Three Horrible Superintendents In A Row

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens must “step up to the challenge” of leading Kentucky’s largest school district and regain the trust that has eroded in the past year, according to an annual evaluation unanimously approved by the school board Tuesday. [WDRB]

Thanks, religious extremists, for ruining hospitals everywhere when you buy them up! The state is investigating whether patient care is unsafe at University of Louisville Hospital because of staff cuts made by KentuckyOne Health. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s a battle over trees but for Cynthia Huber the fight has a deeper meaning. “This is not only did they lose their loved ones that they have memorialized but they’re also losing the tree in memory of that person,” she said. [WHAS11]

Welp, readers of the Herald-Leader can now look forward to a much poorer experience. The Lexington Herald-Leader announced on Monday that it will transfer its printing and packaging operations to Louisville starting in August, and that the company will put its downtown Lexington building on the market. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Jefferson County Public School board voted unanimously to approve Superintendent Donna Hargens’ 2015-2016 summative evaluation. [WLKY]

“You might think, ‘Well that is not going to happen to us in America. We’re not going to listen to some ridiculously haired buffoon, peddling lies and nativism in the hopes of riding a protest vote into power.’” Oliver said. “Well let Britain tell you, it can happen, and when it does, there are no fucking do-overs.” [HuffPo]

Photographs went viral on social media; thoroughbreds with sores on their backs, ribs showing. Hooves in need of trimming. The outcry began drawing attention from equine industry standards such as the Daily Racing Form and Blood Horse. [WAVE3]

In his final State of the Union address in January, President Obama made an ambitious pledge to overhaul the management of fossil fuels on America’s public lands in his final year, focusing, in particular, on the antiquated and little-known federal coal program. [ThinkProgress]

A new Google project to estimate solar potential has come to Louisville. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell tried to blame Democrats for refusing to fund Zika-related activities. Reality? McConnell and his friends pushed all kinds of nastiness into the legislation that they knew would keep Democrats from supporting it. Like trying to harm women and undoing confederate flag bans in federal cemeteries. [TPM]

Aetna Inc. isn’t happy with Missouri’s decision earlier this year to oppose its pending purchase of Humana Inc. [Business First]

The South Central Regional Airport Authority has received assurance of the $750,000 local match needed for the runway extension project at the Clark Regional Airport. [News & Tribune]

UofL Hospital Sounds Like Tons Of Fun

A southern Indiana man was arrested in California yesterday armed with explosive chemicals and guns. Police say he told them he was headed to a gay pride event in Los Angeles. We spoke with some of Jim Howell’s neighbors who told us they had no idea how dangerous he was. [WDRB]

A leading University of Louisville surgeon says that staffing cuts by KentuckyOne Health at U of L Hospital have rendered it “unsafe” for the care of seriously ill and injured patients. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands marched from Indiana and Kentucky to show their support for the people of Orlando. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Community and Technical College System Board of Regents approved its budget for next year, which includes a 6.1 percent tuition increase for students and no raises for faculty or staff to help deal with continued budget cuts. [H-L]

Two people were taken to University Hospital after a shooting at a White Castle. [WLKY]

Rabbi Michael Lerner, a political activist and the editor of Tikkun Magazine, didn’t hesitate to get political while speaking at the funeral of sports legend Muhammad Ali, who died at age 74 on June 3. [HuffPo]

Twenty-year-old James Howell, who attended Ballard High School, has been arrested multiple times in Southern Indiana. [WAVE3]

A gunman wielding an assault-type rifle and a handgun took hostages and opened fire inside a crowded Florida nightclub, killing approximately 20 people and wounding 42 others before dying in a gunfight with SWAT officers, police said Sunday. [Politico]

The Kentucky Supreme Court will decide the fate of local minimum wage laws. On Friday, the court heard arguments over whether Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance violates state law by going beyond the scope of Kentucky’s minimum wage, which is tied to the federal rate of $7.25 per hour. [WFPL]

If you support this monster, you’re enabling, supporting, okaying, begging for more hatred. Donald J. Trump on Sunday sought to capitalize on the mass shooting at a gay club in Orlando, reiterating his controversial call for a temporary ban on Muslim migration to the United States and criticizing Hillary Clinton for what he claimed was her desire to “dramatically increase admissions from the Middle East.” [NY Times]

It’s so far, so good as Aetna Inc. works to fold Humana Inc. into its business. [Business First]

A new leader has been named to guide the News and Tribune’s editorial vision. [News & Tribune]

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Louisville’s Compassion Spread To Lexington, IN

Hardin County is tapping a home-grown educator for its biggest job. [WDRB]

