Your Governor’s Gonna Choke Medicaid

One in four Kentuckiana counties lost residents over the last five years, according to federal data that show outlying areas are the biggest winners and losers of regional population change. [WDRB]

Isn’t it fun watching Kentucky’s half-literate governator claim “God” has sanctioned his extreme Medicaid cuts? That’s what Jesus would do – choke even more out of the working poor, deny access to dental and vision, claim it’s helping them. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! Twenty-four hours have passed since caution tape and Louisville Metro Police squad cars blocked off Louis Coleman Drive near Young Avenue after three men were discovered inside a Park DuValle home. [WHAS11]

The Medicaid revamp proposed by Gov. Matt Bevin last week is built on a belief that providing health care to low-income people somehow robs them of their dignity. Also, that 20 percent of Kentuckians lacked health insurance only a few years ago, not because they couldn’t afford it, but because they were disengaged or didn’t understand deductibles. On that dubious base, Bevin wants to replace a fairly straightforward system with a red-tape tangle of penalties, incentives, premiums and cutbacks in coverage, including some proposals that the federal government already has rejected in other states. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian accident in Compassionate Possibility City. Police are on the scene after a pedestrian was hit on Dixie Highway at Rockford Lane. [WLKY]

Donald Trump appeared to shift his position on a blanket ban on all Muslims entering the United States, saying on Saturday he wouldn’t be bothered if a Muslim from Scotland or Great Britain entered, according to reporters from CBS and CNN. [HuffPo]

If it’s not a shooting, a pedestrian death, a stabbing or a child dying in a hot car, it’s a drowning. A child who was found in a pond in the Buechel area died at Kosair Children’s Hospital on Sunday night. [WAVE3]

Lives are on the line: the smearing of LGBT individuals by right-wing extremists is more than disturbing – it’s dangerous. [Salon]

The Louisville Metro Council on Thursday unanimously approved the city’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year. [WFPL]

Hawaii’s governor signed a bill making it the first state to place its residents who own firearms in a federal criminal record database and monitor them for possible wrongdoing anywhere in the country, his office said. [Reuters]

More than a decade ago, the Louisville International Airport began a cooperative advertising program to help carriers offset some of their expenses if they launched new service here. [Business First]

The number of people getting probation instead of jail time is growing quickly under new sentencing rules, but communities that oversee probation programs say they don’t have enough money to handle the influx. [News & Tribune]

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Finally, An End To A Terrible Week

A spokeswoman for insurance giant Humana says the company is increasing security after receiving a report of graffiti found inside a restroom. [WDRB]

This is what lobbyists can get you. Norton Healthcare has secured city agreement to issue up to $725 million in tax-exempt bonds, with much of the proceeds targeted for helping to pay for a long list of capital projects. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell, author of Breaking Cardinal Rules, has now added her name to a lawsuit against some UofL students who claimed their degrees were diminished by her claims. [WHAS11]

Growing abuse of the powerful painkiller fentanyl drove the number of overdose deaths in Kentucky to a new record high in 2015, according to a report released Tuesday. [H-L]

Officials with MSD, LG&E and the Louisville Water Company announced the date for the 27th annual Ohio River sweep — June 18. [WLKY]

John McCain is responsible for the Orlando massacre because he has long pushed homophobic policies. [HuffPo]

Indiana State Police are asking for the public’s help in solving two homicide cases. On May 11, the bodies of Sarah Ipock, 30, and an unidentified male were pulled from the Ohio River by separate barge crews. [WAVE3]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

It seems unlikely that Louisville Metro Council members will approve a large sewer rate increase after a contentious budget hearing Wednesday. [WFPL]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. plans to build a four-story nursing home in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS: Still The Most-Hated Local Devil

The Jefferson County Board of Education met for more than three hours in executive session following its regular meeting Tuesday night to discuss the performance and evaluation of Superintendent Donna Hargens. [WDRB]

Tucked against an Ohio River levee in Rubbertown sits a plain brick building that on many rainy days is all that stands between nature’s fury and deadly flooding that could impact tens of thousands of residents. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Support from Mayor Mike Moore to ease traffic congestion on a busy road means hundreds of thousands of dollars getting pulled from an airport expansion agreement. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin spoke this past weekend at a Utah retreat organized by Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee who has been one of the most outspoken critics of Donald Trump. [H-L]

The Jefferson County Public Schools Board of Education met Tuesday night. Board members voted to approve a $165,603 contract with Bellarmine University and Dr. Theresa Magpuri-Lavell, an employee of Bellarmine University, for the third year of the JCPS-Bellarmine Literacy Project. [WLKY]

