Bob Hill Seems Frustrated These Days

From the end of his driveway, Bob Hill can hear the hum of construction work. He lives close enough to the four-lane highway taking shape that he can see it when a line of trees thins for the winter. [WDRB]

An assault case in Jefferson Circuit Court was dismissed Tuesday by a judge who ruled an assistant commonwealth’s attorney “altered” evidence that was “deliberately not disclosed and concealed” from the defense counsel. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner American Pharoah will retire and breed here in Kentucky. [WHAS11]

If Matt Bevin’s ignorance and code words leave you with a bitter taste in your mouth, you’re not alone. [H-L]

In newly released audio statements, an Olmsted Academy North student told police that he was choked so hard by a school resource officer that he could barely breathe and had blurry vision. [WLKY]

It wasn’t that the intelligence community was giving the administration wholesale faulty intelligence. It was that the administration was lying to the American people about what the intelligence actually showed. [HuffPo]

The mayor of Goshen has resigned, a city representative said Wednesday. Earlier in the day, an email apparently from Mayor Bob Thacker was sent to residents saying that members of a neighborhood watch Facebook group – which the email referred to as “The Disease” – had crossed a line, mentioning the mayor’s wife and children in online posts. [WAVE3]

States lack accurate statistics on widespread heroin use. [NPR]

The Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness is conducting the 2015 Community Health Needs Assessment survey to help the department and local hospitals determine which programs, policies and services will lead to a healthier Louisville. [WFPL & Survey]

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Wednesday announced the results of a four-state crackdown aimed at stopping illegal distribution of addictive prescription medicines, such as opioid painkillers, that yielded 280 arrests. [Reuters]

Work on The Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass’s expansion is well under way, but just how much will the 53,400-square-foot addition cost? [Business First]

The preliminary $119 million plan to revamp, rebuild and realign several Greater Clark County Schools would result in an additional $13.74 cents per $100 of assessed property valuation for 2016 property taxes, the district superintendent told school board members Tuesday night. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Loves Cutting TARC Routes

TARC is asking for the public’s opinion about possibly cutting service on three of its busiest routes. [WDRB]

Clarksville Community Schools — which Superintendent Kimberly Knott called “the neediest school district in Southern Indiana” — stands to lose more than $500,000 under Indiana’s new budget, which was signed last week by Gov. Mike Pence and introduces changes to the school funding formula. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway is suing Marathon Petroleum Corp. over high gas prices. The 2015 gubernatorial candidate filed the complaint Tuesday with the United States District Court for the Western District of Kentucky – one week ahead of the state’s primary election. [WHAS11]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. Judicial corruption is a big deal in the rest of the state. [H-L]

Following a heated public meeting, the Floyd County Council is holding off on a decision to cut half of the county’s animal control budget. [WLKY]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

People are freaking out because police found marijuana growing at the scene of a shooting. [WAVE3]

Jerry Abramson sends emails to the White House staff. [White House]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Indianapolis-based American Senior Communities LLC plans to build a new facility in Louisville. [Business First]

To downtown Jeffersonville resident McNeil Wynn, TARC is vital in his everyday commute to Louisville. [News & Tribune]

Tolls Will Still Hit Poorest Hardest

Scott County, Indiana, wants its needle exchange program to keep running even after the governor’s executive order expires. [WDRB]

Trinity High officials on Wednesday touted their decision to begin random drug- and alcohol-testing of their 1,200-plus students, saying the move will act as a deterrent and could help keep students from becoming addicted later in life. [C-J/AKN]

Police in Lawrence, Ind. have located a Louisville pizza delivery driver’s car that was stolen May 3. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has approved a plan by Keeneland to move its simulcasting — betting on live horse races run elsewhere — to The Red Mile in Lexington. [H-L]

Officials approved a plan to minimize the effects of bridge tolls on low-income residents. And it won’t do much of that. [WLKY & Press Releases]

About a half-dozen states are considering cutting income taxes and simultaneously increasing sales or excise taxes — sparking debate on whether wealthier taxpayers will benefit disproportionately at the expense of those living on lower incomes. [HuffPo]

Ignore the bit where Connie Leonard snidely uses “Democrat” as an adjective. A lot of taxpayers are up in arms over recent home assessments in Metro Louisville. That’s because in many cases, assessed values jumped much higher than homeowners expected and certain neighborhoods are in more sticker shock than others. [WAVE3]

A federal appeals court panel ruled on Thursday that the NSA’s bulk collection of metadata of phone calls to and from Americans is not authorized by Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act, throwing out the government’s legal justification for the surveillance program exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden nearly two years ago. [The Intercept]

Louisville Metro Council members are scrutinizing new property assessments that, in some neighborhoods, have spiked by as much as 40 or even 150 percent. [WFPL]

Three men campaigning to lead the state of Kentucky faced potential voters Wednesday night in Booth Auditorium at the University of Pikeville. [WYMT]

Over the years, Papa John’s International Inc. has added a few non-pizza foods to its menu, including chicken wings, a giant chocolate chip cookie and, most recently, garlic knots. [Business First]

Democratic incumbent Jeff Gahan defeated challenger David White by almost 700 votes, or 60 percent to 39 percent, in the New Albany mayoral primary Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Tolling Secrecy Is SOP In Possibility City

If you missed it last night, Jamie Comer’s career officially ended. [Page One from C-J/AKN]

A Louisville lawmaker has asked Attorney General Jack Conway to decide if the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet followed public records law when it refused to release a study on easing bridge tolls on low-income drivers. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro police are investigating separate fatal shootings from Saturday, both involving men in their 20s. [C-J/AKN]

