More Possibility In Chattanooga Than Louisville?

The words don’t always come easy. For Perry Clemons, they sometimes vanish. Clemons is 58-years-old and lives in Clarkson, Kentucky. [WDRB]

As Mayor Greg Fischer joins Metro Council member Angela Lee in calling for a fuller environmental study of the Brownsboro Road site purchased for a new Veterans Affairs Medical Center, plans are in the works to turn about half of the second choice site into a subdivision. [C-J/AKN]

What? Another shooting? Surely not. Not in Possibility City where everything is Compassionate and Transparent. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul takes the first step toward running for president when he asks state party leaders to endorse his idea to create a 2016 presidential caucus in Kentucky. [H-L]Singed by their defeat in the battle over Homeland Security funding, Republicans aren’t about to renew their fight against President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration anytime soon. [Politico]

They’ll run stories like this about animal shelters hundreds of miles away. But couldn’t be bothered to dig in at Metro Animal Services at any point over the past decade. [WLKY]

Louisville doesn’t have the guts to do something like this. Fischer and council will always bend over backwards for lobbyists. [HuffPo]

Lexington has started to shoot its kids just like Louisville! Copycat. We were first. Lexington police told media outlets a 9-year-old boy was taken to UK Hospital after being shot while riding in his parents’ car. [WAVE3]

A factory in Louisville, Kentucky, made chewing tobacco for over a century before folding in 2009. Now the abandoned site is a symbol of how the city is changing: The 24-acre brownfield will soon become one of the largest hubs for local food in the U.S. [Fast Company]

Louisville Metro Police is on track to putting body cameras on some officers this summer. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s proposal to consolidate more than a dozen regulatory offices into an agency that would oversee food safety is drawing the intrigue and ire of some food safety advocates, producers, and experts — some of whom question the feasibility of a move that’s decades in the making. [ThinkProgress]

A U.S. Supreme Court decision about whether patients who get insurance through federally administered exchanges should have their costs subsidized is not expected to have an impact on Kynect, Kentucky’s insurance exchange. [Business First]

At first it looks like some kind of marketing ploy. Six picnic tables, surrounded by a garbage can on a concrete slab in the middle of Same Peden Community Park in New Albany. [News & Tribune]

About Having Compassion For The Homeless…

The Jefferson County Board of Education is being asked by its teachers union to hold off extending the contract of Superintendent Donna Hargens to allow time for “stakeholder involvement.” [WDRB]

The animal-rights group PETA is continuing its push for federal regulators to take action against Tim Stark, a Charlestown man who has run the nonprofit organization Wildlife in Need on his property since 1999. [C-J/AKN]

Cracked and dripping ceilings – buckets litter every room. This is how Patrick Christner and Megan Tate have been spending their week post President’s Day snowstorm. [WHAS11]

Last fall, Pike County school board chairman Charles Johnson made a motion for the district to set what’s known as a “compensating” tax rate, which means property taxes would be adjusted to produce the same revenue as the year before. [H-L]

The parents of a toddler who was accidentally killed hope to build a community park in his honor. [WLKY]

The World Food Program is confronting its worst challenge since World War II in trying to tackle five top-level humanitarian crises at the same time, the head of the U.N. agency said Friday. [HuffPo]

A group of firefighters is hoping to spark a movement and inspire warm acts of kindness in the recent cold temperatures. [WAVE3]

When the season’s first cold snap hit in November, Kenneth Winfield arrived at Louisville’s St. John Center for Homeless Men — his hands icy cold after sleeping outdoors. [USA Today]

All eyes are on Kentucky’s state senators to see if they’ll move on the House’s proposed statewide smoking ban. [WFPL]

It was a short week for the Kentucky General Assembly, which canceled three days of meetings because of a severe winter storm. But while the House decided to forgo its scheduled Thursday and Friday meetings, the Senate was in session those two days. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Kentucky Retail Federation, Kentucky Restaurant Association and Louisville-based company Packaging Unlimited have filed a lawsuit that seeks to prevent Louisville from hiking its minimum wage. [Business First]

After weeks of debate and discussion, the Floyd County Election Board got exactly what it wanted. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City Had A Murderous Weekend, Kids

A solution to a sidewalk problem in Fairdale will only take two weeks to finish and many who live in the area say the project is a big deal. [WDRB]

The Louisville Jefferson County Democratic Party on Sunday selected attorney Pat Mulvihill to be its nominee for an election in November to serve out the final year of the late Metro Councilman Jim King’s term. [C-J/AKN]

It’s kind of sad that anyone thought they could stop the local Democrats from playing corrupt politics. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Court of Appeals says a company that once managed 125,000 Medicaid recipients must pay the state damages for leaving the contract early. [H-L]

