Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Harassment Scandal Still Front & Center

A mobile application concept developed by a team of eighth graders at Meyzeek Middle School has won the school $20,000, the students brand new tablets and now they’ll work with an expert to make their concept a reality. [WDRB]

At the Metropolitan Sewer District, board members and the executive director routinely use private accounts or personal smartphones to do agency business, sending emails or text messages to each other, the former chairman asserts. This is how Greg Fischer conducts business these days. He’s crapping his pants. [C-J/AKN]

We now know the theme of this year’s Thunder Over Louisville. The big reveal took place Tuesday morning with the help of six sponsors for the big day: A Boom with a View. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate said Monday he will rule this week whether the Legislative Research Commission must turn over all sexual harassment complaints involving lawmakers and staffers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Local first responders are facing a major life-and-death situation, and they’re not sure how to stop it from getting worse. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama wants to create a new government agency dedicated to keeping the nation’s food safe. [HuffPo]

A woman being booked into Louisville Metro Corrections was found to be carrying a possible explosive device. [WAVE3]

What can be proven beyond a doubt is that, even if underlying economic trends have increased inequality, Obama’s economic policies have reduced it sharply. [NY Magazine]

The plan to develop a Wal-Mart on Broadway and Dixie Highway is now heading to the Board of Zoning Adjustments—bringing the project just a couple steps away from construction. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is bringing in an all-star team led by Hill-veteran Antonia Ferrier. [Politico]

Following an uptick in office activity in 2014, the industrial vacancy rate in the Louisville area continued to fall in 2014 as absorption soared above 5.6 million square feet of warehouse inventory, according to a report by Louisville commercial real estate firm Commercial Kentucky Inc. [Business First]

The outlook for the May primary, and in some regards, the November general election, became clearer this week as several candidates filed in major New Albany races. [News & Tribune]

When Will The Adults Be In Charge Of JCPS?

Help Kenn Parks. He deserves it. His son deserves it. [Give Back]

A JCPS official says EMS examined six students at Byck Elementary School on Cedar Street for frostbite after reports that they were suffering from exposure to the cold due to a lengthy wait at a bus stop. [WDRB]

Yep, a Senate foe who opposed expanded alcohol sales was arrested for DUI. [C-J/AKN]

A Louisville man is behind bars Thursday after police said he stole an ambulance and later crashed it in the Germantown-Schnitzelburg area. [WHAS11]

In his first speech on the Senate floor as majority leader, U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell expressed optimism for the future of the country and the congress despite a “moment of great anxiety as a nation.” [H-L]

An editor at an Elizabethtown newspaper issued a retraction and apology after he said Hardin County Sheriff John Ward was misquoted in Thursday’s paper. [WLKY]

Once again many in the media have fallen for GOP strategists’ attempts to make a candidate seem moderate — “soften” and “softening” seem to be the words of choice for CNN and others — while he’s not changed his hardcore right-wing position at all. [HuffPo]

Rand Paul pledged his support to new Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s efforts, even as other lawmakers said politicians like Paul could complicate McConnell’s work. [WAVE3]

Micah Clark of the American Family Association explained to The Indianapolis Star that the bill would allow small businesses to refuse services to same-sex couples and also that it would allow adoption agencies to refuse to place children with same-sex couples. [Think Progress]

As the University of Louisville grapples with the terms of a controversial $6 million gift proposal from Papa John’s International CEO John Schnatter and billionaire Charles Koch, university-watchers might want to take a look at what Koch got for his money from his most recent taker, Arizona State University. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and Waze (http://www.waze.com), the real-time, “crowd-sourced” navigation app powered by the world’s largest communities of drivers, have entered into a partnership through the new Waze Connected Citizens program, the company’s largest municipal effort to date. [Press Release]

State law doesn’t say city and county governments cannot set their own minimum wage limits, but it doesn’t say they can, either. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council approved a third consecutive balanced budget in 2014. But several meetings included no voting items or only a nonbinding resolution for consideration, and Councilman John Gonder said he felt like there was more that could have been done by the city’s legislative body last year. [News & Tribune]

