Let’s Lock All The Youth Up Or Something

If you missed it earlier this week, kids these days are horrible. [WDRB]

A judge has upheld Gov. Matt Bevin’s right to cut higher education in the current budget year, ruling that under Kentucky law the governor has the authority to reduce spending within state government. Wingate’s order rejects arguments in the high-profile lawsuit filed April 11 by Attorney General Andy Beshear. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Are y’all goin over to the shootin festival? [WHAS11]

Only about 20 percent of Kentucky’s 3.2. million registered voters made it to the polls for Tuesday’s primary election. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Guess what most gay people don’t give a flip about, Fairness Campaign: hate-filled, backward religious organizations. Maybe you should keep your money – donated mostly by gay people – out of church nonsense. [WLKY]

The House passed a massive National Defense Authorization Act late Wednesday, and tucked inside of it, a provision that would allow federal contractors to fire employees for being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. [HuffPo]

Wednesday marked 10 years since Earon Harper was murder and 10 years since her daughter 2-year-old Erica Hughes was shot multiple times in the head and rushed to the hospital. [WAVE3]

The overdose death toll from opioids, both prescription drugs and heroin, has almost quadrupled since 1999. In 2014 alone, 28,000 people died of opioid overdoses, more than half from prescription drugs. [ProPublica]

This sort of thing is a big deal for food deserts. [WFPL]

On Friday afternoon, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a new rule regarding the implementation of nondiscrimination protections under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It guarantees that transgender people cannot be denied health care by professionals that receive federal funding, and also that it is discriminatory to refuse them access to transition-related services. [ThinkProgress]

The lowest-paid employee at 21st Century Parks Inc. earns just $1 per year. But “he may double his wage after this,” CEO Dan Jones said at the Louisville nonprofit’s fundraiser kickoff luncheon Monday, benefiting The Parklands of Floyds Fork. [Business First]

Indiana Department of Transportation officials met with contractor representatives and New Albany city engineer Larry Summers at Seymour District offices last week to launch a $811,000 Local Public Agency (LPA) project that will make improvements at the Spring Street/Silver Street intersection this summer. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City Strikes Once Again!

Compassionate City! An eight-year-old boy witnessed his mother’s murder on Mother’s Day. [WDRB]

With a playground, splash pad, restrooms, covered stage area and grassy event lawn, Clarksville Gateway Park took just under a year and nearly $2 million to bring to life. [C-J/AKN]

This is what counts as education coverage for WHAS – two sentences. JCPS is eliminating more than two dozen jobs in the central office in an effort to slash nearly $3 million from the budget. [WHAS11]

A new study by University of Kentucky researchers contends that there is a strong relationship between suspensions and the racial achievement gap between black students and white students. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Indiana State Police are investigating a death of an inmate who was found asphyxiated in her cell over the weekend and her family welcomes the investigation. [WLKY]

Donald Trump likes giving nicknames to his enemies, but now he’s got a couple of his own. “He is the ugly American,” former Mexican president Vicente Fox said in an interview on the Kickass Politics podcast. “He is the hated gringo because he’s attacking all of us. He’s offending all of us.” [HuffPo]

Tolls for RiverLink, the all-electronic tolling system, will be based on the height of the vehicle and the number of axles it has. [WAVE3]

Donald Trump says he thinks he can win the general election, even if the Republican Party does not unify to support his candidacy. [ABC News]

Todd Boston spends his workdays hammering on horse hooves. The farrier fits fresh shoes on horses. And this Derby Week, he’s one of hundreds of workers — trainers, holders, cleaners — milling about in the track’s backside stables, making sure the high-priced horses are ready to race. [WFPL]

Including a Kentuckian from Henderson. President Barack Obama commuted the sentences of 58 more federal prisoners Thursday, seeking to add momentum to his drive to allow earlier releases of men and women serving lengthy terms for drug offenses. [Politico & Press Release]

Turning Point Brands Inc., a company that deals in tobacco and related products such as Zig-Zag rolling papers, Beech-Nut chewing tobacco, cigar products and moist snuff, is on its way to becoming Louisville’s next publicly traded company. [Business First]

Two incumbents and four others, including a political newcomer, advanced in the race for Floyd County Council At-large Tuesday night. Three candidates from each party moved on to the November general election, where voters will elect three of the six. [News & Tribune]

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Aaaaaaand Thunder Is Finally Here Again

If you’ve followed our coverage on Page One, you know you can’t trust the Commissioner of Education or anyone else at the Kentucky Department of Education when it comes to accountability and that’s something we’ve proved time and time again. Kentucky’s top education official was in Louisville Thursday night asking the public help to shape what students learn. [WDRB]

Kentucky Lt. Gov. Jenean Hampton recently cast aspersions on studying history. It is an interesting and sad juxtaposition for a daughter of the race that produced Ida B. Wells, Carter G. Woodson, Audre Lorde and Paul Robeson to utter such words. In her rush to display conservative bona fides and historic amnesia (or ignorance), Hampton spits in the face of the fact that the study of history richly rewards us. [C-J/AKN]

