It’s Oaks Day And No One Is At Work!

It’s a disturbing side effect to big events like the Kentucky Derby, and this week, officials and local organizations are raising awareness about human trafficking. [WDRB]

Policing strategies and economic development were major topics at Monday’s debate between the two candidates for the seat representing the Louisville Metro Council’s 6th District, which includes the Old Louisville, Park Hill, California and Algonquin neighborhoods. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city is now just days away from Kentucky’s biggest event of the year. Hundreds of thousands will pour into derby city to be part of the festivities. Those large crowds will typically bring large boosts to the city’s hospitality and economy, but this year’s turnout hasn’t been like the year’s before. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s coal industry continued to hemorrhage jobs in the first three months of 2016, hitting the lowest level in more than a century. The number of jobs dropped by a little more than 1,500 during the quarter. There were an estimated 6,900 people employed at coal mines as of April 1, the lowest number since 1898, according to a report released Monday by the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Former President Bill Clinton campaigned in Louisville Tuesday on behalf of his wife, Hillary Clinton. [WLKY]

The Federal Reserve Board’s Open Market Committee (FOMC) decided not to raise interest rates at its meeting last week. However, the FOMC also made clear that a rate hike was still an option for its June meeting. [HuffPo]

Thousands of tourists will soon feast their eyes on Churchill Downs. They will also drive, park and walk through the neighborhoods the track is surrounded by. [WAVE3]

ProPublica is launching a new interactive database that will help you keep track of the officials who represent you in Congress. [ProPublica]

The teenager in custody was suicidal, which meant staffers at the Lincoln Village Juvenile Detention Center were tasked with near-constant surveillance. [WFPL]

FBI requests for customer records under a secretive surveillance order increased by nearly 50 percent in 2015, according to a U.S. government transparency report published this week. [Reuters]

Surprise! Another “luxury” subdivision is hitting Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

Four Republicans hope for spots in the Clark County Council At-large seats. [News & Tribune]

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Hot Brown Spring Rolls? Someone Should Be Punished Quickly And Harshly

Another day, another fun double shooting in Compassionate City! And just before Derby, no less. [WDRB]

With litigation pending, a potential buyer of the Galt House and possibly other large real estate holdings owned by the Al J. Schneider Co. is finding it difficult to secure title insurance needed to finance the purchase of the property. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Claudia Catfish is back on the teevee again and this time she’s got a story about JCPS. Here’s hoping she’s got her ducks in a row this time. [WHAS11]

House Speaker Greg Stumbo raised concerns Thursday about how Gov. Matt Bevin handled vetoes of several bills approved by the state legislature and indicated he may ask a court to determine if the governor acted properly. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Teachers across Jefferson County protested a potential wage freeze at several JCPS schools.[WLKY]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) vowed to take his fight for the Democratic presidential nomination all the way to the party’s convention in July, promising not to give up even if he continues to trail Hillary Clinton in pledged delegates. [HuffPo]

Okay. Enough is enough. Hot Brown SPRING ROLLS? Jesus H, what is this world coming to?! [WAVE3]

House Republicans threw a temper tantrum over a rule that bans financial advisers from scamming retirees. [ThinkProgress]

The seven Democratic candidates vying for the District 8 seat on Louisville’s Metro Council don’t disagree on much. [WFPL]

ProPublica is launching a new interactive database that will help you keep track of the officials who represent you in Congress. [ProPublica]

A national retailer is set to open its first store in Louisville at Shelbyville Road Plaza. [Business First]

No plans for Pleasant Ridge Subdivision redevelopment or revitalization are on the books yet, though city officials likely will present their version soon. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Racist Republicans Sure Are Lots Of Fun

Dozens of Jefferson County Public Schools have scheduled “walk-ins” this week to protest district recommendations that would loosen the district’s code of conduct and freeze salaries. [WDRB]

Wanna see a racist turd burglar white about the removal of a confederate statute? Here you go. It’s a full-on white guy circle jerk of awful. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! Metro Councilman Kevin Kramer of District 11 stopped by Good Morning Kentuckiana to speak with Tabnie Dozier for this month’s Metro Council Saturday. [WHAS11]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer says three schools have been awarded grants for projects to help combat urban heat island. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The U.S. Bank Great Balloon Glow is one of the most popular events of the Kentucky Derby Festival. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama saved his jokes about Donald Trump for late in his White House Correspondents’ Dinner remarks, but didn’t spare the Republican frontrunner. [HuffPo]

