JCPS & MSD Want More Of Your Money

The Jefferson County Board of Education may need to seek a 4 percent property tax revenue increase later this summer in order to balance its $1.4 billion budget for the 2015-16 year, according to a tentative budget approved by the board on Monday night. [WDRB]

For the second year in a row, the Metropolitan Sewer District board is looking at a 5.5 percent increase in customers’ rates. [C-J/AKN]

The American Red Cross is hoping you have what it takes to be a hero. Unless you’re gay, then you’re dead to them. [WHAS11]

Jefferson County Public Schools has a budget that’s four times that of the Lexington-Fayette County government. [H-L]

Louisville police are working to identify a woman whose body was pulled from the Ohio River on Tuesday. [WLKY]

North American energy ministers said on Monday they had set up a working group on climate change and energy, a partnership designed to help Canada, the United States and Mexico harmonize policies. [HuffPo]

Terror can he heard in the voices of two women who called 911 and told the operator they were being shot at after leaving a gas station. [WAVE3]

The Distillery Innovation and Excise Tax Reform Act unveiled Tuesday would drop the current tax rate for distilled spirits from $13.50 per proof gallon to $2.70 per proof gallon on the first 10,000 gallons of productions for all distillers and then $9 per proof gallon after that. [The Hill]

A new health ranking of senior citizen health in the U.S. puts Kentucky near the bottom of the list. [WFPL]

One of the most basic facts about the Trans-Pacific Partnership is also the most important: It’s huge. [NPR]

Last week, I wrote about a study that indicated that women-owned businesses in Kentucky were growing more slowly than those in other states. [Business First]

The rows and rows of homemade chocolates nestled behind glass cases at Schimpff’s Confectionery soon will double. [News & Tribune]

Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Only 50 Weeks Til City’s Next Cleanup

All of these resignations are the result of not just Helene Kramer but Donna Hargens. Don’t let anyone try to tell you otherwise. And if you think Hargens’ push to hire an outside law firm isn’t another effort to avoid accountability, you’re lost. You’re going to love what comes out over the next few weeks. [WDRB]

As Jefferson County Public Schools works to simplify and provide more parity in its magnet application process, duPont Manual High is proposing one solution: Let Manual pick its students first. [C-J/AKN]

Police are investigating the death of a man found in Phillips Lane. [WHAS11]

Gerald and Nancy Barton are in a fix. After an April 3 storm flooded their Louisville home, they had to tear out the floorboards and the bottom half of the wallboards. But they can’t get the permits they need to repair the damage. [H-L]

The mother of a Louisville man found shot to death Wednesday morning spoke to WLKY. Cordell Richardson, 28, was discovered inside a car parked at an apartment complex on Navaho Court in north Radcliff around 6:40 a.m. [WLKY]

Famously animal-loving Jon Stewart is said to have bought a farm in New Jersey, for purposes of giving home to rescued farm animals. [HuffPo]

Two men are suing a Catholic priest, the Louisville archdiocese and a Dominican nun, claiming they were sexually abused by the priest in the 1970s and the church failed to protect them. [WAVE3]

What the Kentucky Derby owes to China. If it weren’t for KFC’s giant Asian consumer base, the annual classic would be a much poorer event. [Politico]

The names for these prize-winning racehorses might be whimsical, but the name-approval process is fairly dull and bureaucratic. A racehorse owner must first submit the preferred name to The Jockey Club, the body that governs horse racing, says Claire Novak, online features editor for The Blood Horse magazine. [WFPL]

It was a record-breaking 141st running of the $1 million Longines Kentucky Oaks (Grade I) at Churchill Downs Racetrack which culminated as 123,763 fans, the highest attendance of all time, watched a memorable win by Lovely Maria. The prior attendance record was 116,046, set in 2010, during the 136th running of the Kentucky Oaks. [Press Release]

Anybody at Churchill Downs Racetrack yesterday can attest that it was an absolutely gorgeous day to watch the Kentucky Derby and experience the grandeur of it all. [Business First]