No Poverty? Thousands Can’t Pay Their LG&E Bill

Louisville Metro Council elected leadership Monday night and there’s a few familiar faces in the leadership positions. [WDRB]

The local paper finally did a story about the minimum wage increase and this is what they came up with. [C-J/AKN]

Should everyone be skeptical about the new hotel plans? [More C-J/AKN]

Mayor Rick Richards pleaded guilty to drug trafficking but says that he is still innocent. [WHAS11]

Kentucky taxpayers will fork over about $3.56 million to pay for the 2015 General Assembly, which begins at noon Tuesday. Most of the money will go for legislative compensation. [H-L]

An investigation is underway into a garage fire near the Bullitt-Jefferson County line. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell are warily looking for areas of agreement as they begin a new chapter in a relationship that is likely to remain frosty but businesslike. [HuffPo]

Monday’s cold temperatures left some parents wondering if it was too cold for students, especially bus riders, to go to school. [WAVE3]

The cost of US war-making in the 13 years since the September 11 terrorist attacks reached a whopping $1.6 trillion in 2014, according to a recent report by the Congressional Research Service (CRS). [Mother Jones]

Thousands of Jefferson County residents in jeopardy of having their heat cut off during the winter months will soon be allowed to apply for the Low-Income Heating Assistance Program. [WFPL]

Representative Phil Moffett, R-Louisville (32nd District) announced Monday his intention to file a bill for the 2015 session of Kentucky’s General Assembly that if passed would direct all counties that currently do not have an operating jail to consolidate their local jailer’s office with the county sheriff’s office. The proposal is the first bill filed by the newly elected House Republican. [Press Release]

Cunningham’s Restaurant on South Fourth Street closed Sunday night, but its owner is now saying that it’s not gone for good. [Business First]

A donation drive in December yielded much-needed supplies and even some cash for the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter. [News & Tribune]

Prediction: JCPS Shenanigans Will Get Way Worse

Maybe they wouldn’t be coming up short if they didn’t hate the gays so blatantly. [WDRB]

Spoiler alert: The only people asserting privacy interests are Helene Kramer and Donna Hargens. The folks who filed the complaint protested the redactions and even told the paper’s new education reporter as much. Surprising that didn’t make it into the story. [C-J/AKN]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has agreed to have its audit committee investigate an ethics complaint of an undisclosed nature filed by its board vice chairman against the district’s recently retired board chairman and a fellow current director. Current Vice Chairman Tom Austin filed the complaint earlier this month against James Craig, who resigned last month as MSD board chairman, and fellow board member Lonnie Calvert. When he resigned, Craig said he was going to devote time to his law practice. [More C-J/AKN]

The coroner released the names of three people killed in separate accidents over the weekend. Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray named Mark Barnard the city’s new police chief on Monday morning. [H-L]

A New Albany woman charged with animal abuse was arraigned Monday morning. [WLKY]

Republicans’ fortunes may depend in part on how the newly GOP-controlled Senate functions and whether incoming Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky can advance legislation or gets hamstrung by the tea party faction in his caucus led by Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, another potential White House candidate. [HuffPo]

Another day, another daycare van crash. [WAVE3]

Obama’s turnaround in recent weeks – he’s seized the offensive with a series of controversial executive actions and challenges to leaders in his own party on the budget — can be attributed to a fundamental change in his political mindset, according to current and former aides. [Politico]

The Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting has filed a lawsuit against the University of Louisville over the release of records related to a financial review of the university. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission (PSC) has approved the construction of the state’s first major solar-powered electric generating facility. In an order issued Friday, Dec. 19, the PSC authorized Kentucky Utilities Co. (KU) and Louisville Gas & Electric Co. (LG&E) to build a 10-megawatt (MW) photovoltaic solar array at the E.W. Brown Generating Station in Mercer County. A megawatt of generating capacity produces enough power to supply about 800 average homes. [Press Release]

Let the hand-wringing over minimum wage increases begin. [Business First]

Floyd County Sheriff-elect Frank Loop found the man he wants to be his second in command. [News & Tribune]

People Thought Minimum Wage Hike Would Occur?