A man wanted in connection to the murder of a Louisville teen has been found after a month on the run. [WAVE3]

Kentucky is and likely always will be one of the most corrupt states in the nation. [Click the Clicky]

Negotiators for United Parcel Service and the Independent Pilots Association will resume talks later this month in hopes reaching a contract agreement. [WFPL]

The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence said on Friday it has sharply cut back an online ad that had used the names and faces of mass shooters and urged the news media not to identify them after the group drew criticism from other gun control activists. [Reuters]

Just six states, plus the federal government, stand between Aetna Inc. and its purchase of Humana Inc. [Business First]

A high-tech global manufacturer its closing its Jeffersonville operations and moving jobs overseas. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Just Got Waaaaay Worse

Delores Sisson says the first jump in rent of her subsidized apartment on W. Breckinridge Street happened two years ago – rising from $358 a month in 2014 to $438 a month last year and jumping to $652 a month this year. [WDRB]

Surprise! Greg Fischer and his team are lying about something again. This time that something benefits his wealthy friends and donors but no one has the guts to call him out on it. A little more transparency — something Fischer has never taken seriously — would go a long way. [C-J/AKN]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings. Police responded to a report of a shooting in the 1700 block of Berry Boulevard around 2:30 a.m. Sunday morning. [WHAS11]

As a boxer and humanitarian, Muhammad Ali stood out. So does the bright pink home in Kentucky where he shadowboxed and played pranks on his brother. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another pedestrian killed by a train in Louisville. [WLKY]

These anti-woman efforts aren’t just taking place in Floriduh, they’re also taking places in Kentucky. And Democrats are cheering the restrictionsi along every step of the way. [HuffPo]

See? All kinds of shootings. One person was injured in a shooting on Oak Street on Sunday. [WAVE3]

Reproductive rights advocates are warning that Indiana has become one of the most dangerous states for pregnant women, thanks to the governor’s decision to approve a sweeping new anti-abortion law that combines some of the harshest attacks on reproductive rights into one piece of legislation. [ThinkProgress]

The Louisville Metro Council rejected a bid from Louisville Gas and Electric to establish a natural gas franchise agreement. [WFPL]

We’ve been leading the pack when it comes to revealing information about new scandals. Find out how to keep up. [Page One]

A developer is asking Louisville Metro government and Jefferson County Public Schools for property tax breaks worth $11.3 million over the next 20 years so it can move forward with two apartment projects planned near the intersection of Baxter Avenue and Broadway. [Business First]

A Clark County judge on Friday confirmed the appeal of a candidate challenging the outcome of the recount in the Jeffersonville City Council At-large race. [News & Tribune]

Let’s All Freak Out About Lead Pipes

How is JCPS addressing the learning gap between white and African-American students? That was just one of many topics at a meeting between Louisville’s NAACP and district leaders Monday night. [WDRB]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Every morning in every Louisville public school, custodians run the water fountains for up to a minute before children arrive for the day. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city of New Albany is set to break ground on a new dog park on the site of the Cannon Acres Sports Complex, but a group of residents say that doing so would desecrate a historic Native American site. [WHAS11]

When the state’s oldest and largest art museum closes for three years for a $50 million makeover, expectations are high. But the transformation of the Speed Art Museum, which attracted 17,000 people to a 30-hour marathon reopening last weekend, blew me away. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Scott County hired a fifth prosecutor who will assist with the fight against drugs, which goes hand in hand with the efforts to curb the HIV outbreak in the area. [WLKY]

Burning coal doesn’t just pollute the environment and harm people’s health — it’s a huge drain on the world’s increasingly strained supply of freshwater. [HuffPo]

Concerns over children’s safety and control have prompted cancellations of protests planned for this year’s Kentucky Derby Festival Pegasus Parade on May 5 and a demonstration scheduled outside KDF’s downtown offices Monday evening, organizers said. [WAVE3]

An Indiana man was sentenced to life in prison on Friday for his part in causing a 2012 home explosion that killed two neighbors, injured dozens of people and damaged scores of homes in an Indianapolis neighborhood, a court official said. [Reuters]

The crumbling house next door to George Palmer’s 41st Street home hasn’t changed much over the years. Phone books are piled on the porch. Boards, cracked and curled after years of baking in the sun, cover the windows and front door. [WFPL]

More than 10,000 Kentuckians have registered to vote or updated their registration using GoVoteKY.com, the Commonwealth’s new online voter registration system. “GoVoteKY.com publicly launched last week and is already a huge success,” said Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes. “Over 10,000 people have used the site to register to vote or update their information. And anyone can use it – we’ve seen users from the age of 18 to 98!” [Press Release]

