Hide That Medicare Bit Behind Fire Coverage

General Electric Co. will no longer provide supplemental Medicare plans to about 130,000 former hourly workers and their spouses across the country — the latest in a series of moves aimed at cutting the company’s expenses for retiree benefits. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board on Monday made final a rate increase of 5.5 percent, starting Aug. 1, and approved the salary and compensation package for its incoming executive director. [C-J/AKN]

The Downtown Development Review Overlay committee, or DDRO, voted on Wednesday, July 29, to approve the Omni design plan. [WHAS11]

Humana Inc. on Wednesday reported second-quarter earnings of $431 million. [H-L]

Nearly four months after the fire at GE’s Appliance Park, fire officials release the results from the investigation into what went wrong. GE disputes the findings. Maj. Henry Ott said the company is ‘”cherry picking” facts to protect its interests. [WLKY]

After the Republican Party took a drubbing at the polls on Election Day 2012, RNC Chairman Reince Priebus ordered an autopsy. The party, the coroner’s report found a few months later, had alienated women and minorities and came off as plutocratic. [HuffPo]

After several tense exchanges between Kentucky’s candidates for governor, Republican Matt Bevin during a media interview accused a WAVE 3 News reporter of working for his rival. [WAVE3]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Tuesday named Gabriel Fritz to be the new director of the Office of Housing and Community Development, an appointment that comes as the city prioritizes its affordable housing needs. Here’s hoping he isn’t scandal-ridden. [WFPL]

There weren’t many substantive insights drawn from Monday’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway before a Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Business Summit crowd. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro Council is planning to hold two public hearings on the creation of special taxing districts to give financial help to two projects. [Business First]

The city has the discretion to release the full disciplinary record of fired New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook and is not required to provide the documents by law, Indiana Public Access Counselor Luke Britt stated in an advisory opinion issued Monday at the request of the News and Tribune. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City: MURDER DEATH

A mission of the Hope by Hope organization is to let kids know that somebody loves them. [WDRB]

Metro planners have scheduled same-day, zoning-related public hearings for two major developments, one for Louisville’s second Costco store on Bardstown Road at the former Showcase Cinemas site and the other to allow a makeover of The 800 Apartments just south of downtown. [C-J/AKN]

Restaurant managers near Whiskey Row said having the street shut down all week was tough on business. [WHAS11]

The Davies household is like any other with small children and working parents at 5:30 p.m. — 10-month-old Caroline scoots across the floor; Kate, almost 3, looks frantically for her baby doll while their parents deal with dinner-making, dog-walking and bedtime-starting. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! THEY STILL DON’T REALIZE THEY’RE HOGGING YOUR DATA! It’s estimated that more than 20,000 children in Louisville have a parent in jail. [WLKY]

Police departments across the country that have spent years boasting about plummeting crime numbers are now scrambling to confront something many agencies have not seen in decades: more bloodshed. [HuffPo]

Five homicides in a five-day period earlier this week continues a violent 2015 in Louisville, and the increase in the city’s homicide rate is part of trend in major U.S. cities. [WAVE3]

The civil suit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky on behalf of four Rowan County couples, two same-gender couples and two opposite-gender couples, against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and the county will be heard for a preliminary injunction hearing on Monday, July 13 at noon in U.S. District Court in Ashland. [The Morehead News]

Kentucky’s electricity generation landscape will look drastically different in the next five years, as coal-fired power plants retire or convert to natural gas. [WFPL]

The result of this is an incessantly repeating argument where a Black person says “Racism still exists. It is real,” and a white person argues “You’re wrong, I’m not racist at all. I don’t even see any racism.” [Click the Clicky]

Hilliard Lyons will provide training to its advisers in a series of six-month training modules taught by faculty of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. [Business First]

The town’s planning and zoning department finally got the go-ahead at Monday’s town council meeting to begin work on the first comprehensive plan update Clarksville has implemented in 23 years. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Bunch Of Death

A homicide investigation is being conducted by LMPD’s Homicide Unit and the Jefferson County Coroner’s Office in the 4400 block of Blevins Gap Road, near Saw Mill Road. [WDRB]

Maybe it can be hidden away in the Louisville Underground? The long-beleaguered Louisville Clock will be moved Friday from its home on Fourth Street at Theater Square to a warehouse in the Portland neighborhood, where it will rest until a suitable permanent location can be found. [C-J/AKN]