The HIV public awareness campaign, You Are Not Alone, is now being expanded to include messages aimed at reaching travelers and truck drivers along Interstate-65 between Louisville and Indianapolis. The messages encourage drivers to know their HIV status and to protect themselves by avoiding risky sexual behavior. [WHAS11]

Blake Johnson, 16, who identifies as gay, said when he attended last year’s Pride Prom, an annual event for high school students, “I was surrounded by people like me.” [H-L]

Three people have been arrested and charged in connection with a homicide on Derby night. [WLKY]

Famously animal-loving Jon Stewart is said to have bought a farm in New Jersey, for purposes of giving home to rescued farm animals. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? [WAVE3]

“It’s a lot of fun,” House Speaker Greg Stumbo said of the four-way GOP primary. Gov. Steve Beshear added: “They’re having a good time it looks like among the four of them going back and forth.” [CN|Toot]

Here’s your political duh moment. Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul’s efforts to appeal to minority voters hit a rough patch over the past week. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left intact New Jersey’s ban on counseling intended to change the sexual orientation of gay children. [Reuters]

Fresh off a record attendance at the Kentucky Derby on Saturday, a new report has found that the state’s tourism industry continues to grow. [Business First]

Questions surrounding the legality of a signage campaign against the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s referendum may end with a complaint filed with the state Election Division. [News & Tribune]

Fischer? Playing Favorites? Surely Not!

Should the East End bridge be a hazmat route? In Indianapolis, trucks carrying hazardous materials are banned from passing through downtown. A similar prohibition quietly took effect last year for the main northern Kentucky interstate into Cincinnati. [WDRB]

A lawsuit contends Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s office gave preferential treatment to prominent developer Bill Weyland, awarding his company a multi-million dollar contract for office space when it could have rented more space for less under an alternate deal. The lawsuit against the city, filed in Jefferson Circuit Court late Monday by real estate investors Mac Sawyers and Bill Lerner, contends the deal with Weyland was rigged and cost taxpayers more. [C-J/AKN]

Three people are recovering at the hospital after two shootings in Louisville Monday night. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Derby contenders Bolo, International Star, American Pharoah, Dortmund are featured in Tuesday’s report of activity and horses on the backside of Churchill as race preparations kick up a notch. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating after human remains were found in a burned car in the 5000 block of KY 393, near US 42, outside Buckner. [WLKY]

In a new survey, more than half of self-identified Republicans said they didn’t think the Affordable Care Act is increasing the number of people with health insurance, with a fifth of respondents saying it has actually reduced the number of people with coverage. For the record, the evidence suggests these people are flat-out wrong. [HuffPo]

Several homeowners on East Riverside Drive plan to file a lawsuit against the Metropolitan Sewer District because they said they were unaware of a Metro Louisville flood ordinance that will force them to move from their home. [WAVE3]

If you were wondering about Greg Fischer being the most milquetoast and ineffective mayor in the country? You’d be mistaken. She’s actually in Baltimore, home of Cordish. [The Hill]

A Kentucky proposal to study the background levels of certain chemicals in urban soil has gotten funding from the federal government. [WFPL]

Want to hear audio of yesterday’s Supreme Court hearing on gay marriage? Transcript will be there, as well. [Part One & Part Two]

Here’s a non-shocker for ya: Greg Heitzman, executive director of the Louisville-Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District, announced during an MSD board meeting that he will retire later this year. [Business First]

Victoria Bennett had a plan. In 2010, realizing that she needed to follow her dream of graduating with an Indiana University degree, Bennett — then a political science student at Kennesaw State University near Atlanta — sold her house, gathered up her savings and prepared to move. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

It’s Possibility Pedestrian Death City!

This should be embarrassing to everyone in Louisville. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and other city officials kicked off the “Look Alive Louisville” pedestrian safety program Thursday. [WDRB]

Really, it’s just embarrassing. With Louisville averaging 16 pedestrian deaths during each of the past five years, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Thursday a new safety program called “Look Alive Louisville” that is designed to greatly reduce pedestrian fatalities. [C-J/AKN]

So many questions in West Buechel…and getting answers is proving to be difficult. [WHAS11]

For decades, if not for the past 141 years, racing fans have looked with envy upon a coveted section of seats in the Churchill Downs grandstand, where only 20 sets of lucky horse owners could sit. [H-L]

A loan to finance the East End Crossing section of the Ohio River Bridges Project was announced Thursday U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. [WLKY]

The private prison industry’s growing role in immigrant detention is due in part to Congress’ requiring the federal government to maintain some 34,000 detention beds, according to a report released Wednesday. The report, drafted by Grassroots Leadership, a nonprofit based in Austin, Texas, calls on Congress to eliminate the immigrant detention quota from its 2016 appropriations request. [HuffPo]

The owners of a troubled Bardstown Road hotel, who provided a tour to WAVE 3 News on Wednesday, said they were focused on passing a city inspection next week before renovating the lodge. [WAVE3]

A new strain of dog flu from Asia that started infecting pets in Chicago this January has spread to thousands of dogs in Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio and Indiana and killed six, animal health officials said. [Reuters]

Louisville can’t figure out how to manage a flipping animal shelter. So there’s little chance it can handle a fancy sports team. Advocates of Louisville having a pro sports franchise focused for years on bringing the National Basketball Association to the city. [WFPL]

As a historic constitutional showdown over gay marriage looms this month at the U.S. Supreme Court, attorneys are fighting over another bitterly disputed issue: their fees. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) says it again will pursue a contract to provide Medicaid managed-care services to the state of Kentucky. [Business First]

A group of developers still hopes to market six lots along Bank Street for commercial and residential use, but they want the New Albany Redevelopment Commission to readjust its asking price for the properties. [News & Tribune]