Guns, Silly Condos, Stabbings, FOP Meltdowns And Awful Indiana Things

In case you missed in earlier this week… A freshman at Atherton High School was arrested Tuesday after bringing a loaded .380 handgun to the school. [WDRB]

The board of the trendy Cherokee Triangle neighborhood will appeal a recent Jefferson Circuit Court ruling that would give clearance to the construction of a luxury condominium tower called Willow Grande at Willow and Baringer avenues. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Catholic Charities of Louisville resettles an estimated 700 refugees every year. [WHAS11]

A Fayette district judge’s ruling on a 2016 amendment to the drunken-driving law has prosecutors and defense attorneys battling in court. [H-L]

In case you missed it earlier this week… Police are investigating a stabbing in the 3300 block of Preston Highway. [WLKY]

Of course Mitch McConnell is playing politics with issues of major importance. Mr. Cornyn concedes the tumult of this election year was a major factor given sharp disagreement among Senate Republicans reflected in the decision by Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, to not allow a vote on a proposal most believe would pass easily. [NY Times]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Members of the River City Fraternal Order of Police voiced their concerns Tuesday night over Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad’s reorganization plan. The chief was on a peace walk in west Louisville during the FOP meeting. [WAVE3]

Arctic ice cover in 2016 reached the second lowest minimum on record, tied with 2007. [BBC]

Earlier this year, first grader Cora Maddox stopped receiving Medicaid benefits that helped pay for treatment of her apraxia, a brain disorder that affects her speech and motor skills. [WFPL]

Carla Hayden, a career librarian who grew up in Chicago and kept Baltimore’s libraries open during last year’s civic unrest, was sworn in Wednesday as the 14th Librarian of Congress, becoming the first woman and the first African-American to lead the national library. [WaPo]

A Cincinnati developer received one of its needed city approvals for a $47 million apartment development at the corner of Fourth and Chestnut streets that could be open in early 2018. [Business First]

An embattled wildlife sanctuary in Southern Indiana will remain open, despite three attempts by the United States Department of Agriculture to terminate the owner’s operating license. [News & Tribune]

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Is The Ramsey Hangover Gone Yet?

One-hundred bicycles were given to children Saturday in memory of boxing legend Muhammad Ali. [WDRB]

Members of the county’s teachers union have voted to approve a tentative two-year salary agreement with Jefferson County Public Schools that would give teachers additional raises in addition to their experience-based step raises. [C-J/AKN]

WARING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Several major developments highlighted the University of Louisville Foundation gathered for its annual meeting Friday with the resignation of Dr. James Ramsey being as big as any. [WHAS11]

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is unlikely to approve changes to Kentucky’s Medicaid program that would interfere with its “extremely successful” progress at helping more people get health insurance, a top official said Wednesday. [John Cheves]

Bond is set at $100,000 for a man police say led them on a high-speed chase after a shooting. [WLKY]

Police shot and killed a teenager in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday night following a reported armed robbery. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Kentucky Harm Reduction Coalition is offering overdose prevention training and free Narcan kits on Monday. [WAVE3]

Of course Brown-Forman is fighting the legalization of marijuana – if not with dollars, then with ignorance like this. [The Intercept]

[Yet Another] study shows that Kentucky has the worst-funded pension system in the nation, compounded by the fact that of all the states, the commonwealth is doing the worst at paying off its pension debt. [WFPL]

Guess which borderline racist, definitely homophobic PR guy pushed this story on Reid Wilson. In November 2014, days after Republicans recaptured control of the U.S. Senate in the midterm elections, Mitch McConnell called Kentucky state Rep. Jonathan Shell to complain. McConnell had just scored a huge reelection win, and when the 114th Congress gaveled into session, he would fulfill his lifelong goal of becoming majority leader. [The Hill]

Fifth Third Bancorp plans to close another 44 branches across its footprint, marking its second major round of branch closings in the past year. [Business First]

Clark Memorial is offering a flu shot clinic from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, in the main lobby of the hospital. [News & Tribune]

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Everyone Panicked Over A UofL Foundation Meeting That Ultimately Didn’t Take Place

All that media hype for nothing. The special University of Louisville Foundation meeting set for Labor Day has been called off because of concerns raised by the U of L Board of Trustees. [WDRB]

Of course two entitled white guys are arguing over something in the West End. Louisville Metro Council President David Yates scolded fellow member Kelly Downard on Thursday evening for getting involved in the West End Wal-Mart negotiations, saying it was an inappropriate step that had pushed the project back. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro’s Meals on Wheels program cares for more than a thousand seniors every year and more volunteers are needed to continue that generous work. [WHAS11]

