New Albany Schools Have Come A Long Way

The New Albany Floyd County School board has added “sexual orientation” to its non-discrimination policy. [WDRB]

A University of Louisville study of asthma, older adults and indoor air quality is revealing a mix of potentially dangerous chemicals inside participants’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

The footage is hard to watch. “No mother ever wants to see anything like that and my daughter was clearly trying to get away from her and it hurt. It hurt a lot,” parent Valerie Gholston said. [WHAS11]

Top level administrators are being hired at the University of Kentucky at more than twice the rate of full-time faculty, according to UK employee statistics. [H-L]

Just hours after two people are arrested and brought in for questioning about a Tuesday night killing, the victim’s girlfriend hopes justice will be served. [WLKY]

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday there was “no data” to support the notion that the national debate over the use of force by police has made the country less safe, an idea that has sometimes been referred to as the “Ferguson effect.” [HuffPo]

Oh, right, that’s totally going to solve all of their problems. Just a few weeks after hosting a Halloween Party, a troubled motel on Bardstown Road is inviting the neighborhood over for another holiday event. [WAVE3]

Tell us more, Matt Bevin, about how great refugees have it and about how easy it is for them to find safety. LGBT refugees from across the Middle East flock to Turkey, escaping Islamist militias, sexual assault, and death threats. But what they find there leaves many in despair. [BuzzFeed]

With uncertainty about the future of his signature health initiative, Gov. Steve Beshear is touting the outcomes of Kentucky’s efforts to improve the well-being of residents. [WFPL]

More than half a dozen state governors have come out against President Obama’s plans to relocate several thousand Syrian refugees within the United States. Some have pledged to actively resist settlement of these refugees. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R), for example, signed a letter to Obama that begins “as governor of Texas, I write to inform you that the State of Texas will not accept any refugees from Syria in the wake of the deadly terrorist attack in Paris.” Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) issued an executive order instructing all “departments, budget units, agencies, offices, entities, and officers of the executive branch of the State of Louisiana” to “utilize all lawful means to prevent the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the State of Louisiana while this Order is in effect.” The problem for Jindal, Abbott and the other governors opposed to admitting refugees, however, is that there is no lawful means that permits a state government to dictate immigration policy to the president in this way. [ThinkProgress]

Surprise! UofL put Deborah Dietzler on leave. [Business First]

Residents within West Clark Community Schools’ boundaries won’t just vote for a president this time next year, but also a referendum project for the district. [News & Tribune]

UofL Continues Series Of Hot Garbage Fires

In the span of less than two hours Wednesday afternoon, the University of Louisville announced that its Board of Trustees executive committee would have a closed-door meeting Thursday morning — then said the committee would not meet after all. [WDRB]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering why your neighbor is snowed into hype about compassion? It’s because media outlets run crap like this, unchecked, as if it’s gospel. Mayor Greg Fischer is celebrating Louisville’s status as a compassionate city. [WHAS11]

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Maybe Louisville should try the same thing? The Lexington Parking Authority is giving people the opportunity to pay off parking tickets with food. [WLKY]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

The name of a man who was shot and killed Tuesday night in a Dixie Highway Taco Bell parking lot during dinner time has been released. [WAVE3]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Matthew Barzun, the American ambassador to the Court of St. James’s, stood before a buzzing, boisterous audience of several hundred teenagers in a poor borough on the southern edge of greater London and asked them what frustrated or concerned them the most about the United States. [NY Times]

Just wait til we start talking about affairs and sex scandals at LWC… Louisville Water Co. president and CEO Jim Brammell announced Wednesday that he will retire from the position, effective Jan. 1. [Business First]

While tentative tolling rates for the Ohio River Bridges Project have been set for almost two years, some details have yet to be finalized. For some, those details could make all the difference. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

Stumbo Lackey Wants To Be Pretzeldent

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

The Centers for Disease Control is in Scott County, Indiana, testing hundreds of people for HIV. [WDRB]

This should be an awkward Greg Stumbo-style disaster. David Yates is jumping into the race for Metro Council president next year in an effort to unify Louisville Democrats, suggesting incumbent David Tandy is losing support among the splintered majority caucus. [C-J/AKN]

The search is on for a murder suspect police say shot and killed a man near a Valley Station business Tuesday evening. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s police department hopes to have its officers equipped with body cameras by June. [H-L]

