JCPS Needs About A Billion Dollars

The long-awaited opening of a new elementary school this summer will come at the same time Jefferson County Public Schools is expected to unveil a plan to deal with a growing problem – more than $880 million in facility needs scattered across the district. [WDRB]

Conversations about alleged drug activity on the nextdoor.com social network site for Crescent Hill are increasing, and residents were urged to report such incidents to the police at a recent gathering. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It will apparently take a second resignation from the UofL Board of Trustees before Governor Matt Bevin can act to replace Paul Diaz. [WHAS11]

More than a dozen states have strengthened laws over the past two years to keep firearms out of the hands of domestic abusers, a rare area of consensus in the nation’s highly polarized debate over guns. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another pedestrian accident. [WLKY]

U.S. employment gains slowed more than expected in January as the boost to hiring from unseasonably mild weather faded, but surging wages and an unemployment rate at an eight-year low suggested the labor market recovery remains firm. [HuffPo]

Hundreds turned out to say goodbye to local civil rights pioneer, Benjamin Shobe, Sunday at his visitation. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder if you haven’t yet read this. How do you stop states and cities from forcing more disclosure of so-called dark money in politics? Get the debate to focus on an “average Joe,” not a wealthy person. Find examples of “inconsequential donation amounts.” Point out that naming donors would be a threat to “innocents,” including their children, families and co-workers. And never call it dark money. “Private giving” sounds better. [ProPublica]

On the corner of Breckenridge and Logan streets, at the edge of Smoketown, there’s a giant hole in the ground. It’s an active construction site, with trucks and heavy machinery working behind a barbed-wire fence. [WFPL]

There are some subtle indications Republicans may be rethinking the wisdom of trying to make right-to work-an issue in this year’s legislative elections. [Ronnie Ellis]

The International Boat Builders’ Exhibition & Conference (known as IBEX) is leaving Louisville for Florida. [Business First]

In the May primary election, two familiar faces will vie for a judge’s seat on opposite sides of the aisle. [News & Tribune]

Enjoy The Snowpocalypse While It Lasts

Three people were murdered in Louisville Wednesday night, and homicide detectives are investigating a double shooting that left a woman gravely injured. [WDRB]

In a decision filed Jan. 11, an Administrative Law Judge ruled that the U.S. Department of Agriculture failed to prove that Wildlife in Need director Tim Stark was unfit to hold a federal exhibitor’s license. [C-J/AKN]

Big-box grocery chains and liquor store lobbyists continue to scuffle over the latest attempt to lift Indiana’s longtime ban on Sunday carryout alcohol sales. [WHAS11]

The Republican-controlled state Senate has approved a bill that requires a woman to have a face-to-face meeting with a doctor before having an abortion. [H-L]

An investigation is underway after a man’s body was found in a home Wednesday night. [WLKY]

That awkward moment when your dad thinks your rival will best you in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) must have been pretty bummed when his father, former Congressman Ron Paul, admitted that it’s likely Donald Trump will become the GOP’s candidate for president. [HuffPo]

The first major snowfall of the season serves as a good reminder to always be prepared when you are driving. [WAVE3]

Last year looks like it was an unwelcome watershed for the embattled U.S. coal industry. Power companies in 2015 for the first time may have burned more natural gas than coal to generate electricity, according to analysts who attribute it to the cheapest gas prices in 16 years and a record number of coal-fired plants retired from service because of the high cost of meeting environmental regulations. [Reuters]

A legislative panel has passed a bill that would allow Louisville Metro Police officers to work more than 40 hours a week without being paid overtime. [WFPL]

Kevin Schiller had no idea what hit him. With 21 years on the job, the building engineer for Macy’s department stores had been in and out of every nook and cranny of many of the retail giant’s Texas stores, including the storage room in the Macy’s in Denton, Texas. [NPR]

If you’re a Kroger customer, you soon could be grocery shopping from the comfort of your home. [Business First]

For about $30,000, Performance Services was hired to perform the facilities study for West Clark Community Schools in preparation for their November 2016 referendum. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

All This Snow Makes Day Drinking OK

WDRB is apparently still freaking out over kids misbehaving on school buses. [WDRB]

Brown-Forman Corporation has received an initial go-ahead from city regulators to start major work on its Old Forester Distillery and visitors experience project at 117-119 W. Main St. [C-J/AKN]

We’d tell you what WHAS11 was freaking out about but their website was down all day. And their crotchety old twitter people have us blocked, unlike every other media outlet in town, because they probably can’t take jokes. Even WDRB knows how to take a joke. Eric Flack can take a joke. Can you imagine? It’s the most hilarious thing since A Kentucky Newspaper started blocking our websites due to criticism of its atrocious Felner coverage. [Deep WHAS11 Funtimes]

