Another Fischer Administration Scandal

Not only is Greg Fischer’s newest hire (guy at MSD) a par for the course, scandle-ridden guy

But…

We hear another recent hire at the director level of an infamous Metro Government agency has run into a bit of a drinking-and-driving problem. After Metro Call apparently received tips that the director was drinking and driving in their city vehicle, said director had their privileges quietly yanked by the mayor’s office.

Have known for several weeks but keep forgetting to mention it to you folks. Now’s a good time with the MSD situation and a new Parks director being named. (They’re not from Parks)

Can you guess who it is?

Would name them but there’s no fun in that and some jackass would just take credit for it anyway.

Is Fischer’s Omni Train Off The Rails?

If you’re wealthy and aren’t supporting this place, something is wrong with you. It is expected to be a much safer environment for women and children in danger. The Center for Women and Families is in the process of getting an extra layer of protection. [WDRB]

The Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau has set up an advisory council of representatives of some high-profile, out-of-town organizations to suggest what Louisville might do to improve its status as a meeting destination in hope of drawing more lucrative tourism business. [C-J/AKN]

If it’s not a gunshot death or a pedestrian death, it’s possibly a train death. [WHAS11]

The Council on Postsecondary Education is holding a series of public meetings around the state to get input on a new five-year plan to guide Kentucky’s higher education and adult education systems. Don’t worry, this won’t matter. Don’t get too excited about it. [H-L]

A new report shows the number of people who died from drug overdoses in Kentucky jumped 7 percent last year while the number of deaths attributed to heroin stayed about the same. [WLKY]

More states are considering restoring the right to vote to felons, with supporters saying that once their debt to society is paid they should be allowed to exercise a fundamental right. [HuffPo]

The design for the 30 story Omni building planned for downtown Louisville is suddenly uncertain after a regulatory panel delayed its approval for at least two weeks. [WAVE3]

Wondering why poor kids are unhealthy? The Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday adopted a GOP amendment that would provide schools flexibility in meeting Department of Agriculture (USDA) rules for serving whole-grain products and reducing sodium levels. [The Hill]

Since 2010, vandals have caused more than $400,000 in damages at Louisville parks and community centers, according to data provided by Metro Parks. [WFPL]

The top electricity providers in the country are going renewable much more slowly than smaller companies, according to data reported Tuesday by sustainability group Ceres. [ThinkProgress]

A few weeks ago, we reported that the U.S. Department of Justice had filed a lawsuit that aims to block AB Electrolux’s acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. The government contends that the deal would lead to less competition, higher prices and fewer options for American buyers. Electrolux, for its part, has a plan to convince regulators otherwise. [Business First]

Another candidate has entered the New Albany race for mayor, but this one wants to break through the limitations of the current political system. [News & Tribune]

Never-Ending No Kill Lou Huckstering

Just when you thought the No Kill Louisville hucksters couldn’t stoop lower…

About that fancy award:

The Better Business Bureau is warning small businesses and consumers to be wary of a new vanity awards program linked to the notorious US Commerce Association.

The program, operating locally as the Louisville Award Program, notifies businesses via emails that they have been selected to receive a Best of Louisville Award for their “exceptional marketing success.” The award program honors “the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Louisville area.” BBB believes the program’s actual purpose is to persuade businesses to spend $80 to $180 for an award plaque or hand-polished crystal trophy.

So that’s fun.

Grifters getting taken for a ride by some other grifters.

That’s some real Possibility City goodness.

