Support That JCPS Clothing Program

Just more of that well-known Greg Fischer transparency! Greg Fischer’s office called a meeting but banned cameras as it planned to update local media on the Omni Hotel project. [WAVE3]

Officials with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office arrested a man who authorities say passed contraband to a Metro Corrections inmate. [WDRB]

One by one, women board a breast-cancer screening van in southwestern Jefferson County to receive mammograms. [C-J/AKN]

We’d share more information with you but the new comms person at JCPS is apparently a disaster who refuses to communicate with anyone who doesn’t drink the Kool-aid. The JCPS annual Clothing Assistance Program Blitz kicked off Monday morning. [WHAS11]

Even after years of talk about a “war on coal,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell startled some of his constituents in March when he urged open rebellion against a White House proposal for cutting pollution from coal-fired power plants. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just a reminder that, sure, there’s fun crap happening but your leadership is effectively ignoring the shooting problem in this city. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama fired back at former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R) on Monday after the 2016 Republican presidential candidate invoked the specter of the Holocaust in comments regarding the Iran nuclear deal. [HuffPo]

History was made Sunday when the the city’s first statue honoring a woman was unveiled at Cathedral of the Assumption. [WAVE3]

In L.A. and cities across the United States, it is effectively illegal to be dirt poor in a country where more than 45 million people live in poverty. [The Intercept]

Harrison County, Indiana, officials are being sued in federal court by a former employee of the county clerk’s office who claims she was fired after refusing to process a same-sex marriage license. [WFPL]

New York state recently announced an increase in the minimum wage for fast food workers, to $15 an hour. It’s the fruit of a three-year labor campaign. But there’s another group of workers out there that hasn’t had a real wage increase in decades. [NPR]

The advertising and marketing agency Power Creative has developed a new executive leadership team. CEO David Power said he’s promoted three employees to serve as chief operating, innovation and marketing officers. He created the three positions to better define roles. [Business First]

This time last year, onlookers from the Big Four Bridge were met with the sight of dilapidated docks and an eroding, uneven shoreline at Jeffersonville’s Ohio River bank. [News & Tribune]

PEE ALERT: Fischer Hired Private A P.I.

The Cordish Companies, the company that manages 4th Street Live!, is under fire after the release of a new report that outlines widespread allegations of discrimination. [WDRB]

Now Greg Fischer has hired a private investigator? HAHAHA. His scandals just won’t go away. The man can’t hire anyone who isn’t dirtier than Jerry Abramson’s housing director. [C-J/AKN]

Citing his innovative approach, vision and leadership in managing and maintaining park facilities and programming, Mayor Greg Fischer today named Seve Ghose as the new director of Metro Parks and Recreation. Prediction on how long it takes for this guy’s scandal to surface? [WHAS11]

The only reason not allow the demonstration is because they know it harms their case when people see it’s just slot machines by a different name. Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate denied a motion by The Family Foundation to require racetracks to provide an in-court demonstration of historical wagering, or instant racing. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The number of heroin cases flooding Louisville’s courts has surged from 190 in 2011 to more than 1,500 in 2014. [WLKY]

One of the nation’s most recognizable names in climate science, Dr. James Hansen, released a new paper this week warning that even 2 degrees Celsius of global warming may be “highly dangerous” for humanity. [HuffPo]

A university board with no black members is unacceptable, say two African American leaders. They are asking Kentucky’s Attorney General to get involved on the makeup of University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [WAVE3]

President Obama is enjoying a winning streak lately, with the Supreme Court reaffirming his signature health care law and Iran agreeing to curbs on its nuclear program. But one longstanding goal continues to bedevil him: closing the wartime prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. [NY Times]

Members of the Justice Resource Center and the West Louisville Minister’s Coalition want Attorney General Jack Conway to weigh in on whether Gov. Steve Beshear broke state law when he did not appoint a single African-American to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees. The groups sent a letter to Conway Tuesday. [WFPL]

Hillary Clinton trails three top Republican presidential candidates in matchups in three key swing states — Iowa, Colorado and Virginia — a new Quinnipiac poll finds. [The Hill]

In February, Louisville-based Almost Family Inc. announced plans to purchase Buffalo, N.Y.-based WillCare HealthCare. It looks like that transaction will be closing soon. [Business First]

After a failed referendum in May, a consultant may give the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp. the advantage next time around. [News & Tribune]

Plans, Commissions, Studies, Buzzwords

Jefferson County Public School bus drivers vote Tuesday on a contract that offers more money for working troublesome routes. [WDRB]

Here’s yet another “plan” from Greg Fischer. Because we all know a plan from Washington that provides zero funding and only hype will solve this city’s murder problem. Fortunately, most people in Louisville see this for what it is. [C-J/AKN]