If you want to know why so many average Kentuckians are unhappy about the lack of good jobs and better wages since the Great Recession, read a report published Wednesday by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. The report has a mix of good news and bad news, with most of the good news in the “Golden Triangle” between Lexington, Louisville and Cincinnati and most of the bad news in rural and chronically depressed parts of Kentucky. [Tom Eblen]

Louisville Metro Police are investigating the city’s 81st homicide of 2016. Police were called around midnight Sunday on a report of a shooting in the 600 block of Village West Drive. [WLKY]

Taco trucks on every corner!? SIGN US UP! [HuffPo]

A belated Fourth of July celebration was held in Crescent Hill on Sunday. [WAVE3]

Lawmakers are returning to Washington next week to confront an impasse over funding bills that threatens to cause a government shutdown, something Republican leaders want to avoid at all costs. [The Hill]

Elizabeth Boccieri has been using meth and oxycontin in the past few days, ever since she heard about extra-strength laced heroin that’s been making its way south from Ohio to Louisville. [WFPL]

A powerful drug that’s normally used to tranquilize elephants is being blamed for a record spike in drug overdoses in the Midwest. Officials in Ohio have declared a public health emergency and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says communities everywhere should be on alert for carfentanil. [NPR]

When Florida State athletes arrived on campus in 1998, they received $144,750 in free Nike footwear and apparel. This year, a vault of $2.8 million in Nike gear awaited players arriving in Tallahassee. That’s in addition to the $1.4 million in cash Nike will pay this year for the right to outfit the university’s athletes. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council hopes higher fines in an updated noise ordinance will ratchet down the number of violations. [News & Tribune]

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Yarmuth: Still Kentucky’s Only Democrat

Congressman John Yarmuth is accusing Gov. Matt Bevin of plotting to end Medicaid expansion in Kentucky. [WDRB]

Matt Bevin’s administration unveiled its long-awaited plan to reshape the state’s Medicaid program Wednesday, and while it restores some benefits Bevin proposed be cut two months ago, it retains the most controversial components of the governor’s approach to overhauling the federal-state health plan for low-income and disabled Kentuckians. [C-J/AKN]

One month after a deadly building collapse in West Louisville, the incident will receive a closer look from the Metro Council Public Safety Committee. [WHAS11]

After years of recession-induced silence, the drumbeat is sure to start again: builders, developers and land speculators will want to expand the Urban Service Boundary. [Tom Eblen]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A public health emergency has been declared in Clark County, Indiana, allowing the county health department to establish a syringe exchange program. [WLKY]

It’s a question political pundits will be attempting to answer for generations: How did real estate magnate and reality TV star Donald Trump win the Republican presidential nomination? [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police have to look no further than Facebook to find images of young men, holding up guns, money and gang signs with the call letters of their gang right in their profile names. [WAVE3]

The ignorance of Mitch McConnell and his new staffers is harming women in areas affected by Zika. [Rewire]

Jo Ann Orr really wants African-Americans to donate blood. Her son died 16 years ago, when he was 32, of sickle cell disease. [WFPL]

The National Labor Relations Board decided in two separate cases last week that — as far as federal labor law is concerned — charter schools are not public schools but private corporations. [WaPo]

OneJet, the regional flight service that offers daily nonstop flights on small corporate aircraft, has landed a major infusion of funding from Louisville investors. [Business First]

The state of Indiana is looking into building the state’s fourth port, possibly in southeastern Indiana near Cincinnati. [News & Tribune]

Another Fun Weekend Of Compassionate Death Wraps Up In Possibility City

GE Appliances says the wages of about 4,000 union-represented production workers at Louisville’s Appliance Park are too high to be competitive in the low-margin appliance business. [WDRB]

Tighter federal clean-air rules could save the lives of at least 48 people a year in the Louisville metro area over a year, according to a new study released Wednesday morning by a medical association. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO One person is dead after being hit by a train just north of the Kentucky Fair and Expo Center Saturday. [WHAS11]

The Affrilachian Poets, a diverse Lexington-based collective of writers directly or indirectly connected to Appalachia, has rejected its 2016 Governor’s Award in the Arts, citing Gov. Matt Bevin’s positions on education, the humanities and other issues. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a triple shooting near downtown. Police said at least three juveniles were shot at 16th and Jefferson streets Sunday. [WLKY]

This past Monday was supposed to be a turning point for Donald Trump. That was the day many Republicans hoped their presidential nominee, who was giving a speech at the Detroit Economic Club, would make his long-awaited pivot to the general election. More teleprompter, less Trump. [HuffPo]