The Courier Journal reported JCPS was following up anonymous complaints and found chips, waters, and other vending machine items came into Waggener, but the amount of money being deposited from vending machine sales was short of what it should have been to the total of $3,900. [WHAS11]

The number of heroin overdoses at five northern Kentucky hospitals has continued to climb, but officials aren’t sure if that’s because more people are calling 911 for help, or more people are using heroin. [H-L]

The reward in the case of a missing Nelson County woman has again increased. [WLKY]

Coming back from its Independence Day vacation, Congress appeared no closer Tuesday to finding a way to avoid yet another government shutdown showdown in the fall. [HuffPo]

They are split-second decisions made by police — choices that can mean the difference between life and death for a suspect. Should officers use force? And how much? Community activists like Chad Golden believe sometimes police go farther than they should. [WAVE3]

Questions have been raised about some statues in downtown Lexington. Now, Mayor Jim Gray wants a city board to take a closer look at the statues. [WKYT]

A case over water pollution from Louisville Gas & Electric’s Cane Run Power Plant is scheduled for a hearing in federal court in Louisville tomorrow. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Harry Reid passed the blame on Wednesday over the Senate’s inability to overhaul the Bush-era No Child Left Behind bill. [The Hill]

Some business organizations have decried President Obama’s proposed changes to overtime pay for salaried employees, but most restaurant and retail companies are still working through how, and whether, the regulations would affect them. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair said he was “surprised” that a $450,000 appropriation for police cars was included on Monday’s agenda. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Went Crazy w/Guns

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini told stock analysts on a conference call Monday that the “very capable” leaders of Humana’s Medicare-driven government business will remain in place following Aetna’s planned $37 billion purchase of Humana. [WDRB]

The Rev. Cynthia Campbell of Louisville’s Highland Presbyterian Church says she looks forward to performing its first same-sex marriage now that Kentucky’s ban on gay marriage has been lifted. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Mayor will be celebrating a big milestone at the LG and E Cane Run plant. The conversion from coal fired to natural gas is complete. [WHAS11]

Don’t underestimate the power of a miniature horse. Though small — about 2½ feet tall — miniature horses demonstrated their strength, athleticism and finesse Friday at the Mid-America Miniature Horse Club Mini Julep Cup by jumping, pulling carriages and posing. [H-L]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings, you know the drill, Possibility City, Compassionate City, blah blah empty words blah. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Seriously, eight people shot and three of them dead in a single weekend. Meanwhile, Greg Fischer plays pat-a-cake with historic preservation, promotes events that only the elite can attend, only addresses something that matters when called out by the media. [WAVE3]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival energy usage will be offset entirely with green power for the first time this year. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Community Ventures Corp. broke ground last week on its planned business incubator called Chef Space in the Russell neighborhood — but what hasn’t been reported yet is that the incubator is just the start. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey believes keeping the city’s police vehicle fleet updated will save taxpayers maintenance expenses required to keep older cruisers in service. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is A Ton Of Awful Fun Again

JCPS officials have fired a teacher who was under investigation over accusations she had inappropriate contact with a student. [WDRB]

Former Jefferson County Board of Education member Debbie Wesslund says Adam Edelen’s JCPS audit was a fraud. Mainly because it was selective and manipulative, which everyone already knew. [C-J/AKN]

On June 23 Jefferson County Public Schools fired a bus driver, Melinda Sanders, who dragged a student, 7-year-old Ally Rednour, down a street by her backpack on May 15. [WHAS11]

Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld the nationwide tax credit subsidies to help people buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year and there are dozens of other events happening around the metro area to celebrate Independence Day. [WLKY]

You won’t believe this horrible Fox story about the homeless. Or maybe you will. [MMFA]

She was arrested, along with Louisville’s former Chief Financial Officer Steve Rowland, and charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct. The police report said they were engaged in “disruptive, provocative and intimate behavior.” [WAVE3]

They took a page out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. City workers and police cleared an encampment of homeless people from the west side of Baltimore on Friday morning, provoking a brief traffic-blocking protest and leaving some of the city’s homelessness services organizations chagrined at what they say was a surprise operation. [ThinkProgress]