When will JCPS get its act together? Police arrested a JCPS principal on speeding and DUI charges early Saturday morning. [WLKY]

Insurers aren’t required to encrypt consumers’ data under a 1990s federal law that remains the foundation for health care privacy in the Internet age — an omission that seems striking in light of the major cyberattack against Anthem. [HuffPo]

In two days, four people were killed within Louisville city limits during one of the most violent weekends the city has seen in years. But ask Greg Fischer and everything is puppies and rainbows. [WAVE3]

EquiLottery CEO and inventor of the patented lottery game with the same name, Brad Cummings, will be testifying on behalf of SB74 in Frankfort, Kentucky on Tuesday, Feb. 10 (that’s today). The bill, which supports a lottery game like EquiLottery based on the outcome of live horse racing, will be heard in front of the Senate Licensing, Occupations and Administrative Regulations Committee at 10 am in Room 169 of the Capitol Annex and is open to the general public. [Press Release]

When it came time for Anna Brashear to finish high school, college seemed out of reach. Financially, Brashear couldn’t swing it. And she said her family wasn’t in position to help either. [WFPL]

It was a busy legislative week on one end of the capitol during the second week of the 2015 General Assembly, as the Republican Senate passed a series of bills its leaders call their priorities – most of which have little chance of success in the Democratic-controlled House. [Ronnie Ellis]

In 1974, music critic Jon Landau famously wrote, “I have seen rock and roll future and its name is Bruce Springsteen.” [Business First]

Floyd County Democratic Party Chairman Adam Dickey is accepting applications to fill a vacancy on the Franklin Township Board created by the resignation of Hazel Riley. [News & Tribune]

Yet Another Stinky Mess For MSD This Week

Another day, another senseless murder in Possibility City. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has boosted salaries of several top executives by up to 11.6 percent and paid out annual performance payments, including a $32,760 bonus to Executive Director Greg Heitzman. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville International Airport putting a stop to ride-sharing companies from picking up passengers. [WHAS11]

Poor Andy Beshear. More than a year away from being sworn in to an office he hasn’t even won, and already his integrity in that office is open to question because of his unprecedented fund-raising. Not to mention the shadow cast on the administration of his father, Gov. Steve Beshear, as state contractors, lobbyists and appointees have lined up at 87 fund-raising events to give almost $1.5 million to the son’s campaign for attorney general. [H-L]

New court records show how investigators may have gotten a break in an unsolved murder. [WLKY]

The white police officer who killed Michael Brown has resigned from the Ferguson Police Department, his attorney said Saturday, nearly four months after the fatal confrontation with the black 18-year-old that fueled protests in the St. Louis suburb and across the nation. [HuffPo]

An estimated 3,000 to 4,000 coats were handed out during a different kind of Black Friday transaction in Kentuckiana: the Free Coat Exchange. [WAVE3]

The U.N. Committee against Torture urged the United States on Friday to fully investigate and prosecute police brutality and shootings of unarmed black youth and ensure that taser weapons are used sparingly. [Reuters]

The number of Kentuckians who are “underbanked”—that is, people who don’t participate in the banking system—has increased. Nearly a third of Kentuckians (33.2 percent) are considered “underbanked,” according to a recently released report from Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. [WFPL]

Urban agriculture is playing an increasingly important role in global food security, a study has suggested. [BBC]

Bardstown Road Aglow has grown tremendously since its first year. When founder Rosemary Bailey started it 29 years ago, only six businesses participated, recalled Kelli Milligan, owner Renaissance by Design. The antique store was one of the six. [Business First]

Area parents looking to have a night out on the town will want to circle Monday on their calendars, because that’s the deadline to register children for Clarksville Parks & Recreation’s inaugural Parents’ Night Out. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Needs A New Frankfort Leader Now

A state audit released in May found that JCPS is spending too much on high-dollar administrators, and not enough on students. Six months later, the district gets a new progress report with a grade school leaders did not see coming. [WDRB]

Walmart has filed a development plan with the city for its much-anticipated western Louisville store just southwest of Broadway and 18th Street. [C-J/AKN]

In a state that leads the nation in lung cancer cases, Kentucky is turning its attention to small but growing group: lung cancer survivors. [WHAS11]

In a surprise announcement Wednesday, House Speaker Pro Tem Larry Clark said he will not seek re-election to the chamber’s No. 2 post he has held since 1993. [H-L]

A Louisville man who admitted to killing a woman while driving drunk wants to get out of prison early but prosecutors say he needs to spend more time behind bars. [WLKY]

In some American cities, up to 40 percent of households don’t have an Internet connection, according to a new analysis based on census data. [HuffPo]

