The Minimum Wage Meltdown Isn’t Over

Community leaders began searching for information Wednesday night regarding who was responsible in the hit and run death of Deniesha Pugh. [WDRB]

Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, potentially tipping the balance of a board divided over the actions of the university’s foundation. [C-J/AKN]

Agencies, hospitals and schools across Kentuckiana that serve children with special needs were notified by the WHAS Crusade for Children this week that their grant requests will be funded from the money collected during the 62nd annual WHAS Crusade for Children. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate heard arguments Wednesday in an instant-racing lawsuit on a motion by the Family Foundation to have an in-court demonstration of the electronic games based on past horse races. [H-L]

Bourbon lovers can get their hands on a rare bottle of Pappy Van Winkle without having to wait for hours as Liquor Barn celebrates the grand opening of two new locations. [WLKY]

U.S. employers added a solid 223,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate fell to 5.3 percent, a seven-year low. The numbers reflect a job market moving close to full health and raise expectations that the Federal Reserve will start raising interest rates as early as September. [HuffPo]

Thousands of workers will receive a 50-cent increase in their hourly pay Wednesday as Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance goes into effect, even as a lawsuit against the city continues. [WAVE3]

Senator Mitch McConnell is standing by his call to remove the statue of Jefferson Davis from the state Capitol Rotunda. [More WDRB]

The first phase of Louisville’s minimum wage increase went into effect Wednesday. [WFPL]

In a victory for opponents of partisan gerrymandering, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld the use of an independent commission to draw Arizona’s congressional districts. Writing for a narrow majority in the 5-4 ruling, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg touted the importance of direct democracy and making sure the power of the people is not hijacked by its elected representatives. [Mother Jones]

Kentucky has signed new contracts with five managed-care organizations to provide health care services to Medicaid eligible Kentuckians. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. [News & Tribune]

Give Thanks For The Needle Exchange

Metro Louisville’s needle exchange program designed to combat the heroin crisis kicks off today. [WDRB]

What’s that? One of Greg Fischer’s “innovation” team members was tazed and arrested after allegedly leaving a child in a hot car? And he works for former Metro Animal Services shyster Donald Robinson? Surely not. [C-J/AKN]

What the hell is wrong with people these days?! [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday told lawmakers Monday that state officials would work with Fayette County staff to develop a plan aimed at closing the achievement gap. [H-L]

Really, what the hell is wrong with people!? Louisville Metro Police investigators were at Ballard Park again Tuesday morning, collecting evidence after a 9-year-old boy was shot Monday night. [WLKY]

Next season’s flu shot will contain two new flu strains that weren’t present in last season’s shot, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

These data only include base pay and don’t include monstrous payouts from, say, the UofL Foundation. [WAVE3]

The rate of abortions falls across almost all of the US since 2010, a new survey from the Associated Press suggests. [BBC]

Bluegrass musicians played a Kentucky-flavored tune at the graduation ceremony last week for nine graduates, who received their bachelor of fine arts degree. [WFPL]

After watching the biggest donors increasingly shun the major political parties and send their six-figure checks to super-PACs and other outside spending groups, Republican and Democratic leaders in Congress made a sly bid last December to bring billionaires and millionaires back into the party fold. [Mother Jones]

American Pharoah wasn’t a shoo-in to win the Triple Crown. But his prospects for victory appeared more likely than other Thoroughbreds that won both the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes in recent years. [Business First]

A tiny park in the middle of downtown Jeffersonville is now easier to enjoy. [News & Tribune]

Hope Henderson Doesn’t Copy Secrecy

A family is trying to figure out why their dad was stabbed at a Louisville gas station. [WDRB]

A backup power generator at a pumping station could have prevented April’s massive flooding and a big sewage spill at Louisville’s Morris Forman Water Quality Treatment Center, state officials have concluded. [C-J/AKN]

The Phoenix Hill Tavern (PHT) and Jim Porter’s Good Time Emporium closed permanently on Monday, June 1. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics has wrapped up a 10-year, $2.5 million donation from BB&T that will result in a new program on capitalism and funding toward the college’s $65 million renovation. But Gatton officials stepped back from the more controversial aspects of the original 2004 agreement, including a requirement for an Ayn Rand reading room, named for the novelist and free market philosopher. [H-L]

A Louisville park is hosting a night of camping in June as part of a national celebration. [WLKY]

U.S. police have shot and killed 385 people during the first five months of this year, a rate of more than two a day, the Washington Post reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

A minister has a new plan to try to curb crime in West Louisville. [WAVE3]

