Another Week of UofL Messes Begins

Leaders at the University of Louisville and its affiliated foundation agreed Friday on the process for hiring a special auditor to examine questionable spending by the foundation – a move that averts a potential lawsuit by the university against the foundation. [WDRB]

A group will host a series of eight public forums statewide to alert people about possible changes to the state Medicaid program and seek comments, with the first one scheduled Sept. 26 in Morehead. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Smoketown neighborhood was buzzing Friday morning, Sept. 23. Hundreds of people volunteered as part of Habitat for Humanity’s “Love Your Neighborhood” initiative, building two new Habitat for Humanity homes, cleaning up sidewalks and parks, and doing repairs on existing homes. One of those homes belongs to Ellen Sloan, who moved into her Habitat house seven years ago. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Supreme Court dealt a decisive blow to Gov. Matt Bevin’s executive power Thursday, finding that he exceeded his statutory authority by cutting state universities’ budgets by 2 percent last spring, after the General Assembly had already appropriated their funding. [H-L]

A new law meant to give some felons a second chance by expunging their criminal records is causing confusion and disagreement. [WLKY]

Donald Trump said Wednesday he finally gave up pushing conspiracy theories about President Barack Obama’s birthplace because it was politically convenient to do so. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Councilwoman Mary Woolridge got stuck in an elevator at City Hall. [WAVE3]

A new study that examines some major health care proposals from the presidential candidates finds that Donald Trump would cause about 20 million to lose coverage while Hillary Clinton would provide coverage for an additional 9 million people. [AP]

Leaders of the University of Louisville and its foundation pledged Thursday to continue working through their differences even amid more public dissent. [WFPL]

As his two-term presidency draws to a close, Barack Obama is looking back—at the legacies of his predecessors, as well as his own—and forward, to the freedom of life after the White House. In a wide-ranging conversation with one of the nation’s foremost presidential historians, he talks about his ambitions, frustrations, and the decisions that still haunt him. [Vanity Fair]

Members of the University of Louisville board of trustees and the University of Louisville Foundation board of directors sparred Thursday about oversight of a special audit of the foundation’s finances. [Business First]

Concerns about vacation time and caseload led to an investigation into Clark County Chief Public Defender Amber Shaw, who last week was asked to resign less than three months after being hired. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Continues To Get Crazy Under Donna Hargens’ “Leadership”

JCPS is getting really fancy these days. An Iroquois High student was arrested after allegedly bringing a loaded handgun to the school on Wednesday. [WDRB]

John Owen has a vision of a streetcar line returning to Market Street to connect West Louisville to downtown and East Louisville, capitalizing on the fact that much of the rail line infrastructure is still intact beneath the pavement. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! By 2020, graduation ceremonies may look different for greater Clark county schools. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky officials will eventually unveil a controversial mural in Memorial Hall that was shrouded last year and will surround it with other works of art and more context, President Eli Capilouto announced Thursday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville has seen as many homicides so far this year as there were in all of 2015. [WLKY]

The James Graham Brown Foundation, which has provided more than $72 million in grants to the University of Louisville and related entities over the past 55 years, has threatened to cut off funding unless the U of L Foundation hires a nationally recognized forensic accounting firm to review its finances. [C-J/AKN]

What should be the criteria for removing a student from the Jefferson County Public Schools’ magnet program? [WAVE3]

The U.S. added 151,000 new jobs in August and the unemployment rate held steady at 4.9 percent, according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. [NPR]

Joann Robinson stands under the trestle on Vine Street and Broadway, looking with admiration at the mural she painted back when the neighborhood was called German Paristown. [WFPL]

In 1988, a small-time drug dealer became the first man charged under a new, harsh drug law signed by then-President Ronald Reagan. Almost 30 years later, President Barack Obama granted a sentence commutation to Richard Van Winrow, a literal posterboy for the history of America’s drug war. [BBC]

When Heaven Hill Distilleries Inc. is finished with a $25 million expansion of its Bernheim Distillery in West Louisville next summer, it will have one of the biggest distilleries in the state, according to Denny Potter, master distiller and plant manager. [Business First]

The Republican challenger of Indiana schools Superintendent Glenda Ritz wants authorities to investigate a contract benefiting a company that hired a Ritz aide. [News & Tribune]