Budget woes are leading to layoffs at Jefferson Community & Technical College. [WHAS11]

The state will pay a $250,000 penalty to Kentucky’s two largest newspapers to settle a lawsuit that requires public disclosure of documents about children who die or are severely injured from abuse or neglect. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A lot of things have changed since Kathy and Samantha Netherland were found murdered in their Nelson County home, but Kentucky State Police said they are not giving up on the investigation. [WLKY]

If corporations paid the same tax rate as they did under Ronald Reagan, governments in the U.S. would have enough money to fund prekindergarten for every 4-year-old in America and higher education for every American attending public colleges and universities, according to a Huffington Post review of government data. [HuffPo]

Another day, another shooting in Compassionate City! [WAVE3]

This is a story that begins with cries for help from a small town school district and ends with justice. You’ll want to read all of this. [Page One]

The chairman of the Kentucky Retirement Systems Board of Trustees is presiding at a meeting in defiance of Gov. Matt Bevin’s order removing him from the board. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin deserves major applause from everyone on this KRS move! Matt Bevin has removed the chairman of the Kentucky Retirement Systems board of trustees, which oversees about $16 billion in assets for the pension and insurance benefits of state and local government retirees. [John Cheves]

A 10-year labor of love that required more than $125 million in public and private funds and about 80 real estate transactions paid off on a beautiful morning as the Parklands of Floyds Fork opened its final phase in the nearly 600-acre Broad Run Park today. [Business First]

South-central Los Angeles has little in common with Logansport. [News & Tribune]

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Watch John Yarmuth Speak Some Truth

In the summer of 2008, David Kaelin attended a series of meetings on the future of land along the Floyds Fork creek, which flows about two miles from his eastern Jefferson County farm. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville’s Faculty Senate is set to discuss its views on the fate of embattled President James Ramsey behind closed doors. [C-J/AKN]

While police continue to investigate who shot and killed a UofL student, her friends and family at a local church are responding to her death. [WHAS11]

For the first time, the Kentucky Revenue Department this year is asking taxpayers to wait. Kentucky and other states are becoming more forthright, telling taxpayers they’ll have to be patient and allow time for verification before refunds are sent. [H-L]

A Jefferson County judge is asking the state to dismiss ethics charges against him. Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has thrown out jury panels that lack diversity. [WLKY]

Landlords and property owners who exclude people with criminal records from renting or buying may be violating the law, according to new guidance released by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. [HuffPo]

Kentucky voters rarely have had clout in determining who the Democratic and Republican parties will nominate in the race for president. The Commonwealth has too few people and too few delegates at stake for a May primary to do little more than reinforce or contradict a result already reached. [WAVE3]

Even after years of education, training and experience as an obstetrician/gynecologist, I am never prepared to deliver the news that a pregnancy is abnormal. There is no good way to tell a pregnant woman — a woman who may already be wearing maternity clothes, thinking about names and decorating the nursery — that we have identified a fetal anomaly that can lead to significant, lifelong disability or even her baby’s death. [WaPo]

Like many folks, Louisvillians can be rebellious nostalgists, railing against the churn of urban change. [WFPL]

Few people are thanking the president for low unemployment. Instead, many discouraged workers are attracted to Donald J. Trump’s economic message. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville board of trustees and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin reached a settlement last month in Franklin Circuit Court with the Kentucky Justice Resource Center Inc. regarding a racial imbalance on the board. [Business First]

An agreement for a development at 10th and Spring streets that’s been in the works since May has finally been signed. [News & Tribune]

So… Everyone Should Avoid Spencer Co?

This sounds totally safe and wonderful. The Spencer County Sheriff’s Office will no longer provide round-the-clock law enforcement services beginning Tuesday, April 5. [WDRB]

Responding to public concerns about lead in public drinking water supplies, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has created a work group to review existing government regulations or practices and potentially make recommendations for changes. But the agency that created the work group, which includes a variety of public officials, intends to exclude the general public – potentially violating the state open meetings law. [C-J/AKN]

Does this count as a pedestrian accident? [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ruled that Kentucky cannot bar a corporation from contributing to political campaigns while no such restrictions apply to other organizations such as labor unions. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Additional charges could be filed after a University of Louisville student was shot and killed during a triple shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WLKY]

Stagnant pay for many Americans is already a defining issue of this year’s populism-filled presidential election. But add in the rising cost of living, and the picture is even bleaker. [HuffPo]

Can you imagine being trapped in a Louisville park for several hours? [WAVE3]

A lawsuit last week in Canada is seeking to halt a major $15 billion sale of light-armored vehicles to the government of Saudi Arabia, part of a growing international movement to stop arms sales to the Saudi government over its alleged war crimes in Yemen. [The Intercept]

The Louisville residents who were allegedly assaulted at a Donald Trump rally earlier this year are suing the presidential frontrunner. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday appeared likely to rule that property owners can challenge the federal government in court over the need for permits under a national water protection law in a case involving a company’s plans for a Minnesota peat mine. [Reuters]