It’s almost like these folks in Henderson didn’t bother talking to anyone living in the real world in Louisville. [Henderson Gleaner]

A resident must work full-time and earn at least $14.17 an hour to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment in Louisville, according to a recent study from the National Low Income Housing Coalition. [WFPL]

Among African American adults with low education and income levels, the increase in risk of heart disease or stroke associated with living in poverty is largest for women and people under age 50, according to a large new study. [Reuters]

Ford Motor Co. CEO Mark Fields said aluminum-body F-Series Super Duty Trucks will be launched next year and that the design will “wow people.” [Business First]

Parts of South Clarksville could be the next Newport, Ky., or at least a bustling addendum to the Louisville metropolitan area. [News & Tribune]

Glad A Local Will Be Your Governator?

Portland neighbors say they’re drowning in water bills that are twice the normal cost. The problems on one block uncovered a bigger issue for Louisville Water Company customers. [WDRB]

Which David Jones crony will get the job this time? Weeks after Superintendent Donna Hargens informed Helene Kramer that her contract was not being renewed, Jefferson County Public Schools has posted the position for its chief communications and community relations officer. [C-J/AKN]

Firefighters, police and Animal Control entered a home in the 2200 block of Beargrass Avenue just off Bardstown Road after hearing from multiple neighbors Tuesday. Neighbors were concerned after finding pet abandonment notices on the door, overgrown weeds in the yard and hearing constant barking inside the home. [WHAS11]

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five greater Clark County schools may close as part of a plan the superintendent believes will help the district. [WLKY]

A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives wants to stop poor people from buying junk food with food stamps. [HuffPo]

Some people are just the absolute worst. [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering what really happened to Jamie Comer in the gubernatorial primary? It’s much more simple than he would have you believe. [Page One]

Once again, Louisville has ranked poorly on the annual ranking of city park systems from a national group. [WFPL]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

Too many tables and too little kitchen space — that’s been a pain point for Big Four Burgers & Beer in Jeffersonville since it opened in December 2013. [Business First]

Samuel pointed to tattoos on his forearms and chest to count how many times he’s been incarcerated in Clark County jail. [News & Tribune]

Y’all Holding Your Breath On UofL?

U.S. Senior District Judge John G. Heyburn II, a Republican who carved an independent and progressive path in three decades on the federal bench, upholding school desegregation and striking down laws that forbade gay marriage, died Wednesday, according to U.S. District Court clerk Vanessa Armstrong. [C-J/AKN]

Dozens of horses have tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs – including speed – at the racecourse which will host the Kentucky Derby this weekend. [Daily Mail]

A member of the University of Louisville Board of Trustees has asked Kentucky Auditor Adam Edelen to conduct a “truly independent accounting” of the finances of the university and its separate, $1.1 billion foundation, following reports by WDRB and other media of million-dollar executive compensation packages. [WDRB]

A five-year-old kindergartner at Maupin Elementary has died after being struck by a car while waiting for her bus Wednesday morning, a spokesman with the Louisville Metro Police Department has confirmed. [C-J/AKN]

In a videotaped deposition and several documents released Tuesday, which include a letter written by Louisville native Father Gilbert “Allen” Tarlton, the priest admits to several incidents where he engaged in sexual misconduct with students or children in his care. [WHAS11]

A Kentucky Court of Appeals panel heard arguments Tuesday on whether a circuit court judge was correct when he ruled last year that Bluegrass Pipeline cannot use eminent domain to take private property for construction of a natural gas liquids pipeline. [H-L]

The great weather has brought hundreds of racing fans to the backside of Churchill Downs in the early morning hours this week. [WLKY]

The case for garden-based learning in schools seems simple, even obvious, at first: What harm could there be in encouraging young children to connect with nature and learn more about the ecology around them, including where the food they eat comes from? [HuffPo]

It’s hard to steal the smile of a 9-year-old. Especially Taylor Maddux, a playful 3rd grader at Coral Ridge Elementary School. But instead of practicing her cheers or hanging with her friends, Taylor is lying in a hospital bed fighting to recover after a bizarre and freak accident at a Louisville Metro Park. [WAVE3]

An environmental group has identified what it calls the 50 communities in Central Appalachia that are most at risk from mountaintop removal and 17 are in Kentucky, including the most at risk, Kryton, located in Perry County. [Ronnie Ellis]

WFPL’s community conversation Thursday (from April 17) on the surge of heroin addiction in the region drew a wide range of participants, including public health officials, treatment professionals and people in recovery. [WFPL]

