Holding Our Breath For An End To The Death

Louisville police say the city’s latest murder victim was robbed and kidnapped before he was murdered. [WDRB]

Maybe we can try arresting our way out of yet another nightmare. After a deadly start to 2015, leaders of the Metro Council’s Public Safety Committee asked top city officials, including Police Chief Steve Conrad, to speak during a specially called Monday meeting to talk about recent violence and increase in homicides. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal hit and run involving a pedestrian. [WHAS11]

Lexington is pushing forward with its efforts to increase Internet speeds. [H-L]

Before the latest bout of snow, crews were working on repairing the roads, but the weather brought those plans to a halt. Now officials estimate there are nearly 10,000 potholes across Louisville. [WLKY]

A New York judge ordered a Papa John’s pizza restaurant franchise and its owner to fork over more than $2 million after short-changing hundreds of delivery workers and shaving hours from their paychecks, prosecutors said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Everybody is losing their mind over an upcoming Prince concert. [WAVE3]

On Monday, the city council of Indianapolis passed a “Homeless Bill of Rights” to protect its population without housing, one of the first cities to do so. [ThinkProgress]

Braving temperatures in the 30s on a recent Wednesday morning, the 25 or so people bunched in the Kroger parking lot in west Louisville had plenty of grounds for complaint. [WFPL]

The United States government on Friday urged the Supreme Court to strike down bans on same-sex couples’ marriages across the country, concluding, “There is no adequate justification for such a discriminatory and injurious exercise of state power.” [BuzzFeed]

It might come as little surprise that Kentucky, home to Papa John’s International Inc. and Yum! Brands Inc., has the highest number of fast-food restaurants per capita. [Business First]

A request to seek bids on a partial repaving of the district’s service center was contested at Greater Clark County Schools board of trustees meeting and passed by a thin margin. [News & Tribune]

Enjoy The Holiday Break Cause 2015 Will Suck

Spoiler Alert: A gymnasium isn’t going to solve the problem. In the last 10 years, Wayne Blakey Sr. has seen a lot of violence near his home on River Park Drive in West Louisville. [WDRB]

Launched in September in four high-crime areas, Zones of Hope is a city initiative trying to tackle issues of education, unemployment and violence by focusing on young black males. [C-J/AKN]

It was a joyous welcome for Santa and his elves at the Wayside Christian Mission on Christmas Eve. With the help of the Louisville community, Santa brought presents for all the Mission’s residents, spending their holiday at the shelter. [WHAS11]

The University of Louisville has been awarded a $155,000 grant to map disease genes in horses. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! For one family, Christmas Eve isn’t just a holiday, but the anniversary of a devastating loss. [WLKY]

This is not the kind of bourbon that will get you excited. Researchers have identified the cause of a Kansas farmer’s mysterious death this summer as Bourbon virus. [HuffPo]

The rally at Jefferson Square in downtown Louisville was organized by the local group Man Up, and came just hours after another person was shot dead by police near St. Louis. Maybe in the future, they could hold a rally without one of the city’s most notorious bigots screaming into the microphone? [WAVE3]

The 2014 midterm elections saw a wave of Republican candidates elected and re-elected to federal office, many of whom are now rearing to make the environment their first casualty of the 114th Congress. As it turns out, the fossil fuel industry may have had something to do with that. [Think Progress]

Steve Beshear is heading into his final regularly scheduled legislative session next month, but he said he doesn’t believe that will hamper his ability to help get legislation passed in the 2015 General Assembly. [WFPL]

Here’s a fun read about Ambassador Matthew Barzun’s musical tastes. Just read between the lines. [BuzzFeed]

Churchill Downs Racetrack has named its latest track announcer. For some reason, a ton of folks wrote in asking for this link. Here you go. [Business First]

Amid public outcry over a new fee being assessed, the Clark County Commissioners declined to vote on an ordinance that would have facilitated the collection of the fee. [News & Tribune]

A Great Song For The Leaders At JCPS…

We’d like to dedicate this song to JCPS, Greg Fischer, LMAS (same shit, new people), MSD, that new guy at W(T)FPL allegedly ruining all the things, Jim King, Steve Beshear, all the people in the media who freak out when old people die, all the people shilling for the retirement system and the NKL shysters. But mostly JCPS.