Yeah, That Was Totally Just A Glitch

The Louisville Water Company failed to read one of the meters at the KFC Yum! Center for four years, letting about $100,000 in water and sewer charges go uncollected, arena officials said. [WDRB]

An event is planned at the University of Louisville on July 20 to mark the 1969 lunar moon landing by the Apollo 11 astronauts. [C-J/AKN]

Executives at Floyd Memorial Hospital say they plan to hire a consultant to consider options for securing the survival of the 236-bed facility in New Albany. [WHAS11]

Considering Republicans’ condemnation of Beshear for implementing the Affordable Care Act by executive order, the suggestion that he wield his pen again on this issue was more laughably hypocritical than the Rowan County clerk’s explanation of her intolerant beliefs. [H-L]

It floods enough that people should know better to drive into water, right? Rescue crews were called to Louisville’s Lake Forest community twice Tuesday morning to help two drivers whose cars were submerged in floodwaters. [WLKY]

It was September of their sophomore year at Tufts University in 2012 when John Kelly went to a party and saw someone who had sexually assaulted them only two weeks earlier. [HuffPo]

If you’ve headed into downtown Louisville lately, you have probably noticed a big difference on the Ohio River Bridges Project as some major progress is being made. [WAVE3]

Two Richmond residents had their bags packed and were ready to get married June 26 regardless of Kentucky law. However, the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision meant they could celebrate at home with their family instead of traveling to Chicago that night, they said. [Richmond Register]

When Roger Collins first started coming around the Baxter Community Center, the kids really didn’t talk to him. [WFPL]

U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning heard testimony today in the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky’s lawsuit against Rowan County and Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to issue marriage licenses to any eligible couple, in an attempt to keep same-gender couples from obtaining them. [ACLU-KY]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees’ compensation committee voted unanimously Monday to give university president James Ramsey a pay raise of 6 percent and a 25 percent annual bonus — though a consultant’s study found that Ramsey is already paid much more than his peers. [Business First]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services interim CEO Dr. Dan Eichenberger said he is seeking out the help of a consultant to map out the future of the hospital. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is A Ton Of Awful Fun Again

JCPS officials have fired a teacher who was under investigation over accusations she had inappropriate contact with a student. [WDRB]

Former Jefferson County Board of Education member Debbie Wesslund says Adam Edelen’s JCPS audit was a fraud. Mainly because it was selective and manipulative, which everyone already knew. [C-J/AKN]

On June 23 Jefferson County Public Schools fired a bus driver, Melinda Sanders, who dragged a student, 7-year-old Ally Rednour, down a street by her backpack on May 15. [WHAS11]

Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld the nationwide tax credit subsidies to help people buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year and there are dozens of other events happening around the metro area to celebrate Independence Day. [WLKY]

You won’t believe this horrible Fox story about the homeless. Or maybe you will. [MMFA]

She was arrested, along with Louisville’s former Chief Financial Officer Steve Rowland, and charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct. The police report said they were engaged in “disruptive, provocative and intimate behavior.” [WAVE3]

They took a page out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. City workers and police cleared an encampment of homeless people from the west side of Baltimore on Friday morning, provoking a brief traffic-blocking protest and leaving some of the city’s homelessness services organizations chagrined at what they say was a surprise operation. [ThinkProgress]

James Blanton is the new director of the Louisville Free Public Library, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday. He takes over for retiring director Craig Buthod, who announced his resignation in November after 17 years on the job. [WFPL]

There have only been 9 days this year when the police have not killed somebody. Some news outlets put the number as high as 500 dead in the past six months, according to both The Guardian and Killed by the Police.Net. The Washington Post’s own investigation showed nearly 400 dead as of the end of May. [WaPo]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has approved a settlement that reduces the base rate increases sought by Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. [Business First]

It starts with a professional rodeo and ends with a demolition derby. In between there will be a queen pageant, midway rides, interactive activities for children and exhibits to view. And yes, there will be plenty of animals. [News & Tribune]

More Fun Stuff At Cahoots Last Night

Gobs of police showed up at Cahoots (1000 block of Bardstown Road) around 4:00 A.M., shutting down traffic, causing all kinds of fun:

LMPD and LMEMS eventually pulled someone out on a stretcher:

That sounds fun. Cahoots sure sounds like a fun family place. Somewhere you definitely won’t get shot and definitely won’t see all kinds of horse deals going down.

But don’t worry! It’s the Highlands. There’s no need for there to be full-court press when something goes down because it’s not the West End. Right? (Kinda like when LMPD tells you the gunshots you not only heard but witnessed, three people called 911 about, were just fireworks, in the daylight…)