What we do know — what I’ve known my entire life — is that the sight of two men kissing is a stunning, terrifying thing. A dangerous thing. A thing that inspires fury and fear and violence and, yes, murder. [HuffPo]

Another tree fell in a storm, so Louisville media lost its mind for an entire day. [WAVE3]

Muhammad Ali grew up in a poor neighbourhood in segregated Louisville, Kentucky, in the 1950s. Sixty years later, segregation has yet to lose its grip on the city. [BBC]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is looking to ban nearly all apartments and condominiums from use as short-term rental units. [WFPL]

Last weekend, US TV show host John Oliver bought and forgave $15m (£10.3m) worth of medical debt, delighting hundreds of people who had defaulted on the sky-high expenses from life-threatening illnesses. It only cost him $60,000 plus a $50 set-up fee. So is it that simple? [BBC]

PNC Bank has agreed to pay millions of dollars to the University of Kentucky’s marketing partner to be the school’s “official” bank, with the school getting 70 percent of the proceeds. [Business First]

The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA) announced last week that New Hope Services has been approved for funding an expansion and rehabilitation of its Highland Glen housing community in Scottsburg. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Returned To Murder

It was a long, tumultuous school year for hundreds of JCPS bus drivers as they dealt with disruptive and abusive student behavior, often while trying to monitor traffic signals and navigate around pedestrians and other vehicles. [WDRB]

When it comes to hospital safety, Kentucky ranks worse than most other states, and no hospital in the Louisville area earned an “A” from a nonprofit group that recently evaluated scores of health-care institutions nationwide. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The woman killed in an early morning shooting has been identified. [WHAS11]

Celebrity chef and renowned restaurateur Bobby Flay has finalized a deal with WinStar Farm to acquire a minority interest in Grade I winner and Belmont Stakes entrant Creator. [H-L]

Two people were taken to University Hospital after a shooting at a White Castle. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali is remembered for his influence inside and outside of the boxing ring and for standing up for his principles in the face of fierce backlash. [HuffPo]

A cop got shot and suddenly the community cared about gun violence. Never mind the hundreds of other shootings. [WAVE3]

It is impossible to realize fully the significance of a time or events as one lives them. It’s only in looking back from a distance of time and perspective that you might be able to understand. [Ronnie Ellis]

Thousands of people crowded the streets of Louisville on Friday to pay their final respects to boxing legend Muhammad Ali. He died last week at age 74. [WFPL]

In the 1830s, the civilized world began to close debtors’ prisons, recognizing them as barbaric and also silly: The one way to ensure that citizens cannot repay debts is to lock them up. In the 21st century, the United States has reinstated a broad system of debtors’ prisons, in effect making it a crime to be poor. [NY Times]

Louisville has made another step toward bringing Google Fiber here. The Louisville Metro Council unanimously passed an ordinance Thursday that grants Google Fiber’s Kentucky affiliate a franchise for public right-of-way access to install communications infrastructure. [Business First]

For the first time since the 1970s, Clarksville selected a town manager to lead the town during a time of growth and redevelopment. Kevin Baity is expected to start work by the end of the month. [News & Tribune]

Shootings, Shootings & More Shootings!

Greater Louisville Inc. is calling on employees of Louisville businesses to line the procession route for boxing legend Muhammad Ali on Friday. [WDRB]

Gov. Matt Bevin on Friday appointed three new members to the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD is investigating a shooting that may have injured a child. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey and three-time Kentucky Derby winner Kent Desormeaux issued a brief statement Saturday through his agent, J.R. Pegram, stating that Desormeaux will return to riding in New York on June 9 following a brief stay in an alcohol rehabilitation program at Cirque Lodge in Sundance, Utah. [H-L]

There are several events going on around Louisville this week to honor Muhammad Ali. [WLKY]

Throughout U.S. history, white Americans have toned down the life stories of radical people of color so that they can celebrate them as they want them to be, not as they were. [HuffPo]

Another day, another bunch of shootings in Compassionate City. It’s really compassionate. [WAVE3]

On the morning of May 29, 2014, an overcast Thursday in Washington, DC, the general counsel of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Robert Litt, wrote an email to high-level officials at the National Security Agency and the White House. [VICE]

Regulations governing Louisville’s short-term rental industry won’t take effect until later this summer. [WFPL]

Arising from the shadows of the American repressed, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump have been sending chills through the corridors of establishment power. Who would have thunk it? [Bill Moyers]

