The TV Folks Love Scaring Meemaws

Instead of scaring the absolute living shit out of the elderly people watching television, maybe start educating the community about needle exchanges? Maybe do something about educating folks on the proper way to discard used needles? [WDRB]

After working into the early hours of last Wednesday morning, paramedic Jon Tyson wheeled into his garage, plugged a large black power cord into his electric-powered Nissan Leaf and hit the sack. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe if we keep killing people we won’t have to worry about the poor or the sick. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul led a successful effort to block renewal of the Patriot Act early Saturday morning, followed by a deeply divided Senate leaving Washington without taking action on the National Security Agency’s soon-to-expire power to collect Americans’ phone records. [H-L]

The Indiana attorney general’s office says the state had to pay more than $1.4 million in fees to plaintiffs’ attorneys in its unsuccessful attempt to maintain its ban on same-sex marriages. [WLKY]

With more and more U.S. states facing public transit funding cuts despite record-breaking commuter demand, many transit systems are being forced to consider service cuts or fare hikes, both of which disproportionally impact low-income riders and neighborhoods. [HuffPo]

A family who lost their son has spent years turning their personal tragedy into a community event to spread positivity. [WAVE3]

The sleepy United States senators thought they were done voting. But then, around 1 a.m. on the Saturday before Memorial Day, Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky and presidential candidate, marched spryly to the Senate floor to let it be known that, no, he would not agree to extend the federal government’s bulk collection of phone records program. Not even for one day. [NY Times]

Louisville residents use public transportation at one of the lowest rates among the nation’s largest cities, according to new research from the University of Michigan. [WFPL]

Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind’s long relationship with dogs, showing canine domestication may have occurred earlier than previously thought. [Reuters]

It’s time for a reminder about Adam Edelen and educational audits. An audit is NOT a forensic accounting investigation. It’s typically a random sampling that gets reviewed unless specific concerns are brought to light. Or, in the case of Montgomery County, not. Because specific concerns were deliberately ignored by Edelen’s team. When he says there was no fraud discovered? Remember: not a forensic accounting, not an in-depth investigation of every nook and cranny. [Business First]

Michael Crone asked who in the room knew a bully or a victim or a witness to bullying. Only a few hands raised. Crone knew better. [News & Tribune]

Will JCPS Have A Scandal-Free Week?

It appears Jefferson County Public Schools wants to move forward with plans to centralize the district’s application and acceptance process for its magnet schools. [WDRB]

The U.S. Supreme Court has never ruled on whether public schools could force all students to submit to random drug testing, as Louisville’s private Trinity High School has decided to do. But constitutional experts say it is unlikely the court would allow such testing at public schools, unless there was a suspicion that individual students were using drugs. [C-J/AKN]

Almost a week after an incredible Derby race, another amazing event took place at Churchill Downs Friday afternoon. Just before Race 7, a mile-long turf race, a horse broke out of the starting gate and managed to dump it’s jockey. [WHAS11]

Things started changing in the 1980s with “pro-business” policies and “trickle-down” economic theories that resulted in the highest level of wealth inequality in nearly a century, not to mention the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression and a slow, uneven recovery. [Tom Eblen]

Louisville Metro Police say a worker at an aluminum plant has been killed in an accident. [WLKY]

The urban poor in the United States are experiencing accelerated aging at the cellular level, and chronic stress linked both to income level and racial-ethnic identity is driving this physiological deterioration. [HuffPo]

A local mother is fired up after she says her rights were violated when she was told she couldn’t breastfeed in an Academy Sports and Outdoors store in Louisville. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Sunday defended his support for a measure in the USA Patriot Act that has anchored a National Security Agency program to collect Americans’ phone data. [Reuters]

The total number of homeless residents in Louisville decreased about 14 percent in the past year, according to the 2014 Louisville Homeless Census. [WFPL]

A heron lifted off from a branch overhanging the Little Sandy River and it immediately reminded Chuck Chambers of the time he watched a similar bird on the Elk River in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

Kentucky boasts four automobile assembly plants — two in Louisville and one each in Bowling Green and Georgetown. State leaders estimate that Kentucky is home to more than 400 auto-related businesses, when you count suppliers and other supporting businesses. [Business First]

As the number of HIV cases in Southeastern Indiana continues to grow, Gov. Mike Pence signed an act meant to combat the IV drug use problem underlying the epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Gets Back To Being Murdery

Louisville Metro Police are investigating two separate homicides. [WDRB]