Preliminary estimates from a consulting firm hired by the city show the cost will be $175 to $200 million to build a fiber-optic network to increase sluggish Internet speeds and expand Internet access in Fayette County. [H-L]

SNOOOOOOOOOWWWWWPOOOOOOCALYYYYYYYYYPSEEEEEEEEE! [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), still disappointed at being left off the main stage at last week’s GOP presidential debate, expressed disapproval of polling criteria during a campaign stop at a barbershop on Monday afternoon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police confirmed Wednesday that remains found in Oldham County were those of a UPS pilot missing since May. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder of what Julie Raque Adams has been doing to poor women in Kentucky. While she flits about Frankfort talking about how great she is for wealthy, Republican women? Poor people are suffering as a direct consequense of her imposing her antiquated religious beliefs on the Commonwealth. [Page One]

Police departments across Kentucky began outfitting officers with body cameras last year, but don’t expect state troopers to join their ranks anytime soon. [WFPL]

For years there have been calls for more transparency in Kentucky’s retirement systems, especially the system for lawmakers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republic Bancorp Inc. CEO Steve Trager has just gained control of an additional 671,808 shares of the bank-holding company’s stock, according to a Jan. 8 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. [Business First]

Cheaper cigarettes are the lure for people in Illinois who cross the Wabash River to visit the Smoker Friendly tobacco outlets in Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Continues To Muck Things Up

In November, the University of Louisville Board of Trustees filed a motion in Franklin Circuit Court to dismiss a lawsuit by the Kentucky Justice Resource Center contending the board has too few minority members in violation of state law. [WDRB]

The city must pay former Jefferson County Constable David Whitlock about $33,000 in wages for more than five years of unpaid work, a Jefferson Circuit Court judge has ruled, and may owe other peace officers similar back salaries. [C-J/AKN]

A man whose drone was shot down over a Bullitt County home is now suing that shooter in federal court. [WHAS11]

Really, there aren’t more pressing educational issues to tackle instead of pandering in an election year? A Kentucky Republican state senator from London has introduced a bill that he said could have prevented biblical references from being cut from a presentation of A Charlie Brown Christmas at a Johnson County elementary school. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Some southern Indiana families face an uncertain future after city officials in Charlestown revived controversial plans that could lead to tearing down a neighborhood. [WLKY]

The nation’s largest LGBT civil rights organization, Human Rights Campaign, endorsed Hillary Clinton for president on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

A routine appointment vote this month for the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Merit Board was anything but routine after a Louisville Metro councilman asked to table or postpone a vote to reappoint two people to that board. [WAVE3]

A federal judge on Tuesday ruled President Obama cannot use executive privilege to keep records on the “fast and furious” gun-tracking program from Congress. [The Hill]

Superintendent Donna Hargens says Jefferson County Public Schools is working to ensure that Louisville families are aware of its offerings in anticipation of a new push for state charter school legislation. [WFPL]

One European country can’t seem to stop breaking records when it comes to wind power. [ThinkProgress]

Is your favorite Louisville restaurant making the grade? [Business First]

The Clark County Clerk’s office was granted an $10,800 additional appropriation this week in part to help with transferring the influx of Jeffersonville city court cases that are coming in. [News & Tribune]

Awful Jim Ramsey-UofL Soap Opera

All the sudden we’re just supposed to trust that Metro Animal Services is going to solve this dog shooting problem? Just like that? What the heck kind of short memory does this city even have? [WDRB]

Raising the stakes for University of Louisville President James Ramsey, two members of the board of trustees announced Thursday that they no longer support his presidency while the board’s chairman said he favors reducing the president’s powers. Don’t forget that Greenberg has never cared about Ramsey in the past. Not during any number of other scandals. Fascinating to see this turn. [C-J/AKN]

The Kennedy Bridge is shutting down for half a year and everyone is losing their mind. [WHAS11]

Louisville-based Brown-Forman announced on Thursday it is selling the Southern Comfort label, as well as Tuaca liqueur to New Orleans-based Sazerac, owner of Buffalo Trace, for a combined $543.5 million. [H-L]

The men police say brutally beat a woman and then dumped her body in a shallow grave faced a judge Thursday. [WLKY]

A former federal regulator and Elizabeth Warren acolyte who has repeatedly questioned the Obama administration’s treatment of student loan borrowers just took a job with the Department of Education. [HuffPo]