Abramson said he would advise local politicians across the country that their work shouldn’t be about big developments. “If you can’t pick up the garbage, if you can’t get recycling picked up, if you can’t fill the potholes, then no community’s going to give you the opportunity and support when, as an example, I decided to expand the airport, relocate 4,000 people and 180 businesses and 11 churches,” Abramson said. “That was a monumental decision.” [WAVE3]

More than two dozen advisers to Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul converged inside a boutique Washington hotel Wednesday to begin to form the skeleton of a 2016 presidential campaign. [U.S. News]

The group behind a project to build a botanical garden on Louisville’s waterfront will unveil its master plan. [WFPL]

Some spectacular jumps in generic drug prices have been exposed in an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. [CBS News]

Ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft are banned from picking up customers at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. [Business First]

The city of Jeffersonville revoked the zoning permit from MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. last week that allowed it to operate an asphalt plant at the Hanson-Atkins Quarry. [News & Tribune]

No Way Around It. Yesterday Was Just Horrible.

Officials say one person has been shot and one person has been taken into custody after a shooting at Fern Creek High School Tuesday. [WDRB]

A child was been found dead in Cherokee Park Tuesday evening, Louisville Metro Police said, and the incident is being treated as a death investigation. [C-J/AKN]

Officials confirm that a suspect is in custody in relation to the shooting of a student at Fern Creek High School [yesterday] afternoon. [WHAS11]

A state lawmaker is calling for the results of a review on the operations of Kentucky legislative staff to be made public. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO THAT THE STATION’S GENERAL MANAGER DOESN’T UNDERSTAND HOW TO STOP! Louisville police now believe a man found along the side of a road was killed. [WLKY]

THIS is the bullshit Rand Paul is supporting and pandering to. Anti-gay baker Melissa Klein openly cried at the Values Voter Summit last week over the forced closing of her business due to backlash stemming from her refusal to make a cake for a lesbian couple’s wedding. [HuffPo]

Have you seen the latest with Chris Thieneman? This incident involves a horse, a kid and severe head injuries. [WAVE3]

Are you Eastern Kentucky buttcramps so disconnected from reality that you can’t see that having a coal dock on the waterfront in Louisville would be a horrible idea? WTF planet are you people living on? [Floyd County Nonsense]

Philosopher Stephen Cave argues that since the beginning of civilization humans have always tried to defy or defeat death. [WFPL]

Kentucky is done, with Sen. Mitch McConnell on his way to a hard-fought, single-digit victory over Alison Lundergan Grimes. [ U.S. News]

A new report shows there were few shakeups among the area’s largest banks as ranked by deposits in Louisville’s metropolitan statistical area. [Business First]

ndiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller and State Sen. Ron Grooms visited Clark Memorial Hospital in Jeffersonville on Friday to recognize the hospital for its efforts to fight prescription drug abuse. [News & Tribune]

Let’s Take Racism More Seriously, Louisville

Officials with Jefferson County Public Schools unveiled a plan to the school board Monday on where to place two new innovative schools that will open in time for the 2015-16 school year. [WDRB]

The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday the crew of a UPS jet that crashed last year in Birmingham, Ala., made mistakes during the critical pre-dawn approach to the runway, adding that the fatigue of the pilot and co-pilot were factors in the accident. [C-J/AKN]

With the appliance sale of General Electric to Electrolux, many employees are wondering what it will mean for them in the future. [WHAS11]

Republican Agriculture Commissioner James Comer formally entered the 2015 race for governor on Tuesday in front of hundreds of hometown supporters in an ambitious campaign rollout more than a year before the election. [WKYT]

Will this Josh Young saga never end with local media??? [WLKY]

Atmospheric volumes of greenhouse gas hit a record in 2013 as carbon dioxide concentrations grew at the fastest rate since reliable global records began, the World Meteorological Organization said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Six decades ago a family’s home was attacked in a neighborhood ripped apart by racism. Now, researchers at the University of Louisville are retelling the story about two families and their fight for desegregation and need the public’s help. [WAVE3]

The Louisville ECHO program (Louisville is Engaging Children Outdoors), Louisville Metro Parks and Recreation’s signature environmental education initiative for fourth-grade students, has received significant support this year with $41,295 in grant funding from the U.S. Forest Service, and $7,500 Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky, Inc. [Press Release]

Starting this week, members of the Jefferson County Board of Education are hosting community conversations across the district. [WFPL]

WDRB in Louisville, Kentucky has hired six journalists from print publications to contribute to its website during the last two years, said Barry Fulmer, the station’s news director. [Poynter]

A University of Louisville cancer researcher, Dr. Anthony Dragun, is trying to make treatment easier for breast cancer patients. [Business First]

An outside firm will investigate New Albany’s police department for possible workplace violations after a state police investigation cleared two officers accused of working on private jobs on taxpayer time. [News & Tribune]