Support That JCPS Clothing Program

Just more of that well-known Greg Fischer transparency! Greg Fischer’s office called a meeting but banned cameras as it planned to update local media on the Omni Hotel project. [WAVE3]

Officials with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office arrested a man who authorities say passed contraband to a Metro Corrections inmate. [WDRB]

One by one, women board a breast-cancer screening van in southwestern Jefferson County to receive mammograms. [C-J/AKN]

We’d share more information with you but the new comms person at JCPS is apparently a disaster who refuses to communicate with anyone who doesn’t drink the Kool-aid. The JCPS annual Clothing Assistance Program Blitz kicked off Monday morning. [WHAS11]

Even after years of talk about a “war on coal,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell startled some of his constituents in March when he urged open rebellion against a White House proposal for cutting pollution from coal-fired power plants. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just a reminder that, sure, there’s fun crap happening but your leadership is effectively ignoring the shooting problem in this city. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama fired back at former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R) on Monday after the 2016 Republican presidential candidate invoked the specter of the Holocaust in comments regarding the Iran nuclear deal. [HuffPo]

History was made Sunday when the the city’s first statue honoring a woman was unveiled at Cathedral of the Assumption. [WAVE3]

In L.A. and cities across the United States, it is effectively illegal to be dirt poor in a country where more than 45 million people live in poverty. [The Intercept]

Harrison County, Indiana, officials are being sued in federal court by a former employee of the county clerk’s office who claims she was fired after refusing to process a same-sex marriage license. [WFPL]

New York state recently announced an increase in the minimum wage for fast food workers, to $15 an hour. It’s the fruit of a three-year labor campaign. But there’s another group of workers out there that hasn’t had a real wage increase in decades. [NPR]

The advertising and marketing agency Power Creative has developed a new executive leadership team. CEO David Power said he’s promoted three employees to serve as chief operating, innovation and marketing officers. He created the three positions to better define roles. [Business First]

This time last year, onlookers from the Big Four Bridge were met with the sight of dilapidated docks and an eroding, uneven shoreline at Jeffersonville’s Ohio River bank. [News & Tribune]

Plans, Commissions, Studies, Buzzwords

Jefferson County Public School bus drivers vote Tuesday on a contract that offers more money for working troublesome routes. [WDRB]

Here’s yet another “plan” from Greg Fischer. Because we all know a plan from Washington that provides zero funding and only hype will solve this city’s murder problem. Fortunately, most people in Louisville see this for what it is. [C-J/AKN]

As stats continue to roll in like Thunder Over Louisville, it looks like event in its 26th year is proving to be a successful one. [WHAS11]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

Another day, another murder. Police remained at the scene of a shooting in the 2500 block of Duncan Street in Portland more than 12 hours after it was reported. [WLKY]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

Another train death? A pedestrian died after being hit by a train in Pleasure Ridge Park Monday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

If you plan on dining out Wednesday, there’s a chance a portion of your final bill will help fund patient services at The Healing Place, a drug and alcohol recovery shelter in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

Food delivery service might be one of the latest trends to pick up in Louisville. Takeout Taxi has been a staple in Louisville for more than 15 years and works with 102 restaurants in the area. And of course, some restaurants have their own delivery drivers. But it seems that in the last year, more food delivery services have come to Louisville. [Business First]

Residents of Clark and Floyd counties will soon get a taste of what the ongoing Ohio River Greenway Project could become — and it’s much more than a system of multi-use pathways and river views. [News & Tribune]

Will Jimbo’s House Of Cards Tumble?

Over the last several months, University of Louisville President James Ramsey has insisted that multi-million-dollar deferred compensation packages he and his top aides have received from the school’s $1.1 billion foundation were implemented with the full knowledge and consent of U of L’s Board of Trustees. [WDRB]

University of Louisville President James Ramsey last year was paid 2 ½ times more than the average of the Atlantic Coast Conference’s other 14 presidents and chancellors — all of whose universities are ranked far higher academically than U of L. [C-J/AKN]

Really, why in the piss is this news? Just an attempt to embarrass the man? What? This bullshit of eating each other alive in the local media has got to stop at some point. [WHAS11]

Last spring, Marc H. Morial, the president of the National Urban League, found himself in a place he has come to know well over the years, across a desk from Sen. Mitch Mc-Connell, the majority leader, talking about public policy. [H-L]

If it’s not terrifying weather or water main break, it’s a gas line rupture. [WLKY]