Basically, everybody is voting like woah against UofL’s Jim Ramsey. He just needs to resign and get it over with. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This was a really dumb move for Easter. But that’s what you’ve come to expect from a newspaper that only consists of people who are bitter (except Phillip Bailey) at the rest of the media world. [WHAS11]

Kentucky lawmakers have completed work on a bill aimed at requiring that public school students receive basic CPR training. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! New details are emerging after a man and a woman were found dead inside a southern Indiana home. [WLKY]

It’s hard to know where to begin with the nonsense from the fossil fuel industry’s front men. [HuffPo]

Tucked away in French Lick, Indiana there’s a spa where you are not the one getting pampered, but rather the one doing the work. [WAVE3]

President Obama late Monday scolded members of the media for their coverage of the 2016 presidential race, calling on them to not “dumb down the news” in a campaign with headlines dominated by businessman Donald Trump. [The Hill]

The board of Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District voted on Monday to let the district’s staff explore other options for a controversial overflow basin in Smoketown. [WFPL]

The Innocence Project released a report alleging that prosecutors are almost never punished when they withhold evidence or commit other forms of misconduct that land innocent people in prison. [ProPublica]

For those of who like to know what you’re getting into — food-wise, at least — Churchill Downs Racetrack has announced its menu for this year’s Kentucky Derby. [Business First]

River Ridge Commerce Center and Clark Regional Airport Authority officials have long recognized and promoted their mutually beneficial relationship. [News & Tribune]

Pedestrian Deaths, Shootings And JCPS Bus Crashes Are All The Rage In Compassionate City

No one thinks the Omni Hotel will live up to all the Fischer-pushed hype. Not even the people surrounding Fischer. [WDRB]

It’s now painfully clear that A Kentucky Newspaper’s education reporter will regurgitate whatever JCPS tells her without question. We had high hopes for her. Shame on us. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The students over at Bellarmine University are on a rescue mission. [WHAS11]

Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced Friday afternoon that he is retiring after 34 years with the agency. [H-L]

Another day, another JCPS bus crash. A Jefferson County Public Schools bus driver was injured Tuesday morning in a crash on Bardstown Road at Little Springs Boulevard, just south of the Gene Snyder Freeway. [WLKY]

The same crap is happening in Kentucky but the KDP is sitting on its hands. In South Dakota, Governor Dennis Daugaard is right this moment mulling over a bill sent to his desk by the legislature that would bar transgender students — kids often facing bullying and discrimination — from using bathrooms or locker rooms that correspond with their gender identity. [HuffPo]

Six months ago, Tracy Blue was waxing poetic about “Modern Louisville,” a new magazine geared to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communities, the fourth print venture that her husband, University of Louisville trustee Jonathan Blue launched with her listed as publisher. [WAVE3]

Over a lifetime following government and politics as a spectator and for many years as a reporter, I’ve reached some conclusions. Campaigns matter. They tell us things about candidates and usually, though not always, what sort of office-holders they’ll likely be. Visions and philosophies are shared and promises made. Campaigns often reveal how the candidate operates under pressure as well as insights into character. [Ronnie Ellis]

There will be more court-appointed attorneys available to represent poor people in court under Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget. [WFPL]

We started getting some clarity in the Republican and Democratic races Saturday night. Hillary Clinton squeaked out a win in Nevada — but did so in a way that suggests she has, despite Bernie Sanders’s strength, maintained her national advantage. Marco Rubio’s strong showing in South Carolina helped push Jeb Bush out of the race, giving Mr. Rubio a chance to unify the mainstream of the Republican Party and bring about a true three-way race. [NY Times]

A more than $6.2 million expansion could be coming to a senior living facility in southeast Louisville. [Business First]

For more than 14 years, foster parents William Yowell and Lizzette Steed-Yowell have opened their New Albany home to children whose lives have been turned upside down by neglect or abuse. The couple stresses the importance of providing a safe home for children in need, but there’s another ingredient they say is even more impactful: Open hearts. [News & Tribune]

Woah, This Is Clarksville’s First Black Cop?!

Community leaders and parents are saying enough is enough with all the recent violence in Louisville. [WDRB]

Four Louisville Metro Council members are pooling their resources to hire former Democratic Caucus Director Elizabeth Hoffman for an unspecified role in City Hall less than a month after she was fired. [C-J/AKN]

Seriously? Not even a mention of failing a polygraph being essentially meaningless? And we’re supposed to trust the teevee folks. [WHAS11]

ESPN reported Tuesday that five former University of Louisville basketball players and recruits told their “Outside the Lines” reporters that they attended parties at a campus dorm from 2010-14 that included strippers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Months after Crystal Rogers, 35, a mother of five disappears, new details are emerging about the case. [WLKY]

A key House Democrat suggested Monday that Vice President Joe Biden can’t win the Democratic nomination on his own and should not enter the contest. [HuffPo]