Sure, raising the minimum wage is the right thing to do in this country. But was anyone really naïve enough to believe that this current Metro Council would be able to pull something like that off? They can’t even handle a simple Metro Animal Services investigation. [WDRB]

Everyone is freaking out about this… The Metropolitan Sewer District board Monday rejected a contract offer by a union that represents about 150 of its workers and said a key provision was illegal under state law. [C-J/AKN]

Clarksville Town Council members discussed adding the position of town manager in a session Monday evening. [WHAS11]

Following the example of Louisville and Nashville, Lexington will soon start a program to help get longtime homeless people off the streets. Earlier this month, the Urban County Council approved a three-year, $750,000 contract for the Hope Center, a homeless shelter in Lexington, to provide housing and case management to 20 people. [H-L]

Clark County’s prosecutor will seek the death penalty against a man who confessed to killing his ex-girlfriend in Jeffersonville. [WLKY]

In a rare show of defiance of the National Rifle Association, the Senate on Monday confirmed Dr. Vivek Murthy to serve as surgeon general of the United States. Murthy’s nomination had been stalled for nearly a year due to comments he made in support of stricter gun laws. [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun Jefferson County Public Schools bus accident. [WAVE3]

Incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has hired a federal budget expert to join his leadership staff as a policy adviser next year. Jon Burks, who currently works as the House Budget Committee’s policy director, will be responsible for budget and appropriations issues in McConnell’s office. [The Hill]

A tribunal is expected to decide by the end of this week the fate of a Jefferson County Public Schools principal fired in October for “conduct unbecoming of a teacher.” [WFPL]

Despite warnings about abuse, Medicare covered more prescriptions for potent controlled substances in 2012 than it did in 2011. The program’s top prescribers often have faced disciplinary action or criminal charges related to their medical practices. [ProPublica]

The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating Porter Bancorp Inc., parent company of PBI Bank, for possible violations of federal law related to false bank entries and banking and securities fraud. [Business First]

A severance benefit written into a schools superintendent’s contract extension could take the spotlight at a public hearing Wednesday. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Shooting, More Outrage

Muhammad Ali is probably the most famous Kentuckian since Abraham Lincoln. Now there’s a controversial new effort to have Ali’s image on display alongside Lincoln at the State Capitol. [WDRB]

Louisville doctors announced late Monday afternoon that they surgically removed the hand they transplanted onto a 67-year-old Bowling Green man last week because it was failing, and the medical team will now review the case to find out why. [C-J/AKN]

The most talked about topic at Charlestown’s City Council meeting was not on the agenda. Residents of the Pleasant Ridge subdivision demanded a vote on whether the city will move forward with a Blight to Bright plan to redo the neighborhood. [WHAS11]

State tourism officials are seeking proposals for a developer to build the first privately operated lodge at a Kentucky state park. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Gunfire in the Portland neighborhood sends one man to the hospital and has residents concerned for their safety. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell is trying to use a massive appropriations bill to loosen campaign finance rules. [HuffPo]

Officials at Fort Knox say requirements for access to the base are expected to get stricter next year. [WAVE3]

Levi Cummings didn’t die of old age. He didn’t die in an accident, and he wasn’t murdered. Cummings died because he was homeless. [Think Progress]

Four-and-a-half years after they were first announced, the Environmental Protection Agency plans to finalize the nation’s first federal rules on the handling of coal ash this month. [WFPL]

Tumbling oil prices are draining hundreds of billions of dollars from the coffers of oil-rich exporters and oil companies and injecting a much-needed boost for ailing economies in Europe and Japan — and for American consumers at the start of the peak shopping season. [WaPo]

Nativity Academy at St. Boniface plans to raise its profile in Louisville as it prepares to add a new grade and “re-envision” some of its facilities to accommodate the expansion. [Business First]

A resurgence of commerce made downtown New Albany the darling of area media reports and business association speeches over the past five years, but glaring voids have been left by the jettison of some establishments of late. Though some have been replaced by other merchants, more than 20 downtown New Albany businesses have closed or reduced their hours of operation during the past three years. [News & Tribune]