It’s no secret that Jennifer Lawrence loves food, and by now, everyone should be familiar with her thoughts on dieting (“If anybody even tries to whisper the word ‘diet,’ I’m like, ‘You can go fuck yourself'”). [HuffPo]

The new bridge being constructed in downtown Louisville to carry I-65 traffic is expected to be open to drivers in less than six months. [WAVE3]

U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took swipes at Wall Street and her Republican rivals on Monday, promising to impose tougher regulations on banks and raise the wages of ordinary Americans if she wins the 2016 White House race. [Reuters]

Louisville Public Media announced on Monday that Stephen George has been named the organization’s executive editor. Does this mean the sexist mess that’s caused everyone else to quit will be out the door soon? [WFPL]

House leaders are considering sweeping changes to Congress’ reimbursement requirements in the wake of the Aaron Schock scandal, including forcing lawmakers to provide more detailed documentation about how they spend taxpayer money and disclosing those details to the public. [Politico]

Mid City Mall’s look is outdated, but planned upgrades are aimed at bringing the Highlands shopping center’s look into the 21st century. [Business First]

Fun in the sun doesn’t have to end when school begins. The Clarksville Aquatic Center might be getting a $3.5 million revamp that would allow the facility to stay open longer, change and keep some of its features and cut down on operational costs. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Went Crazy w/Guns

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini told stock analysts on a conference call Monday that the “very capable” leaders of Humana’s Medicare-driven government business will remain in place following Aetna’s planned $37 billion purchase of Humana. [WDRB]

The Rev. Cynthia Campbell of Louisville’s Highland Presbyterian Church says she looks forward to performing its first same-sex marriage now that Kentucky’s ban on gay marriage has been lifted. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Mayor will be celebrating a big milestone at the LG and E Cane Run plant. The conversion from coal fired to natural gas is complete. [WHAS11]

Don’t underestimate the power of a miniature horse. Though small — about 2½ feet tall — miniature horses demonstrated their strength, athleticism and finesse Friday at the Mid-America Miniature Horse Club Mini Julep Cup by jumping, pulling carriages and posing. [H-L]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings, you know the drill, Possibility City, Compassionate City, blah blah empty words blah. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Seriously, eight people shot and three of them dead in a single weekend. Meanwhile, Greg Fischer plays pat-a-cake with historic preservation, promotes events that only the elite can attend, only addresses something that matters when called out by the media. [WAVE3]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival energy usage will be offset entirely with green power for the first time this year. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Community Ventures Corp. broke ground last week on its planned business incubator called Chef Space in the Russell neighborhood — but what hasn’t been reported yet is that the incubator is just the start. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey believes keeping the city’s police vehicle fleet updated will save taxpayers maintenance expenses required to keep older cruisers in service. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Shoots Even More

A MetroSafe dispatcher has confirmed that multiple victims were shot near 25th Street and Broadway in west Louisville. [WDRB]

Aetna’s acquisition of Humana appears to be part of a merger frenzy as the five biggest U.S. health insurers look to get bigger. But any acquisition or merger of this proportion must overcome potential hurdles. [C-J/AKN]

The opportunity of ownership is a wish come true for one of Louisville’s newest small business owners looking to turn his new restaurant into the Russell neighborhood’s latest treasure. [WHAS11]

The Humane Society of the United States is objecting to a proposed expansion of bear hunting in Kentucky. The group says the state’s black bear population is still small and needs time to expand. [H-L]

Louisville Fire and Rescue continued their search for three people missing after a pontoon boat capsized on the Ohio River Saturday night. [WLKY]

So let me be clear about a few things: I do not want to order a wedding cake from a bakery owned by a guy who thinks I’m going to hell. I have no desire to purchase bouquets from a florist who pickets Pride parades. I wouldn’t serve pizza at a wedding if the owner paid me and offered to serenade my guests with an a cappella version of “Born This Way.” And finally, the suggestion that I would be insane enough to want to force a homophobic clergyperson to preside over my most sacred day is beyond insulting. [HuffPo]

Louisville is home to more than 12,000 Humana employees, but the company’s sale could affect thousands more. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s voters have seen this script before: insurgent Kentucky Republican takes down established candidates openly or presumably preferred by U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, Kentucky’s ultimate establishment Republican. [Ronnie Ellis]

If Aetna’s plan to purchase Humana becomes official, what was Louisville’s largest standalone publicly traded company by revenue will cease to exist as the city has known it. [WFPL]