The number of craft spirits distillers across the United States have grown by a rate of 16 percent annually between 2007 and 2015, according to a preliminary report from the American Craft Spirits Association, the International Wine and Spirits Research and industry firm Park Street. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council approved an ordinance Thursday night which requires the registration of any property in the city that will be rented to tenants. [News & Tribune]

Brown Gave Master Class In Throwing Shade

Community activist Angela Newby-Bouggess has died. [WDRB]

Nearly 500 sexual assault kits that would have continued to sit untested in the Louisville Metro Police property room will now be sent for lab testing after a shift in LMPD philosophy. The department is sending 1,386 untested rape kits to Kentucky State Police for testing – 463 more than originally intended. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “We have to start opening our eyes and reconciling the fact that these things happened,” says Attorney Larry Wilder, a statement he has repeated since October when his client’s book Breaking Cardinal Rules hit store shelves. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission has dedicated 88 acres to an existing preserve in Pulaski County. [H-L]

Another day, another fun pedestrian accident in Possibility Compassionate City! [WLKY]

The White House has narrowed its search for a Supreme Court nominee to three federal appeals court judges, Sri Srinivasan, Merrick Garland and Paul Watford, a source familiar with the selection process said on Friday. [HuffPo]

If she can do it, you can do it. One year after her story went viral, Asia Ford returned to the Rodes City Run 10K Saturday. [WAVE3]

Obama Administration transparency is a lot like Fischer Administration transparency. It’s not a real thing. Two years ago last month, I filed a public-records request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency as part of my reporting into the flawed response to Hurricane Sandy. Then, I waited. [ProPublica]

Kelly Downard has apparently turned into all bark and no bite. No clue what happened to him but he’s been entirely neutered. [WFPL]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A pair of sisters is opening a barber shop that will be a little different than most others. [Business First]

Two contracts up for a vote in April got some scrutiny by the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s board of trustees work session Monday. [News & Tribune]

Wait. Nope. Another Bad Week For JCPS

JCPS has received 115 calls through its bullying tipline. Fifty-two calls have come from middle schools, 31 from elementary schools, and 25 from high schools, while seven calls have come from other areas. [WDRB]

Jessica Green needs to hold Greg Fischer’s feet to the fire. She’s one of the few people who could do it and get away with it. Metro Council members blasted Mayor Greg Fischer’s administration Thursday for failing to alert them about a key vacancy on the planning commission last summer that resulted in an appointment being made without the mayor’s or council’s approval. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An 18-year-old Jeffersontown High School student appeared in front of a judge Friday morning, charged with a felony after police say he and two other students beat another student, leaving him for dead. [WHAS11]

Just what Kentucky needs! Another tax increase. The very thing the working poor cannot afford is sales tax. [H-L]

The new and improved Speed Museum has reopened its doors. The museum had been closed for 3 1/2 years for renovations and construction of a new wing. [WLKY]

In NPI’s telling, white Americans are increasingly under siege in their own country, doomed to be a hated minority as people of color grow ever more numerous and politically powerful. And Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy has given the group’s members more hope than ever that help is on the way. [HuffPo]

There are new developments for a firefighter’s widow fighting with state government over whether her husband died in the line of duty. [WAVE3]

Kashiya Nwanguma, a student at the University of Louisville who is black, attended a Trump rally in Louisville this month, she says, to better understand the Trump phenomenon. She said in an interview this week that she suddenly felt the crowd’s attention turn to her after Trump saw the anti-Trump sign she was holding and asked that she be removed. Someone promptly snatched it out of her hand. Next, she was being roughly shoved by several white men. “I think a lot of it has to do with ignorance that’s rooted in fear of the other,” said Nwanguma, 21, when asked about the incident Thursday. “None of the people who were attacking me even knew what was on my sign. I obviously stood out in the crowd based on my appearance.” [WaPo]

Louisville has officially kicked off an education and advocacy campaign to promote the use of solar energy. [WFPL]

More than 30 states have enacted some version of voter ID law in recent years. How much do these laws change voting rules and what impact could they have on the general election? [ProPublica]

“‘Population health” has become something of a trend in the health care industry. [Business First]

The Clark County Council will vote Monday, March 14, on a budget revision to account for cuts dictated in the state certified budget order, for the sixth year in a row. [News & Tribune]