No more Red7e? The Kentucky Science Center has named PriceWeber Marketing Communications Inc. as its agency of record. [Business First]

The heart of Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana work is in Dawn Klemm’s sunny living room, decorated with the coastal blues inspired by Charleston, South Carolina and aided by the company of her pug. [News & Tribune]

At Least There’s Good Bourbon News

Check out the spin/excuses from Jack Conway’s former spokesperson. A meeting held Wednesday was supposed to address the JCPS code of conduct. However, JCPS and the Metro Public Safety Committee saw the clock run out on a conversation many are waiting to have. [WDRB]

Louisville’s Coalition for the Homeless announced Monday that the overall number of homeless people in the city has dropped for the third year in a row — but those numbers don’t change local agencies’ disappointment in the federal government’s decision to cut their funds by 11 percent this year. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky bourbon production hit a nearly 50-year high last year. [WHAS11]

The Republican leader in the Senate says most candidates for president have released their tax documents as presumptive GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump insists he’ll wait until after an IRS audit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Ten years ago a 2-year-old Louisville girl was shot multiple times and her mother was killed. [WLKY]

More than 7 million previously uninsured Americans gained health coverage in 2015, the second full year of the Obamacare coverage expansion, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

While JCPS tries to provide social and emotional support for students in the form of Student Response Teams, Positive Behavior Coaches and other resources, Metro Council members voiced their concern that it is not enough. [WAVE3]

Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump said it would take another 9/11 to wake up border security — and predicted refugees would plan the next attack. [The Hill]

Faculty and staff within the Jefferson County Public Schools system continue to call out district administration for potential changes to teacher salary structure and the student code of conduct. [WFPL]

Interviews with dozens of women who have worked for Donald Trump or interacted with him socially reveal a pattern of often unsettling personal behavior by the Republican presidential candidate, The New York Times reported on Saturday. [Reuters]

Kroger isn’t just in the beginning stages of grocery delivery, it’s been testing refining things in Lexington and other markets so it can be rolled out ASAP. [Business First]

Anesthesiologist Jaime Guerrero, who had a practice in Jeffersonville, was sentenced to 100 months in prison Thursday by United States District Judge Greg N. Stevens, and according to the terms of a prior plea agreement, agreed to forfeit his license to practice medicine and real property owned by Guerrero Real Estate Investments, LLC. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Drama Must Just Be Never-Ending

Approximately $1.7 million is being cut by Jefferson County Public Schools by eliminating 25 central office positions, according to new information obtained through an open records request. [WDRB]

Former Metro Council President David Tandy has been hired by one of Louisville’s oldest and largest law firms as an attorney and lobbyist who will be tasked with finding opportunities for emerging minority and women-owned companies. [C-J/AKN]

From Safari and TeensConnect camps at the Louisville Zoo, to Summer Reading and the annual Cultural Pass, Louisville is offering dozens of programs designed to keep students’ minds and bodies active during the summer break, Mayor Greg Fischer announced. [WHAS11]

The drugmaker Purdue Pharma launched OxyContin two decades ago with a bold marketing claim: One dose relieves pain for 12 hours, more than twice as long as generic medications. [H-L]

Another day, another shooting or two. Police are investigating two shootings blocks apart in the Parkland neighborhood. [WLKY]

Two Boston brothers accused of urinating on and beating a homeless Mexican man and telling police “Donald Trump was right: All these illegals need to be deported,” were sentenced to prison on Monday, prosecutors said. [HuffPo]

A same-sex couple is accusing the Archdiocese of Louisville of discriminating against them after Catholic Cemeteries denied the design for their joint tombstone. [WAVE3]

Data released Friday by the Major Cities Chiefs Police Association, based on reports from more than 60 cities, showed notable increases in murders in about two dozen cities in the first three months of the year compared to last year and a 9 percent increase nationwide. [NY Times]

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin says the commonwealth has a lot in its favor when it comes to attracting manufacturers. [WFPL]

From the time we began reporting on the archive provided to us in Hong Kong by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, we sought to fulfill his two principal requests for how the materials should be handled: that they be released in conjunction with careful reporting that puts the documents in context and makes them digestible to the public, and that the welfare and reputations of innocent people be safeguarded. As time has gone on, The Intercept has sought out new ways to get documents from the archive into the hands of the public, consistent with the public interest as originally conceived. [The Intercept]

They’re people with advanced degrees who hail from all over the world, and they are relocating to Louisville. [Business First]

Floyd County finances improved by $878,000 Tuesday night. But what happens to that money was the main topic of discussion at the monthly Floyd County Council meeting. [News & Tribune]