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Everyone Panicked Over A UofL Foundation Meeting That Ultimately Didn’t Take Place

All that media hype for nothing. The special University of Louisville Foundation meeting set for Labor Day has been called off because of concerns raised by the U of L Board of Trustees. [WDRB]

Of course two entitled white guys are arguing over something in the West End. Louisville Metro Council President David Yates scolded fellow member Kelly Downard on Thursday evening for getting involved in the West End Wal-Mart negotiations, saying it was an inappropriate step that had pushed the project back. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro’s Meals on Wheels program cares for more than a thousand seniors every year and more volunteers are needed to continue that generous work. [WHAS11]

If you want to know why so many average Kentuckians are unhappy about the lack of good jobs and better wages since the Great Recession, read a report published Wednesday by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. The report has a mix of good news and bad news, with most of the good news in the “Golden Triangle” between Lexington, Louisville and Cincinnati and most of the bad news in rural and chronically depressed parts of Kentucky. [Tom Eblen]

Louisville Metro Police are investigating the city’s 81st homicide of 2016. Police were called around midnight Sunday on a report of a shooting in the 600 block of Village West Drive. [WLKY]

Taco trucks on every corner!? SIGN US UP! [HuffPo]

A belated Fourth of July celebration was held in Crescent Hill on Sunday. [WAVE3]

Lawmakers are returning to Washington next week to confront an impasse over funding bills that threatens to cause a government shutdown, something Republican leaders want to avoid at all costs. [The Hill]

Elizabeth Boccieri has been using meth and oxycontin in the past few days, ever since she heard about extra-strength laced heroin that’s been making its way south from Ohio to Louisville. [WFPL]

A powerful drug that’s normally used to tranquilize elephants is being blamed for a record spike in drug overdoses in the Midwest. Officials in Ohio have declared a public health emergency and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says communities everywhere should be on alert for carfentanil. [NPR]

When Florida State athletes arrived on campus in 1998, they received $144,750 in free Nike footwear and apparel. This year, a vault of $2.8 million in Nike gear awaited players arriving in Tallahassee. That’s in addition to the $1.4 million in cash Nike will pay this year for the right to outfit the university’s athletes. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council hopes higher fines in an updated noise ordinance will ratchet down the number of violations. [News & Tribune]

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Latest Aetna-Humana Fun: Good? Bad?

A section of a popular green space in a Louisville neighborhood could become the site of a backup power facility for the water plant. [WDRB]

The NCAA has not finished interviewing people in its investigation of the University of Louisville’s men’s basketball program. [C-J/AKN]

A 17-year-old male was injured in a shooting at 32nd and Greenwood, in the Parkland area, according to MetroSafe. [WHAS11]

PEE ALERT! Andy Barr says people are poor because they receive assistance. The fact that the Kentucky Democratic Party can’t rustle up someone to beat this halfwit is a searing indictment of the Party’s inability to do anything other than conduct insurance fraud schemes these days. If you think Candy Barr isn’t out of his league and just as terrible as people like Tim Longmeyer, take a look at his anti-poverty proposal. It involves gutting public education and ending the requirement that financial advisers disclose conflicts of interest to their clients. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! On Tuesday, a group of Jefferson County Public Schools took the opportunity to lead the conversation on race relations in Louisville. [WLKY]

The CEO of Aetna threatened an Obamacare pullout if the feds opposed its merger with Humana. [HuffPo]

It’s that time of year again. The time when all the JCPS school bus accidents start flooding the teevee news. The crash happened at the intersection of Cane Run Road and Bridwell Drive at 3:28 p.m. [WAVE3]

Federal health regulators have announced plans to crack down on nursing home employees who take demeaning photographs and videos of residents and post them on social media. [ProPublica]

Aaron Siskind, the 20th century photographer best known for his detailed pictures of urban architecture, once said: “Photography is a way of feeling, of touching, of loving. What you have caught on film is captured forever; it remembers little things, long after you have forgotten everything.” [WFPL]

The “lock her up” chants started early and came often at Donald Trump’s campaign event near Fort Lauderdale, Florida on Wednesday evening. [BBC]

Kindred Healthcare Inc.’s rehabilitation department has a new person in charge. [Business First]

