Council, council members learned that the proposal to lay off employees has been rescinded. [WLKY]

Louisville can definitely handle a public market like this. For nearly four decades, the Union Square Greenmarket has served as a grand bazaar in Lower Manhattan, where produce, baked goods, flowers and foodstuffs are hauled in from the countryside (or some Brooklyn bakery) four days a week. And almost anyone can afford to shop there. [HuffPo]

A party is creating an uproar on social media for what’s being called a lack of respect for the dead. Pictures of the party’s setup near or in a cemetery have been shared dozens of times on Facebook. People who have worked to keep up the abandoned Eastern Cemetery on Baxter Avenue say it’s the latest insult to the people buried there. [WAVE3]

Some local law enforcement officers wonder why the fund used to provide training and salary supplements has grown but the stipend they receive hasn’t for more than 10 years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Some bar owners in Louisville say the city’s burgeoning bourbon and food scene could take a hit if the Metro Council changes closing times from 4 a.m. to 2 a.m. But leave it to Tom Owen to do something dumb. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says he is “absolutely” in the presidential race for the long haul, despite sagging poll numbers and his early debate struggles. [Politico]

Generation Tux, the startup online tuxedo rental company, could end up bringing more than the 80 jobs originally planned to Louisville, the company’s chief technology officer, Matt Howland, said in an interview with Louisville Business First Thursday. [Business First]

The Indiana Supreme Court upheld a Floyd County court’s decision to sentence a Southern Indiana man to the death penalty Thursday following his conviction for brutally murdering his mother’s friend in April 2012. [News & Tribune]

UofL Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves. In Other Words? Told Ya So Years Ago, Nothing Has Changed

Who could have known, over the past eight years, that there’s a morale problem with faculty and staff at the University of Louisville??? Vicious and disrespectful: that’s how some faculty and staff describe the work environment at the University of Louisville. [WDRB]

African Americans living in Kentucky saw their average yearly incomes drop by more than 11 percent in one year, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released this week. The poverty rate also rose for black Kentuckians at a rate four times more than the rest of the state from 2013 to 2014. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 has learned, through MetroSafe, there is a shooting in the 3800 block of Vermont Avenue, in the Shawnee area. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Metro police said a 66-year-old man found dead last week was slain. Police said Michael Davis was killed sometime last Monday. [WLKY]

Seventy-three law enforcement agencies across the country will receive $20 million in federal grants to help them purchase and implement the use of body cameras, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance announced Monday. [HuffPo]

Crowds rallied together Sunday near the corner of 17th and Broadway with concerns of a new biodigester planned for the West Louisville neighborhood that would deal with methane gas. [WAVE3]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan touted two Louisville educational institutions Thursday during a stop in the city. [WFPL]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services is updating and expanding its surgical facilities in a $2.4 million project. [Business First]

Shane Corbin said his role as Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning director has been an exciting one. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Still Loves Shooting People

Saturday was a big day for Louisville’s gay community. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police have recorded 77 suicides this year, a 30 percent jump compared to this time a year ago and one more than the city totaled all of last year. The suicide total also far exceeds the city’s homicide total this year, which stood at 53 as of Sept. 17. Officials at the state and city level, however, admit Louisville’s suicide count could be higher given that the police do not investigate all deaths that turn out to be ruled suicides. [C-J/AKN]

One of the three teens accused of violently beating a Louisville homeless man in June says they did it as a game. [WHAS11]

One year ago, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway met with a group of out-of-state trial lawyers who urged him to pursue litigation against the oil industry over a now-disused gasoline additive — methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE — found to contaminate groundwater. [John Cheves]

Louisville police are investigating after a man was shot early Saturday morning. [WLKY]

Nearly 1,000 people showed up at the Islamic Center of Louisville, Kentucky, on Friday to paint over anti-Muslim graffiti that appeared Wednesday night, according to a center director. [HuffPo]

Bleachers were packed at Western High School’s home football game Friday evening, hours after an anonymous active shooter threat. [WAVE3]

Republican candidate for governor Matt Bevin is up on the air with his first television ad of the general election following weeks of ads by his Democratic opponent Jack Conway and those on his behalf by the Republican Governor’s Association. Don’t look for any surprises. The ad relies on trusted Republican strategy of tying any Democratic opponent to President Barack Obama, who is deeply unpopular in Kentucky. [Ronnie Ellis]

Somi Babar huddled Thursday morning with a group of mothers, peering at the white exterior walls of the Louisville Islamic Center. [WFPL]

Federal Reserve policymakers appeared deeply divided on Saturday over how seriously problems in the world economy will effect the U.S., a fracture that may be difficult for Fed Chair Janet Yellen to mend as she guides the central bank’s debate over whether to hike interest rates. [Reuters]

Oh, that won’t be terrible at all. A new television show that connects Louisville-area entrepreneurs with local financial backers has named initial members of its panel. [Business First]

A company that operates dozens of nursing homes across Indiana — including three in Clark County — fired its top executive Friday, three days after federal agents searched his home and the company’s headquarters. [News & Tribune]

Where’s The Condemnation From Your Statewide Candidates Over This Islamophobia?

The Islamic Center in Louisville on River Road has been targeted by vandals and Mayor Greg Fischer is asking the community to help clean it up. [WDRB]

Wait, didn’t everyone determine years ago that the VA overpaid for that site because of shady politics? Let’s all turn a blind eye as our leaders figure out a way to make this disappear. [C-J/AKN]

Proposed changes to a city ordinance could make shutting down businesses that are the source of community complaints a lot easier. [WHAS11]

Watch it happen there before it happens in Louisville. Lexington will announce soon a plan to build a fiber-optic network to increase Internet speeds across the city, Mayor Jim Gray said Thursday. [H-L]

Scandal after scandal went down at Metro Animal Services over the last decade and all the teevee folks can come up with is a story about a stolen puppy. [WLKY]

Louisville is apparently the third most affordable place to live in the country. [HuffPo]

If you want to see privilege in action, watch these people freak out over a golf course. [WAVE3]

A U.S. watchdog office urged Congress on Wednesday to empower regulators to extend a Dec. 31 deadline for freight and passenger railroads to adopt new safety technology that could prevent major derailments and other deadly crashes. [Reuters]

Oh, look, Greg Fischer still thinks he’s going to successfully run for higher office. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer has declined to join other mayors around the country in signing a letter to President Obama supporting stricter national standards for smog. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell acknowledged Wednesday that he and the House Speaker are discussing a short-term government funding bill to avoid a shutdown on Oct. 1. [The Hill]

Plans for major improvements at the Jerry E. Abramson Terminal at the Louisville International Airport have been approved. [Business First]

A Clark County Sheriff’s Department captain agreed to a demotion to lieutenant and a pay reduction in lieu of a merit board hearing concerning allegations of misconduct. [News & Tribune]