All hell broke loose in Louisville last week. Track excavators were rolled into General Electric’s Appliance Park Saturday to clear a path for firefighters to reach two stubborn pockets of flames that continued burning inside the wreckage of Building 6. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police’s Traffic Unit is investigating a fatal accident that left an 8-year-old girl dead Saturday evening. [WHAS11]

Health officials in Indiana on Saturday began a needle-exchange program Saturday in a county where an HIV outbreak among intravenous drug users has grown to nearly 90 cases. [H-L]

It’s been one year since a Louisville man was found murdered on the doorstep of his Rubel Avenue home. Friday night, his family pleaded for anyone with information to step forward. [WLKY]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz are among 57 Republicans in Congress who are calling on the Supreme Court to uphold state bans on same-sex marriage. [HuffPo]

With flash floods causing havoc across the metro and canceling classes for Jefferson County students, graduation dates have shifted along with the last day of school. [WAVE3]

PEE ALERT! PEE ALERT! Social conservatives are doubling down on their push for state-based religious freedom laws, lashing out at businesses that have vigorously opposed the measures and accusing Democrats of trampling Christians’ civil rights. [Politico]

Shantasia Durr was first institutionalization at age 5. She spent much of her youth in social services, living in more than a dozen places until she graduated high school last year. [WFPL]

At the Tin Roof, a live music joint near Lucas Oil Stadium, where the NCAA’s Final Four basketball tournament concludes Monday, bar manager Brittany Strohmeyer eyed a group of out-of-town fans. Do they view Indiana as she sees it, warm and hospitable? Or do they think her state is run by bigots? [WaPo]

The Starks Building has been sold, according to a source close to the deal. [Business First]

The handling of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act by the Statehouse and Gov. Mike Pence gave Indiana a “black eye,” and it’s important for people who oppose the law to speak up, New Albany City Councilman John Gonder said of his resolution calling for the legislation to be repealed. [News & Tribune]

Don’t Worry, Everything Is Puppies & Rainbows!

Just in case you were wondering why Greg Fischer doesn’t have time to actually do the job he’s paid to do? Here you go. Here’s the latest publicity stunt. [WDRB]

By all accounts eighth-grader Stephen Patton was cheerful and well-liked by most of his classmates at Floyd County’s Allen Central Middle School. But a few of them, his family says they discovered, repeatedly abused, taunted and bullied the 13-year-old gentle giant, who stood 6 foot 3, weighed 196 pounds and had a stutter. [C-J/AKN]

The Centers for Disease Control is setting up shop in Southern Indiana to help manage the growing outbreak of positive HIV cases. The Scott County Health Department reports 55 confirmed cases of the virus with 12 more preliminary positives. However heath workers believe this is just the tip if the iceberg. [WHAS11]

The friendly rivalry for the hearts and throats of bourbon lovers is about to get more interesting, particularly in Louisville where major distilleries are focusing their tourism efforts. [Janet Patton]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police say their latest murder arrest, in a case that was growing cold, is thanks to part to tips from the public. [WLKY]

California Gov. Jerry Brown said Sunday that it is a “disgrace” that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is trying to thwart the Obama administration’s plan to curb greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. [HuffPo]

This is just the kind of the puppies and rainbows thing that exacerbates Louisville’s problems. Sure, feel happy about it because it’s pretty and fun to watch on the teevee. But get over it quickly. [WAVE3]

Soon after the U.S. and other major powers entered negotiations last year to curtail Iran’s nuclear program, senior White House officials learned Israel was spying on the closed-door talks. The spying operation was part of a broader campaign by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government to penetrate the negotiations and then help build a case against the emerging terms of the deal, current and former U.S. officials said. [WSJ]

Most Kentucky parents believe their child receives a nutritious lunch at school, according to a Kentucky Health Issues Poll released Thursday. [WFPL]

The tech startup bubble has America’s retirement funds — like Kentucky Retirement Systems — chasing unicorns. [Zero Hedge]

The new addition at the north end of Fourth Street Live is bright orange, made of steel and has a giant iPhone-like touch screen. It’s called AirBare, and it’s an interactive kiosk at the corner of Fourth and Liberty streets that displays the local air quality. [Business First]

March 30 will be a public arts blowout for Jeffersonville. The events begin with the dedication of the “Jeff” sculpture created by R. Michael Wimmer on the berm, at Mechanic and 10th streets, at 4:30 p.m. Immediately following the dedication is a public art masterplan kick-off at Jeffersonville City Hall, 500 Quartermaster Court, from 5 to 7 p.m., according to a news release. [News & Tribune]

How Many Will Be Shot Dead This Week?