A pedestrian was struck and killed by an LMPD wrecker in the 4900 block of Southside Drive. [WLKY]

As friends and family gathered Tuesday at the funeral of Tyshawn Lee — one of the youngest Chicago residents lost to gun violence this year — to mourn and remember the boy, Father Michael Pfleger delivered a fiery eulogy indicting the city over the execution of a 9-year-old child. [HuffPo]

Here comes the positive media spin from Chad Carlton and crew about tolls. And whattya know, they couldn’t even get the facts straight about when the area last saw tolls. [WAVE3]

The last time Kentucky elected a Republican governor he ran into trouble with the Democratic attorney general. [Ronnie Ellis]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

In its ongoing Failure Factories series, the Tampa Bay Times is investigating the disastrous effects of the Pinellas County School Board’s 2007 decision to abandon school integration in favor of “neighborhood schools.” Schools in high-poverty black communities were promised additional funding and resources. Then the promises weren’t met, and performance at the schools has plummeted. [ProPublica]

An organization led by Louisville’s high-profile rehabilitation king Gill Holland has recently received $250,000 in private funding. [Business First]

New police body camera video shows a struggle during an arrest in Clarksville for which a local business owner was later found not guilty. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Bad Moment For JCPS

SurveyUSA has finally been kicked to the curb! [H-L & C-J/AKN]

Police say they arrested two men Tuesday night after an investigation into credit card skimming. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens named Tom Hudson, president and CEO of Louisville manufacturing company Nth/works, as the school district’s new chief business officer. [C-J/AKN]

Police in La Grange are asking for the public’s help in locating a woman missing for a month. [WHAS11]

Republican state Rep. Mike Harmon defeated state Auditor Adam Edelen, denying a second term to a politician many have seen as a rising star among Kentucky Democrats. [H-L]

Of COURSE Jefferson County Public Schools had another bad news day! [WLKY]

If France can do it, the United States can do it. France will end its ban on blood donations by gay men, its health minister said Wednesday, calling the move the end “of a taboo and discrimination.” [HuffPo]

Is Portland on the edge of changing or are things getting worse? Maybe all these incidents seem to be increasing because there’s increased media attention? [WAVE3]

It is rare to hear a candidate for the United States Senate so earnestly quote rock lyrics. Rarer still, lyrics from a Canadian progressive-rock band. But Rand Paul quoted “The Spirit of Radio” by Rush — a group whose members were similarly influenced by the writings of Ayn Rand — everywhere he went during the Republican primary in Kentucky in 2010. [NY Times]

Opinions issued by a federal appeals court Monday will allow two major air pollution-related lawsuits in Louisville to move forward. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s newest lieutenant governor-elect is unique in many ways. She and her running mate, Gov.-elect Matt Bevin, are some of this election cycle’s first victorious political outsiders. (Bevin had been likened to Donald Trump). Jenean Hampton is also the first African American to be elected to statewide office in Kentucky. And she’s just one of a handful of black women on the national level to identify with the tea party movement. [WaPo]

If you’ve been paying attention to the Louisville-area industrial real estate market during the last 12 to 18 months, you know the market is punching along at a rate rarely, if ever, seen for Louisville. [Business First]

Solutions for cars speeding through a neighborhood and taxis operating illegally in the city were both on the discussion list for the Board of Public Works and Safety in New Albany on Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

More Puppies & Rainbows For Metro Govt

Another day, another pedestrian hit in Possibility Compassionate City. [WDRB]

Western Louisville residents will have an opportunity to question the Metropolitan Sewer District about building a massive storage basin beneath Shawnee Park at a public meeting next Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

On Election Day people in southern Indiana decided they liked the direction their cities are going. Both New Albany and Jeffersonville decided to re-elect their current mayors for another term. [WHAS11]

There was no shortage of story lines in the Fasig-Tipton sales pavilion Sunday evening, from the bittersweet parting a couple of years in the making to the family who, once again, wasn’t that upset to leave some money on the table and take one of its favorite girls back home. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In Jeffersonville, Mike Moore will serve another term as mayor. [WLKY]

Law enforcement officers accused of sexual misconduct have jumped from job to job — and at times faced fresh allegations that include raping women — because of a tattered network of laws and lax screening that allowed them to stay on the beat. [HuffPo]