Weight screenings in high school were not enough to get overweight and obese kids on track toward a healthier weight, a recent U.S. study found. [Reuters]

The merger deal between Louisville-based Humana Inc. and Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. finally has been announced. Though we now know details of the agreement, we have to wait to see what the fallout will be for Louisville. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. But about two months into the division’s operations, the Jeffersonville City Council is discussing ways to reorganize it because some members are dissatisfied with the qualifications of its manager. [News & Tribune]

Morning Bourbon & Needle Fun Stuff

A death investigation began shortly after a body was found in the Ohio River Tuesday morning. [WDRB]

The relocation of hundreds of government employees out of decaying office space is beginning, with the entire move expected to be completed by mid-fall. [C-J/AKN]

Eight authors who have written books about bourbon are scheduled to open a days-long event giving participants a behind-the-scenes look at Kentucky’s bourbon industry. [WHAS11]

Of course Hal Rogers opposes needle exchanges. Until his family members figure out how to profit from them, they won’t get his support. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year. [WLKY]

What? Coal kills? Surely not. Surely all that hype wasn’t just the Coal Association using PR hacks to claim otherwise. [HuffPo]

Two local TV station employees suffered minor injuries as a car ran a light and slammed into their live truck, flipping it onto its side. [WAVE3]

Charter Communications announced early Tuesday that it will acquire Time Warner Cable — a little over a month after a proposed deal between Comcast and Time Warner was killed by regulators. [The Hill]

The appeals period for the latest round of Louisville property tax assessments closes at the end of this month. Some appeals will be successful, but others will not. [WFPL]

Senate Republican leaders managed to scrape up enough votes just past midnight Saturday morning to put off decisive action on the NSA’s bulk collection of American phone records until next Sunday, May 31. But the hardliners — and make no mistake, they are taking an even harder and more absurd line than the NSA itself — have no endgame. [The Intercept]

Louisville leaders are encouraging foreign-born residents of Louisville to call their friends and family and tell them how much they enjoy living here. [Business First]

A Southern Indiana county at the epicenter of the worst HIV outbreak in Indiana history is seeking state permission to implement a yearlong needle exchange program. [News & Tribune]

The TV Folks Love Scaring Meemaws

Instead of scaring the absolute living shit out of the elderly people watching television, maybe start educating the community about needle exchanges? Maybe do something about educating folks on the proper way to discard used needles? [WDRB]

After working into the early hours of last Wednesday morning, paramedic Jon Tyson wheeled into his garage, plugged a large black power cord into his electric-powered Nissan Leaf and hit the sack. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe if we keep killing people we won’t have to worry about the poor or the sick. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul led a successful effort to block renewal of the Patriot Act early Saturday morning, followed by a deeply divided Senate leaving Washington without taking action on the National Security Agency’s soon-to-expire power to collect Americans’ phone records. [H-L]

The Indiana attorney general’s office says the state had to pay more than $1.4 million in fees to plaintiffs’ attorneys in its unsuccessful attempt to maintain its ban on same-sex marriages. [WLKY]

With more and more U.S. states facing public transit funding cuts despite record-breaking commuter demand, many transit systems are being forced to consider service cuts or fare hikes, both of which disproportionally impact low-income riders and neighborhoods. [HuffPo]

A family who lost their son has spent years turning their personal tragedy into a community event to spread positivity. [WAVE3]

The sleepy United States senators thought they were done voting. But then, around 1 a.m. on the Saturday before Memorial Day, Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky and presidential candidate, marched spryly to the Senate floor to let it be known that, no, he would not agree to extend the federal government’s bulk collection of phone records program. Not even for one day. [NY Times]

Louisville residents use public transportation at one of the lowest rates among the nation’s largest cities, according to new research from the University of Michigan. [WFPL]

Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind’s long relationship with dogs, showing canine domestication may have occurred earlier than previously thought. [Reuters]

It’s time for a reminder about Adam Edelen and educational audits. An audit is NOT a forensic accounting investigation. It’s typically a random sampling that gets reviewed unless specific concerns are brought to light. Or, in the case of Montgomery County, not. Because specific concerns were deliberately ignored by Edelen’s team. When he says there was no fraud discovered? Remember: not a forensic accounting, not an in-depth investigation of every nook and cranny. [Business First]

Michael Crone asked who in the room knew a bully or a victim or a witness to bullying. Only a few hands raised. Crone knew better. [News & Tribune]