As stats continue to roll in like Thunder Over Louisville, it looks like event in its 26th year is proving to be a successful one. [WHAS11]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

Another day, another murder. Police remained at the scene of a shooting in the 2500 block of Duncan Street in Portland more than 12 hours after it was reported. [WLKY]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

Another train death? A pedestrian died after being hit by a train in Pleasure Ridge Park Monday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

If you plan on dining out Wednesday, there’s a chance a portion of your final bill will help fund patient services at The Healing Place, a drug and alcohol recovery shelter in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

Food delivery service might be one of the latest trends to pick up in Louisville. Takeout Taxi has been a staple in Louisville for more than 15 years and works with 102 restaurants in the area. And of course, some restaurants have their own delivery drivers. But it seems that in the last year, more food delivery services have come to Louisville. [Business First]

Residents of Clark and Floyd counties will soon get a taste of what the ongoing Ohio River Greenway Project could become — and it’s much more than a system of multi-use pathways and river views. [News & Tribune]

Is Fischer’s Omni Train Off The Rails?

If you’re wealthy and aren’t supporting this place, something is wrong with you. It is expected to be a much safer environment for women and children in danger. The Center for Women and Families is in the process of getting an extra layer of protection. [WDRB]

The Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau has set up an advisory council of representatives of some high-profile, out-of-town organizations to suggest what Louisville might do to improve its status as a meeting destination in hope of drawing more lucrative tourism business. [C-J/AKN]

If it’s not a gunshot death or a pedestrian death, it’s possibly a train death. [WHAS11]

The Council on Postsecondary Education is holding a series of public meetings around the state to get input on a new five-year plan to guide Kentucky’s higher education and adult education systems. Don’t worry, this won’t matter. Don’t get too excited about it. [H-L]

A new report shows the number of people who died from drug overdoses in Kentucky jumped 7 percent last year while the number of deaths attributed to heroin stayed about the same. [WLKY]

More states are considering restoring the right to vote to felons, with supporters saying that once their debt to society is paid they should be allowed to exercise a fundamental right. [HuffPo]

The design for the 30 story Omni building planned for downtown Louisville is suddenly uncertain after a regulatory panel delayed its approval for at least two weeks. [WAVE3]

Wondering why poor kids are unhealthy? The Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday adopted a GOP amendment that would provide schools flexibility in meeting Department of Agriculture (USDA) rules for serving whole-grain products and reducing sodium levels. [The Hill]

Since 2010, vandals have caused more than $400,000 in damages at Louisville parks and community centers, according to data provided by Metro Parks. [WFPL]

The top electricity providers in the country are going renewable much more slowly than smaller companies, according to data reported Tuesday by sustainability group Ceres. [ThinkProgress]

A few weeks ago, we reported that the U.S. Department of Justice had filed a lawsuit that aims to block AB Electrolux’s acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. The government contends that the deal would lead to less competition, higher prices and fewer options for American buyers. Electrolux, for its part, has a plan to convince regulators otherwise. [Business First]

Another candidate has entered the New Albany race for mayor, but this one wants to break through the limitations of the current political system. [News & Tribune]

Will Jimbo’s House Of Cards Tumble?

Over the last several months, University of Louisville President James Ramsey has insisted that multi-million-dollar deferred compensation packages he and his top aides have received from the school’s $1.1 billion foundation were implemented with the full knowledge and consent of U of L’s Board of Trustees. [WDRB]

University of Louisville President James Ramsey last year was paid 2 ½ times more than the average of the Atlantic Coast Conference’s other 14 presidents and chancellors — all of whose universities are ranked far higher academically than U of L. [C-J/AKN]

Really, why in the piss is this news? Just an attempt to embarrass the man? What? This bullshit of eating each other alive in the local media has got to stop at some point. [WHAS11]

Last spring, Marc H. Morial, the president of the National Urban League, found himself in a place he has come to know well over the years, across a desk from Sen. Mitch Mc-Connell, the majority leader, talking about public policy. [H-L]

If it’s not terrifying weather or water main break, it’s a gas line rupture. [WLKY]

It’s no secret that Jennifer Lawrence loves food, and by now, everyone should be familiar with her thoughts on dieting (“If anybody even tries to whisper the word ‘diet,’ I’m like, ‘You can go fuck yourself'”). [HuffPo]

The new bridge being constructed in downtown Louisville to carry I-65 traffic is expected to be open to drivers in less than six months. [WAVE3]

U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took swipes at Wall Street and her Republican rivals on Monday, promising to impose tougher regulations on banks and raise the wages of ordinary Americans if she wins the 2016 White House race. [Reuters]