It is not safe for work.

Here’s hoping Donna Hargens turns the volume up before she hits play.

Yep, Felner Cronies Continue To Wreak Havoc

Aaaand the rumors have begun about Toni Konz fishing for a job with the Kentucky Department of Education, just like Nancy Rodriguez. Remember, they’re just rumors. Even though there’s an established pattern of Holliday fluff. [WDRB]

In 2008, Louisville set out to boost its college-educated workforce — setting the goal for half its working-age adults to hold associate or bachelor’s degrees by 2020. But at the current rate, the goal won’t be reached until 10 years later, according to a report issued Tuesday by the city’s 55,000 Degrees initiative. [C-J/AKN]

You know what leads to ill-advised posts like that? Ignorant, back water racism. Nothing less than pure racism. Here’s hoping Norton sends that poor, uneducated woman some help in avoiding such… ignorance… in addition to firing her. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council is expected to review a new ordinance regulating ride-sharing companies such as Lyft and Uber in January, months after debate began on how Lexington should regulate the companies that use technology to connect drivers with riders. [H-L]

Do you know these folks? Louisville detectives need the public’s help identifying two burglary suspects caught on video. [WLKY]

The amount the United States spent on health care went up last year by the smallest amount since federal scorekeepers started tracking these dollars half a century ago, according to an audit issued Wednesday. The news might come as a shock to Americans struggling to keep up with rising costs. [HuffPo]

This story will probably cause you to pop a vein. A woman is facing charges after her mother was found covered in bedbugs, fleas, feces and urine, according to Louisville Metro police. [WAVE3]

On a memorial to West Virginia’s most recent mining disaster, the silhouettes of 29 figures are etched into black granite, men posed with arms around each another like teammates. [NY Times]

The comment period for the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed greenhouse gas standards ended on Monday, and more than two million individuals, states, corporations and trade groups were eager to weigh in. [WFPL]

Really? Is anyone surprised that Robert Felner lackey John Deasy is in this mess? L.A. school district officials turned over 20 boxes of documents Monday in response to a federal grand jury subpoena for documents related to its troubled iPad project, officials confirmed Tuesday afternoon. [LA Times]

Marvin Maxwell is eager to sell his Mom’s Music location on Mellwood Avenue where, for years, musicians have bought instruments, recorded songs and learned how to rock. [Business First]

The Clark County Commissioners and county council are set to take a closer look at the finances of Clark Memorial Hospital. [News & Tribune]

Human Trafficking, Stabbing And Electric Buses

The first person in Louisville convicted of human trafficking was sentenced to 10 years in prison with no probation Monday morning. [WDRB]

In June, 16-year-old Elivar Mazariegos stepped off a bus in the desert town of Altar, Mexico, 1,900 miles north of his rural village in Guatemala, where a death threat had pushed him to join a surge of unaccompanied children fleeing violence and poverty. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun stabbing? The victim of the stabbing in the 500 block of East Ormsby has been identified. [WHAS11]

Louisville officials plan to phase out the oldtime-looking trolleys that are a staple of downtown in favor of all-electric buses. [H-L]

The 125th fall meet is officially underway at Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

A few hours before dawn on Wednesday morning, city counselors in Fort Lauderdale, FL passed a bill to make it harder to feed the homeless. [Think Progress]

Two months after a baby girl was shot to death on her front porch in Louisville’s West End, we’re learning more about why. [WAVE3]

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said on Saturday the U.S. government will recognize same-sex marriages in six more states, bringing to 32 the number of states where couples in gay unions qualify for federal benefits. [Reuters]

Kentuckians enrolling in Kynect, the state’s health care exchange, can expect changes in the way they shop for health insurance beginning Nov. 15. [WFPL]

Listen to voters from either end of the political spectrum and you’ll hear a similar complaint: most are tired of the inability of members of Congress to work together to get something done. [Ronnie Ellis]

Teddy Abrams doesn’t see why the Louisville Orchestra shouldn’t sell out every performance. [Business First]

The newest member of the Sellersburg Town Council hopes to bring some of youth to the team. [News & Tribune]

