Your Good Morning Grass & Jay Walking

You may have noticed some grass around Louisville standing taller than people. Lots of people complained about the eyesore and even called it a hazard, so we asked the city what is taking so long to get it cut. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Council members ripped into Mayor Greg Fischer’s office on Tuesday afternoon about the lack of prompt grass cutting at city parks and medians along major thoroughfares. [C-J/AKN]

There are around 1,000 school bus drivers carrying tens of thousands of Jefferson County Public School students during the school year. Officials say sometimes an office mistake can happen. [WHAS11]

In the early 1880s, James M. Bond walked from Barbourville to Berea, leading a young steer that he sold to pay for tuition. Bond, who was born into slavery, graduated from Berea and later from Oberlin College with a divinity degree. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! And it’s Metro Council, not City Council. [WLKY]

A year ago, after 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, police responded to even peaceful daytime protests in the St. Louis suburb by deploying attack dogs and tactical vehicles, pointing sniper rifles at peaceful protesters, arresting people for simply standing still on public sidewalks, flooding demonstrators with tear gas — often without warning — and shooting them with bean bags, wooden pellets and balls filled with pepper spray. [HuffPo]

Louisville is one of the states with the highest number of pedestrian related crashes in the country, according to Louisville Metro Police Department Sgt. Ruby Ellison. [WAVE3]

The phone rings just as Katrina Fingerson and Latoya McClary are about to leave to start their shift at the Goddard Riverside Community Center. [ThinkProgress]

General Electric said Monday it is unveiling a new top-load washing machine design that will mark the biggest new product launch in its laundry division in two decades. [WFPL]

The poor are treated like human ATM machines, and our politicians are actively encouraging their exploitation. In the 1960s, the Lyndon Johnson administration launched an official War on Poverty. Needless to say, poverty has emerged victorious. [Salon]

An old distillery in Kentucky soon will start spirits production again. In May 2014, Peristyle LLC announced plans to restore and reopen the historic Old Taylor Distillery in Woodford County. Work has been taking place at the facility since. [Business First]

An ordinance adopting an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration from the Clark County health officer was formally passed Thursday evening at a county commissioners meeting. [News & Tribune]

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Yes, Tolls Are Still The Local Devil

And you thought people in Indiana wouldn’t get screwed. About three times as many residents of Clark County, Ind., travel to Louisville to work than do people commuting in the opposite direction, new data shows. [WDRB]

If you missed it last week, another Fischer official jumped ship. [C-J/AKN]

People are still the absolute worst. Metro Parks is dealing with a second case of vandalism at Algonquin Park in a little over a month. [WHAS11]

A Louisville woman who authorities say admitted to setting a series of fires throughout the city has been sentenced to 20 years in prison. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A JCPS student is home safe after being left at the wrong bus stop Thursday, and not being located until nearly 2 a.m. Friday. [WLKY]

Your tax dollars at work — all so Jack can score a few extra political points. Fifteen state attorneys general petitioned a federal court in Washington on Thursday to block new U.S. rules to curb carbon emissions from power plants, in the first of several expected legal challenges to the Obama administration measure. [HuffPo]

Gas prices at dozens of Louisville gas stations plummeted 50 cents overnight, less than two days after they spiked by the same amount amid speculation that problems at a Chicago-area refinery would cause shortages. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Department of Justice says that banning people from sleeping in public could be a violation of their constitutional rights. [Time]

For the first time, Kentucky State Fair-goers who take a TARC bus will pay half-price adult admission and, of course, not pay the $8 parking fee. [WFPL]

It should be easy to come up with a weekly column during a governor’s race, but the 2015 election between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway is unlike any I’ve ever seen. [Ronnie Ellis]

An Ohio development company plans to buy the former Mercy Academy property and build a four-story apartment complex on the East Broadway site. [Business First]

With just over two weeks until applications for the $84 million, statewide Regional Cities Initiative must be submitted, the board that’s required to submit the application locally has yet to be formed. [News & Tribune]

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Tough To Believe Sadiqa’s Leaving

The University of Louisville will honor boxing legend Muhammad Ali with the inaugural Grawemeyer Spirit Award. [WDRB]