Ford reports lower-than-expected profits for the first three months of 2015 after it sells fewer vehicles in North America and continues to lose money in Europe and South America. [BBC]

One of the greatest beneficiaries of the Kentucky Derby’s economic ripple effect is the hotel and hospitality industry. [Business First]

Eight Jeffersonville City Council candidates — none who are incumbent — are vying for positions in three districts, and all of them are Democrats. Districts two, three and five are uncontested in the primary election. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

We Were First! Kentucky Hated The Gays Before Indiana

Just in case you needed another instance of Greg Fischer having no idea what he’s talking about. He’s to be applauded on the needle exchange front but we all know he didn’t “misspeak” — he just had no idea what was going on. [WDRB]

Oh, now David Jones wants a closer look at the JCPS budget? How convenient. He thinks he can sit on his hands for ages and only wake up after tension boils over the top. [C-J/AKN]

A man found dead after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood in West Louisville has now been identified. [WHAS11]

For the first time in the history of this tobacco state, the House voted on — and passed — a bill to ban indoor smoking statewide in workplaces and other public spaces, such as bars and restaurants. And then the Senate assigned House Bill 145 to its Committee on Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection, where it saw no further action. [H-L]

Way to go, Louisville, now your old people are shooting each other. [WLKY]

The National Collegiate Athletic Association expressed concern Thursday with a new “religious freedom” law in Indiana that could open the door to legalized discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. [HuffPo]

Watching this AirBnB slap fight between Greg Fischer and the Metro Council is tons of fun. [WAVE3]

There is significant evidence that cop cams cut down on most civilian complaints. But a close examination of violent encounters with the police caught on tape suggests that even with seemingly incontrovertible video evidence, questions will often linger. The kind of sea change that police reform activists desire will still likely escape them. [HuffPo]

African American leaders in Louisville are speaking out against Kentucky’s U.S. senators and their efforts to block the confirmation of Loretta Lynch as U.S. attorney general. [WFPL]

Remember when Kentucky enacted this legislation in 2013 and no one batted an eyelash? Thousands of people marched in Indiana’s largest city on Saturday to protest a state law that supporters contend promotes religious freedom but detractors see as a covert move to support discrimination against gay people. [Reuters]

If you can’t find the right people for these jobs you aren’t even trying to look for them. Period. [Business First]

Jeffersonville’s embarrassingly bad mayor has shown himself once more? [News & Tribune]

More Possibility In Chattanooga Than Louisville?

The words don’t always come easy. For Perry Clemons, they sometimes vanish. Clemons is 58-years-old and lives in Clarkson, Kentucky. [WDRB]

As Mayor Greg Fischer joins Metro Council member Angela Lee in calling for a fuller environmental study of the Brownsboro Road site purchased for a new Veterans Affairs Medical Center, plans are in the works to turn about half of the second choice site into a subdivision. [C-J/AKN]

What? Another shooting? Surely not. Not in Possibility City where everything is Compassionate and Transparent. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul takes the first step toward running for president when he asks state party leaders to endorse his idea to create a 2016 presidential caucus in Kentucky. [H-L]Singed by their defeat in the battle over Homeland Security funding, Republicans aren’t about to renew their fight against President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration anytime soon. [Politico]

They’ll run stories like this about animal shelters hundreds of miles away. But couldn’t be bothered to dig in at Metro Animal Services at any point over the past decade. [WLKY]

Louisville doesn’t have the guts to do something like this. Fischer and council will always bend over backwards for lobbyists. [HuffPo]

Lexington has started to shoot its kids just like Louisville! Copycat. We were first. Lexington police told media outlets a 9-year-old boy was taken to UK Hospital after being shot while riding in his parents’ car. [WAVE3]

A factory in Louisville, Kentucky, made chewing tobacco for over a century before folding in 2009. Now the abandoned site is a symbol of how the city is changing: The 24-acre brownfield will soon become one of the largest hubs for local food in the U.S. [Fast Company]

Louisville Metro Police is on track to putting body cameras on some officers this summer. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s proposal to consolidate more than a dozen regulatory offices into an agency that would oversee food safety is drawing the intrigue and ire of some food safety advocates, producers, and experts — some of whom question the feasibility of a move that’s decades in the making. [ThinkProgress]

A U.S. Supreme Court decision about whether patients who get insurance through federally administered exchanges should have their costs subsidized is not expected to have an impact on Kynect, Kentucky’s insurance exchange. [Business First]

At first it looks like some kind of marketing ploy. Six picnic tables, surrounded by a garbage can on a concrete slab in the middle of Same Peden Community Park in New Albany. [News & Tribune]