LG&E Managed Its DUI Scandal Better Than LWC

If you’re going over the Kennedy Bridge in the next few months, you may notice some new equipment as temporary transponder readers were put up on Friday. [WDRB]

If the spokesperson for LG&E gets fired for a DUI, why shouldn’t the overpaid CEO of the Louisville Water Company be fired for the same? [C-J/AKN]

The founder of USA Harvest, Hugh “Stan” Curtis, was sentenced to 24 months in prison and three years of supervised probation Thursday after pleading guilty to tax evasion, mail fraud and money laundering. [WHAS11]

The state this week finalized new rules on coal-mining permits that include upgraded water-quality standards. Several environmental groups argue the rules aren’t strong enough, however, and are suing over one key provision. [H-L]

Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson said an investigation into corruption allegations in the New Albany Police Department found no criminal violations. [WLKY]

Lil Randy raised eyebrows this weekend when he endorsed one of the most hawkish positions toward the Islamic State militants currently wreaking havoc in Iraq and Syria. [HuffPo]

It can be heard for miles – a bellowing from the Louisville Zoo. But it’s not a lion or large animal making the sound. The animals causing all the noise are only about three feet tall. [WAVE3]

The Justice Department and immigrant-rights attorneys clashed before a federal judge in Seattle on Wednesday — a case dramatizing the split personality in the Obama administration over the question of providing counsel to child migrants faced with deportation hearings. [Politico]

Teddy Abrams has arrived. The 27-year-old new music director of the Louisville Orchestra opens the orchestra’s season Saturday with the annual Fanfara gala performance. [WFPL]

Moms Demand Action is launching what it describes as its first ad campaign against a corporate gun policy. The group, a campaign of former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Everytown for Gun Safety, is running print and digital “homepage takeover” ads in half-a-dozen newspapers criticizing the gun policy at grocery retail chain the Kroger Co. [WaPo]

A Clark County prosecutor says anyone caught vandalizing the Big Four Bridge shouldn’t expect any sympathy from his office. [Business First]

Looks like Home Depot stores in the metro area were hit by credit card hackers. [Consumerist]

The Clark County Redevelopment Commission voted 4-0 with one abstention to pay up to $500,000 for environmental and surveying work to establish the route for a proposed road connecting Ind. 62 near the River Ridge Commerce Center to the Clark County Regional Airport. [News & Tribune]

Greg Fischer: He’s The Opposite Of Transparent

The city of Jeffersonville is changing its plans for a marina that’s been vacant since the first of the year, after construction bids were more expensive than expected. [WDRB]

Chris declined to comment if Kindred had asked the city for financial incentives to assist its project. Because he can’t be caught being transparent with taxpayers and his former employer, the paper, can never be caught pressing him to open up. [C-J/AKN]

An infant was shot and killed and another person was injured after a shooting in the 110 block of South 37th Street, close to Market Street. [WHAS11]

Lexington hopes to have its first “Housing First” program that would provide permanent housing to about 20 homeless people by the end of the year. [H-L]

Local organizations met Wednesday at the VA Medical Center on Zorn Avenue to find ways to help homeless veterans in Louisville. [WLKY]

Lexington is apparently one of the ten cities with the highest quality of life. [HuffPo]

It was called Frost Middle School, one of Jefferson County’s most low performing schools, but that all is gone. In its place is the new Robert Frost 6th Grade Academy. [WAVE3]

Cowboy boots and denim jeans. That’s all that was new here Tuesday as Mitch McConnell and Alison Lundergan Grimes squared off before more than 500 at the Red, White and Blue Picnic on the grounds of the Daviess County Courthouse in sweltering, mid-90 degree heat. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday, Jeffersonville unveiled large-scale, wood models of the first piece commissioned by a community, civic and private initiative focused on developing public art in the Southern Indiana city. [WFPL]

“There’s only one thing Barack Obama needs to keep his grip on power,” Mitch McConnell said, his voice cracking amid the applause. “He needs the U.S. Senate!” [NY Times]

Ghislain d’Humieres, the director of the Speed Art Museum, has seen how the other half lives through many trips abroad. [Business First]

With a promise of 82 jobs to be added over the next three years, the New Albany City Council approved tax abatements for three companies . [News & Tribune]