The investigation began with a single phone call. A donor to Sen. Mitch McConnell called his campaign office last year and asked why he hadn’t gotten the customary “thank you” note for his contributThe investigation began with a single phone call. [C-J/AKN]

The Century Foundation released a report that puts Louisville as the tenth worst city in the US for concentrated black poverty. [WHAS11]

Lgzelijizi, who said she lost faith in Obama when he wouldn’t admit he is Muslim and who thinks Osama bin Laden is alive, said she likes Paul because she “can tell by his face he’s speaking from the heart.” She’s probably one of those ladies who gets on YouTube talking about how she sees lizard people. [H-L]

We still can’t stop laughing over Sadiqa Reynolds heading the Urban League. Maybe she’ll last longer than three months. [WLKY]

Public health agencies and drug treatment centers nationwide are scrambling to battle an explosive increase in cases of hepatitis C, a scourge they believe stems at least in part from a surge in intravenous heroin use. [HuffPo]

Gender identity has been a focus of national conversation all summer long. Now, as the school year ramps up the discussion is headed to the classroom. [WAVE3]

A Washington Post reporter who was arrested at a restaurant last year while reporting on protests in Ferguson, Mo., has been charged in St. Louis County with trespassing and interfering with a police officer and ordered to appear in court. [WaPo]

Gary and Malissa Wright have rented apartments to nearly a dozen homeless veterans in Louisville. [WFPL]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) attracted another huge crowd at a rally for his presidential campaign in Los Angeles on Monday night. [The Hill]

It looks like Jim Beam Distillery is getting close to finishing its Urban Stillhouse attraction at Fourth Street Live. [Business First]

Clark Memorial Hospital is now under new ownership, less than two weeks after Clark County officials approved the acquisition. [News & Tribune]

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Sadiqa Reynods Finally Jumped Ship

Now that Sadiqa Reynolds has jumped Greg Fischer’s ship to lead the Urban League, how long will it take her to sink the organization?

Or at least make it as bad as the mess she made for Metro Animal Services?

Fischer’s pushing this along as if he hasn’t been looking for ages for a way to get rid of her (spoiler alert: he has).

If you don’t remember Sadiqa, here’s a massive trip down memory lane:

Sadiqa is without a doubt one of the worst Metro Government administrators in decades.

I can honestly say it’s a relief she’ll no longer be on the public payroll.

Thoughts and prayers should be with the Urban League.

On Fischer’s Latest Historic Property Mess

Here’s what Healthy Urban Design, via Keith Runyon, had to say regarding Greg Fischer’s action/inaction on the Water Company property:

The group of citizens, architects and environmentalists known as Healthy Urban Design (HUD) is both surprised and disappointed to learn of Mayor Greg Fischer’s announcement today that the city intends to proceed immediately with dismantling and storage of the historic Louisville Water Company building. Such a process could begin by September 5, after a 30-day notice requirement is met.

Mayor Fischer has been cooperative up to today in offering businesses and individuals an opportunity to develop projects that would permit the Water Company building to be transported to another site. Yet as he and the leaders of Louisville Forward know, or should know through the advice of their Landmarks and Historic Preservation office, historic buildings cannot be dismembered and stored like so many Legos from one location to another. Financial packages to permit adaptive reuse for older structures depend upon the availability of federal and state tax credits. Location is a key factor, and the farther away from the original site the building is moved, the less likely that tax credits will be available. Moving buildings as units help to ensure that this key financial tool is available. Such will be difficult if not impossible if the LWC building is broken up into pieces.

Mayor Fischer calls the Omni project “transformational,” yet if it truly were transformational, it would have been more responsive to citizen requests that it relate to the scale of the city around it in accordance with components of the Downtown Development Review Overlay guidelines. It would have allowed a redesign of the Third Street façade to reduce the “urban canyon” effect by becoming more inviting to pedestrians and merchants, and it would move its parking and loading dock entrances into an alley. It would have incorporated more significant “green” elements.

While our organization supports the concept of the Omni project, many issues remain unresolved. And they deserve resolution since taxpayers are expected to underwrite 48 cents of every dollar spent on this project.