LMPD responded to the scene of a shooting at 26th and Chestnut Streets in the Russell neighborhood. Police Chief Steve Conrad says a male in his 20s was shot by an LMPD officer during a narcotics investigation. [WDRB]

A half-dozen faculty members speaking before the University of Louisville Faculty Senate on Wednesday denounced large deferred compensation packages that have been given to the university’s top executives. Several speakers said that while the packages for President James Ramsey, Provost Shirley Willihnganz and Chief of Staff Kathleen Smith might be legal, they are not ethical, given tuition hikes and low pay for faculty. [C-J/AKN]

Protesters were out in force in Louisville Saturday night, echoing a common cry across the country: Black lives matter. [WHAS11]

About 45 minutes before Comer’s remarks began, the latest Bluegrass Poll was released showing the state commissioner of agriculture trailing former Louisville councilman Hal Heiner by 8 points and tied with Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, who lost a primary challenge to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell last spring. Hours before that, Comer’s campaign faced a minor embarrassment when the PageOneKentucky blog revealed that the parents and brother of Holly Harris Von Luehrte, Comer’s former campaign manager, were hosting a fundraiser for Heiner. [H-L]

Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when the car they were riding in was struck by a train in the West Buechel area. [WLKY]

The share of unemployed Americans who receive unemployment insurance benefits has dwindled to its lowest point in decades, thanks in part to benefit cuts in Republican-led states. Just 23.1 percent of unemployed workers received state unemployment benefits at the end of 2014. [HuffPo]

“I heard the shot,” Pamela Vethel recalled. She saw when police pulled up at an apartment building on the corner of 26th Street and Chestnut. She didn’t expect what would happen next, just as two officers entered the stairwell. [WAVE3]

Johnathan Masters admits he’s not exactly the ideal running mate – he’s got a string of charges on his record, and pending court appearances on the calendar — but he is absolutely puzzled by his latest arrest in Kenton County, Kentucky. Apparently, he was told by police on Wednesday he failed to return a library book from 11 years ago. [Umm]

PharMerica Corp., the nation’s second-largest operator of institutional pharmacies, has agreed to settle two federal healthcare fraud lawsuits, one of which accuses the Louisville-based company of taking kickbacks to help expand the misuse of an anti-seizure drug in nursing homes during an 11-year period. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell says there’ll be no vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general until Republicans and Democrats resolve a dispute over a human trafficking bill. [Politico]

Wait for it, wait for it… Claudia Coffey, executive director of the Louisville Apartment Association, said the city’s rental boom is infused by job growth. Couldn’t possibly have anything to do with no one being able to afford to buy. [Business First]

J.P. can see the end of the road to his journey out of homelessness. The 42-year-old Jeffersonville resident lives in a shipping container near some railroad tracks. [News & Tribune]

Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Harassment Scandal Still Front & Center

A mobile application concept developed by a team of eighth graders at Meyzeek Middle School has won the school $20,000, the students brand new tablets and now they’ll work with an expert to make their concept a reality. [WDRB]

At the Metropolitan Sewer District, board members and the executive director routinely use private accounts or personal smartphones to do agency business, sending emails or text messages to each other, the former chairman asserts. This is how Greg Fischer conducts business these days. He’s crapping his pants. [C-J/AKN]

We now know the theme of this year’s Thunder Over Louisville. The big reveal took place Tuesday morning with the help of six sponsors for the big day: A Boom with a View. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate said Monday he will rule this week whether the Legislative Research Commission must turn over all sexual harassment complaints involving lawmakers and staffers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Local first responders are facing a major life-and-death situation, and they’re not sure how to stop it from getting worse. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama wants to create a new government agency dedicated to keeping the nation’s food safe. [HuffPo]

A woman being booked into Louisville Metro Corrections was found to be carrying a possible explosive device. [WAVE3]

What can be proven beyond a doubt is that, even if underlying economic trends have increased inequality, Obama’s economic policies have reduced it sharply. [NY Magazine]

The plan to develop a Wal-Mart on Broadway and Dixie Highway is now heading to the Board of Zoning Adjustments—bringing the project just a couple steps away from construction. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is bringing in an all-star team led by Hill-veteran Antonia Ferrier. [Politico]

Following an uptick in office activity in 2014, the industrial vacancy rate in the Louisville area continued to fall in 2014 as absorption soared above 5.6 million square feet of warehouse inventory, according to a report by Louisville commercial real estate firm Commercial Kentucky Inc. [Business First]

The outlook for the May primary, and in some regards, the November general election, became clearer this week as several candidates filed in major New Albany races. [News & Tribune]