Tyler Russell was pronounced dead at University Hospital after being shot near the intersection of 20th Street and Market Street around 9:40 p.m. Wednesday. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama has vigorously defended his legacy while striking an optimistic note for America’s future in his final State of the Union address. [BBC]

St. Matthews City Council members are distancing themselves from that city’s police department claim that juvenile crime is spiking in the Louisville suburb. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell’s life mission is to do anything and everything to be a roadblock for President Barack Obama. Even if that means screwing over his constituents. Because most of them are too disconnected and scared to notice. [Politico]

How much do you know about Kentucky Towers, Barrington Place and Crescent Centre? They think stories like this are worth paying for and they wonder why they’re still dying. [Business First]

City Controller Amy Deering is stepping down from her position with the city of Jeffersonville and taking a job with Louisville Metropolitan Government, said Mayor Mike Moore. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

ANOTHER Week Of Mall Hype???

Of course WDRB has jumped even further into the (paid?) nonsense/pseudoscience realm. Your body doesn’t need a “reset” or a cleanse. Your liver and kidneys do the detoxing. [WDRB]

Frankfort is looking at tougher penalties to fight the appearance of flakka. [C-J/AKN]

A real shame LMAS can’t be trusted to handle things like this and people like Kelly Downard are now turning a blind eye because they’re bored. [WHAS11]

The American Printing House for the Blind in Clifton is trying to raise $95,000 by Jan. 29 to buy one of only six know copies of Louis Braille’s 1829 book introducing the Braille system of reading and writing with raised dots. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Mike Ward’s involved so you know it’s going to fail. Way to go, Mike. Thanks for killing legalization efforts in Kentucky. [WLKY]

According to a comprehensive report from The Washington Post, nearly 1,000 Americans were shot and killed by police in 2015. That startling number aside, another surprising finding from the data is just how little the FBI truly understood the breadth of police shootings in previous years. [HuffPo]

Oh, wait, local teevee shysters are still obsessed with the damn mall story. [WAVE3]

Mitch McConnell is again confirming he has no plans other than to stand in the way of President Barack Obama. Because his base of support is comprised of racist mouth-breathers who fear brown people. [Salon]

Kentucky’s remaining constitutional officers were sworn in Monday, with all but one of the five posts changing hands. [WFPL]

Inside the backward ideology driving the right-wing terrorists who captured an empty federal building. [ThinkProgress]

The most recent edition of the Federal Reserve’s Burgundy Book for the Louisville Zone provides data that show the region had strong economic growth this year, with noteworthy reductions in unemployment and strong home sales. At the same time, zone residents also took on more debt, perhaps optimistic about the ability to pay off this debt. [Business First]

Jeffersonville City Court Judge Ken Pierce has had a year to prepare for stepping down from the bench, becoming the last judge to preside over the 55-year-old court that city council voted to abolish last year. [News & Tribune]

Everything Is Awful. Go Back To Bed.

WTF is going on with WDRB? Has literally everyone there turned into some magnet for racist panic? They’re really running stories about Marc Murphy’s cartoon? Jesus H, Louisville, get it together. The entire city is not some awful trailer park filled with Klansmen. This shit has to end at some point. [WDRB]

Fans entering the KFC Yum! Center will experience additional security measures at events beginning January 14. And people are freaking out. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer’s right – the local media hyped the Mall St. Matthews crap up. [WHAS11]

The electric bill at Lacey Griffey’s neat Harlan County home, with its yellow siding and silk-flower arrangements decorating the living room, was $582.07 in January 2013. [H-L]

More people are using their furnace as temperatures drop, leaving room for more cases of carbon monoxide poisoning. [WLKY]

If you missed it this week, there was a whole lot of Jim Gooch hilarity. [Page One]

A skyrocketing homicide rate, a budget surplus of more than $18 million, and the prospect of growing business: those are some of Louisville’s highlights in 2015. [WAVE3]

When officers take the lives of those they are sworn to protect and serve, they undermine their own legitimacy. [The Atlantic]

Registration is now open for Louisville’s Kilowatt Crackdown, a contest to reward for energy efficiency improvements in the city’s buildings. [WFPL]

And if you missed it in Louisville? Everybody is losing their damn mind over some misbehaving kids at a shopping mall. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Hepatitis C, which can damage the liver and cause cancer, affects more than 3 million people in the U.S., and new medications that have come on the market in the past few years will cure the virus in most patients. But a study has found that Medicaid in Kentucky, Indiana and more than 30 other states restrict who receive the pricey drugs. [Business First]

Some Indiana police agencies say their fight against methamphetamine production would be helped by a proposed state law change to require a doctor’s prescription for a common cold medicine that is used to make the illegal drug. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]