This is no way to run a compassionate or responsible government. We urge Mayor Fischer to reconsider this hasty and unnecessary step and to work more openly and actively to repurpose the Water Company Building, not to send it to storage where, if history is a judge, it will molder and be forgotten.

There’s not much more to say than that other than… Possibility City…?

Watch Matt Bevin Just Fall Apart

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A historic building formerly occupied by the Louisville Water Company will be going into storage. According to a letter to the citizens of Louisville sent by Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, the vacant Water Company building located near the corner of 2nd Street and Liberty Street will be dismantled and placed into storage to make way for the $289 million Omni hotel and apartment building. [WDRB]

Myliah Rose Davis slept on a blanket in her mother’s lap, her tiny hands moving every now and then, as if orchestrating a dream. [C-J/AKN]

A friendly game of hula hoop or interaction with a police horse – it’s the simple activities Louisville Metro Police say break down some often uncomfortable barriers. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin’s love-hate-love-hate relationship with the annual Fancy Farm picnic this last weekend was confusing, contradictory and likely ill-advised. As if there’s anything the man does that isn’t ill-advised. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A railroad crossing accident at Buechel and Crawford avenues this week was the second incident there in four months. [WLKY]

A hard-to-watch video, filmed in 2012 by undercover investigators with Mercy for Animals, shows Idaho dairy farm workers viciously abusing cows. [HuffPo]

Weeks after the Louisville Metro Council allocated $5 million in additional funding for roadwork, progress on the roads was moving slower than some had hoped. [WAVE3]

On Tuesday, Allan Kauffman (D), mayor of Goshen, Indiana, posted a statement announcing that the City Council would not be voting on a proposed LGBT nondiscrimination ordinance that night. “Despite several attempts to tweak the ordinance amendment to respond to concerns expressed, they have not been enough to gain good consensus from City Council members,” he wrote. [ThinkProgress]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s political figures decried the long awaited carbon emission regulations announced Monday by President Barack Obama. [Ronnie Ellis]

A Cincinnati company last week purchased an 88-unit apartment complex off Preston Highway and could start on a substantial renovation as early as this month. [Business First]

Mayor Mike Moore is tired of waiting for the 10th Street medians to be maintained on a regular basis. So he made an executive decision during Wednesday night’s Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission meeting to take care of overgrown weeds — and then some. Just in case anyone needed another reason to think this guy is a sad excuse of a mayor. [News & Tribune]

Metro Government Is Suuuper-Shady

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Soap, a shower and hot water are normally simple luxuries that can be taken for granted. For people living on the streets, a daily shower just isn’t possible. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Councilwoman Julie Denton has re-filed a bipartisan ordinance seeking more openness from Mayor Greg Fischer’s office about how his administration makes appointments to dozens of city boards and commissions. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced on July 31 that GPS trackers will be put on 481 vehicles used by the City of Louisville to increase fuel efficiency, driving safety and improving maintenance. [WHAS11]

Federal crime-fighters started an outreach campaign Friday to recruit Kentuckians to help uncover government corruption and end the state’s “fairly sordid” history of scandals that rob trust in government, law enforcement officials said. [H-L]

Lonewolf Family Sports Pub expected nearly 300 cars at their car show Sunday afternoon. It is their second annual show, but they said the it’s more than a simple car show. [WLKY]

The Obama administration will release final standards for power plants on Monday that are, in several key ways, tougher than the draft version of the plan. [HuffPo]

You already know Metro Government is shady as hell. But is it also shady? [WAVE3]

Since Indiana opened its first state-run needle exchange last spring, Tara Burton, 25, has made weekly visits to turn over needles she used to shoot Opana, a prescription painkiller, up her track-marked arm. [Reuters]

Four-year-old Evander Conroy was born with a neuroblastoma tumor compressing his spinal cord. Because of the tumor, he’s never been able to move his legs. [WFPL]

Sen. Rand Paul is attributing GOP rival Donald Trump’s rise in the polls to a momentary “loss of sanity.” [The Hill]

The greatest number of high-wage jobs in the Louisville region, by far, are found in the lifelong wellness and aging/health enterprises sector, positions such as registered nurses, physicians and therapists. [Business First]

Clark County commissioners voted to accept the county health officer’s declaration of an HIV epidemic at a public hearing Thursday. [News & Tribune]