Growth is the common theme underscoring the mayoral primary election for a city councilman and the incumbent who each face challenges Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

It’s Oaks Day So You’re Already Tanked

Here’s your weekly oh snap moment… WAVE 3 anchor Dawne Gee has filed a lawsuit against Baptist Health Louisville over alleged “negligent” treatment she received last May. [WDRB]

If GLI supports the JCPS shakeup, you can bet it’s an absolute disaster. [C-J/AKN]

The post-position draw happened at Churchill Downs on April 29. The Kentucky Derby will happen on May 2. [WHAS11]

Get a glimpse backside as Kentucky Derby contenders work out and clean up. [H-L]

The body of a man missing since February has been found in a truck along Southern Parkway. [WLKY]

Feds pay for drug fraud: 92 percent of foster care, poor kids prescribed antipsychotics get them for unaccepted uses. [HuffPo]

During any other week twenty flights would make a busy day for Atlantic Aviation. However, the Thursday through Saturday of Derby week redefines wingtip-to wingtip. [WAVE3]

For a moment last year, it looked as if the Obama administration was moving toward a history-making end to the federal death penalty. [NY Times]

The Louisville Metro Council, Mayor Greg Fischer and MSD officials announced a plan this week for possibly creating a home buyout program for houses in the area that have been consistently flooded-out during the past several years. Right now, there are a slew of homeowners in flood-prone areas with flood damage they can’t repair even though they have flood insurance. [WFPL]

Looks like Jerry Abramson’s been meddling in Vermont and it didn’t go so swell. [Rutland Herald & VPR]

The University of Louisville’s entrepreneurial ecosystem just got a boost in funding and status. U of L has received a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to commercialize research. [Business First]

As Scott County enters its second month of emergency health provisions, its HIV outbreak is sounding alarms across the country for areas at risk of a similar epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Fischer? Playing Favorites? Surely Not!

Should the East End bridge be a hazmat route? In Indianapolis, trucks carrying hazardous materials are banned from passing through downtown. A similar prohibition quietly took effect last year for the main northern Kentucky interstate into Cincinnati. [WDRB]

A lawsuit contends Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s office gave preferential treatment to prominent developer Bill Weyland, awarding his company a multi-million dollar contract for office space when it could have rented more space for less under an alternate deal. The lawsuit against the city, filed in Jefferson Circuit Court late Monday by real estate investors Mac Sawyers and Bill Lerner, contends the deal with Weyland was rigged and cost taxpayers more. [C-J/AKN]

Three people are recovering at the hospital after two shootings in Louisville Monday night. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Derby contenders Bolo, International Star, American Pharoah, Dortmund are featured in Tuesday’s report of activity and horses on the backside of Churchill as race preparations kick up a notch. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating after human remains were found in a burned car in the 5000 block of KY 393, near US 42, outside Buckner. [WLKY]

In a new survey, more than half of self-identified Republicans said they didn’t think the Affordable Care Act is increasing the number of people with health insurance, with a fifth of respondents saying it has actually reduced the number of people with coverage. For the record, the evidence suggests these people are flat-out wrong. [HuffPo]

Several homeowners on East Riverside Drive plan to file a lawsuit against the Metropolitan Sewer District because they said they were unaware of a Metro Louisville flood ordinance that will force them to move from their home. [WAVE3]

If you were wondering about Greg Fischer being the most milquetoast and ineffective mayor in the country? You’d be mistaken. She’s actually in Baltimore, home of Cordish. [The Hill]

A Kentucky proposal to study the background levels of certain chemicals in urban soil has gotten funding from the federal government. [WFPL]

Want to hear audio of yesterday’s Supreme Court hearing on gay marriage? Transcript will be there, as well. [Part One & Part Two]

Here’s a non-shocker for ya: Greg Heitzman, executive director of the Louisville-Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District, announced during an MSD board meeting that he will retire later this year. [Business First]

Victoria Bennett had a plan. In 2010, realizing that she needed to follow her dream of graduating with an Indiana University degree, Bennett — then a political science student at Kennesaw State University near Atlanta — sold her house, gathered up her savings and prepared to move. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Crisis In Southern Indiana Highlights Importance Of Needle Exchanges