A Sellersburg company will cease manufacturing and cut its workforce nearly in half before the first of the year. [News & Tribune]

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Yet Another Murder In Compassionate City

Another day, another murder. Louisville Metro Police are investigating a fatal shooting near Churchill Downs. [WDRB]

Here’s a story that many people in the area are forgetting about or quickly ignored. Forty-one current and former members of Louisville Metro Police’s SWAT team are suing the city for overtime pay, claiming the department’s on-call policy is burdensome and violates federal and state wage and labor laws. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! They dropped their 8th graders off at Crosby Middle School, but moms Michelle Whitehead and Antoinette Whithaker said they had to pick them up at the Kosair Emergency Room. [WHAS11]

Kentucky House and Senate leaders produced a two-year, $21 million spending plan for the state early Thursday morning that cuts universities and colleges by 4.5 percent over the next two years and provides more than $1 billion to cash-strapped public pension programs. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s another look at Compassionate City’s latest gun death. [WLKY]

This man speaks in stark contrast to bumbling halfwits Jenean Hampton and Matt Bevin when it comes to education. [HuffPo]

This is going to blow your mind. A Clifton resident is moving forward after a Historic Preservation Committee questioned solar panels on his home. [WAVE3]

America’s criminal justice system is a patchwork of local, state, and federal policies that together resemble a maze with too many entrances and too few exits. When low-risk people enter this maze after arrest, pretrial policies can ruin their lives. [The Atlantic]

The frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination and controversy magnet Donald Trump is due back in Louisville next month. [WFPL]

We can’t decide if Jim Gray is a horrible U.S. Senate candidate or just an embarrassingly slow and out-of-touch candidate. Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Jim Gray wants Ashlanders to know his opponent, Sen. Rand Paul, voted against the Trade Adjustment Assistance program. Gray’s Senate campaign contacted The Daily Independent with its reaction two weeks after Paul’s official visit to Ashland, during which he directed staff to help laid off AK Steel workers applying for federal assistance. [Ashland Independent]

What is the point of this silly article about internet speeds? It’s almost as if AT&T lobbyists convinced Baylee Pulliam to trot out something about how Google Fiber isn’t the savior. [Business First]

Cynthia Weigleb told detectives she lost her temper when her 3-month-old daughter wouldn’t stop crying in their New Albany home Dec. 19, 2010. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Needs About A Billion Dollars

The long-awaited opening of a new elementary school this summer will come at the same time Jefferson County Public Schools is expected to unveil a plan to deal with a growing problem – more than $880 million in facility needs scattered across the district. [WDRB]

Conversations about alleged drug activity on the social network site for Crescent Hill are increasing, and residents were urged to report such incidents to the police at a recent gathering. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It will apparently take a second resignation from the UofL Board of Trustees before Governor Matt Bevin can act to replace Paul Diaz. [WHAS11]

More than a dozen states have strengthened laws over the past two years to keep firearms out of the hands of domestic abusers, a rare area of consensus in the nation’s highly polarized debate over guns. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another pedestrian accident. [WLKY]

U.S. employment gains slowed more than expected in January as the boost to hiring from unseasonably mild weather faded, but surging wages and an unemployment rate at an eight-year low suggested the labor market recovery remains firm. [HuffPo]

Hundreds turned out to say goodbye to local civil rights pioneer, Benjamin Shobe, Sunday at his visitation. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder if you haven’t yet read this. How do you stop states and cities from forcing more disclosure of so-called dark money in politics? Get the debate to focus on an “average Joe,” not a wealthy person. Find examples of “inconsequential donation amounts.” Point out that naming donors would be a threat to “innocents,” including their children, families and co-workers. And never call it dark money. “Private giving” sounds better. [ProPublica]

On the corner of Breckenridge and Logan streets, at the edge of Smoketown, there’s a giant hole in the ground. It’s an active construction site, with trucks and heavy machinery working behind a barbed-wire fence. [WFPL]

There are some subtle indications Republicans may be rethinking the wisdom of trying to make right-to work-an issue in this year’s legislative elections. [Ronnie Ellis]

The International Boat Builders’ Exhibition & Conference (known as IBEX) is leaving Louisville for Florida. [Business First]

In the May primary election, two familiar faces will vie for a judge’s seat on opposite sides of the aisle. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]