Louisville Public Media announced on Monday that Stephen George has been named the organization’s executive editor. Does this mean the sexist mess that’s caused everyone else to quit will be out the door soon? [WFPL]

House leaders are considering sweeping changes to Congress’ reimbursement requirements in the wake of the Aaron Schock scandal, including forcing lawmakers to provide more detailed documentation about how they spend taxpayer money and disclosing those details to the public. [Politico]

Mid City Mall’s look is outdated, but planned upgrades are aimed at bringing the Highlands shopping center’s look into the 21st century. [Business First]

Fun in the sun doesn’t have to end when school begins. The Clarksville Aquatic Center might be getting a $3.5 million revamp that would allow the facility to stay open longer, change and keep some of its features and cut down on operational costs. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Shoots Even More

A MetroSafe dispatcher has confirmed that multiple victims were shot near 25th Street and Broadway in west Louisville. [WDRB]

Aetna’s acquisition of Humana appears to be part of a merger frenzy as the five biggest U.S. health insurers look to get bigger. But any acquisition or merger of this proportion must overcome potential hurdles. [C-J/AKN]

The opportunity of ownership is a wish come true for one of Louisville’s newest small business owners looking to turn his new restaurant into the Russell neighborhood’s latest treasure. [WHAS11]

The Humane Society of the United States is objecting to a proposed expansion of bear hunting in Kentucky. The group says the state’s black bear population is still small and needs time to expand. [H-L]

Louisville Fire and Rescue continued their search for three people missing after a pontoon boat capsized on the Ohio River Saturday night. [WLKY]

So let me be clear about a few things: I do not want to order a wedding cake from a bakery owned by a guy who thinks I’m going to hell. I have no desire to purchase bouquets from a florist who pickets Pride parades. I wouldn’t serve pizza at a wedding if the owner paid me and offered to serenade my guests with an a cappella version of “Born This Way.” And finally, the suggestion that I would be insane enough to want to force a homophobic clergyperson to preside over my most sacred day is beyond insulting. [HuffPo]

Louisville is home to more than 12,000 Humana employees, but the company’s sale could affect thousands more. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s voters have seen this script before: insurgent Kentucky Republican takes down established candidates openly or presumably preferred by U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, Kentucky’s ultimate establishment Republican. [Ronnie Ellis]

If Aetna’s plan to purchase Humana becomes official, what was Louisville’s largest standalone publicly traded company by revenue will cease to exist as the city has known it. [WFPL]

Weight screenings in high school were not enough to get overweight and obese kids on track toward a healthier weight, a recent U.S. study found. [Reuters]

The merger deal between Louisville-based Humana Inc. and Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. finally has been announced. Though we now know details of the agreement, we have to wait to see what the fallout will be for Louisville. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. But about two months into the division’s operations, the Jeffersonville City Council is discussing ways to reorganize it because some members are dissatisfied with the qualifications of its manager. [News & Tribune]

The Minimum Wage Meltdown Isn’t Over

Community leaders began searching for information Wednesday night regarding who was responsible in the hit and run death of Deniesha Pugh. [WDRB]

Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, potentially tipping the balance of a board divided over the actions of the university’s foundation. [C-J/AKN]

Agencies, hospitals and schools across Kentuckiana that serve children with special needs were notified by the WHAS Crusade for Children this week that their grant requests will be funded from the money collected during the 62nd annual WHAS Crusade for Children. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate heard arguments Wednesday in an instant-racing lawsuit on a motion by the Family Foundation to have an in-court demonstration of the electronic games based on past horse races. [H-L]

Bourbon lovers can get their hands on a rare bottle of Pappy Van Winkle without having to wait for hours as Liquor Barn celebrates the grand opening of two new locations. [WLKY]

U.S. employers added a solid 223,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate fell to 5.3 percent, a seven-year low. The numbers reflect a job market moving close to full health and raise expectations that the Federal Reserve will start raising interest rates as early as September. [HuffPo]

Thousands of workers will receive a 50-cent increase in their hourly pay Wednesday as Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance goes into effect, even as a lawsuit against the city continues. [WAVE3]

Senator Mitch McConnell is standing by his call to remove the statue of Jefferson Davis from the state Capitol Rotunda. [More WDRB]

The first phase of Louisville’s minimum wage increase went into effect Wednesday. [WFPL]

In a victory for opponents of partisan gerrymandering, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld the use of an independent commission to draw Arizona’s congressional districts. Writing for a narrow majority in the 5-4 ruling, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg touted the importance of direct democracy and making sure the power of the people is not hijacked by its elected representatives. [Mother Jones]

Kentucky has signed new contracts with five managed-care organizations to provide health care services to Medicaid eligible Kentuckians. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. [News & Tribune]