Thanks to a $250,000 grant, the Clarksville Police Department has hired three new officers, including the first African American to serve on the force. [WAVE3]

The two women who want to be Kentucky’s next lieutenant governor offered sharply contrasting views on education and economic policies in a televised debate on Kentucky Education Television Monday evening. [Ronnie Ellis]

Nearly 1,000 local leaders and neighborhood revitalization advocates from across the nation are in Louisville this week for the annual NeighborWorks America Community Leadership Institute. [WFPL]

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has granted Kentucky a one-year extension for meeting requirements of the stringent new identification security law known as REAL ID – meaning a Kentucky driver’s license is still sufficient for gaining access to the vast majority of federal installations. [Press Release]

The Courier-Journal’s horse racing reporter, Jennie Rees, who’s been with the paper for 34 years, will leave after accepting a buyout offer from the paper’s parent company. [Business First]

After three city department heads decried the measure, New Albany City Councilman Kevin Zurschmiede pulled his ordinance to adopt the International Property Maintenance Code on Thursday night. [News & Tribune]

UofL’s Leadership Is Still The Worst

Everyone pray to the Flying Spaghetti Monster that someone with no ties to Greg Fischer runs this program so it stays on track and comes to fruition. Google Fiber announced it was considering bringing its high speed internet service to Louisville earlier this month and now the company is hiring managers for the project. [WDRB]

It looks like Louisville may go another year without a monitoring program for airborne toxic chemicals, as city and state officials keep looking at each other as the future funding source. [C-J/AKN]

Family members of five people who died when a boat capsized on the Ohio River say in federal court documents that the placement and condition of a construction barge caused the tragedy. [WHAS11]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

She’s old enough for that? Jennifer Lawrence is the latest Louisville native to be honored by the Greater Louisville Pride Foundation’s Louisville Hometown Heroes series. [WLKY]

Daniel Suddeath has been hired as editor of the Glasgow Daily Times, effective Tuesday, Sept. 29. Suddeath, a staff writer for the News and Tribune in Southern Indiana for the past seven years, also served as editor for Southern Indiana Business Source magazine during that time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Neighbors who say there has been an increase in crime in their area are frustrated and now they are taking action by starting a neighborhood watch. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called homelessness an “emergency” in the city and proposed spending $100 million to provide permanent housing and shelters for the city’s 26,000 indigent. [Reuters]

State Auditor Adam Edelen says he’s looking into the financial management of the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the university’s $1.1 billion endowment, and the university’s board of trustees as part of an ongoing investigation. [WFPL]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

It looks like another expansion is on the way at Ford Motor Co.’s Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The city’s mayoral candidates did not hold back during Thursday night’s League of Women Voters debate, answering moderated questions and sending accusations the other’s way. [News & Tribune]

Transparency Is Not A Thing In Possibility City

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found with a gunshot wound inside the Hampton Inn on Jefferson Street in downtown Louisville just before 11 o’clock Monday night. [WDRB]

Because there’s no such thing as transparency in Louisville! The question of whether the Metropolitan Sewer District was violating the state’s open records rules from its board members’ use of private email accounts won’t be answered by Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway. [C-J/AKN]

People are still freaking out about the murder on Ewing Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Fayette County Public Schools have cancelled classes for the rest of the week, according to the district’s website. [H-L]

There was an open conversation between African-American veterans and Congress Wednesday morning in Louisville. [WLKY]

A federal judge’s ruling halting the president’s executive actions on immigration did little to persuade either party in Congress to publicly back down from a budget standoff. [HuffPo]

Electrolux, the Swedish company buying General Electric’s appliance division, will make Louisville’s Appliance Park a key part of future plans, the company’s leader said Tuesday. [WAVE3]

Louisville is the 11th-poorest city in the United States. But it’s still all puppies and rainbows and whatever else Greg Fischer’s spokesgays can come up with on any given day. [CBS News]

Jefferson County Public Schools is asking parents whether an A letter grade should be based on a 90-100 point scale instead of the 93-100 scale currently used. [WFPL]

Scott Welk, who brought forward the lawsuit on Tuesday in California federal court, accused the Jim Beam Brands of violating California’s False Advertising Law with its handmade claims thus forcing him to pay a premium price for Jim Beam’s white label Bourbon. [The Spirit Business]

The elephant in the room: forcing everyone at the dying newspaper to re-apply for their jobs despite saying that wouldn’t happen. And laying Jim Carroll off because Kentucky doesn’t need to know anything about Washington, D.C., obviously. [Business First]

Two challenges have been filed against Clarksville Town Council candidates — Rick Schafer running for District 2 and Dave Disponett running for District 4. [News & Tribune]