Residents are concerned Germantown is becoming too populated with bars and restaurants that will disrupt the neighborhood. [WAVE3]

President Obama on Monday mocked Republican presidential candidates as thin-skinned for lashing out at CNBC over the network’s handling of last week’s primary debate. [The Hill]

Economy Inn, the troubled motel on Bardstown Road, has passed its latest inspection by the Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, a Republican political novice, wealthy Louisville businessman and Tea Party favorite, was elected Kentucky’s next governor on Tuesday, a victory that could herald a new era in a state where Democrats have held the governor’s mansion for all but four of the last 44 years. The Associated Press declared Mr. Bevin the winner shortly after 8 p.m. [NY Times]

This is in an alternate universe, right? Louisville Metro Government has earned the rank of the second best digital city in the U.S., according to a new survey released by e.Republic’s Center for Digital Government. [Business First]

Comments collected at five public workshops are coming together to provide a vision for Clarksville’s future. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! Jim Ramsey Did A Stupid Thing

It has made headlines for crime and health violations, but Saturday brought a different view of a controversial Louisville hotel. The Economy Inn held a Halloween party. [WDRB]

The former principal of Buechel Metro High School says Jefferson County Public Schools leaders have created a false perception of his tenure as a way to demonstrate a need to merge two alternative schools and create the new Minor Daniels Academy. [C-J/AKN]

Metro Police are investigating a shooting that happened just south of downtown. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton Jr. has stepped in, after months of back-and-forth between Jefferson District and Family courts over which would take on the additional workload of new Emergency Protective Orders meant to protect dating couples from an abusive partner. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police are conducting a death investigation after a was body found Saturday morning near Frost Middle School. [WLKY]

Triple Crown champion American Pharoah took charge out of the gate, winning the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic by 6 1/2 lengths Saturday in his final race before retirement. [HuffPo]

On Tuesday New Albany voters will decide who should lead the city. There will be three names to chose from – the incumbent, a real estate developer or a businessman. [WAVE3]

I applaud the Democrats and Republicans who came together [Friday] morning to pass a responsible, long-term budget agreement that reflects our values, grows our economy and creates jobs. This agreement will strengthen the middle class by investing in education, job training, and basic research. It will keep us safe by investing in our national security. It protects our seniors by avoiding harmful cuts to Medicare and Social Security. It is paid for in a responsible, balanced way – in part with a measure to ensure that partnerships like hedge funds pay what they owe in taxes just like everybody else. It locks in two years of funding and should help break the cycle of shutdowns and manufactured crises that have harmed our economy. This agreement is a reminder that Washington can still choose to help, rather than hinder, America’s progress, and I look forward to signing it into law as soon as it reaches my desk. After that, Congress should build on this by getting to work on spending bills that invest in America’s priorities without getting sidetracked by ideological provisions that have no place in America’s budget process. If we can do that, we’ll help our workers and businesses keep growing the economy and building an America full of opportunity for all. [President Barack Obama]

Everyone keeps begging us to write about Jim Ramsey’s latest racist stunt. If this is what sets everyone on fire over Jimbo and his mess, something’s gone terribly wrong. The man has been in a literal pile of corrupt shit since 2008. Felner and the rest of the folks have thieved, done prison time, gotten away with everything while Ramsey turned a blind eye. Shirley Dubya? She’s currently being paid more than $300,000 to do nothing for a year. The myriad Rick Pitino sex scandals? Just blips on the radar. But the man shows his true colors by dressing in a demeaning and racist way? That’s what sets fire to him and causes rage to bubble to the surface? We’re tired. [WFPL]

Amid the recent pressure on police to wear body cameras, one thing is often overlooked: Not all cameras are created equal. In fact, cameras vary a lot — and the variations — some contentious — can have a profound effect on how the cameras are used and who benefits from them. [NPR]

The U.S. Justice Department has rejected a settlement offer from AB Electrolux that would have allowed the company to move ahead with its acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. [Business First]

While candidates for Charlestown’s city council come from different parts of the area and different political parties, they all envision a growing Charlestown. That’s because with the River Ridge Commerce Center and the east-end bridge, the city can’t escape changes. But how the city can take advantage of those changes is where the candidates from the city’s four districts differ. The most talked about issues include the future of the Pleasant Ridge Subdivision and they city’s battle with brown water. [News & Tribune]