Emergency departments are busy places — ask anyone who’s watched the TV show “Scrubs.” But some health systems have busier emergency departments than others, and it turns out that Norton Healthcare Inc.’s is one of the busiest in the country. With about 103,500 patient visits in 2015, the system ranks 33rd on Becker’s Hospital Review’s national list. [Business First]

Jeffersonville is suing the town of Clarksville for construction work within Jeffersonville city limits, asking work be stopped until an agreement is executed. [News & Tribune]

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Really Gonna Miss All This Compassion

Gov. Matt Bevin must first fill two open seats on the University of Louisville Board of Trustees before the board can take up a proposed vote of “no confidence” in the leadership of President James Ramsey, according to the terms of a settlement reached last month in a lawsuit challenging the board’s lack of minority representation. [WDRB]

A new survey of Louisville roads released Tuesday by Metro Public Works shows a slight improvement in the city’s overall road conditions, but more than one-third of major thoroughfares are still so deteriorated that they require “immediate attention,” including rehabilitative work. [C-J/AKN]

Compassionate City just can’t stop killing its people. [WHAS11]

That line of pear trees in the Palomar neighborhood in south Lexington is gorgeous, fluffy and decked out like clouds descended to suburban earth. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Additional charges could be filed after a University of Louisville student was shot and killed during a triple shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WLKY]

A new report nearly doubles previous predictions for sea level rise if global emissions continue unabated, portending a doomsday scenario for many of the world’s coastal cities. [HuffPo]

According to the city of New Albany, preliminary work to prepare for the final planned section of the city’s portion of the Ohio River Greenway project has begun. [WAVE3]

In these first years of the 21st century, we may be witnessing a new world being born inside the hollowed-out shell of the American system. [Bill Moyers]

In the United States, we like to think that our success is determined only by how hard we work. But in reality, some of it’s just luck. And some of that luck has to do with things we can’t control: Our race. Our gender. Our sexual orientation. What language we grow up speaking. [WFPL]

Shandra Woworuntu arrived in the US hoping to start a new career in the hotel industry. Instead, she found she had been trafficked into a world of prostitution and sexual slavery, forced drug-taking and violence. It was months before she was able to turn the tables on her persecutors. Some readers may find her account of the ordeal upsetting. [BBC]

When you buy a car, the salesman makes a commission. The same’s often true when you buy insurance from an agent — unless they’re selling you a health plan from Louisville insurance giant Humana Inc. or one of the other major insurers who have decided not to pay them. [Business First]

Michael Shepard headed to his campus food court this week looking for students hungry for political action. He came away unsatisfied. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Compassionate City Loves It Some Gun Violence

The Louisville Metro Planning Commission has stopped reviewing “conservation subdivisions” in Jefferson County while it looks into whether regulations approved in 2008 achieve a goal of saving green space. [WDRB]

Responding to public concerns about lead in public drinking water supplies, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has created a work group to review existing government regulations or practices and potentially make recommendations for changes. But the agency that created the work group, which includes a variety of public officials, intends to exclude the general public – potentially violating the state open meetings law. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police confirm that one woman has died and two men are injured after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey Calvin Borel, a three-time winner of the Kentucky Derby, has informed his agent, Larry Melancon, that he is retiring effective immediately. [H-L]

A bill giving death benefits to families of EMS workers killed in the line of duty has been signed into law by the governor. [WLKY]

The biggest question of the political season is whether Donald Trump will get enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination before the convention. Prediction markets, which allow people to bet on future events using real money, estimate an average 61 precent chance of a contested Republican convention with two or more votes required. The chance Trump will fail to get to the required 1,237 delegates before the convention, they estimate, is 69 percent. [HuffPo]

A man was shot in front of a Louisville clothing store on Saturday over a pair of new athletic shoes, Louisville Metro Police said. [WAVE3]

From late Friday Afternoon… “The governor’s unilateral action in cutting the appropriated funding of colleges, universities and community colleges was outside of his authority. The law on budget reductions is straightforward. It requires a declared shortfall that does not exist. If it did, the last budget bill that was passed and signed into law dictates the steps that must be taken. We are therefore requesting the governor withdrawal his order. We are confident he will comply.” [Attorney General Andy Beshear]

This could be one of the dumbest moves from JCPS yet and Allison Martin isn’t helping matters. Jefferson County Public School officials are declining to discuss gang activity in local schools with a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from the United States has proved popular from the beginning. When he first articulated it following the Paris terrorist attacks in November, he surged in the polls and hasn’t slumped since. And while progressives might want to believe the appeal of Trump’s divisive idea is limited to a small subset of conservatives, a new poll indicates Islamophobia actually runs deep across the spectrum of the American electorate. [ThinkProgress]

A legal dispute between the four daughters of late Louisville real estate developer Al J. Schneider focuses on a belief by two of those daughters that the trustees for the estate want to quickly liquidate the company’s millions in real estate assets — to a point that beneficiaries would not receive the fair value for those properties. [Business First]

While Clarksville continues to focus on revitalizing the community through extensive development and redevelopment efforts, the town is making plans to ensure proper infrastructure is in place to improve conditions and handle growth. [News & Tribune]