Officials are now calling the HIV outbreak in southern Indiana an epidemic. [WDRB]

Are you excited for the beginning of the Kentucky Derby Festival? Get ready. It’s almost here. [C-J/AKN]

The area’s first organized walk to end discrimination and bullying took place Wednesday evening at Louisville’s Big Four Bridge. [WHAS11]

Members of the NAACP in Lexington are raising questions about how Fayette County Public Schools distributes money to individual schools and about the district’s minority hiring rates. [H-L]

Sounds like these kids need to be in charge of UofL’s actual finances. Maybe they could stop the unbelievable swindling of tens of millions of dollars right under Jim Ramsey’s knowing nose. Some business students from the University of Louisville are participating next month in the national level of a global financial analysis competition. [WLKY]

Gary Fury was working at a Simonton Windows factory in West Virginia in July 2012 when a large two-window unit slipped to the floor. [ProPublica]

It’s not the picture of Louisville many people want to see – garbage and litter lining the interstates and expressways into town. [WAVE3]

Kentucky is apparently the 8th-worst state for retirement. Which shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. [Bankrate]

Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District Board has voted to change the way the agency disposes of surplus property. The board voted unanimously to adopt the modifications to MSD’s policies on Monday. [WFPL]

The Early Childhood Profiles, produced by the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics (KCEWS), are compiled to help community leaders, Community Early Childhood Councils and school districts with data to assist in developing local strategies for helping every child in their community arrive at kindergarten ready to do kindergarten work. [Click the Clicky]

A $30 million upscale student housing complex is slated to open by fall 2016 at the northwest corner of South Floyd Street and East Brandeis Avenue near the University of Louisville. [Business First]

Donors are still being sought, but statewide, community foundations have reached the halfway point in a funding drive to match a Lilly Endowment Inc. grant worth up to $66 million. [News & Tribune]

Ford Motor Co said on Wednesday it is recalling more than 220,000 vehicles in North America for potential issues with door handles, vacuum pump relays and sensors. [Reuters]

Are You Excited For Not Diana To Visit?

Everybody is freaking out about Prince Charles and that lady who is not Diana coming to Louisville. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer on Monday nominated Sujata Barai Chugh, a public policy and nonprofit grant writing consultant, to fill one of two open seats on the Metropolitan Sewer District board. [C-J/AKN]

An underground service explosion caused a disruption to power to some customers in the areas of 4th, Liberty, Fifth and Jefferson streets, according to LG&E spokesperson Natasha Collins. [WHAS11]

Raising the minimum wage is a top issue for Kentucky voters, contrary to the nonsense Greg Fischer has spewed. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville police are investigating human remains found on a construction site in Lake Louisvilla in eastern Jefferson County, on Monday. [WLKY]

When he published Diana: Her True Story in 1992, Andrew Morton faced a “cataclysm” from the British establishment, who wished to “deny the message and denigrate the messenger” behind the explosive biography. [HuffPo]

Now we’re leaving shootings (okay, not really) and are getting back to good old fashioned stabbings. [WAVE3]

Hypocrisy. Disappointment. Frustration. That’s how Democrats described their feelings about Republicans as they listened to President Barack Obama call for a renewal of the Voting Rights Act in front of the Edmund Pettus Bridge on the anniversary of the march that helped get the law passed 50 years ago. [Politico]

Louisville Metro Government will pay $1.5 million to settle a legal suit filed by a group of young men wrongfully arrested in summer 2014. [WFPL]

No new research projects will begin at the U.S. government’s key livestock study center until animal welfare is improved through stronger oversight and better training of standards, U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said on Monday. [Reuters]

Nucleus, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, plans to keep its deadline intact for the construction of a six-story parking garage at 220 S. Preston St. in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

The Indiana Senate’s top budget writer said Thursday he wants to consider ways of possibly easing proposed school funding shifts that could lead to cuts for many urban and rural districts with shrinking enrollments. [News & Tribune]