On May 22, 2007, Curtis Lee Brown was shot seven times in the back at 35th Street and Broadway. Curtis’s brother, Chaz Brown, got the first call about his brother’s death. [WAVE3]

Coal mining. Bad management. Runoff from cities and farms. These are all things that are creating major problems for America’s rivers, according to a new report. [ThinkProgress & American Rivers]

Louisville’s bike share program is facing yet another delay. [WFPL]

The Republican leader of the U.S. Senate, Sen. Mitch McConnell, said this past week that maintaining his party’s control over the chamber is looking “dicey.” That’s primarily the product of an unfriendly 2016 map: 24 Republican senators are on this year’s ballot while Democrats must defend only 10 seats. Donald Trump isn’t making it any easier for McConnell either. [Ronnie Ellis]

It’s a race to the courtroom for two big insurance mega-mergers — and it might be a close one. [Business First]

A move out of the district he represents prompted the resignation of a school board member in Clarksville Community Schools. [News & Tribune]

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LOOK! Something Shiny! Everyone Look Away! Get Distracted!

Surekha Kulkarni immigrated to America from India and has made it her life goal to empower other women, especially refugees. [WDRB]

Surprise! Racial profiling is still a problem in Compassionate Possibility City! An analysis of 2014 vehicle stops by Louisville Metro police officers has found again that black drivers are searched twice as often as whites. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Hate to be the bearer of bad news… but… uh… no one really believes she’s coming home safely, right? [WHAS11]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is wrestling with an unenviable, arguably impossible task this election year: protecting Senate Republicans from the political upheaval caused by Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy. [H-L]

Mayor Greg Fischer is inviting the city to a new lunchtime event in downtown Louisville. [WLKY]

A graphic video shows a Baton Rouge police officer shooting and killing Alton Sterling, a 37-year-old black man who was selling CDs in front of a convenience store early Tuesday morning. [HuffPo]

It’s a call police get more than they would like – reports of people firing guns in their backyards, especially on holiday weekends. [WAVE3]

If you missed it, Jamie Comer and his crew are under investigation by the Office of the Attorney General. [Page One]

During a sweltering summer afternoon, Metro workers are on their hands and knees spreading green goop that smells like a brand new rubber eraser on parts of Louisville’s bike lanes. [WFPL]

At a time when Democrats and Republicans in Congress can’t agree on just about anything, there is one issue that unites them: the urgent need for criminal justice reform. [ProPublica]

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear will file a fresh lawsuit that challenges Gov. Matt Bevin’s actions to disband and recreate the University of Louisville board of trustees. [Business First]

These are the arguments going down in Southern Indiana. Who is responsible for maintaining the Sellersburg Pool is a matter of disagreement among town officials. [News & Tribune]

Shootings, Shootings & More Shootings

For the last year, signs with pictures and information about Crystal Rogers have been posted all over Bardstown. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools has made important accomplishments this year but there have also been “obvious mistakes and omissions,” the district’s board said in its yearly performance evaluation of Superintendent Donna Hargens. [C-J/AKN]

School is right around the corner for Clarksville Community students and officials are already focusing the need for supplies. [WHAS11]

Massie’s ideas about “sovereignty” are an extreme example of the naïve thinking that fueled the Brexit vote, has propelled Trump’s candidacy and energizes Tea Party activists. It is our inner 4-year-old screaming, “You can’t tell me what to do!” [H-L]

One person was taken to the hospital after an overnight shooting in south Louisville. The shooting happened at about 2:30 a.m. at Déjà Vu on Taylor Boulevard, near Longfield Avenue. [WLKY]

Senate Republicans have never made it easy for President Barack Obama to put judges on federal courts. But now, with just months left in his term, they’re not even pretending to try to let judicial nominees through. [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City! [WAVE3]

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin proclaims the days of “pay to play” ended with his arrival in Frankfort. But some House Democrats say if you’re not willing to play, Bevin isn’t reluctant to make you pay. [Ronnie Ellis]

A Lexington city council committee will soon review constable policies in the central Kentucky community. [WFPL]

The coal industry is slated to lose clout in the next Congress, with term limits set to force out a chairman who has frequently battled with the Obama administration on behalf of mining companies. Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Keeping Eastern Kentucky Impoverished) will relinquish the gavel of the House Appropriations Committee in January, after having led the powerful panel for six years, which is the maximum allowed under GOP rules. [The Hill]

The Louisville Sports Commission has named a new slate of officers and appointed new board members. [Business First]

The contract for newly hired town manager of Clarksville has been approved and Kevin Baity is scheduled to start June 30. [News & Tribune]