James Blanton is the new director of the Louisville Free Public Library, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday. He takes over for retiring director Craig Buthod, who announced his resignation in November after 17 years on the job. [WFPL]

There have only been 9 days this year when the police have not killed somebody. Some news outlets put the number as high as 500 dead in the past six months, according to both The Guardian and Killed by the Police.Net. The Washington Post’s own investigation showed nearly 400 dead as of the end of May. [WaPo]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has approved a settlement that reduces the base rate increases sought by Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. [Business First]

It starts with a professional rodeo and ends with a demolition derby. In between there will be a queen pageant, midway rides, interactive activities for children and exhibits to view. And yes, there will be plenty of animals. [News & Tribune]

Let The Minimum Wage Freakout Begin

A Louisville Metro Council member is asking the mayor to take action concerning the Economy Inn on Bardstown Road. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Clerk Bobbie Holsclaw is turning over to Louisville Metro Government more than $2.46 million as surplus from fees she collected during her fourth, four-year term than ran through 2014. [C-J/AKN]

A Jefferson County Circuit judge has upheld an ordinance raising the city’s minimum wage to $9 an hour over the next three years. [WHAS11]

Redefining marriage for the nation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed one another. The 5-4 decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges reverses a Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that upheld state bans of same-sex marriage in Kentucky, Ohio, Michigan and Tennessee. Lower courts in all four states had struck down the bans as unconstitutional. [H-L]

Union workers at Appliance Park are getting ready to vote on a new contract. [WLKY]

Paleontologists in South Africa have announced the name for a new dinosaur species, but they didn’t have to do any digging to find the creature’s bones. [HuffPo]

A young woman was killed after a hit-and-run at 26th Street and Broadway, and the 19-year-old’s family members said they are begging for answers and justice. [WAVE3]

North Carolina and Tennessee are the latest states to side with telecoms, which have long lobbied against allowing cities to become Internet providers. [ProPublica]

Twelve years after first meeting and almost four years after being engaged, Tadd Roberts and Benjamin Moore on Friday became the first same-sex couple to be legally married in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. President Barack Obama said on Friday that for too long Americans have been “blind” to the “unique mayhem” caused by gun violence in this country. [Reuters]

Emptier words have never been spoken. Wiederwohl stresses the importance of transparency in public sector. [Business First]

Fired by the New Albany Merit Commission for conduct unbecoming an officer, Laura Schook is claiming two of the board members who voted to terminate her are serving illegally based on city ordinance. [News & Tribune]

But We Can’t Come Up With WIC Funds

Aetna Inc., the second-largest U.S. health insurer by market value, is closing in on an acquisition of Humana Inc. and could reach a deal as early as this weekend, several people with knowledge of the matter said. [Bloomberg]

A man is found dead in the middle of the street in a quiet Fern Creek neighborhood. [WDRB]

But we can’t afford WIC programs… Louisville waterfront officials have cobbled together just over $500,000 that will go for major enhancements around the Big Four Bridge on the Kentucky shore. [C-J/AKN]

People are freaking out about the sighting of a bear. [WHAS11]

The U.S. Supreme Court could issue a decision on Kentucky’s same-sex marriage ban as soon as Thursday, but Kentucky officials are staying mum on what, if any, preparations they’ve made if the justices vote to allow gay marriage. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Everybody is freaking out about some clouds. [WLKY]

A former Baltimore police sergeant took to Twitter Wednesday to air a stunning list of acts he said he participated in and witnessed during his 11 years on the city’s force. [HuffPo]

The giant hole in the ground where a couple of old buildings used to stand on Third Street makes it clear: Nothing is getting in the way of the new $300 million Omni Hotel project, not even the historic Louisville Water Company building. [WAVE3]

Racehorses are continuing to get quicker, a study of winning times spanning 165 years of racing indicates. [BBC]

Halfway into its first year, Louisville city officials and residents say a plastic bag ban for yard waste has been met with a surprisingly positive reception. [WFPL]

More Americans are renting — and paying more — as homeownership falls. [NY Times]

Names, birth dates, addresses and Social Security numbers may have been exposed after hackers gained access to classified Clarksville Town Court records Tuesday, a judge says. [Business First]

Less than 48 hours after nine black men and women were murdered inside a house of worship, prayers of encouragement, forgiveness and mercy were offered in the midst of a church that provided slaves safe passage during the Civil War. [News & Tribune]